A: If it looks like a ??? it almost certainly is a ??? Because the factory used to change the hardware at a whim there will be slight variations. This has, in most cases, nothing to do with a particular year but more to do with what happened to be to hand at the time. Some exceptions are pickups, pickguards, logos and headstocks. All I know is here on the website if you look hard enough. Also bear in mind that your guitar may have been modified at some stage in its life.
Note that we paid little attention to the power ratings of these amps. Judging a guitar amp by its power rating is usually a bad idea for many reasons. First, small increases in power have almost no effect on a guitar amp’s maximum volume. All other things being equal, doubling the power gets you only a 3-decibel increase in output, which is barely noticeable. To get double the perceived volume, you need 10 times as much power. A 100-watt amp might be twice as loud as a 10-watt amp, but a 20-watt amp will only be slightly louder than the 10-watt amp.

P good...So Fun...Like most console gamers, I have greatly enjoyed the "Arkham" Trilogy by Rocksteady Studios, I say that because I did not complete Arkham Origins (Dev by Warner Bros.), however I did beat that now infamouse Deathstrokeboss fight but after that the game felt very recylced and I told my self I would for next-gen Arkham installment by Rocksteady....I was a fan of all three Batman games that came out last gen. Arkham Knight changes the formula just enough to keep it fresh, along with amazing graphics (best water effects ever) and Dual Shock 4 controller options, I know I'll be playing this game for quite some time.


Rackmounts are most commonly used in recording studios and "front of house" live sound mixing situations, though professional musicians who play electric bass, electric guitar, or synthesizers may use them in place of stompboxes, to create a rackmounted head unit for their speaker cabinet(s). Rackmounts are controlled by knobs, switches or buttons on their front panel, and often by a MIDI digital control interface. During live performances, a musician can operate rackmounted effects using a "foot controller".[14] By setting up effects in a rack-mounted road case, this speeds up set-up and tear-down, because all of the effects can be connected together with patch cords (which can be left connected permanently) and all of the units can be plugged into a power bar. This means that a musician only needs to plug in the main power bar into AC Mains power and plug their instrument into the rack, and the last effect unit's output into their instrument amplifier and/or the PA system.
Alvarez has always been an under-rated brand. Beautiful workmanship, great sound- an excellent value for the money. I have one of the old six string "dove" guitars and a Yairi 12 string: both are close to forty years old and both still sound and look great and have never needed any repairs. I also have an old Martin six string. I have done the "blindfold" test with friends to choose the best sound between the alvarez and the martin - alvarez wins every time.
Some areas of the top’s lacquer finish have been peeled away from the long-ago removal of a few stickers and black electrical tape (the previous owner admitted to decorating the guitar with the black stripes in a tiger-theme). The guitar plays well, with a good neck angle and decent original frets. The guitar was just set up this past month by the pros at the renowned Guitar Factory in Orlando(http://www.guitarfactory.us/). It now plays great and needs nothing – they do great work! Pickups read 4.12 (neck) and 4.20 (bridge), and pots and switches work well. And, very important to note on vintage Gretsch guitars, there is NO binding rot. Also includes the Original Hard Shell Case.

My first recommendation is Epiphone. It is not just one of the best but it is the best guitar brand for beginners who are looking to buy a guitar to learn the ropes. I have included a few recommendations from this brand in this post. If you don’t know which one to buy and you are a beginner then buy one from this brand and you won’t go wrong for sure.
This is an amazing acoustic guitar for the new generation of guitarists that is quite presentable, especially in stage performances. It comes with a black border and has a free gig cover. The fret board is made from rosewood, which makes it quite easy to handle. It has incredible rigidity, with truss rods on both sides. It produces a considerably high quality of sound and is cost effective with prices ranging from about INR 4,999. This may sometimes be accompanied by free packing and shipping. Find more information on the site link below:
Compressor sometimes sounds good after distortion too, it helps with noise (compressors can be noisy and if put before overdrive then the distortion pedal makes the noise louder). Placing the compressor after distortion also increases your sustain (depending on the type and amount of distortion used!). It can sound darker if placed after as well - so it really is down to your ears and what you think sounds best! But I have mine first in the chain, before Fuzz as I don't often (ever?) use them together
Inspirational, motivational and light background tune with beautiful and atmospheric melody. Good production audio for the slideshow, presentation, youtube, advertising, business project, motivational and successful videos, inspiring moments, bright achievements, film scores. I used electric guitar, muted guitar, piano, staccato strings, bass, drums, Glock, bright pads.
The Playability of the guitar is outstanding, and has a thin, nicely rounded fast neck. It has a very musical tone, with a particular sweet spot in the upper end. The bluegrass G chord in the 1st position with G/6th string, D/5th strings sounds tremendous on this guitar. Both fingerpicking and strumming are effortless, and jazz chords are well articulated. The volume of the guitar is Loud, and should only increase over time as the top opens up.

Categories: Guitar manufacturing companies of the United StatesGuitar amplifier manufacturersManufacturing companies based in ChicagoManufacturing companies established in 1890Companies disestablished in 19681890 establishments in Illinois1968 disestablishments in IllinoisDefunct companies based in IllinoisMusical instrument manufacturing companies of the United States

Along with repairing instruments, we do complete restorations. Restorations often come in the way of family heirlooms and antique finds. After acquiring these instruments, you may think of them as only keepsakes, or something to put a shelf. We want to take these old instruments and restore them to their full use. There's nothing like playing on a violin or guitar that's been in the family for generations, and we want you to experience that.
In order to trigger these notes, a MIDI guitar controller is needed. Alot of work just to recreate what you can do on a real guitar. The only advantage to this technique, is the ability to take a MIDI track, creating this way, and substitute different guitar models to audition what might sound best. Also, the MIDI guitar track can also serve as an educational tool and how a part is performed.
As mentioned above, the versatility of multi-effects require complexity, and complexity requires longer learning curves. Thankfully, manufacturers have been continually improving the control interface and workflow of their units, so its never been easier to setup multi-effects units. Bigger display screens and good control positioning are important, but they also add to the overall size and bulk, so don't expect them on smaller units. Some even go as far as adding small LED scribble scripts to the footswitches, which removes the need to memorize or list down your presets.
Eventually, silicon transistors replaced germanium ones, helping to combat the inconsistent sounds of the germanium version (each circuit varies, and they were often affected by hot temperatures). Silicon completely changed the distortion, making it brighter, edgier, and more aggressive, as exemplified by the famous Electro-Harmonix Big Muff. The later introduction of the integrated circuit provided even more stability. Digital emulators can now universalize effects in a standalone unit. Materials don’t lie, however; when compared to their analog ancestors, the digital units lack the unique wildness of the germanium effect.
Having got the technicalities out of the way, it's time to look at recording methods. The traditional method, and still the most satisfactory in many cases, is to mic up a really good amplifier, but where this isn't appropriate, we have a choice of physical modelling guitar preamplifiers, complete guitar/pickup/amp modelling systems using Roland's VG series of products, or the slightly lower-tech approach of using analogue guitar recording preamps (solid state or valve). The latest option is to plug the guitar directly into the computer and use a software plug-in to handle the amp and speaker modelling, but I'll start at the beginning with the miking options.
I have owned a lot of amps over the years. I am also a dealer in music accessories. Please note that we do not sell these amps, so I am not endorsing and using something my shop sells. I recently have bought a couple of amps in a series (I bought one first and then bought another) and have been really impressed. The Vox AV series. http://www.voxamps.com/AVSeries
Certainly, the response to these innovative guitars at the time gave no indication. They tanked pretty quickly. No one has ever even seen a real Moderne, and players didn’t warm up to the Explorer and V until the 1970s. These models even inspired at least two new American brands – Hamer and Dean – both dedicated to making “improvements” on the Gibson originals. Japanese manufacturers also picked up on the appeal of these designs.

