Though not much is known about the production of the Hi-Flier after about 1977, it clearly came to an end — and clearly has had an impact on players in the vintage market. Used by guitarists like Cobain and Lee Ranaldo of Sonic Youth, as well as many others in a variety of bands, the Hi-Flier gained notoriety as a unique guitar with a sound as striking as its looks.
As the ’60s dawned, electric guitars began to increase in popularity again, and many distributors turned to Europe for suppliers. The Italian makers were the most successful, with EKO, imported by LoDuca Brothers, in Milwaukee, leading the pack. German makers were paced by Framus, which was imported by Philadelphia Music Company, located in suburban Limerick, Pennsylvania. The Scandinavian contingent was represented by Levin, Landola and Hagstrom, the latter picked up by Merson.
When Bob Dylan described the Band's "wild mercury sound," he was really talking about Robbie Robertson's guitar, as exemplified by his torrid, squawking solo on "Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues" from their 1966 tour. But by the time the Band were making their own LPs, Robertson had pared down his approach, evolving into a consummate ensemble player. "I wanted to go in the opposite direction," said Robertson, "to do things that were so tasteful and discreet and subtle, like Curtis Mayfield and Steve Cropper… where it was all about the song."
Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic - Body Size: Grand Concert - Top Wood: Solid Mahogany - Back: Solid Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Dovetail - Neck Construction: V-Shape - Fingerboard: Maple - Binding: Ivoroid - Frets: 20 - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Maple - Hardware: Open Gear Tuner, Chrome - String Instrument Finish: Open Pore Natural

Before I got this guitar, I purchased a classical "starter" package that had crazy good reviews on Amazon. I have been playing guitar on and off for a few years but I would still classify myself as a beginner. In addition, it was my first classical guitar. I was extremely disappointed with the starter package (Yamaha) guitar. Chords sounded awful, and subtle chord changes, such as cadd9 to g were lost in the deep, bass sound. I understand that classical guitars are mainly for finger picking, but I need a guitar that can do both.


You can choose between tube amps, hybrids, or solid state models. The first are generally viewed as the grooviest. The latter are cheaper, more reliable, and require less maintenance. And the hybrids are often a practical compromise. (Keep in mind that watt for watt, tube amps are much louder than their solid state cousins with similar wattage ratings.)
You are bidding on a previously owned and in good working condition Blackstar Amplification HT Studio 20H guitar amp head. This auction is for the amp and power cable you see pictured. No footswitch is included. Nothing else is included. It comes as pictured. Please take a moment to look at the pictures and get a better idea of what you are bidding on. This unit has some scuffs and dings from being moved around. It has been tested and is in good working condition.
Breedlove is a semi-recently founded guitar manufacturer that has a main focus of acoustic guitars. Breedlove doesn’t have a massive following like some other brands, so it can be difficult trying to find one to test before purchasing. Breedlove tends to evolve their guitars and tries to push the world of acoustic guitars forward. Their Oregon Concerto Myrtlewood acoustic, for example, manages to produce a big, refined sound and the notes are more resonant. This is due to their tapered myrtlewood body and smaller sound-hole. The body shape is also very important as it’s part of the reason they sound so good and it’s even comfortable to play. All of their guitars are very high-quality and work well for all fingering styles and genres of music. If you want a really great acoustic, you really can’t go wrong with Breedlove.

