Dan Erlewine first saw this Tele back in the 1960s, before Mike Bloomfield recorded with it on Bob Dylan’s Highway 61 Revisited album. That was also before Bloomfield and Dylan were booed for going electric at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival. And before Bloomfield recorded the first Paul Butterfield Blues Band album with this guitar. There’s a lot of history in this Telecaster!
I have had an old beat-up non-functioning norma electric archtop (hollow body) since i was 13(in 1984). A friend gave it to me and said i could have it if i could fix it... well like 20 years later i fixed it! and had the electrical redone for like $60.00. it needed some new parts (basiclly EVERYTHING) but i really wanted an archtop and knew i could fix this one up to sound pretty cool.... what i have found out about these guitars is that they really arent worth anything... i thought this one may have been from the late 50's early 60's so i may be worth something.. but as it turns out most people i have talked to about restoring it says its not worth anything that they were just little copies made in the 50's-60's and bought in the US at probably sears or something.... oh well I DONT CARE i really like it and its made well, so for the sheer vintage look and great feel I LOVE IT!-jj

The same goes for Electrovoice's RE20, which counts Steve Albini, John Fry, and especially Glenn Kolotkin amongst its friends. "I like to use RE20s on most amplifiers when they're available", says Glenn, "because the quality is great and they can take really high levels. They're very directional and they're great for rock and roll." The mic also exhibits an unusually wide and flat frequency response and is specially designed to resist proximity effect.

The Ibanez Gio GRGM21 Mikro in Black Night proves that guitars don’t have to be super expensive to sound great. This is a fantastic cheap electric guitar that doesn’t suck, often picked up by beginner guitarists who are into metal and hard rock and those who like a shorter scale guitar. Featuring an iconic shape, a specially designed GRG neck made of maple, rosewood fretboard and 2 x Infinity R humbucker pickups that can be used separately or in unison via the 3-way pickup selector, you have a comfortable and great sounding powerhouse of a guitar at your disposal. It’s one of our favourite cheap electric guitars that sounds amazing when you throw some distortion at it! Available in different finishes here.


Gibson originally offered a single cutaway from the guitar body, so that players could access higher frets.  Notice that Fender includes a double cutaway design so the player’s thumb also has access to the higher side of the neck.  Gibson used “3 On A Side” tuners, so Fender offered “6 Inline” tuning pegs.  It was these choices that created a large part of the visual appeal of the Strat.
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I'm no pro, but I take my time when I'm buying a guitar. I played everything, and for feel, sound and playability, I was about sold on a Gretsch 6119 vintage remake. Then I played an Eastman TX 186. Hollowbody constructed from all solid wood, better pickups than the Gretsch, and just fantastic tone that gets better the more I play it. And it cost about 60% what the Gretsch cost - not an entry level price, but a guitar I won't get tired of playing. They deserve to be better known. Some of the Epiphones and most of the Ibanezes felt and sounded cheap in comparison.
I think it's just a matter of how you prefer to restring your axe. Personally I use a peg winder and just thread all six through the body of the guitar (BC Rich Warbeast for practice, Ibanez for live play) at one time and then go through and wind them all up and tune accordingly. I think though that the main reason I do this is because restringing my Ibanez is not for the faint of heart, so it's way easier for me (I have one of those, I don't remember the model, that you have to lift the bridge up off the body and thread the strings underneath) doing it that way rather than going one at a time.