Finally, amidst all the considerations about tops and shapes and tones, don't underestimate the importance of choosing a guitar that you like. Choose one that feels comfortable, whether you are sitting or standing. Make sure you pick a guitar that responds to the way that you play, and don't settle on a "good" guitar if you don't like the way it sounds to your ears.
An equalizer (more often called EQ) is the device that allows you to adjust certain frequencies within your tone. The 3-band part implies that the EQ offers three points of control: bass, middle and treble. While 3-band is the standard, you can also have 2-Band EQ (which tend to offer just bass and treble), as well as 4-band EQ, 5-band EQ (low-bass, mid-bass, midrange, upper-midrange, treble) and upwards! Of course, the higher the band, the more versatility the amp offers. But 3-band tends to be the easiest to get to grips with.
Tube Is Probably Not The Way To Go – Don’t get me wrong, I am a fan of tube amps. There are a lot of great things about them, but in most cases, tube amps are a lot more expensive than solid-state amps. They are also harder to maintain and keep working. While you might want the tone of a tube amplifier, a chance is you can’t afford it as a beginner and neither do you have to afford it. As a beginner, at least I, did not have enough skills to make full use of tube amps so why spend money on a model that you cannot fully make use of? Apart from that, solid-state, especially practice ones are renowned for their durability. Whether you play it for hours on end or have a small accident you probably won’t damage it (unless you really try).
Though it’s a pretty sad end to what became a beloved brand and guitar, the Hi-Flier guitars and basses gained new life in the mid-‘90s, thanks to the aforementioned famous players. Today, they're again seeming to blossom in the vintage market. Only a few years ago, a Hi-Flier could be purchased on the cheap, but sales prices for these funky guitars have steadily been on the rise.
Choruses (Chori?) come in mono, stereo, and true stereo versions, and a good one will provide lots of control across the depth and speed of the modulation desired. In the case of a mono unit, the aggregate tone produced by the circuit is flattened and passed through a single jack, where as a stereo (sic) unit will pass wet and dry signals through different jacks. A true stereo chorus unit will produce a true stereo signal, where the effect is mixed properly into left and right channels.
In 1970, B.B. crossed over to the white rock audience with “The Thrill Is Gone.” In 1988, he virtually repeated the trick when he recorded “When Love Comes to Town” with U2. Always the humble student of the instrument, B.B. King became jazzier and better than ever as his life and career continued well into the new century. His loss earlier this year was deeply felt by the music community and, particularly, by the guitarist he influenced.
Maton established itself early on the Australian rock scene in the late Fifties, assisted by Australia’s tariff regime, which made imported guitars far more expensive than the local equivalents. Maton guitars were used by many well-known Australian pop and rock groups including Col Joye & The Joy Boys. The company also made one of the first sponsorship deals in Australian rock, supplying Melbourne band The Strangers with a full set of the distinctive ‘El Toro’ model guitars and basses (notable for their outlandish ‘horned’ body shape) while the group was working as the house band on the TV pop show The Go!! Show in the mid-Sixties.
The guitar builder for the giants of jazz, Ibanez now introduces the Artstar AS153 Semi-Hollow Electric Guitar, to answer the needs of the working professional player. Crafted from specially selected tone woods, this guitar features a bone nut, ebony fingerboard, hand-rolled frets and Ibanez's famous Super 58 pickups-capable of tone magic any place...  Click To Read More About This Product
LPM is an online music school. We teach a variety of instruments and styles, including classical and jazz guitar, piano, drums, and music theory. We offer high-quality music lessons designed by accredited teachers from around the world. Our growing database of over 350 lessons come with many features—self-assessments, live chats, quizzes etc. Learn music with LPM, anytime, anywhere!
And that's a wrap. If you're new to the pedal game, don't let anyone tell you that there are no rules. There are some very strict rules that apply if you want to sound professional, and these rules quickly reduce the amount of options down to very few, indeed. The honest and realistic among us will tell you the truth that there is a very firm effects pedal order you should connect your pedals in that you don't want to stray from unless you want to ruin your tone and appear to not know what you're doing. Guitar pedal order matters!

Electric guitars have been popular and prominent for decades. For quite some time, being a left-handed musician was considered a hindrance and artists often had to make due with a right handed guitar. Now, there are plenty of fantastic options for lefties so they can make their mark on the music world. As a left-handed musician you probably know that many legendary artists were lefties too- Paul McCartney, Jimi Hendrix, Kurt Cobain, and Dick Dale are just a few examples of musicians who paved the way for up and coming lefties to seriously rock out. Electric guitars are perhaps the most notable and distinctive instrument in pop and rock music. Heavily used on stage and in the recording studio, the electric guitar provides some of the most memorable parts of a song or tune.

