If you know how to play an E major chord, then you know how to play an A minor chord—just move the chord whole shape over a string. Make sure your first finger is curled, so the open first string rings clearly. Avoid playing the open sixth string when strumming the A minor chord. There are situations when it makes sense to reverse your second and third fingers when playing the A minor chord.
I love this little guitar. it's perfect for my smaller hands to move around on the fretboard. I've been taking guitar lessons for a year and own a full size acoustic and a electric but I love that this one is both. For the price I wish it came with a stand and cable for an amp though but it's a great starter guitar for kids or a person with smaller hands. I would recommend it. it's acoustic and electric. You will need to buy an amp with a cable to use it as an electric but no cable is needed for acoustic. It even has a built in tuner, they supply the batteries.

But opposites not only attract—sometimes they also make groundbreaking music together. This is certainly true of Zoom’s collaboration with Doe and Cervenka. Since that band broke up, Zoom has gone on to do session work with everyone from the late John Denver to the Raconteurs. He’s also become semi-legendary as a guitar amp hotrod guru, having tweaked circuitry for Jackson Browne, the Black Crowes, Los Lobos, L7 and Social Distortion, among many others.
Advanced multi-effects processors can involve significant learning curves. Their hundreds of sounds and functions may entail diving deep into multi-layered menus to get at what you want. The best units offer intuitive and ergonomic user interfaces that keep the most common functions easily accessible via dedicated knobs and switches. Reading user and pro reviews can help you identify which models offer the greatest ease of use.
Here are the reasons why you MIGHT want to raise it: 1. The break angle (the angle change of the strings as they pass over the saddles) is so severe that the strings keep breaking as they pass over the bridge. 2. The break angle is so steep that the strings hit the edge of the bridge before they go over the saddles. I’ve never had a problem with 1 above. However, 2 often happens and it’s not something that bothers me unless it’s severe.

Guitar chords and signatures. Find and save list of chords. Basic guitar chords A sheet of the most used rock chords. Suitable for beginners. Empty chord sheet An empty sheet of chords templates to print out and use. Basic guitar chords Em, C, G, D, Am, E, and A Free lesson on the basic guitar chords Em, C, G, D, Am, E, and A. The following chords are 7 of the most basic open position chords. An open position chord is one that contains at least o


To find which Ernie Ball strings are right for you, the key is experimentation. Figure out which strings sound best to your ear, feel best on your fingers, and most importantly enable you to create the music you want. When you are ready to buy, head over to one of the 5,500 music stores that carry Ernie Ball products. You can discover these stores by visiting our Store Locator.
The Supro brand name was introduced by the National-Dobro Corporation to sell its less expensive electric instruments. The first Supro Spanish and Hawaiian guitars appeared in 1936, and the brand would thrive until the bankruptcy of Valco in 1968. (The modern Supro line of amps bears no relationship to the original brand name). By the end of the 1930s, a pattern was established that would last for the next 30 years: Supro guitars and amps would generally be more affordable than their closest National counterparts, but built to similar quality and sometimes incorporating features not found in any National. Supro instruments were sold through a much less exclusive network of dealers than National, and as a result they have acquired a name recognition that surpasses their “superior” siblings.
My cousin Mike had a red Lotus LP Custom copy that his mom got for him, it was a bolt-on one, looked just about like the one you have in your pic. It played pretty nice, but the tuners and pickups sucked. We added a set of Grovers and a pair of (then popular) DiMarzio super 2 pickups. Mike used this Lotus guitar for 3 or 4 years until he got a Guild s-100. He sold the Lotus for 125.00 after taking off the DiMarzios and Grovers. He gave me those parts and I installed them on a stripped and mutilated 71 SG Standard that I painted with auto enamel (a nice Candy red). I later sold the SG to Mike. The lotus had a plywood body and was pretty cheap, I wouldn't pay a 100 bucks for one today, if anything. But, back then, it was as good as any, we worked with what we could get. I know we played some excrutiating unison leads (ala Blackfoot, Molly Hatchet,etc) he with his souped up Lotus, me with my Memphis Strat copy, both plugged into my bitchin solid state Crate (looked like a real wooden crate!) amp.
The ADA MP-1 was a legend for it’s superior versatility at the time of it’s release. Since first becoming available during the 80’s, players vied after it for it’s midi switching capability via footswitch. Paul Gilbert is most famous for his loyalty to the amp during the spawn of his career.  It runs on two 12AX7 preamp tubes and has three main voicings — Solid State, Clean and Distortion. One downfall of this amp stems from it’s lack of an input volume control, but thanks to a host of mods available nowadays for this thing, one can look really look past this minor flaw. On top of that, you can find them used for around $250! A steal for 80’s tone-in-a-box.
One unique application of a fuzz pedal involves starving the pedal of voltage--which will produce a scratchy, velcro-like tone. This is desirable by some musicians because it is a highly unique sound and is often employed by more avant garde musicians. This sound can be achieved by purchasing a power supply with a sag output, or using a nearly dead battery, although the pedal won't last long when using that method.
You will see numerous inputs and outputs for sound, depending on your computer. You will want to enable the main one (in which all of the sub­devices are listed) and two others: one for input, and one for output. For input, look for something similar to “Line in”. If you only have a microphone jack, enable that instead. For output, look for “Stereo out” or something similar.

If a metallic object (such as an electric guitar string for example) is vibrated above a magnetic coil the magnetic field is disturbed and an electrical current is produced. This current then travels through the pickups connecting wires, eventually making it’s way to your output jack where it is transferred to your guitar lead and ultimately to your guitar amp where the small signal is amplified to produce the sound associated with an electric guitar.