I just recently started to try to" really learn" to play guitar. I've known a few "not too difficult" songs for years. Now at 45yrs. old I bought a couple of cord books and it's bittersweet. It's such a wonderful feeling to play songs all the way to the end with a friend of mine who told me years ago that I had a good natural musical ability. I've learned more in 3 or 4 months than in 25 years. But enough about that... I was handed a jumbo GUILD from I believe around the early 70's. I've never heard anything like it. I must have one!!!
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Basic guitar chords are built using the first, third, and fifth tones of the scale that corresponds with the chord you want to play. For instance, if you want to play a G major chord, you go to the G major scale and find the first, third, and fifth notes in the scale. The G major scale has one sharp (F), so the notes in the scale are G-A-B-C-D-E-F#. The first note is G, the third note is a B, and the fifth note is D. These are the notes you need to make a G major chord. If you wanted a G minor chord all you need to do is make the third note a flat. This system applies to any chord you want to build. These three note chords are called triads and make up the bulk of the beginner open positions chords you’ll use to play a lot of guitar chords songs. When you study these chord shapes, you’ll notice that the root of the note (the first note) usually appears on the lower string and is doubled on a higher string, which reinforces the key tonality.
Next up in your signal path comes the trusty gain pedal, or two or three even.  These effects will pass your signal through a transistor or diode to produce the clipping sound of a tube amplifier cranked up loud.  They can go from subtle drive of a loud Fender to the high gain insanity of a Mesa Boogie Triple Rectifier.  Most players call these effects distortion pedals, but there are different varieties of distortion that produce distinctly unique tones, all driven by the amount of gain you push.
I’m not sure if you’re right about Joe being wrong. My memory of exactly how tone controls are usually wired is kind of failing me, but I think I remember that what you’re saying would be true if the output was taken from the node connected to the capacitor, but it’s not–the output node is the node on the opposite end of the tone pot from the capacitor, unless I’m remembering wrong. I think that filter-characteristics of guitar tone circuits are easier to visualize if you imagine them as reacting to a current source. Meaning “a big resistor in series with a capacitor” reacts the same way that “a big resistor” does. Basically, current above the cutoff frequency is shunted to ground through the tone pot–so if the tone pot is high, very little percentage (compared to if it was just a capacitor) of this current gets shunted, whereas if the tone pot is low, a high percentage gets shunted.
Effects units are available in a variety of formats or form factors. Stompboxes are primarily used units in live performance and (in some cases) studio recordings. Rackmount devices saw a heavy usage during the later 20th century, due to their advanced processing power and desirable tones. However, by the 21st century, with the advant of digital Plug-Ins and more powerful Stompboxes for live usage, the need and practicality of rackmounted effects units went down, and as such, prices of rack effects have diminished due to lower usage.[5] An effects unit can consist of analog or digital circuitry or a combination of the two. During a live performance, the effect is plugged into the electrical "signal" path of the instrument. In the studio, the instrument or other sound-source's auxiliary output is patched into the effect.[6][7] Form factors are part of a studio or musician's outboard gear.[8]
20 pages, black and white with color front cover. In the middle of 1981, Rosetti took over distribution of the Gibson line in the UK. Rosetti were a very big name in Britain, having distributed Epiphone since at least 1963, as well as Hagstrom and others. This catalogue was produced at the tail end of 1981, and introduces a number of models to the UK, such as the MV-II, MV-X guitars and the Victory basses, the GGC-700 and the Flying V bass. Some of these models were so short-lived that they were actually never included in US brochures. The cover image (reproduced in part here) showed some of the earliest demonstration models, including a Victory with a highly unusual white scratchplate.
An excerpt: “The Dobro brand name has been identified with resonator guitars since 1929 and is currently owned by Gibson Guitar Corporation. Despite its registered trademark status, the Dobro name has at times been used generically to refer to woodbodied instruments with 1) an aluminum cone or “resonator” mounted so that the cone opens toward the top of the instrument and 2) an 8-armed spider assembly supporting the bridge.”
The principal difference among the Strats was in finish options. All had 21-fret maple necks, three single-coil pickups, volume and two tone controls, and five-way select. The SWG came in yer basic red or black, with maple ‘board and chrome hardware. These had traditional non-locking vibratos. The SGV was offered in red with white graphics. The SSX was the dusey, with purple burst (white outside, purple in center), tiara turquoise, blue pearl, metallic white, black and candy apple red finish options, with… with matching colored maple fingerboard and (that’s and) matching chrome hardware.
Which brings us to this 1985 DT-250. While it sports the tail notch, the shape is a little more sleek and diminutive than the comparable Dean ML. The lower front bout is extended to be almost symmetrical with the diagonally opposite bass wing. The treble-side lower bout is shortened, giving the whole guitar a tasteful offset-X shape… X Series. To add dimension to the shape, Fuji Gen Gakki added “crystal cuts” to the edges, basically code for angled bevels.
While these guitars are known for their warm woody sound, they are capable of being used in almost any genre that doesn’t require massive amounts of gain, which is prone to feedback.  The guitarist for the Black Keys, Dan Auerbach, is a modern example of a player who will drive the instrument to distortion, but still maintain the jazzy blues quality these instruments are known for.
Finally, we come to our time-based (and space-based) effects group. This includes reverb and delay. Both are forms of the same effect with reverb being a much faster version of delay. All they do is take the input and "smear it out" while reducing the volume over time. Not only does this create an extremely complicated signal that other effects won't react to well, but the variances in volumes these create would further confuse the previous pedals.
Wow, to work with Johnny Mac! But he makes anything sound better, right? I am not a Stick player (love the instrument though), but I would think with a well-tuned setup, it might actually be easier? I think Tony Levin is running a Kemper now for his Stick. The whole idea isn’t an either/or thing, or which one is better. The idea is “running direct is a thing now, and here’s why.” But no one is taking our amps away. BTW, Bootsy is cray cray.
I have a question you might be able to help me with. I currently have a Yamaha silent guitar both nylon and steel and want to set up a home speaker system for a small room. I use a couple of pedals with my guitar. (reverb & delay) and at present use a Yamaha THR amp for sound. This is great for practice but does not fill the room so to speak. I have a larger acoustic amp but not happy with the sound. Can I use a pair of studio monitor speakers instead and if so would I need anything else e.g. (EQ or amp)I am looking to recreate the best possible sound I can get. At present it is only through my headphones. Any help or advice with this would be greatly appreciated.
Many guitarists have chosen this iconic axe for its versatility and capability to sound great in any genre of music, but the Les Paul is most widely known for its heavy duty rock ‘n’ roll vibe.  A great example of this would be Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin fame.  Once Page began using Les Pauls, he never looked back and helped to give the instrument its indelible place in the history books of music.
When I first plugged it in, it made a sound like it was "fretting out" if you put a bar at the twelfth fret position. That's a pretty good feat, given that the guitar has no frets. It turned out that someone had cranked up the pole pieces for extra gain, but had cranked them so far that the strings made contact with them when the guitar was played. A quick tweak right in the store with a jeweler's screwdriver sorted them out and revealed the lovely vintage sound of this little beastie. Supro developed a neat strings-through pickup system with staggered pole pieces that this guitar features.
Does anyone have one of either of these that they can comment on? I dig the looks of the silverburst (though I also dig the cream/ivory colored ones), and kinda want to have an SG in my posession (thanks to Zappa!). I have read all the positive reviews of Agiles on here, but few mention the Valkyrie...I'm a little worried that it is in the lower end of their price range, so I'm wondering how the hardware/electronics/fit and finish are....I'm aware it's not going to be crazy high end, but I'd like it to be useable (even though I may swap out some parts). Any opinions? Also, what parts would you recommend swapping out? Would an Epiphone be a better deal in terms of fit and finish and stock parts?
Strandberg: Extremely unique and of great quality, the guitars made by Strandberg belong to a league of their own. They have extremely unique neck profile called EndurNeck to facilitate comfortable playing, the EGS tremolo is way more stable and easy to tune than other double locking trems. The guitars made by them are ergonomically designed to minimise fatigue among players. Their custom-shop specialises in making made-to measure guitars which are built specifically for each consumer so as to perfectly match his or her playing style. Their custom shop also provides option for Cycfi XR pickups whose sound can be programmed by editing their frequency curve.