Although the electric bass was invented in the 1930s by Paul Tutmarc, his new instrument did not sell well. It was not until Leo Fender developed the Fender Precision electric bass in 1950 that this new instrument took off in the marketplace. Unlike the upright bass, a solid-body electric bass does not produce acoustic sound from a hollow body; while an upright bass player often benefits from using a bass amp, a bass amp is a necessity for an electric bass player.
What was listed above was just the tip of the iceberg, and many many other pedals are waiting for you: why not check out our huge guitar pedal selection, by clicking here? You will find Multi-effects (a clever way to have all your effects in a single and practical format), looper pedals (in case you want to record a short phrase and start playing over it and layer some guitar parts), fuzz pedals (made famous by the good ol’ Jimi Hendrix and many others), Phaser, Flanger etc.
The final stages of on-board sound-shaping circuitry are the volume control (potentiometer) and tone control (a low-pass filter which "rolls off" the treble frequencies). Where there are individual volume controls for different pickups, and where pickup signals can be combined, they would affect the timbre of the final sound by adjusting the balance between pickups from a straight 50:50.
Guitar is well made. Sounds awesome. The overall height of the strings (in relation to the frets) were not bad. However, it needed to be setup. After having the guitar setup at my local shop, it is so much easier to play (don't have to press as hard on the strings). The Guitar gig bag that comes with the bundle offers zero padding. The Tuner works well, however, since the guitar comes with a built-in tuner, you don't need a separate one. I have not used the dvd that came with it. I use a different set of instructional dvds (purchased separately). Overall a great guitar. Definitely recommend it.
In 1931, Martin reintroduced the dreadnought with X-bracing and two years later gave it a modified body shape to accommodate a 14-fret neck, and it quickly became their best-selling guitar. The rest of the industry soon followed[citation needed], and today the “dreadnought” size and shape is considered one of the “standard” acoustic guitar shapes, iconic for its use in a wide variety of musical genres.
While the HSS Bullet Stratocaster isn’t available in a left-handed model, the similar, somewhat more costly Affinity Series Stratocaster is available in a left-handed version. This guitar differs from our top pick in that it uses slightly higher quality of parts and has a higher quality finish (based on our experience with the Affinity Series Jazzmaster); it has a single-coil pickup instead of a humbucker in the bridge position (which will be noisier and also brighter-sounding); and it has a vibrato bar.
The Smiths' guitarist was a guitar genius for the post-punk era: not a showboating soloist, but a technician who could sound like a whole band. As a kid studying Motown records, Johnny Marr would try to replicate not just guitar riffs but piano and strings too, all with his right hand. His voluptuous arpeggios – often played on a chiming Rickenbacker with incredible flow and detailing – were every bit as essential to the Smiths' signature sound as Morrissey's baritone. And he was a tireless explorer: For 1983's "This Charming Man," Marr dropped knives onto a '54 Telecaster, a revelatory incident that Radiohead may have been alluding to in their Smiths-inspired "Knives Out." "He was a brilliant rhythm player, rarely played solos, so full of sounds," said Radiohead's Ed O'Brien – part of an entire generation of British guitarists who took their cues from Marr. "I've been in the studio with him, and there's nothing he cannot do on guitar," said Oasis' Noel Gallagher. "The man's a fuckin' wizard."
Modifying this guitar is also quite easy and you can add things to it to make it a lot better. Overall, it is just the right value for your money item to have. Again, if you are an intermediate or expert level player then avoid this guitar. If you are a beginner & looking for the lowest price electric guitar for beginners clicks the button on this one. With the price you pay, I am pretty sure you will be impressed by the performance of this guitar. Here is the link to buy this product or know more about it –
The simplest tone control is the one inside practically every guitar. That knob is a single potentiometer set up as in Figure 1. The signal from the pickup coil goes through the internal impedance of the pickup itself, then to the output jack. The capacitor C and resistor R are in series to ground from the guitar signal. C shunts signals above some cutoff frequency to ground. R prevents this by resisting the signal flow to ground. As R is made smaller, more and more treble is lost. However, the bass level remains at the same volume as it was before the treble cut.
Used as a send effect, a resonant filter can be used much more creatively than as an insert.You get very different results from your filtering depending on where you put the filter in the signal chain. To introduce some real movement into delay lines, for example, place sweeping low-pass filters before the delay. You then get the movement of the dry sound contrasting with the movement in the delay line. If both the filter sweep and the delay lines are tempo-sync'd, you can create interesting effects where the filter appears to be moving up and down at the same time.
The fact that there are a lot of us belies a truth about learning guitar: It’s kind of frustrating. Unless you’re moving to guitar from some other kind of musical training, there’s a lot to adjust to right out of the gate. While a piano can sound reasonably good if you simply press a key, playing that same note on a guitar requires you to hold both hands the right way, situate the guitar properly, and make sense out of holding a pick.
One app I can recommend for playing these SoundFonts on smartphones or tablets is bs-16i from bismark.  Large SoundFount files like Nice-Keys-* listed at the top of this page have been tested and run perfectly on newer iPads with 3gb of Ram or more. For iPads with 2gb (Air2) it is best to limit the SoundFont size to around 600mb. For older devices try SoundFonts around 300mb.
While Line 6 is probably the best known high-volume preset modeling amp brand, Peavey isn’t far behind – and truly rivals the offerings of Line 6, both in quality and quantity. What’s especially intriguing about this particular amp is that it allows you to choose not just the amp models and a wealth of applicable effects, but that it gives you the power to choose the type of instrument you’re plugging into it – thusly shaping the rest of the options accordingly. Whether you play guitar, acoustic guitar, or bass, this amp can change it sound to suit the instrument. And that’s a lot more than other competitors’ amps have to offer. It also features a tap tempo, USB connectivity, a headphone jack, and more.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Top Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Construction: D-Shape - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Pearl - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Hardware: Black, Grover Tuners - Pickups: Seymour Duncan Live Wire - Pickup Configuration: Dual - String Instrument Finish: Charcoal Burst, Vintage Burst
SOLD OUT : in AMAZING Top vintage condition, Plays with ease with nice low action. Solid Sitka Spruce Top amazing Brazilian Jacaranda Rosewood back - sides -Fingerboard - bridge & headstock overlay, bindings are figured and flamed maple wow what a classic beauty. if you have been thinking of getting the late model Glen Fry F360 for $1700+ think again...OWN Vintage , matured aged exotic woods is what make the greatest sounding guitars this baby has it at a great price.. buy the new Tak and 2 years later its worth %%% less, not these exotic tone woods vintage guitars they are going up...mark my words you will do well with this baby... in top all round condition really well cared for and maintained. This guitar is in the upper percentile quality & workmanship just about as good as it gets and dare I say it ...this will give a Martin a real good run for its money folks... Get this RARE beauty before she's gone.. you will not be disappointed. Email Joe at JVGuitars@gmail.com .
As the ’70s dawned, the market for electric guitars began to revive, significantly but conservatively. Gibson retracted its hopes for the flagship SG and reintroduced the Les Paul in ’68. Fender, likewise, was moving away from Jazzmasters and Jaguars, concentrating on its earlier successes, the Stratocaster and Telecaster. Paced by Shiro Arai of Aria, who’d been inspired by the reissue of the Les Paul (a “copy” of the ’50s classic), Japanese manufacturers were beginning to explore making copies of popular American designs, and the “copy era” was getting underway.
Hook, who covered the economics of running a nightclub in his 2009 book, “The Hacienda: How Not To Run a Club”, predicted: “The guitar companies are going to restructure and get smaller. The true artist in the company — the guy who builds a guitar by carving it out of a piece of wood hopefully will be the one that will be celebrated, not the middle management.”