The GuitarTricks instructors are working professional guitarist and great teachers. With more than 45 instructors you have plenty of choice to find the ones you like best. There is a structured, best practice, teaching approach to every lesson, song and the entire curriculum which beats the hap-hazard approach of picking free lessons on YouTube. I also like that the I can learn not just what something does but WHY it does it and how to apply it to other parts.
Every guitar player needs a great acoustic guitar – or several – in their collection. Finding the right acoustic guitar for you can be a daunting process even for the most seasoned player. If you are new to shopping for guitars, then it is even more critical that you learn all you can before you make your first purchase. If your first acoustic guitar is not the appropriate choice for you, then it can dramatically reduce the enjoyment you will get out of your instrument. If you are a new guitar player, the wrong guitar can be downright discouraging. You want a guitar that fits you, is effortless to play, and has the rich, beautiful tone you love to make it the instrument you dream of playing hour after hour.
After I published that blog post, a number of beginners wrote to tell me they had a higher budget and would actually like me to recommend some better beginner guitars than those you typically find in starter packs. When I dug deeper, most told me they had a max budget of about $300 for the guitar alone, and weren’t interested in all-in-one starter packs. They wanted a really great (but affordable) guitar and wanted to shop for amps and accessories separately. I further confirmed this with a little informal poll on Twitter:

I have been playing guitar for over 40 years and purchased Taylor's, Gibsons and Fenders as well as many others. This Godin company understands value and passes that along to its customers. Fine tone when played acoustic or threw an amp. The wood tone and workmanship are awesome for this or any price point. You will not be disappointed with this guitar, it is a great value.


Fender has a long history of building amplifiers, so much so that many of the amps we see today still mimic the look and aesthetics of the amps that they built many decades ago. You could also say that many of the amps we have today can trace their roots to the classic Fender amp design. Also impressive is the long list of Fender amplifier users which include Eric Clapton, Jerry Garcia, Brian Setzer, Neil Young, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Eddie Van Halen and many more. For a company with a long legacy and a massive line up of amplifiers, maintaining high rating across the board is quite the feat, but then again, this is to be expected from the company that helped shape the electric guitar sound that we know today. These days, Fender is well represented in the entire amplifier market, from entry level models with amp modeling, to premium modern reproductions of their iconic tube amps.
In the present scenario many brands are providing the better quality Guitars and serving their customers the best services. Nowadays music industry is demanding better performances. For performing the best people are switching one to other brands. The brands are competing with each others to maintain their selves in to the top 10 chart. So please strike down to your strings for the right notes.
Dick Dale: Nicknamed “The Beast” by Dale himself, the guitar comes in “chartreuse sparkle” (a greenish-gold color) with a white pickguard and rosewood fretboard, with vintage 50s features and a number of custom modifications. Notably, the guitar comes with a reverse headstock and a reverse angled bridge pickup to achieve the sound of playing a Stratocaster upside-down, which was how Dale learned to play.
B.C. Rich manufactured a ten-string six-course electric guitar, the Bich, whose radical shape positioned the machine heads for the four secondary strings onto the body, avoiding the head-heaviness of many electric twelve-string guitars. However, many players bought it for the body shape or electrics and simply removed the extra strings. The company recognized this and released six-string models of the Bich, a shape now generally incorporated into their standard Warlock.

On the way folks arriving soon stay tuned pics of this made in Japan hand crafted beautiful Exotic Vintage Martin copy will be uploaded soon ... in great players condition original and stock Takamine pickup installed you can plug in at the strap pin jack and go electric and sounds amazing or fully acoustic of course unpluged. You know theses are know for the ultimate beauty of them as well as the Rich complex tone they offer well seasoned instrument of this caliber Japan had to offer in the Lawsuit series days 70-85 or so that have been discontinued decades ago as they say they don't make um like this any more... Stay tuned for another exotic Brazilian Rosewood guitar at JVGuitars.com any questions for Joe email: jvguitars@gmail.com.
The F-55 was identical to the F-50 except for the addition of a bridge DeArmond humbucker, plus the attendant three-way toggle on the cutaway horn and a second set of volume and tone knobs flanking the treble f-hole. The F-55, too, had a Martin “M” trapeze tail. This series began with guitar #279831. Some 1,700 F-55s were made from mid-’62 to the summer of 1965.
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The problem of the recent Gibson bashing is well-founded. There were quality issues over the last maybe 15 years. The thing is that a Gibson is still a dream for a lot of people. They get better and giving themselves a present after putting money away. Then, after several years, maybe decades of anticipation they get crappy quality for several thousand dollars. The brand is alive, they can bounce back, but the managment...instead of the elevator, they should take the japanese business shortcut. As soon as the quality and passion is back, people will love to buy one. Hope they'll get back on track before 2020. - MountainGoat
Variable 1: Speaker size. In Clip 1 you hear similar phrases played through models of four common speaker types. First comes the sort of 10" speaker you’d find in a small Fender Champ-style combo. Next is the 12" speaker of a midsized Fender-style combo, then a 12" Celestion Greenback you might encounter in a vintage Marshall cabinet, and finally the Celestion Alnico Blue from a vintage Vox combo.
15 years ago a friend brought his in Miami i think. The guitar sounds amazing and the care for making it was awesome. The guitar have a cristal like sound and shines particulary well. Today i've acquire it from him by a fair trade: i purchased a new Falcon guitar, wich is the best brand here in Peru, and trade it for his Palmer. Is the best trade i've done. Not sure for him ;) My friend paid $100 for it 15 years ago and the model is PF20. Hope this information was helpfull
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Like effects pedals, multi-effects processors are used to modify and alter the clean signal of your guitar to produce a large variety of effects (reverb, wah-wah, overdrive, distortion, chorus, etc). Unlike a simple pedal that gives you one or two options for modifying tone, a multi-effects processor has a full load of effects and sounds that allow you to play music with a rainbow-colored tonal palette. There are processors for modifying guitar, bass, and even units for vocalists with pitch-correction tools and harmonizer effects.

i'll be 50 yrs old in a few days. i started playing guitar at 8. this is my 30th guitar. i started ordering various guitars from amazon a year and a half ago and have not been displeased at all with any of my orders. i get some for young people who cannot afford to get one for themselves and so have started exploring the guitars in the price range of 80 to 140 dollars. at first glance, it would seem pretty much impossible for any guitars in this price range to be of any worth, but the factories are set up to put out fine instruments now in this price range. i can't recommend this guitar highly enough to convince you what i think of it but i am astounded at the quality, playability and sound of this guitar. it has really good tuners and rings out like a


Fender "Squire / Bullet" Strat. Great, low priced project guitar. Black, laminated body, maple neck with Indian Rosewood fingerboard. 4-bolt neck plate. Original, "covered" tuning machines and nut installed. Frets in NEW condition. Neck adjusted well with slight "back-bow" under no tension and does have adjustable truss rod. Body and neck finish in excellent shape. Headstock finish has wear to the word "Bullet" see photos. We have no additional parts with this one, nor a case or gig bag. Guitar as photo'd only. Ready for your custom hardware parts. Would make a great project / player or second "don't care if it gets stolen off the stage" guitar.