Few instruments are as versatile as the electric guitar. Widely heard in most types of music, the guitar's sound can be customized in virtually limitless ways to suit the genre and the player's individual style. Multi effects pedals put all of that personalization within your reach, allowing you to change your soundstage with the push of a button while you play. Many guitarists achieve multiple effects by chaining pedals together. This gives the ability to mix and match different effects to create unique combinations, but it can also be a source of frustration to keep track of so many pedals. A multi-effects pedal avoids this confusion by converting the mess of individual pedals into one discrete unit that's easier not only to use, but also to transport from venue to venue. Multi effects pedals can offer hundreds of onboard distortion, filter, modulation and dynamics effects to transform the sounds of your guitar. With as many or as few features as you prefer, the selection offers a multi pedal for every guitarist's needs. If simplicity is your thing, a basic stompbox can provide a handful of effects with minimal complications. On the other end of the spectrum, you can satisfy your inner technophile with a cutting-edge digital pedal featuring MIDI support and USB connectivity so you can save seemingly limitless library of effects. There are three things to look for in your ideal multi effects pedal: the range of available effects and features, the ruggedness of its construction and the available inputs and outputs. The more effects that are supported, the more the pedal has to offer to your sound. The more durable it is, the more the pedal can withstand being moved from venue to venue. And the more connection options it has, the more versatile it is for studio recording or connecting to additional stompboxes and accessories. Whether you're playing hard rock or smooth jazz, the range of tone alterations offered by a multi effects pedals enables you to deliver a personalized sound that complements your band and your musical style. There are two things that get guitarists into the history books: developing their skills to perfection and crafting their own distinct sound. With a multi effects pedal, you've got the gear you need to start shaping the tones you aspire to be remembered by.
Arch top body 16" wide across the top, carved spruce top, back not carved by arched by braces, rosewood back and sides, f-holes, style 45 backstripe, bound ebony fingerboard, 2 white/black/while lines inlaid down length of fingerboard at the edges, abalone hexagonal fingerboard inlays on 8 frets (a few make with pearloid), vertical "Martin" pearl peghead logo, gold plated parts, sunburst top finish.
And just a quick note: I do not buy or sell guitars. I have no idea what any given guitar from this period would sell for. I don't know if some of the listed guitars are indeed valuable. My sole purpose is to help people looking specifically for information on the maker of their MIJ guitar. So please...don't ask me what your guitar is worth. To me, they're all priceless.
A pedal itself can have an effects loop, but the most commonly used place is on the amplifier itself. You'll see on most amps (but not all) some form of output labeled as Effects Send or Preamp Out accompanied by an input labeled Effects Return or Power Amp In, respectively. Both sets of outputs and inputs refer to the effects loop that you can add between the preamplifier and the power amp section of your amplifier.
The pitch shifter is one of the most versatile effects in the pitch category.  Often used with a rocker pedal like a wah-wah or volume pedal, the pitch can be swept up or down by a specified amount in a smooth glissando-like bend.  It’s typical to hear a player use a range of one or two octaves for the sweep, so the shifted pitch lands back on its original note, but in a higher or lower octave.
The Mahogany body and neck with rosewood fretboard makes it a highly resonant and great sounding guitar whilst the dual Alnico Classic pickups with push pull coil tapping provide a world of tonality. A SlimTaper D Shape neck profile makes it comfortable for beginners to learn on, whilst pro players will enjoy the ergonomic design 2 hours into their set or rehearsal! Available in more finishes here.
"We strive to offer our clients the highest level of service in guitar sales, repair and consulting. We will, as keys to attaining this objective, conduct our business according to a high standard of excellence. We are dedicated to earning our clients' trust through our professional conduct, our many years of experience, and our extensive preparation for their needs."
Definitely, Diary of a Madman is like…the groundwork for so many great songs out there today. And if you listen to that live solo after Suicide Solution, which is only done live, it's just crazy what he could do that you didn't think he could do. If he was still alive, even if he left Ozzy, we would have seen even better stuff from him. Crowley and Crazy Train were actually more watered down marketable songs. That's more or less why Randy was GOING to leave Oz in the first place.
Interesting idea Mike. I suppose you could run some kind of DC bias through the selector switch together with the pickup signals and you’d have to introduce appropriate DC blocking capacitors to contain the DC bias within the guitar… probably possible but a lot of work to get it right. Alternatively you could just look for one of the “super switch” types with more than 2 poles so you can do the LED control on a completely different circuit but driven by the same switch e.g. https://www.premierguitar.com/articles/Introducing_Fenders_5_Way_Super_Switch