Some multi-effects processors have other onboard features. Yes, you can run your guitar sound through scores of effects, but many processors even offer modeling that allows you to replicate scores of digitally modeled guitar sounds with a huge range of pedal effects and also recreate the tones of classic combo amplifier and head/cabinet sounds. In addition, some processors give you the ability to loop and delay; some have drum patterns, built-in tuners, recording software, presets as well as user-programmable effects, built-in expression pedals and phrase trainers that record a passage you can play back at varying speeds for learning and practice. Many multi-effects processors now have USB connectivity and you will also find that almost all have ¼” (instrument cable connectors) and XLR (microphone connectors) inputs and outputs. Unlike simple effects pedals, all these features are packed into one compact unit.
This company slowly merged into Hoshino/Tama but prior to their unification, produced instruments with the Star badge, mainly drums. They also produced guitars, including the infamous Zim-Gar badged electric and acoustic guitars. Over time, drum production was segmented to Pearl, while guitar contracts were taken up by Tama. Zim-Gar production was relatively short, as these were budget guitars made for K-mart between 1962 and 1968.
It wasn't long before Southland went to hell in a hand basket. I would like to acknowledge the professionalism of people like the late Lee Ingber who was quality minded enough to know that junk will ruin any business. It's too bad that the last owners of Southland never learned that, even as their company faded into the sunset of the graveyard of greed.
If you’re looking to get this pedal as a first in your arsenal, then don’t worry at all, you can keep it simple with the offered Reverb dial as it offers high-quality effects which you can tune to your liking. This astonishing “stomp-box” by TC covers guitarist’s needs who possess different ranges of experience, all available at a fantastic startup price.
Why We Liked It - The price on amazon is undoubtedly pretty high, which means that this Gibson is going to be for serious players and professionals only. You'll need to make sure you have gig bags or a guitar case in hand for protection! However, if you’re looking for the absolute best that the electric acoustic market has to offer right now, then there probably aren’t many contenders to the J-200’s crown.
With a typical Strat single coil pickup and assuming an instrument cable capacitance of 500pF, 250K tone pot, 0.022uF cap, guitar plugged in to a 1Meg input, the range of the tone control is roughly from 6.0kHz -3dB (tone fully clockwise – with a resonant peak of +7.4dB at 3.9kHz) to 950Hz (tone fully anti-clockwise – with a resonant peak of +4.5dB at 594Hz). These figures vary from pickup to pickup and depending on the instrument cable capacitance.
One of the things that initially surprised me was that coincident dual-mic techniques, where the two mics are placed as close as possible to each other to minimise phase cancellation between them, actually appear to be more commonly used than single-mic techniques. John Leckie explains: "There's an amazing difference in the sound and colouration you get from adjusting the balance of each of the mics, and you can get radically different textures depending on your mix of the two."
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The Science of Electric Guitars and Guitar Electronics considers the electric guitar and related accessories from a scientific point of view. The majority of books about electric guitars try to avoid using mathematics when describing the scientific phenomena related to the electric guitar. However, mathematics is an invaluable tool in the design processes of all areas of technology, even when designing musical instruments and audio electronics. This book presents simple mathematical methods for modelling the electric guitar as a signal source for electric circuits such as effect pedals and amplifiers. In addition to modelling the electronics inside the electric guitar, the principles of operation of some vintage guitar effects and amplifier circuits are explained and analysed using systematic methods of circuit analysis. The book is intended for everyone who is interested in the design and analysis of basic analogue electronics used in the electric guitar and guitar-related accessories. The presented topics cover the whole signal chain from the guitar strings to the loudspeaker. Therefore, a solid foundation is established for creating own designs in guitar electronics using basic components of analogue electronics.
We are going to start with a Fender amplifier. This Mustang I V2 is a 20-watt combo amp that has won over hearts of a lot of players because of its ease of use and versatility. With one channel that has 24 presets and eighteen amp models you won’t be scrambling for diversity. Apart from that, of course, you get some of the major controls like Gain, Volume, Treble, Bass, Master, Preset Select, Modulation Select, Delay/Reverb Select, Save, Exit and Tap Tempo. The size and price of this model really do not do it justice (I mean, don’t make it more pricey but still). You also will find that this amp features USB connectivity, chromatic tuner and black textured vinyl covering with silver grille cloth that accentuates the simple and elegant look of this model. While 20-watt, as you might know, is not much (unless it’s a tube amplifier) this baby is pretty great if you want it for practice.
Smaller speaker cabinets with one, two, or four speakers, are more commonly used than the 8x10", because while the 8x10" cabinet is able to produce huge volume and powerful bass tone, the cabinets are very heavy and hard to transport. The 2x10" and 4x10" designs are popular for bassists who need less stage volume and an easier-to-transport cabinet to take to rehearsals and gigs. Some bassists own two or more smaller cabinets, such as two 4x10" cabinets. This way, a bassist playing a stadium concert on one day can bring both of her 4x10" cabs, but then if she is playing a nightclub show the next day, or going to rehearsal, she only needs to bring one 4x10" cab.
(Book). Backbeat's successful Handbook format applied to the world's most popular instrument. The Electric Guitar Handbook is the latest entry in Backbeat's best-selling handbook series, combining a two-part book and an audio CD in a practical lay-flat binding for ease of reference when playing. Part one of the book examines how different types of electric guitars are made, and why varying construction methods influence the way guitars sound. It also looks at the role of various pieces of guitar hardware, including pick-ups, tremolo set-ups, and bridges. Part two is a comprehensive, user-friendly course in playing the electric guitar, from the basics of posture and hand positioning to music and tab reading and advanced performance. Newly written exercises presented in the book and also on the accompanying CD take the learner through each step in the process, covering styles including rock, country, blues, soul/funk, indie/alternative, and metal. Author Rod Fogg also offers practical advice on everything from simple scales to complex chords, alongside short features introducing key performers and styles.

Description: Guitar Type: Bass - Body: Ash - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Nut Width: 42.5mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: Medium - # of Strings: 4 - Scale Length: 34" (86cm) - Headstock: 2+2 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome - Pickups: CAP Double Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Natural, Black
“As a general rule, the more powerful the magnet the more high frequencies you’ll get, and also the more low frequencies as well. The high frequencies don’t really need a lot of power to drive them, but the bass frequencies do. However, it’s also down to the coil windings you use and the gauge of wire. So it's not just the magnet that’s responsible for the change.”

Ukuleles were in highest production from 1916 to the 1930's, though still manufactured in quantity until 1965. Production quantities during some periods were as great as Martin guitars. Martin ukes are considered to be the best for craftsmenship and sound. The Koa wood models are more collectible than mahagony models. The fancier style 5 models are worth more than plainer styles 0 to 3. All sizes are collectible.


After the introduction of the Fender Stratocaster Ultra series in 1989, ebony was officially selected as a fretboard material on some models (although several Elite Series Stratocasters manufactured in 1983/84 such as the Gold and Walnut were available with a stained ebony fretboard). In December 1965 the Stratocaster was given a broader headstock with altered decals to match the size of the Jazzmaster and Fender Jaguar.