James Patrick "Jimmy" Page, OBE is an English musician, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and record producer who achieved international success as the guitarist and leader of the rock band Led Zeppelin. Page began his career as a studio session musician in London and, by the mid-1960s, he had become the most sought-after session guitarist in England. He was a member of the Yardbirds from 1966 to 1968. In late 1968, he founded Led Zeppelin. Page is widely considered to be one of the greatest and most influential guitarists of all time. Rolling Stone magazine has described Page as "the pontiff of power riffing" and ranked him number 3 in their list of the "100 Greatest Guitarists of All ...more on Wikipedia
By the time this Blink-182 hit was recorded, the majority of Enema of the State had already been written. Tom DeLonge wanted to add one more song to the album that was simple, and radio friendly so he got to work. The lyric “She left me roses by the stairs” came about when DeLonge’s girlfriend at the time left him roses on the stairs, and the singer found them late one night after recording. The “na na na” section was also inspired by the next band.
Fuzz gained much glory from the sixties and seventies when popularized by musicians such as Jimi Hendrix. Today, fuzz pedals have evolved into a staple for some bands and is capable of producing everything from a singing, warm sustain to a scratchy, velcro sound. The mainstay of a fuzz pedal's sound is produced by an electrical component called a transistor. Fuzz pedals today can be created from silicon transistors, or germanium transistors. Silicon is known to produce a slightly harsh or bright sound (some consider it sterile) while germanium typically accentuates the low end and produces a warmer sound. Just as extreme settings on a silicon fuzz pedal can easily produce a harsh, glass-like sound, extreme settings on a germanium transistor based fuzz can produce an overly warm, and muted tone.

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Where can you find one? My guess is that FIDELITY was a housebrand (like Holiday or Silvertone), and these might be Valcos or some other maker. But I have since seen 2 or 3 of them on Ebay, not going for too much money. Also, there are several other brands (and no-brands) that look much like these, so keep your eyes peeled, don’t pay too much, and score a little gem that will have other guitar players saying “what the hell is that” and have your significant other shaking his or her head when the UPS/Fedex people come knocking.

I purchased this as a replacement for my acoustic guitar of 15 years. I couldn't be more pleased with the purchase. The construction is excellent without gaps or excess glue around joints. The top is solid sitka spruce which is a very attractive feature at any price point let alone $200. The aesthetics on the DG800 are simple and the design on the head stock is painted and will rub off with time. However that has no bearing on the overall fit and finish of this guitar, both of which are excellent for a <$1000 guitar.


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On these guitar tracks, I did use a little bit of the 1176. I don’t overcompress on these tracks, I just basically want to get a little bit more sustain out of the notes, so I have it setup so that there’s plenty of attack that comes through. I’m not trying to control that so much as I am the sustain of the note, and get a little bit more length out of it, though I’m pretty gentle with that. Then it just goes into Pro Tools and I record it as is.
Besides his restoration of vintage guitars, one of the most important contributions Paul has made to the guitar world is passing the torch to a new generation of guitar masters by offering Luthier classes that teaches how to build your own electric guitar at his shop. People from all walks of life have attended his seminars, including Mark Colombo, a former offensive tackle of the Dallas Cowboys. Paul is not only sharing his love of building great guitars but also teaching the science of how the magic works. "I have what's known as the 'no-fail policy,'" he says and laughs. "If you can't do the work, I'll do it for you."
There's no denying the popularity of the Stratocaster, thanks to it being the weapon of choice for a long list of iconic players that include Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton and Jeff Beck to name a few. The American Professional Stratocaster is the latest iteration of this classic, carrying over much of the look and feel of the original, but more reliable and road worthy.
It would be great if we could be born with all our favorite music already memorized. But we're only human, so we don't get that luxury - if we want to know a song, we have to learn it! The process starts with reference materials, so don't wait to start building up a repertoire of your own favorites. Add the tablature to your collection and make sure to practice, and you'll be playing like your favorite guitar heroes soon enough.
Being a true pro-level instrument, the Yamaha LL16 comes with a jumbo body shape and built-in S.R.T Zero impact electronics. Playability remains beginner friendly, with a low action setup that new players will easily master. And since it comes with an all-solid wood body, this guitar will only sound better and better as it ages. If you are looking for a more long term instrument at the sub $1000 level, check out the Yamaha LS16.
A thermally engineered centre block and bracing make this 335 acoustically louder, open and with more clarity. The 'burst top and back also look more modern than vintage, while the translucent dark brown/ almost-black sides and neck-back finish add contrast that creates a classy appearance, along with the nickel hardware. We also get a lightweight aluminium stop tailpiece with locking studs, but this is all-very-classic ES-335 fare, such as the small block inlays and the small fleur head logo. Again, Gibson's build specs tell us we have MHS 'buckers and here the 'Memphis Tone Circuit' includes matched pots with a tight five per cent tolerance, with the same 'orange drop' tone caps as the ES-275.  Plugged in, it's like all our Christmases have come at once. There's a more solidbody response here, as you'd expect, and it really pushes out the sound. It's expensive, but as an investment, this is one of the best electric guitars on the market.
Here you get a very bright sound but the output will be less than if it were wired in series and you no longer have hum canceling. Since you are using just one half of the humbucker, "coil-cut" sounds best when using a high output pickup (DiMarzio "X2N", DiMarzio "Distortion", Seymour Duncan "Invader", Seymour Duncan "Distortion", etc). A coil cut switch is relatively easy to wire up and it is just a matter of connecting one end of an SPST switch to that junction that was created for series wiring and connecting the other end of the switch to ground. So, we now have another 2 tone humbucker arrangement that can easily be switched back and forth between 2 tone options.
The Supro line continued to grow in 1938, as can be seen in the CMI catalog. Still around was the Supro Spanish Guitar, now called the Supro Avalon Spanish Guitar, other than the name change (which is not featured on the guitar, as far I can ascertain), it is identical. Gone are the wood-bodied, frumpy-pear Supro Hawaiian Model and the Model D amplifier, although a Supro Special amplifier is mentioned (and not described) as being available for $40, the same price as the Model D. One and the same?
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WET SANDING You can wet sand with 600 or 800 grit wet sanding papers that you can get from the hardware or auto body shop before you apply the clear coats. You can get precission paper from Stewart Mac Donald that are suppose to cut better, last longer and yeild a better result, but I have never tried them so that's up to you. When wet sanding there are a few things to keep in mind. First you will need to soak the paper overnight in water. You can add a little Murphy's Oil soap to it. It will act as a lubricant and help it cut better. You could even soak the paper in a solvent if you use a laquer finish but I use water because it cleans up easier and dosen't smell. Next be sure not to overly soak the areas that you have drilled holes in. If the water get in the wood it can cause a lift in the lacquer that could lead to cracks in the finish. This is why some people choose a solvent to sand with because it is more forgiving in that area. Start wet sanding with a 600 to 800 grit paper and gradually work your way up to a 2000 plus grit. If you use water you may experience a condition in you finger tips that comes with a prolonged exposure to it called "raisoning". Just let them dry out for a while and get back to work!
The Effect: Pedalboards are not guitar effects, but are an essential piece of equipment for every musician utilizing more than 2 or three pedals. Essentially, a pedalboard is a casing for guitar pedals, specially crafted to house a number of effects – typically ranging from 4 to 12. In some cases, boards come as just casings and it’s up to the player to sort out the electronic department and powers supply; in other cases, all the electronics are included in the mix and even cables are included. So in a nutshell, boards make your pedal use far more convenient and practical. In our opinion, they are an absolute must-have for any player who has more than two effects in use. For a first pedalboard I would recommend the Donner DB-2 as a great option.
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Other early phase shifters used field effect transistors (FETs) to control each phasing stage in place of the light bulbs in the ’Vibe, and certainly later units employed opamps with variable resistors (six TL072 dual opamps or similar in the MXR Phase 100, for example). Electro-Harmonix’s sweet little Small Stone, on the other hand, has a more unusual design that employs five CA3094 type Operational Transconductance Amplifiers (OTAs). The results are similar, but subtly different. Many phasers—such as MXR’s Phase 45 and Phase 90, and E-H’s Small Stone—carry nothing but a speed control, plus a “Color” switch in the case of the latter. Others have Depth, Mix and Resonance controls. The latter appears on many units with internal feedback loops (the Small Stone and most phasers before it lack this circuitry), and allows the player tweak the degree to which the portion of the signal fed back enhances the frequency peaks.
Compared to the guitar amp rankings, the bass amp list is largely dominated by heads rather than combos. Notably, many of the entries on this year's rankings come from the recent wave of ultra-portable, Class D bass amp—a topic we've covered before. Clearly, this subcategory of bass amp is dominating the market, and it's likely that there will be at least a few new entries under that heading at NAMM next month.
Some of the energy is not translated to string movement because it is lost. Where? To the body. Dependant on hardware and body composition, certain amounts of frequencies are absorbed by the body and therefore lost to be seen by the pickups. Body resonance is the OPPOSITE of what most people think. Those prevalent frequencies you hear ringing out of the wood are now unavailable to be transferred to the pickups. Remember, we can't create energy, only move it around. If a guitar is prominent in specific frequencies, it is only because other frequencies have been "removed" to make them stand out.