The Marshall JMP Super Bass is a 100 watt amp. Lemmy, bassist/lead singer of Motörhead, used numerous of these amps to drive cabinets with four 12" speakers and others with four 15" speakers. His amps were labelled named “Killer,” “No Remorse,” and “Murder One".[5] The Peavey Mark IV is a large, solid-state amp providing 300 watts at 2 ohms; the Mark IV was known for its affordable price and its reliability.[6]
Many pedal builders will order their resistors, capacitors, IC, and other components in bulk online. Most of the time, this is a much cheaper method than buying single components – plus it gives you an enormous variety of components to use. It may also be wise to check out the circuit boards inside of any old electronics, or broken guitar pedals you no longer use. You’d be surprised what you may find.
Ibanez brand guitars are manufactured at a variety of factories in several countries under contract from the brand's owner, Hoshino Gakki Group. The catalogs scanned and linked below represent output from the year 1971 through the present. During the 1970's and most of the 1980's, Ibanez guitars were made almost exclusively in Japan, and the majority of electric models were made at the Fujigen Gakki manufacturing plant.
The Guitar Chords: Easy-to-Use, Easy-to-Carry, One Chord on Every Page does one thing extremely well: it is spiral bound. It’s more of a reference than anything else, but one that musicians of all levels will appreciate. It covers the gamut of chords with not just one but two variations of each one. Of course, many have more than that, but it’s good information just the same.
The device can be mounted on and removed quickly from almost any flat-backed acoustic guitar, using a system of magnetic rails. The ToneWood-Amp is designed for guitars with either a magnetic or piezo pickup (bridge or soundhole), but the team behind the device say they're also putting together a “Technician-Free” pickup bundle for those guitars without a pickup.