With a delightful dreadnought shape, this steel-string acoustic is made with a pressure-tested solid cedar top, with solid mahogany back and sides, all with a semi-gloss custom polished finish that allows the guitar to sing – and sing it does! The tonewoods combine to deliver a rich and bright sounding instrument, with plenty of warmth that would please the most demanding of guitarists.
With electric specifically, it's important to ask what genre's of music do you want to play and who are your influences. A humbucker pick-up found in Les Pauls and SGs sound MUCH different than single-coils found in Stratocasters and Telecasters. If you like the sound of your guitar heroes, chances are you will like playing through similar gear. Again, go with my BUDGET, FEEL and SOUND trifecta!
For any venue, it's important to bring along the right amp. A huge amp in a tiny club is not only overkill; it's also extra setup work that you can avoid altogether with a smaller combo amp. On the flipside, a little amp in a big theatre could mean that some of the audience won't even hear you. Take your time deciding what the best option is for you.
The guitar features what is called a Super Strat shape. In other words, it is an evolution of the Stratocaster body style. Ibanez used mahogany as the main tonewood and maple for the neck. This guitar comes with two finish options. You can have the blackberry sunburst or the light violin sunburst. In terms of pickups, we have a set of two Ibanez-made passive humbuckers which pack a decent amount of heat. They handle distortion great but also sound very decent on a clean channel too.
Speaking of overdrive and distortion, I come from the slightly less-is-more school. I recently heard Eddie Van Halen say he likes to crank things until they’re ready to explode, and then backs them down just a hair. I dig that way of thinking, and it applies whether you get your distortion from a pedal, a cranked NMV (non-master-volume) amp, or an amp with a more modern preamp-gain circuit.
In May 1965 Keith Richards used a Gibson Maestro FZ-1 Fuzz-Tone to record "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction".[24] The song's success greatly boosted sales of the device, and all available stock sold out by the end of 1965.[25] Other early fuzzboxes include the Mosrite FuzzRITE and Arbiter Group Fuzz Face used by Jimi Hendrix,[26] the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff Pi used by Hendrix and Carlos Santana,[27] and the Vox Tone Bender used by Paul McCartney to play fuzz bass on "Think for Yourself" and other Beatles recordings.[28]
An instant classic, and an easy guitar song that offers a simple, repeated section of just a handful of dyads, or two-note chords. It is one of the most recognizable guitar riffs of all time and it’s great for beginners to learn. The entire section is played with just two notes per chord, and it’s a progression that keeps your fretting hand in just a single section of the neck. Once you learn this riff, it’ll be tough to stop, since it sounds so good, and it’s easy to play. 

"I've always thought that most people mic amps too closely," comments Alan Parsons. "They supposedly make up with an ambient mic, but I much prefer to find a mic position that works and process that, rather than mix in too much ambience." Despite Parsons' disapproval, though, a lot of the engineers I researched divulged that they use additional ambient mics to capture more of the sound of the room in which the guitar cab was recorded.
Standard versions and collectable versions of the 4003 have included the 4003s (special)(discontinued 1995) a 4003 similar to the 4001s with dot neck markers, no body binding based loosely upon the original Rickenbacker basses and fitted with 4001 pick ups. 1985-2002 versions of 4003 and 4003s were available with black hardware option and black binding. Other later special editions have included 4003 Blue Boy, 4003 CS (Chris Squire) similar to 4001 CS Limited edition specials include the Blackstar, the Shadow Bass, the Tuxedo and 4003 Redneck.

The whole point of having a DIY guitar kit is to build a guitar that you like, so make sure that you get one with you're preferred shape and profile. Kits with classic guitar body shapes are the safest choice, as evidenced by their continued popularity in the market. But don't limit yourself with just the familiar, spend time looking at other designs to see if you're missing out on something cooler, something that better matches your personality.
As the first blues guitarist to pick up an electric guitar and play single-string solos in the late Thirties, T-Bone Walker didn’t just lay down the foundation for electric blues and rock and roll—he also built the first three or four floors. John Lee Hooker credits T-Bone Walker with making the electric guitar popular, claiming that everybody tried to copy T-Bone’s sound.
I have owned a Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier for 5 years now and couldn't be happier! Granted, the amp took a long time to dial in my perfect tone, but it was a good way to familiarize yourself with the amp. If you want cleans, crunch, distortion, and a wall of gain that is big enough to destory small islands than this is the perfect amp. Not to mention, the customer service is out of this world! About a month after purchasing the amp Mesa Boogie called to make sure everything was okay and I was enjoying the amp. They also ask you to take a questionnaire on how the sales person performed. Great company, Best amps.
I use a cheap zoom effects box (actually because it has a fabulous digital tuner built-in) and if I want to play at home I plug that into the stereo. Don't have it any louder than you would a CD etc .. (ok maybe a bit ;-) ) gives you the flexibility of all the effects sounds plus because it's stereo (assuming you hve the speakers a few feet apart) you get that feeling of it being "large" when really it's not that loud.
When I first plugged it in, it made a sound like it was "fretting out" if you put a bar at the twelfth fret position. That's a pretty good feat, given that the guitar has no frets. It turned out that someone had cranked up the pole pieces for extra gain, but had cranked them so far that the strings made contact with them when the guitar was played. A quick tweak right in the store with a jeweler's screwdriver sorted them out and revealed the lovely vintage sound of this little beastie. Supro developed a neat strings-through pickup system with staggered pole pieces that this guitar features.
Ken Rosser picked the Spider Classic 15 as his favorite of the amps we tested, saying, “I think the effects on the Line 6 sounded the best. It gives you a nice range of tone options. The clean tones stay clean even at loud volume, which a lot of these can’t do. One caveat is that, when you switch the amp sound, it changes the way all the knobs work, so the sounds can really jump out at you.” Fred Sokolow liked the Line 6 in general, saying, “I could pretty much figure out what to do with it, but I could figure out the Fender more easily.”
mid-1939 Popscicle bracing on D body sizes. See the above picture for what the popsicle or T-6 or upper transverse graft brace is. The popsicle brace was added to the underside of the top of the guitar, below the fingerboard. The brace was added to help prevent top cracks alongside the fingerboard. Since the first D body size was made in about 1934, problems obviously came about and Martin added the brace by 1939. The brace does not appear in pre-1939 Martin D-sizes, but transitioned in around 1939, and is present in all 1940 and later D models. Without the popsicle brace, the top is attached only by the strength of the spruce fibers and a 1/2" x 2" glue area where the top overlays the soundhole #1 brace. With the popsicle brace there is an additional 1" x 2" glue surface directly under the fingerboard. Unfortunately the popsicle brace can deaden the sound of the upper bout area of the soundboard, and the popsicle brace doesn't always prevent the top from cracking along the fingerboard either. As people search for why the old Martins sound so good, they examine every aspect of them and the popsicle brace usually enters the conversation. Here's some data on popsicle braces:
This set has all three of the best pianos available in a size that can be handled by most modern devices devices (PCs or recommend iPhone 8/iPad Pro). Needlessly long samples have been shortened but looping only happens at almost inaudible trailing ends of samples (many after 20s).  If you are looking for a quality set with different piano types to choose from then this is the one. This set is already included in the Nice-Keys-CompletePlus and Nice-Keys-Extreme.
Fantastic article. I pretty much do all of my recording nowadays through my AxeFX II. Paired with a good set of studio monitors, it’s perfect for the at-home musician who does not want to sacrifice quality. I have a nice Tone King amp and pedalboard with nice boutique pedals like the Strymon Timeline, but when recording it’s so much easier to plug the AxeFX into my laptop. I don’t have to fuss about with mics or room treatment. Also, having three big dogs, it’s great to not worry that they’ll start barking in unison at the mailman when I’m almost finished with a “perfect” take.
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Breedlove is a semi-recently founded guitar manufacturer that has a main focus of acoustic guitars. Breedlove doesn’t have a massive following like some other brands, so it can be difficult trying to find one to test before purchasing. Breedlove tends to evolve their guitars and tries to push the world of acoustic guitars forward. Their Oregon Concerto Myrtlewood acoustic, for example, manages to produce a big, refined sound and the notes are more resonant. This is due to their tapered myrtlewood body and smaller sound-hole. The body shape is also very important as it’s part of the reason they sound so good and it’s even comfortable to play. All of their guitars are very high-quality and work well for all fingering styles and genres of music. If you want a really great acoustic, you really can’t go wrong with Breedlove.