Volume pedals are volume potientiometers set into a rocking foot treadle, so that the volume of the bass guitar can be changed by the foot. Compression pedals affect the dynamics (volume levels) of a bass signal by subtly increasing the volume of quiet notes and reducing the volume of loud notes, which smooths out or "compresses" the overall sound. Limiters, which are similar to compressors, prevent the upper volume levels (peaks) of notes from getting too loud, which can damage speakers. Noise gates remove hums and hisses that occur with distortion pedals, vintage pedals, and some electric basses.
Ibanez is a Japanese guitar manufacturer which was founded in the year 1957. Ibanez was the first Japanese company to gain a foothold in exporting guitars to United States and Europe. They were the pioneer to produce the seven- strings guitars. Ibanez has produced several guitar models including the Electric Guitar Models, the Signature Models, Bass Guitar Models, and Acoustic Guitar Models etc. The Ibanez guitars are one of the best in the world.
Modeling pedals use a host of methods to make your guitar sound like it’s coming from a specific sound source. For example, there are many pedals out there that are designed to model the sound of classic amps. This allows you to plug your amp and pedal straight into a PA system or even a pair of headphones, while maintaining the characteristics of the amp the pedal is modeled after. This also helps you avoid having to carry your amp with you everywhere you go.
*The expensive Fender USA hardware (supposedly genuine, purchased at Guitar Center San Marcos CA), which includes the 2-point delux strat tremolo, big-apple scratch plate, Sperzal USA tuners, Graphtech nut, and pickup selector. These items should all combine to sound awesome, and coming from a reputable supplier and for the price I paid I would expect to be identical to what is found on a USA standard or delux Fender.