We've watched Dan Erlewine repair this 1930s Kay over the previous 3 Trade Secrets. It's time to finish it up. Elliot John-Conry of EJC Guitars ages Dan's patch of new plastic binding so it blends in with the old binding around it. About the guitar in this video: This 1930s Kay Deluxe is a fixer-upper that Dan Erlewine repaired in order to sell. Now that it's in great shape again, maybe Dan'll keep it!
Finally, if you’ve been looking around at different instruments you may have noticed some really cheap guitars by brand names you’ve never heard of. I always recommend starting out on a quality guitar made by a company you can trust. However, I’m also not going to look down on anyone who has to get something less expensive because it is all they can afford.
Some effects produced dramatically weird sounds that were largely impossible to pull off. The peculiar 1948 DeArmond Trem-Trol (used extensively by rock-and-roll pioneer Bo Diddley) altered the volume of the guitar signal by exposing the connecting pin to a brass-and-glass canister half-filled with shaking, water-based electrolytic “Hydro-fluid.” The shaking—and often leaky—fluid washed over the pin and would bend the signal’s volume, causing an oscillating, watery tone. In the words of Chris Gray, one of its few remaining owners, “This is not a subtle effect—it adds all its personality to your sound whether you’re ready for it or not.”

If you want to test the waters, here are the some of the best free guitar effects software packages. Aside from the limited freeware software, there are Lite or Trial versions of commercial programs which you can get for free, but with limited in features. The good thing though is that even when they lack features, they work and sound just as nice.
When creating your tone with effects, understanding the order in which you connect your effects is very important. Creating an effects chain is a lot like making a sundae. The Ice cream is the base of your sundae, followed by toppings and finally sprinkles. If you put the sprinkles and toppings in before the ice cream, the flavours will still be there and it may still be a delicious sundae but it is a lot harder to see what extras you added underneath all that ice cream.
"The Choice of Professional and Student Musicians Everywhere" This eight page catalogue was included as an insert in the 1963 annual "school music" issue of Downbeat magazine (September 1963). As well as keyboards and pedal steels, this catalog contains seven guitars, three basses and ten amplifiers - from student guitars such as the Musicmaster and Duotone to professional models like the new Jaguar.

In May 1965 Keith Richards used a Gibson Maestro FZ-1 Fuzz-Tone to record "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction".[24] The song's success greatly boosted sales of the device, and all available stock sold out by the end of 1965.[25] Other early fuzzboxes include the Mosrite FuzzRITE and Arbiter Group Fuzz Face used by Jimi Hendrix,[26] the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff Pi used by Hendrix and Carlos Santana,[27] and the Vox Tone Bender used by Paul McCartney to play fuzz bass on "Think for Yourself" and other Beatles recordings.[28]
In high school wood shop class, while other kids were building bookshelves that tilted, coffee tables that bowed, and paddles to smack each other with, Crisler was building a guitar. He later attended the Roberto-Venn school of Luthiery in Arizona and became a guitar researcher at Schecter Guitar Research and continued to enhance his knowledge of the guitar. Later, working for places like Guitar Center and Mars Music, which has since closed its doors, Crisler learned the ins and outs of the guitar, how to quick fix problems, and create solutions for unfixable problems. In the '80s, when Van Halen was touring in support of their album 1984, he had the opportunity to go back stage and repair Eddie Van Halen's guitar. "I thought I was so cool," he says. But he'd finally obtain the right to call himself a "guitar master."
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