Augustino Lo Prinzi Guitars - Augustine Lo Prinzi has made more than 10,000 guitars and just started his 49th year as a guitar maker! Renowned throughout the instrument making field, Augustino LoPrinzi's first instruments were classic guitars. As his career progressed he constructed many types of string instruments, numbering in the thousands : mandolins, lutes, violins, and steel string guitars, to list but a few. Now he is applying these years of wisdom to his first love, the classic guitar, which began his journey into instrument making.


Vox is a musical equipment manufacturer founded in 1947 by Thomas Walter Jennings in Dartford, Kent, England. The company is most famous for making the Vox AC30 guitar amplifier, used by The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks, The Yardbirds, Queen, Dire Straits, U2 and Radiohead, the Vox Continental electric organ, and a series of innovative electric guitars and bass guitars. Since 1992, Vox has been owned by the Japanese electronics firm Korg.
An Octaver is a cool little effect that will tune your original sound several octaves up or down in pitch. This effect can give you the ability to fill up the bass frequencies with your guitar. You can often see Jack White using this effect when he plays live with only one other drummer. He will turn on his octaver at certain points of the song to play bass lines.

Straight away, we have to talk about how good this guitar sounds. Lots of low-end and mid-range acoustics tend to do one tonal area well, but the Martin DRS2 does an awesome job all round. It’s got deep, booming lows, while the highs remain nice and crisp. And of course, all of this is available acoustically or electrically in the dreadnought cutaway acousticelectric guitar.
So to conclude, you don’t have to spend much money on a beginner/practice amp to have a tremendous amount of fun with it. Be sure to check out MusicGoRound stores near you for amazing deals on used practice/beginner amps. The store employees can help pick out the amp that fits your budget and your needs. Odd are that your practice/beginner amp will wind up becoming an old and dear friend to you over the years. Enjoy every minute with it!
Me got a Dorado resonator guitar, very nice dark walnut finish with white binding on edges. I bought it in 1985 but assume the guitar is mid-70's. Incidentally the neck has a very "japanese" feel to it. I was told by a guitar dealer that these particular instruments may have been ( at least partially) manufactured in Japan, then possibly had their resonators fitted in USA. They were DISTRIBUTED by Gretsch, in Europe at any rate. Mine is a nice guitar but not nearly as loud as most resonators.
Therefore, if you are a beginner that is still struggling to find a product that comes shipped with other accessories, you should really pay attention to this model. Besides, although this is a full-sized guitar, previous buyers of the model have stated that the unit is not particularly heavy. Consequently, it can be used by teens without worrying about its size and weight.
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In fact, these units were specifically designed to be used by the novices that want to learn the particularities of playing the guitar.Nevertheless, they are also purchased by veteran players because of their quality and maneuverability. As cost-efficient units, these guitars are a great investment, and you should consider them before placing any orders.
We spent 45 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top choices for this wiki. One of the best things about an electric guitar is its portability. Most times, however, you can't say that about the amps you need to go along with them. Fortunately, these mini amplifiers have come along, developed by the top names in full-size models, and offer incredible sound quality in an exceedingly portable package. We've ranked these micro monsters by tonal character, power, and control. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best mini guitar amplifier on Amazon.

At £499, the MBC-1 is designed to hit a completely different price point to the Muse genius's full-fat Manson models, and although still designed by both Matt and Hugh, it's made in Indonesia by guitar-making giant Cort. Price aside, a quick strum lets you know this is a Manson through and through: it rings like a bell, the sort of acoustic response you'd expect from a quality guitar, but not always at this price. In style, the MBC-1 is a pretty accurate repro of the instruments used by Matt. That big upper shoulder won't be to everyone's taste, but in playing position, it's not only lightweight (3.52kg) but with forearm and ribcage contours, it fits like a glove. And the bolt-on maple neck feels superb, too, with a deep C profile and sloping shoulders that tell your hand it's thinner in depth than it actually is. Unusual at this price, too, is the compound radius fingerboard, which flattens out as you move up the neck; with tidy jumbo - but not over-tall - frets, it's a fast, fluid player, as well, which makes it one of the best electric guitars for hard-rock players. Pickup-wise, we have a fairly hot Alnico-powered humbucker at the bridge and a single coil at the neck. Along with a master volume, tone and three-way pickup selector, the upper shoulder also holds a kill button for stutter effects.


The materials and the methods of classical guitar construction may vary, but the typical shape is either modern classical guitar or that historic classical guitar similar to the early romantic guitars of France and Italy. Classical guitar strings once made of gut are now made of such polymers as nylon, with fine wire wound about the acoustically lower (bass side) strings.