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Covers all the material needed for the RGT Grade One electric guitar examination, enabling you to gain an internationally recognised qualification. The book should help you to develop all aspects of guitar playing, increase your knowledge of specialist electric guitar techniques, understand the music theory that relates to electric guitar playing and achieve your full potential as a guitarist.
Dr Doug Clark-"I stumbled onto your site while looking for an entry-level classical guitar for my grandson in Denver, Colorado. Regrettably, I'm not resident in England (though I've been there many times), otherwise I'd be on your doorstep tomorrow morning. That said, might you have any acquaintances in America (firms similar to yours) whom you could recommend? We're limited at this point (8th form next year, at Denver School of the Arts), to around $300 US. Any advice or recommendation you can offer will be greatly appreciated. Watched Harry and Meghan's wedding twice! Wish them both, and England itself, a wonderful decade ahead. PS: I took up steel string acoustic guitar at about age 60. Hence my email "handle". Still working on my skills and loving it."
But having at least a very basic foundation to build upon - such as learning some basic chords, will allow you to learn more songs faster. My best advice is to abandoned any idea of instant gratification and commit to the idea that learning guitar is a slow process in the beginning. It gets exponentially easier to improve your skills after you get past the huge hurdles you encounter in the beginning.
As a new learner, the biggest reason for you wanting to begin with a full-sized guitar as opposed to a slender Stratocaster or a stylish Les Paul, has to do with your love for classic heavy rock tones. In this day and age, when you have scores of guitars with dizzying combinations of single-coil and humbucker pickups, along with complex toggle options, the Davison Full Size Black Electric Guitar keeps it really straight and simple. This is one of the few electric guitars that I’ve had the pleasure of reviewing straight out of the box, with hardly any setting required. And lest I skip the most important purchasing criteria here, you are not just buying a 39” electric guitar but a full-fledged Davison Guitar Beginner Starter Package. So you have a lot more going for that hundred bucks you spend, with a cool gig bag, strap, guitar picks as well as a compact amplifier and cable.
Guitar pedal multi-effects units comprise several effects in just one package. Multi-effects units utilize digital processing to bring out different sound effects when playing guitar. These digital multi-effects pedals come with internal memory in order to save your individual settings. Among the top-rated multi-effects brands you might want to check out are the DigiTech RP and GNX series, the Boss ME-20 and ME-50 models, the Boss GT-6 and GT-8, the Zoom G2, G3, and G5, various Behringer models, and the Line 6 POD.
Boss is an effects legend, but thanks to the digital expertise of parent company Roland, the brand now also has an amp that promises organic, valve-like tones at an impressively low price. It does this by using the same Tube Logic technology employed in last year’s 150-watt Waza Craft head, and other Roland amps. The K100 doesn’t invite direct comparison with specific amp brands and models. Instead, there are five generic voices: Acoustic, Clean, Crunch, Lead and Brown. You can pre-load 15 different effects types into the amp, with 55 to currently choose from when you link the Katana to the Boss Tone Studio application. The Katana may look plain, but its tones are truly exceptional. The Crunch voice is responsive and dynamic, while the Brown solo sound is as good as many USA valve-powered competitors. Start using the Tone Studio editor and the Katana’s edge becomes sharper still, with different effects chain presets and assignable control parameters.
i personally like epiphone/gibsonn a lot. if you are searching to BUY an electric guitar then you should go for your preference. go to guitar center, and play some guitars. find one that feels good to you. remember, the strings in there have been used a million times, so don't make that a factor. feel the guitar. along the sides of the neck, are the frets sticking off the neck a little? making it rough? its all about your preference. also it depends on what style you play blues is definatly Les Paul rock, probably an SG country, probably fender, i don't know much about that genre bluegrass type music is probably a hollow body electric.
But older guitars are not always better than new guitars; they can have unreliable parts, or be difficult to maintain. A lot of these are upgraded to make great players grade instruments. Keeping the essence of the original vintage guitar, but adding a little of today's reliability. A great example is the 1960s Gibson Melody Maker; an all-mahogany set neck guitar with Brazilian rosewood fingerboard and beautiful nitrocellulose finish. Well-built by Gibson, in their Kalamazoo factory, but with very basic pickups, tuning keys and electronics. Upgraded examples are everywhere, and are exceptional value as players grade instruments. Then again some guitars, especially early Japanese and European models aimed at the student guitarists of the early 1960s are completely unplayable. Even the cheapest modern day guitars put these to shame. Before buying any vintage guitar it is a good idea to know exactly what you are buying!
The first successful guitar pickup was developed in the early 1930’s by Rickenbacker® to help amplify Hawaiian lap steel guitars which were popular at the time. The first pickups were single-coils and while they do a good job of picking up the guitar signal they are also susceptible to picking up interference from nearby electrical devices. The Gibson® humbucker (US Patent 2896491) was developed in the 1950’s to eliminate the “hum noises” resulting from electromagnetic interference. The humbucker uses two coils and a pair of pole pieces (having opposite magnetic polarities of each other) for each string. The coils are wound and connected to each other in such a way that the current produced by the moving guitar string in the two coils adds up (in-phase), while the current produced by electromagnetic interference in the two coils cancels (out-of-phase). Not only does the humbucker drastically reduce noise from interference, but it also has a different characteristic sound. The single-coil pickup is commonly considered to have a thin, clear and bright (more treble) sound, while the humbucker is known to have a full, but dark (less treble) sound with more overall signal output.
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Chosen by artists over 3 decades for use on stage and in studio, the Zager 80 Series is the “go to” guitar for the touring musician or veteran player wanting a professional grade lifetime instrument. Consistently rated in the top 5% of acoustics in national and international publications competing with guitars 2 and 3 times its price, yet costs 50% less since you’re buying direct from our workshop in Lincoln, Nebraska. If you enjoy the deep rich bass that’s common in rosewood guitars, a solid cedar top takes it to the next level providing a very mellow, sweet response.  Combined with legendary Zager playability and you have a guitar that will go head to head with any acoustic on the market today…regardless of price.
The Kay Musical Instrument Company grew from the Groeschel Mandolin Company (or Groeshl Instrument Company[8]) in Chicago, established in 1890.[9] In 1921, the company was renamed to Stromberg-Voisinet. In 1923, later president Henry Kay "Hank" Kuhrmeyer joined the company, and in 1928, with the help of an investor,[9] he bought the company and started producing electric guitars and amplifiers.[10]
I bought this kit for myself. I wanted the satisfaction of building and playing my own guitar. The price was well within my budget. I did upgrade the electronics, put on a Bigsby tailpiece, a new roller tune-o-matic bridge, and planet waves self trimming tuners. The items in the kit were fine to use, but i wanted a one off guitar, that would have the sound and the look I wanted.
I have been playing guitar, banjo, bass and harmonica for 46 years - and I don't find a $4,300 Martin D 41 to be affordable (Guitar Center price). I play a Taylor 402ce and a dozen other instruments. I believe Taylor is the best instrument for the price..Alvarez Yairi guitars are very good too. Martin and Gibson make fine guitars but they are overpriced. I have a Chinese Maple Guild that sounds fine but the fretwork is amateurish. A Chinese Takamine New Yorker is very well constructed and sounds great.
From what I've been able to find out (as a proud owner of a mint W-415 'Dove' model acoustic), Lyle guitars are actually Gibson seconds, that for whatever reason didn't pass muster to be sold as a Gibson (bad finish, scuff, imperfection in the wood, etc.). The Lyle company was out of Portland, OR (I believe) and was started by former Gibson employees who would fix the flawed Gibsons and resell them under the Lyle name. Made in Japan was because Gibsons were made in Japan at the time(?). A damn fine instrument; considered rare now, I guess. I don't ever want to get rid of mine!
This D-15M dreadnought features a solid 'genuine' (South American) mahogany top over A-Frame X bracing; the same material is used for the back, sides and neck. The neck profile is a 'modified low oval', and it's hard to imagine anyone having a problem with it. Bone nut and saddle: check. Vintage-style, open-gear tuners check. Super-thin matt nitrocellulose finish all over: check. Tonally, there is a rich and projecting core sound that's complemented by the unmistakable, Martin D-resonance. It's vibrant and ebullient, yet not brash; warm and full without being thick or indistinct. It puts every single cent of its build budget into making the best sounding and playing instrument, with very little concession to cosmetics, electronics or anything else. Solid woods, improved neck joint, bone nut and saddle, no frills whatsoever, save for the 'burst – it's unreservedly recommended.
This acoustic-electric parlor style guitar features a solid cedar top and solid sapele back and sides, premium appointments that other builders will require you to pay top dollars for. And it features old school parlor style body shape, which gives the instrument a vintage appeal, and blues box style tone with emphasis on the middle frequencies. This makes it ideal for blues, folk and old school comping, a good contrast to regular sized acoustics in a mix.
Across the United States, there are increasing concerns from businesses about the supply of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics trained workers. Although science and math test scores in the US are among the lowest around the world, the US educational system is in the process of revitalizing the “hands on” learning techniques as a way to enhance the participation and success of students. Our project meets the needs of applied learning with the flexibility of being modular in the classroom.