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So, I've done what any self-respecting woman with a rather obsessive personality could do and trawled YouTube for all the best videos of Swift performing stripped down versions of her songs where it's just her singing against a minimal melody. I'm sure you'll agree that as much fun as queen of the squad, awkward dancing hero era Swift is, that these videos are all the proof you need that she doesn't need dance moves or supermodel friends on stage in order to rule.
There’s no disguising what the Jackson Pro Series DK2 Okoume is meant for: shredding. From the tonewoods to the construction to the feature set, everything on this guitar is designed to bring the best out of lightning-speed solos and other fretboard pyrotechnics. That it clocks in at under $900 off the rack makes the Pro Series DK2 a great value buy.
The Telecaster is known for its ability to produce both bright, rich, cutting tone (the typical telecaster twang) or mellow, warm, bluesy tone depending on the selected pickup, respectively “bridge” pickup or “neck” pickup. The bridge pickup has more windings than the neck pickup, hence producing higher output, which compensates for a lower amplitude of vibration of the strings at bridge position. At the same time, a capacitor between the slider of the volume control and the output, allows treble sounds to bleed through while damping mid and lower ranges.[3] A slanted bridge pickup enhances the guitar’s treble tone. The solid body allows the guitar to deliver a clean amplified version of the strings’ tone. This was an improvement on previous electric guitar designs, whose hollow bodies made them prone to unwanted feedback. These design elements allowed musicians to emulate steel guitar sounds, making it particularly useful in country music. These characteristics make the Telecaster a versatile guitar, usable for most styles of music including country, blues, rock, and jazz.
Compression: A "limiter" is envisioned as a circuit which prevents the output signal from exceeding a certain limit. If it did this by clipping, it would cause distortion, but if it can do it cleanly by just progressively reducing the amplification of the incoming signal, then it may properly be called a compressor. A compressor reduces the overall dynamic range by "compressing" the gain of high amplitude signals while maintaining the design gain for lower amplitude signals.

When Levon Helm of The Band sang "I pulled into Nazareth, was feelin' about half past dead" in "The Weight," he wasn’t alluding to a weary pilgrim’s desire for salvation. Rather, he was singing about a mythological trip to Nazareth, Pennsylvania, home of C. F. Martin & Co., makers of Martin flat top acoustic guitars. Founded in 1833 by a German immigrant named Christian Friedrich Martin, whose father was also an instrument maker, Martin...Continue Reading


The D-18E was a mahogany dreadnought with the neck pickup and a second bridge pickup. The typical Martin pickguard had the front point cut off and a notch in back to make room for the pickups rings. A three-way toggle was mounted on the upper treble bout. Controls included one volume and two tones, with the big plastic knobs. D-18Es are the rarest of these early Martin electrics, lasting only from the ’58 prototypes through 1959. These began with prototype #163746. Around 858 of these were produced.
Since this guitar is from Taylor it benefits from the company's quality consistency, which applies to all their instruments regardless of price points. While aesthetics and materials are more affordable, it gets the same level of attention to detail and quality as the more premium models. This gives budget limited players the chance to have a true Taylor acoustic that plays like a "dream", and not a watered down version that plays and feels different.
The HOF is one of the single best examples of a convergence of price and quality features that we've ever been able to find. While we can't mention pricing in this article, we'd recommend clicking through and checking the retail price on the HOF, then comparing it to the other reverb pedals in this list. As far as value, the HOF is nearly a perfect 10.
The one-piece maple neck was discontinued in 1959. From 1959 until summer 1962 the fingerboard was a piece of rosewood milled flat on the underside and glued to the maple. This has become known as a “slab fingerboard”. The slab fingerboard was approx 4.8 mm at its thickest point in the center of the neck under strings 3 and 4. From mid 1964–1979 the rosewood and maple were pre radiused and the fingerboard became known as curved, round laminate or “veneer”, having an even thickness across the neck unlike the previous slab type. This design change was made because Fender encountered problems with some of the necks twisting with the slab design and this new method of construction reduced this problem significantly. Maple fingerboards were available as a special order only. The following year the pickguard design changed to a 3-ply (4-ply on some colors) “multi-layer” with 11 screw holes. After purchasing Fender in 1965, CBS began to offer both a maple neck with a separate glued-on laminated maple fretboard in 1967 (known as a “maple cap” neck) and the rosewood fretboard over maple neck remaining the other neck option. Three years later, the CBS-owned Fender companies re-introduced the 1-piece maple neck after a 10-year absence. The primary reason for the switch to rosewood in 1959 was that Gibson guitars had rosewood fingerboards and customers wanted this. Also, the maple fingerboards discolored very quickly because the old nitro cellulose lacquer was not very durable and wore through on the fretboard very quickly.