In 2005, after two years of research and development utilizing Jimmy Page’s actual guitar, Gibson Custom Shop issued a limited run of Jimmy Page Signature guitars based on Jimmy Page’s No. 1 1959. This time, Gibson worked directly from Jimmy Page’s actual guitar, which he lent to Gibson for the project. The guitar featured just one push-pull pot, just like Page’s No. 1, which reversed the phase of the pickups in the up position, which in Page’s own words gave “a close approximation to the Peter Green sound.” Gibson also went to great lengths to replicate the accuracy of the pickups, creating two custom pickups, which were available only in this guitar. The pickups were based on the Burstbucker vintage-style pickups, but featured stronger Alnico magnets and slightly higher output than the other Burstbuckers, as well as slightly higher treble response, which accurately reproduced the sound of the pickups in Page’s guitar. Gibson also replicated the neck profile, which was heavily modified prior to Page acquiring the guitar, and the Grover tuners that Page favored.
Be prepared for each practice session. That means, know what you learned in your previous session and whether you're satisfied you accomplished your goal for that session. If you still need time on your previous session's goal, spend another session on it. Don't move on until you have it nailed. So important. If you feel like you're not making progress with a particular technique or concept, I'm always here to help.

For several years now Godin have been producing some of the most sonically versatile guitars available with their combination of regular pickups, piezo pickups and synth pickups built into their higher end guitars. Note that the synth pickups are 13-Pin and compatible with the Roland GR series guitar synths - if you want MIDI you have to first plug into a Roland synth then take the MIDI out from the synth.


The Hawaiians are likewise hard to identify. One looks to be similar to the later Teisco EG-7L, with a Gibson sort of shape and a pair of offset rocket shapes on either side of the pickup which house roller wheels for volume and tone. A second appears to have a rounded body similar to a Rickenbacker frying pan, looking perhaps like the later Teisco EG-K. This had the same slotted pickup as the J-1, and a single volume control. Finally, there’s an unidentified eight-string lap with an elongated sort of rectangular body and an elevated fingerboard. This had a volume and tone with white knobs, and the tuners were behind the head, rather than sticking straight up, as on later eight-strings.
An excerpt: “The Dobro brand name has been identified with resonator guitars since 1929 and is currently owned by Gibson Guitar Corporation. Despite its registered trademark status, the Dobro name has at times been used generically to refer to woodbodied instruments with 1) an aluminum cone or “resonator” mounted so that the cone opens toward the top of the instrument and 2) an 8-armed spider assembly supporting the bridge.”
If you have a little bit more to spend than what you pay for the Epiphone LP Special II you might want to consider the Epiphone Les Paul 100. It has a mahogany body with a maple top, mahogany neck and rosewood fingerboard. It’s got solid tuners and hardware, a 3-way switch and two tone and volume knobs. It’s slimmer and therefore much lighter than the Gibson Les Paul. The Epiphone LP 100 feels and plays good. It’s a reliable and durable guitar. A great choice for rock and blues!
The Teisco J-1 was a natural maple-topped guitar with a single pickup near the adjustable wooden bridge, a large affair with a metal cover with six slots parallel to the strings and two round bulbs on either side, very space-age! The stop tail was probably rounded, allowing strings to pass through the body, and was covered with a square metal plate. A small pickguard sat between the pickup and the neck. A volume and tone control sat on another little piece of plastic down on the lower treble bout. Knobs were white plastic knurled with a silver ring around the top.
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Behold anther complete package from Les Paul guitar Epiphone series of electric guitar, with everything that you need to start playing right from the onset. For every beginner looking for that perfect set, this guitar they can rely on, not just for its sound quality, but also for the fact that it is a complete package offering lots practicality in terms of mastering the act of strumming and sound generation.
Two-point rocking tremolo or fulcrum vibrato: Features individual string saddles that are adjustable for intonation and height. These are mounted on a bridge that rocks on two bolts mounted on the guitar top. The bridge has a broad perpendicular plate that extends through the body of the guitar. This free-floating plate is attached to the inside of the guitar by springs that match the tension of the strings. Locking tuners, which clamp down on the strings, help keep tuning more stable.
Delay/echo effects can sound pretty good when plugged directly into an amp’s input (See Example 3, above)—hell, the Edge built a whole career out of doing just that—but if you want absolutely clean, pristine delay and echo effects with no distortion, the effects loop is the only way to go. Reverb effects should always be patched into the effects loop (See Example 4, below) unless you always play through the cleanest of clean sounding amps. Overdriven or distorted reverb just ain’t very pretty, and it can destroy any semblance of clarity or definition and smear your sound like the ketchup on a baby’s face when it’s trying to master the fine art of eating a messy pile of French fries.
Epiphone offers one for every guitarist out there and has a product lineage featuring electric, acoustic and other options. One of its famed options among the acoustic line is the Les Paul Ukulele, a true vintage piece. The guitar has been termed as the market leader in the acoustic guitar field. It comes with mahogany body facilitated by top laminated, rosewood fingerboard and maple top. The tone of the same is truly resonating.
In 1964, The Rolling Stones‘ Keith Richards obtained a 1959 sunburst Les Paul.[19] The guitar, outfitted with a Bigsby tailpiece, was the first “star-owned” Les Paul in Britain and served as one of the guitarist’s prominent instruments through 1966. Because he switched guitars often enough in that period (using models ranging from the Epiphone semi-hollow to various other guitars made by Guild and Gibson), Richards is sometimes forgotten as an early post-1960 Les Paul player.[20][21] In 1965, Eric Clapton also recognized the rock potential of the late 1950s Les Paul guitars (particularly the 1958–1960 Standard sunburst models), and gave them wide exposure. He began using Les Pauls because of the influence of Freddie King and Hubert Sumlin, and played a 1960 Standard on his groundbreaking album Blues Breakers – John Mayall – With Eric Clapton. At the same time, Mike Bloomfield began using a 1954 Les Paul goldtop he apparently purchased in Boston while touring with the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, and recorded most of his work on the band’s East-West album with that guitar. A year later, he traded it to guitarist/luthier Dan Erlewine for the 1959 Standard with which he became most identified. Concurrently, such artists such as Peter Green, Mick Taylor, Jeff Beck andJimmy Page began using the late-1950s Les Paul Standards.

My epi is very nice (Almost like a gibson for 1/3 of a gibson price) and obviously, my Jackson is far superior than my other guitars. But I'm just have mid end ibanez guitars and they are very good guitars. The high end ibanez are awesome and worth less than high ends of other brands in most cases having with the same quality (or superior in very cases).
Maton JB6 is a 1970s guitar manufactured by Maton. It features a thin solid body, short scale 24 fret design, two humbucking pickups, two tone controls, one volume, in/out phase toggle for bridge pickup and standard three way pickup selector toggle switch. The body has double cutaways, set neck and heavy metal base plate supporting a stop piece and bridge for increased sustain.
Before I recommended it to him, I went to my local GC and played one through some headphones. I thought it sounded pretty good - and certainly outgunned my Pocket Pod for pure functionality. Is this (or something like it) the be all and and all of tone? Of course not. But this (or something like it) can provide all sorts of options for practicing while leaving your neighbor (or spouse!) in peace.
Playing an amp with an instrument you don’t own is like choosing a girlfriend by dating her mom. Bring your main guitar with you, even if you think the store stocks a similar model. An unfamiliar guitar may have a brighter sound than your personal ax, and an amp that sounded sparkly and lively in the store may actually be dull as Anne Heche on Quaaludes when you get it home.