As early as 1924 or so, Lloyd Loar had experimented with amplifying acoustic instruments, though it would not be until the ’30s that his efforts would pan out (without great commercial success). He was undoubtedly ahead of his time. The only amplifier technology available to Loar was primitive radio amplification, hardly adequate for cutting through the horn section. As the ’20s progressed, Hollywood invented “talkies,” and huge valve amplifiers were developed to fill theaters (the music trade press at the time repeatedly published essays assuring musician readers that talkies would have absolutely no effect on the jobs of theater organists!). Part of this technological development included the invention of more and more tubes and the improvement of older designs, which increased the possibilities for instrumental amplification.
The history of Electric Guitars is summarized by Guitar World magazine, and the earliest electric guitar on their top 10 list is the Ro-Pat-In Electro A-25 "Frying Pan" (1932) described as 'The first-fully functioning solid-body electric guitar to be manufactured and sold'.[31] The most recent electric guitar on this list is the Ibanez Jem (1987) which featured '24 frets', 'an impossibly thin neck' and was 'designed to be the ultimate shredder machine'. Numerous other important electric guitars are on the list including Gibson ES-150 (1936), Fender Telecaster (1951), Gibson Les Paul (1952), Gretsch 6128 Duo Jet (1953), Fender Stratocaster (1954), Rickenbacker 360/12 (1964), Van Halen Frankenstein (1975), Paul Reed Smith Custom (1985) many of these guitars were 'successors' to earlier designs.[31] Electric Guitar designs eventually became culturally important and visually iconic, with various model companies selling miniature model versions[32][33] of particularly famous electric guitars, for example the Gibson SG used by Angus Young from the group AC/DC.
Wah – This type of pedal was a Jimi Hendrix favorite, and you’ve probably heard the original “Cry Baby” in a lot of music. It was the first wah pedal to find success, and paved the way for others to follow. The Cry Baby is an example of manual wah, controlled by a rocker pedal that adjusts the level of treble response dynamically as you move it. Some modern wah pedals, by contrast, are “auto-wah effects,” which do the same thing but use presets for control instead of live input from your foot.
This list is an amateurish joke. Many guitars listed are pure cheap junk I'd toss in the garbage even if they were free. Take it from a 45-year Pro, Parker & PRS are the 2 highest quality. Fender, Ric and Gibson, along w/ brands that have stood the test of time, plus a few hand-made (custom) brands are the only ones you can seriously depend on. The rest are mostly pathetic attempts at copying a major brand and cutting the price by REALLY cutting back on quality. As they say: "You get what you pay for. "
The No. 140 Supro Capitan was a handsome f-holed archtop, which was Regal-made. It sported an arched spruce top with a maple body. The hardwood neck had an ebonized fingerboard with pearl position dot and jumbo frets. An oval Supro logo plate sat on the faceplate. A single rectangular metal-covered pickup (with holes exposing the poles) sat just to the bridge side of the middle position. This pickup had six separate coils! It had a “crystaline pick guard,” probably tortoise, and adjustable compensated bridge, National-stamped trapeze tailpiece, and one volume and one tone control situated just behind the �guard. It came with a grey Servitex tweed case, and in ’42 cost $71.50.
Gibson produced only hollow body electrics until 1952, when the first Les Paul solid bodies hit the market. But that still left a gap. Certain players wanted a guitar with the versatility of a Les Paul, but the warmer, mellow tone of a hollow body — albeit one that could be played at high volume. A solid wood block runs through the center of the guitar’s body, allowing greater sustain and less feedback at high volumes than hollow bodies, while the winged side of these guitars’ bodies still provide for a mellow tone thanks to their acoustic resonance.