Meanwhile, in Sepulveda, Thomas Organ, after importing JMI's British-made amps for a short period in 1964–65, began to produce a line of mostly solid-state amplifiers in the United States that carried the Vox name and cosmetic stylings. With some assistance from Dick Denney, these amps effectively paralleled JMI's own transistorised amplifiers but were different from the British and Italian made Voxes in sound and reliability. To promote their equipment, Thomas Organ built the Voxmobile, a Ford roadster dressed up to look like a Phantom guitar, complete with a Continental organ and several "Beatle" amplifiers. Despite the huge marketing effort, Thomas Organ's Vox products did much to damage the reputation of Vox in the North American market for many years. By 1968, the company had also marketed a line of Vox drum sets (actually made by a German drum company, known as Trixon), which included a kit that featured a conical-shaped bass (kick) drum, that looked more like a wastepaper basket left on its side, and another with a bass (kick) drum, that looked like a flat tire. Such gimmicks did not help sales, and by the early 1970s Vox's American presence was virtually nonexistent.
Do you have an old guitar that requires knowing how to repair a damaged guitar body? Read on and learn some neat tricks for repairing body damage on a guitar. Body damage on a guitar ruins the acoustics. Body damage on a guitar body really make it useless in the playing arena. If you are looking to bust out that old guitar but need some handy advice on how to repair some old damage, MadeMan has the fixes for you. This article will give you the fixes for larger damage and the annoying little nicks and teach you the way to repair them.
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Far as commercial recordings go, the oldest recording seems to be by the Hawaiian group Noelani Hawaiian Orchestra in 1933, which did four songs featuring the electric lap steel recorded on Victor records. However, the guitarist is unknown. Bob Dunn recorded electric lap steel in 1935, as part of the country swing group Milton Brown and His Musical Brownies. George Barnes recorded "Sweetheart Land" and "It's a Low-Down Dirty Shame" with Big Bill Broonzy in early 1938, followed a couple weeks later by  Eddie Durham with the Kansas City Five. Barnes played conventional guitar, not lap steel, so that's the first recording of a "conventional" electric guitar performance.
Package arrived in a timely manner and in good shape. Guitar is alright, built to look like a high-end model but closer inspection proves otherwise. I was fine with that but then had to remove the rear cover of the amp to reconnect a power wire that had become disconnected during shipping just to get power to the amp. After that I still had no sound through the amplifier. I checked the amp and cable with another guitar and all worked fine. That lead me to replace the guitar battery that came with the unit with a brand new one and the problem still persisted. After destringing the instrument and checking the interior connections I am convinced that the issue is in the pickup under the bridge or in the onboard electronics. Hopefully the replacement will work better but buyers should be cautious when ordering this product. The guitar really is beautiful for the price but certain quality control issues leave me wondering, especially once the Amazon product support expires on it.
I've had my Dorado, model #5986, serial #41 since 1972 and have used it for classical guitar study off and on since getting it as a gift. For what it is, the sound quality and playability are quite good. I'm donating it to a church rummage sale tomorrow (6/3/07) and will remember it fondly. I have an Alvarez Regency, similar to the Dorado, which lacks the sound character.
In general, this measurement is taken by measuring the distance between the bottom of the string and the top of the 6th fret while holding the string down at the 12th fret and the first fret. This is where the capo comes in handy - put it on the first fret so your hand is free to take the measurement. Using a feeler gauge of the desired height, in this example, 0.010, hold the low E string down at the 12th fret (with the capo on the first fret), and measure the distance between the top of the 6th fret and the bottom of the low E string. If the distance is greater than the desired relief, then you need to turn the truss rod clockwise (towards your right) as you're looking down the headstock towards the body of the guitar. If the distance is less than the desired amount, then you need to turn the truss rod counter-clockwise (towards your left) as you're looking down the headstock towards the body of the guitar. The basic rule is:
At Sam Ash, we maintain close relationships with the most prominent electric guitar brands to make sure that we always have the very best, latest selection of electric guitars in our inventory. We carry acclaimed electric guitar brands including Fender, Gibson, Paul Reed Smith, Ibanez, ESP, Gretsch, Dean, Epiphone, Yamaha, Schecter, and so much more! If you’re a discerning player or guitar aficionado looking to add a new guitar to your collection, be sure to check out all the fine, premium electric guitars featured in our exclusive Electric Guitars of Distinction collection.
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