A lot of people will tell you that Jackson is not what they used to be. I’m not really going to try to refute or prove this claim, but their guitars are holding up pretty well at this moment. It’s still a brand you can trust to build you a solid guitar. Case in point that JS32 Dinky. It’s my favorite Jackson even though there are much better models in their current lineup.
Wife wants to play guitar again after a long hiatus. My full sized Takamine with fat strings is too big and heavy for her. Got her this 3/4 Yamaha and I fell in love with it. I may have to get another one for her because I've been hogging it. It has a great voice for a 3/4. The action is nice, the built in tuner is a real treat. Never had one before but it is unbelievably convenient. I don't plug it in often but I had to check out that sound too. The electronics sound decent. Can't crank it up too loud or it starts to feedback, but I'm actually sitting right on top of my small but punchy VOX amp so I can't really say how it would work for playing out. The reviews convinced me to buy this one. The best review only had one major complaint; the tuning pegs. I agree they could be better, but I don't think they are awful. I have to tweak the tuning just a little once or twice a day before I play, but it isn't like it goes out of tune when I'm playing, even when I'm beating on it hard. I think it is well worth the price and was surprised by the volume it produces. Much better than expected. If you don't find the tuning pegs worthy, I think the instrument is good enough to spend money on for an upgrade, but I don't plan to. It is solid, light weight, comfortable, nice sounding, well designed, feature rich and handy. I'm keeping it in the corner by the bed and I pick it up every chance I get. I haven't played guitar much the past few years so having a guitar at my fingertips all the time is helping me get my callouses back quickly. No matter what you play, if you lose your callouses, rebuilding them is always painful for a few weeks, but this instrument is pretty easy to play. I've gone through the process several times over the years with my Takamine. This is far less painful. Perhaps that means it will take longer, but at least I can still use my fingers to type long reviews in the meantime. No avoiding the pain regardless of what you play, but there is pain, and there is agony. This guitar hits a sweet spot somewhere in between. It's just right for young or old, big or small. (FWIW, I heard an interview with Clapton where he confessed he doesn't play much when he's not working and when he has to prepare for a tour, even he has to go through the callous building process). Well, I'm way off topic now. Again, great little guitar. Go for it.
Spanish-style electrics, which you could sling in front of you while standing and singing, proved to be much more versatile for many different musical genres. Gibson’s 1936 ES-150 (E for Electric and S for Spanish) had a sleek bar-shaped electronic pickup that was mounted into the guitar’s hollow body for a more streamlined look. The pickup earned the nickname “the Charlie Christian” thanks to the jazz virtuoso who is generally credited with introducing the electric guitar solo. In 1939, Christian stepped out in front of Benny Goodman’s band and performed long, complicated passages imitating the style of horn playing. He explained, “Guitar players have long needed a champion, someone to explain to the world that a guitarist is something more than a robot pluckin’ on a gadget to keep the rhythm going.”

The DD-5 offers four switchable delay ranges and 11 modes that give access to delays from 1ms all the way up to a walloping 2000ms. Delay time can also be set in real time using the Tap Tempo function and an optional FS-5U footswitch. With the Hold mode you can sample a passage simply by pressing and releasing the pedal. This item has normal signs of use/wear. Has been kept in clean, dry and smoke free environment.
CLEAR COATStew Mac sells nitrocellulose lacquer that works realy well for guitar finishing but if your like me you can't afford $10 a can for paint. Or you can check out reranchthough I haven't used any of their products they are a little cheaper. I use Deft spary lacquer. You can get it at Wal-Mart for under $5 a can and it works great. Use the same basic steps that you used when you sprayed you color coats, keeping in mind that you want enough coats so you don't cut through the clear top coat when wet sand and polish it out. Now comes the waiting. The paint has to set for several days to a month to let the solvents that are in the paint to rise to the top and harden. The paint will feel dry but you will notice that it might feel a little sticky or soft when you touch it. I like to do a "nail" test on mine. I use my finger nail and push it into the painted area in the neck pocket to see if it is still soft. No one will see the inside of the neck pocket so it's ok if you scratch it. Once it has cured completly you shouldn't be able dent the finish. It could take longer than a month for certain finishes to harden completely but trust me, you will be glad that you waited. For more information about all the different types of lacquer or clear coats products that are out there and how to choose what may be right for you, check out the drum foundry they have some great info.
The Dean Vendetta pack offers a sharp looking metallic red super Stratocaster style guitar with dual humbuckers, a tremolo bridge for fun dive tricks, and a 24 fret neck. This is perfect for players that want to start learning lead guitar as soon as possible. The neck is quite fast for a guitar in its price range. Also included with the purchase is a 10-watt practice amp, gig bag, instrument cable, picks, a tuner, and a fairly comfortable strap.

I didn’t use any guitar effects. I just used a straight into the amp, and I put the amp up pretty hot, though. The tweeds go up to 12 usually, and this one I had on 10 on the bridge pickup on the Strat. I was using a glass slide. Here’s the slide I was using. It’s like an old medicine bottle. I put some felt in there to make it a little bit of a tighter grip on my finger, but it’s the same slide that Dwayne Allman used.
A. It is never too late to learn how to play a musical instrument. An acoustic guitar does present some unique challenges for beginners, including the formation of calluses over time. Some working professional guitarists actually develop deep grooves on their fingertips after years of performing. But this is not a requirement in order to become an accomplished amateur guitarist. Practically every musical instrument places some physical demands on players, but developing skills like muscle memory and improvisation are tangible benefits of that extra effort.

Basswood comes from Linden trees, and it is soft and easy to work with. A side effect of being soft is that it also dents easy. Because it doesn’t have much of a grain or color, it’s most commonly used on instruments that have an opaque paint-job, though this isn’t always the case (as in the photo above). Basswood has a warm, balanced sound with great mid range and good sustain.
I’d like to think that I am a little more forgiving of slight finish errors than most, so most of the horror stories surrounding Gibson QC do not bother me too much. After all, one area of the body where the sunburst color doesn't fade at EXACTLY the same point all the way around? That sounds more like middle aged guys trying to save face around their buddies after their wives saw the credit card bill the next month and made them take it back.

I am new to guitar but had played Baritone in grades school thru high school in a small school with a band teacher who went on to Iowa State. So I wasn’t finding where notes were and started watching guitar/music theory and found several who headed me to learn my Pentatonic E minor scale before I have finished with chords. I wanted to know where notes are on fretboard.
The Effect: Wah pedals are primarily based on inductors, and later on Fasel inductors – serving as integral parts which play a big role in the outcome of the sound itself. They work on a basic principle, by adjusting a wah pedal’s footswitch your sound frequency’s behavior is modified, resulting in a “wah wah” tone – for further clarification take a listen to “Voodoo Child” by Jimi Hendrix. Naturally, effects may vary slightly or greatly depending on the model in question. Some of the most popular modern wah pedals are Dunlop’s numerous Cry Baby iterations and Vox’ marvelous classic enhanced remakes. The thing that sets wah pedals apart from other types in a unique way, is the fact that they rarely feature any controls, it’s just the footswitch and a dynamic range of impressive funky tones at your disposal.
Though pitch-shifting is an effect, it is easier to control when used via an insert point. However, if you need to use the effect on several tracks in varying amounts, you can use it via a send/return loop, providing the shifter is set to 100 percent wet. That way, you can adjust the effects depth for individual mix channels by using the send control feeding the pitch-shifter.
“Music is ineffable,” says Scott Waara, product manager at Line 6. His company has built a business around providing the widest range of tones possible to guitar players. But even for a firm dedicated to dissecting tone, it’s not easy to reduce things to a simple recipe. “Everybody hears differently,” Waara says, “and the frequency response of everyone’s brain is different, so some things that are cool to some guys are not going to be cool to other guys. You can put it on a scope and see what’s happening on a frequency graph and you’ll see some tendencies and trends and so on.” The trends seen by the Line 6 staff seem to indicate that warmer, fuller tones are more generally accepted and considered “good.”
Ibanez produces a number of signature series, but none of them even come close to Steve Vai’s JEM guitars. JEM7V is by far one of the most intriguing electric guitars Ibanez has to offer, and in general. It’s performance is legendary, just like the man who designed it. I’ve had a chance to play it once and it completely blew my mind. The thing was built to be an extension of your body, plain and simple.

Neither should you confuse acoustic-electric guitars with semi-acoustic hollow or semi-hollow instruments. Acoustic-electrics are acoustic guitars with onboard electronics that allows them to be amplified. They can be played just as well without plugging in. Semi-acoustics are electric guitars with some acoustic properties that are meant to be amplified when played.
Tuning Instabily: Problems with tuning stability are almost always cuased by improper tuning technique (always tune UP to the note) or a binding nut. (There are RARE occasions where the string isn't seating correctly at the bridge, and we're not considering problems with set up regarding a tremolo) Even the cheapest geared tuners don't "slip" as a rule. If a geared tuner is failing it will make a "poping" type of sound as the gear jumps teeth. If the gears are loose, it is possible to pull a string flat with extensive (excessive?) use of a tremolo. If notes are going sharp it is due to the nut binding. What happens is excessive tension builds up between the tuner and the nut in order to overcome the binding. Then as you play the vibration of the string allows it to wiggle through the slot equalizing the tension, and making the string sharp. See above for info on a binding nut. If a fretted note is sharp it is an indication that the nut slots are not deep enough (or excessive presure with high frets/ scalloped or worn fretboard). If a string is going flat, it is always bridge related. Either a problem with the string seating fully (common w/ trapeeze tailpieces and ball ends in vintage tremolos (the reason they came up w/ bullet ends)) or binding on a rough saddle/ the edge of the trem block. Again, it is possible to cause a tuner to back off with extream tremolo, but rare.

@Carl – Sorry to hear that you are having trouble. I am not clear on why this would be happening from the info you have provided. Can you please shoot us an email with details on the input and output connections and how each pedal is being powered when you experience this problem? Also, please also include a video that clearly shows this behavior, your connections, and how each pedal is being powered so that we have a better understanding of what you are experiencing. support@strymon.net
It is a standard dreadnought with 26 frets. There are no electronics, no cutaway, and no fancy upgrades. It has a book matched sitka spruce top, rosewood fingerboard, adjustable rosewood bridge, cream colored plastic binding, rosewood back and sides, and a black inlaid headstock. The neck is not one piece and is made from presumably African mahogany. It has closed gold tone tuners, black beveled pick guard and some plain black line art for a rosette. This guitar is void of polyurethane and has a lacquer finish, so much the better.
For example, bass guitar frequencies are on the relatively low end of the tonal spectrum. However, plucking a bass string can create a sudden, short burst of high and mid-frequency sounds. You need your bass amp to be loud enough to make those low-frequency sounds strong and audible in the mix, but you don’t want to flatten your band mates or blow out your speakers by sudden pops of high-frequency sounds.
The EJ-200SCE is a great acoustic under $500. With a spruce top and maple body, it offers a great tone for the money. It comes highly recommended from other owners, who say it sounds as good as a Gibson for 1/10 of the price. It also has an onboard pre amp with a built in tuner for plugging in. It’s perfect for playing gigs or at church. It has the SlimTaper neck which will be very easy to form chords on with smaller hands. The cutaway is nice for getting those up the neck solos easily, and of course it looks great as well. Check out more pictures of this guitar here.
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I work out of my home shop in Idaho Falls, Idaho. I do repairs for clients and guitar shops all over the United States. I’d love to help you repair or restore your guitar. Repair prices are based on a rate of $60 per hour. These prices apply to guitars in otherwise good working order. Your repair may vary depending on the condition of your guitar and the specifics of the work needed. Please contact me using the contact page if you have a repair that you would like to discuss. Consultations are always free.
Play a classic 6120 or Duo Jet and it can seem a bit, well, old-fashioned. A growing number of players desire the brand’s looks, sound and unmatched vibe, but also want something a tad more versatile and user-friendly. Enter this latest Players Edition model with its neck set lower into the body for improved access, higher-output Filter’Tron-style humbucking pickup (Full’Trons) and a modernised Bigsby vibrato where through-stringing replaces the notorious ‘hooking the ball-end over a peg’ system that scuppered any chance of a quick change. Mate these modern tweaks with another recent innovation (for Gretsch, at any rate), the Centre Block range, and you have a guitar ready to compete with anything out there - in virtually any style.
Sometimes called an auto-volume, these pedals work the same as the wah-wah pedal.  The effect functions based on your picking dynamics, but instead of a change in tone, you get a change in volume.  The effect will have no volume when you pick, but will then swell up to audible levels.  It masks your pick attack and simulates the sound of a bowed instrument.
Distortion and overdrive: In the early days of electronic music, vacuum tube amplifiers were used for processing the output electrical signals. Like any amplifier, these tube amplifiers had a maximum amplification above which they began to clip the peaks of the waveforms. While the resulting distortion may have disturbed the electrical engineers, a substantial fraction of the musicians liked the distorted sound and it became part of the musical medium.
Compared to an acoustic guitar, which has a hollow body, electric guitars make much less audible sound when their strings are plucked, so electric guitars are normally plugged into a guitar amplifier and speaker. When an electric guitar is played, string movement produces a signal by generating (i.e., inducing) a small electric current in the magnetic pickups, which are magnets wound with coils of very fine wire. The signal passes through the tone and volume circuits to the output jack, and through a cable to an amplifier.[22] The current induced is proportional to such factors as string density and the amount of movement over the pickups.
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