The output jack is where you plug in your guitar lead. These are generally 1/4″ and transfer the signal created by your pickups to your guitar amp. They are usually connected from a ground wire and input wire. When the lead is plugged into the output jack the signal can be transferred. These can often be a source of trouble and need to be kept tight to reduce noise.
Starting in January 1999, Taylor guitars are made with a patented bolt-on neck; the NT neck (new technology). It differs from other necks by using a continuous piece of wood all the way to the 19th fret to support the fretboard.[7] The standard practice is to support the fretboard up to the fourteenth fret with the unsupported portion being glued to the constantly moving soundboard. The NT neck fits into a pocket on the top of the guitar body with the desired angle being achieved by small, accurately milled neck spacers (shims). Over time, some guitars require the neck angle to be realigned (referred to as a neck reset). This process is greatly simplified by allowing the replacement of different sized neck spacers to return the neck to the required angle. Prior to 1999, Taylor Guitars had a simpler bolt-on neck. These guitar necks allow for simple adjustment later if needed. Traditional (Non-Taylor) guitars with a glued neck with a dovetail would need to be disassembled to be adjusted.[8][9]
The Venue has an adjustable gain feature designed for acoustics, which is compatible with both passive and active electronic systems. This is, of course, in addition to the five-band EQ we mentioned earlier. For feedback control there's a Garret Null Notch filter and a clipping light that will tell you when you're feeding back or when you need to cut down your output. Other perks include a full chromatic tuner and a boost button that gives you a nine decibel jump, ideal for solos or instrumentals.
A third product which does not fit into the "combo"/"head"/cabinet categorization are powered speaker cabinets designed for use with bass instruments. While these powered speakers share many features with a regular combo amp, a bassist cannot plug her bass directly into a powered speaker cab. The powered speaker system is designed to operate as a "slave" to another amplifier's unpowered signal (or another combo amp which has a pre-amp out jack). Some powered speaker cabs only accept a "link" XLR cable from the main amp. Some powered speaker cabinets are designed as part of a company's line of bass amps; as such, the colour of the cabinet and its grille match the combo amp which will be placed on top of the powered speaker. As well, the powered speaker may have interlocking corners to ensure that the main amp stays put on top of the powered speaker.
Dave Friedman (Rack System, Ltd.): “Pedal order is a very subjective thing, and I’ve had people do it all backwards because that’s the way they like it. Generally speaking, compressors come before overdrives, modulation things are kind of in the middle, and delays are at the end. The wah is kind of a personal preference. Sometimes it’s in front early in the chain, and sometimes it’s after overdrives.
The Kaman Corporation soon diversified, branching off into nuclear weapons testing, commercial helicopter flight, the development and testing of chemicals, and helicopter bearings production. But in the early 1960s, financial problems due to the failure of their commercial flight division forced them to consider expanding into new markets, such as entertainment and leisure. Charles Kaman, still an avid guitar player, became interested in the making of guitars.[2][6]
Bassists can put an incorrect (that is too low) impedance load on their amplifiers even if they connect multiple speakers that are at the correct impedance rating. For example, if a bassist has a combo amp in which the power amp is rated at 4 ohms, and she/he plugs in a second 4 ohm speaker cabinet in parallel, this will drop the impedance ("load") on the amplifier down to 2 ohms, which is too low for the amplifier. When speakers of different impedance are wired up together (e.g., an 8 ohm speaker cabinet and a 4 ohm speaker cab, the impedance is calculated differently). In most applications, when bass speakers are plugged into an amplifier, they are wired in parallel. The parallel "input/output" speaker jacks on the rear of most bass cabinets, when plugged into additional speakers in a "daisy chain" approach, will cause the speakers to be connected in parallel. More rarely, bass speaker cabs may be wired up in series, which means that the impedance is calculated differently. Series wiring is much more complicated and in cases where a bassist is using series wiring, a custom-made cabling system is typically used. Some bass manufacturers that build large speaker cabinets with multiple speakers may wire some of the speakers in series and some in parallel to achieve a certain impedance rating for the entire speaker cabinet (e.g., in 8x10" speaker cabinets, the speakers inside the cabinet may be all wired up in series, but the overall cabinet's "input/output" jacks are in parallel). Professional bass technicians and speaker designers setting up custom-made bass speaker systems for bass players from major bands may use an electronic meter to test the impedance of the speaker cabinets they design.
While experimenting with the Vortex for this article, I was impressed by quite how well the ambient mics seemed to turn a close-miked guitar sound into something that sounded like it was on a record, but the downside of this approach for most home recordists will be that the Vortex is not easy to recreate in a smaller studio — so I thought I'd pass on some ways I found to make it more manageable on a smaller scale. One problem most small studios have is that they don't have large numbers of screens, but in practice I found that I was able to get decent results by putting the guitar cab in the corner of the room and using one or both of the room boundaries in place of the screens. Visconti's trick of aiming ambient mics at the studio glass also turned out to be handy to increase the apparent distance of the farther ambient mic.
The guitar player who makes his guitar sound anything but a guitar. Helicopter rudders, disc scratching, and his use of the kill switch for staccato like guitar riffs has made him probably the most innovative guitar player of our time. He is a guitarist who can take feedback, and ground hum from his own body into coherent music. Be it Rage Against The Machine, or Audioslave you can always see Morello’s signature licks shining through.
With the ME-80, Boss has made a unit that’s slightly different than a traditional multi-fx unit. Instead of trying to simplify the interface and make it sparse and clean, it’s immediately evident that there are a LOT of knobs on the front of this unit. The ME-80 is trying to mimic the feel of having a pedalboard full of pedals at your fingertips. This is good, because us guitar players love pedals for exactly that reason - you can just look down at them, twist some knobs, and your tone changes. Instant gratification! Not many guitarists we know like to scroll through endless menus and read text on a tiny screen, much less have to read the user manual cover to cover to understand how to work our gear. We want to twist a knob or two, and we want to play!
A guitarist’s or bassist’s effects chain can largely determine the uniqueness of that player’s tone. Perhaps the most common effects pedal is a distortion or overdrive pedal, which either provides a distorting effect or overdrives the guitar’s signal into the amplifier—a tone that is highly popular in many genres of music. Other popular effects pedals include a wah-wah pedal (designed for sweeping a guitar’s tone control), fuzz, delay, flanger, phaser, reverb, chorus, compression, looping and boost. Many guitarists also use an EQ pedal to further shape and customize their sound. With all the brands and effects available at Guitar Center, your effects pedal options are virtually endless.
GNUitar is a basic free guitar effects software that allows you to turn your PC into a guitar effects processor without having to spend a single dime. Nothing much needs to be said aside from it is working as intended. Although you don't have too many options, it has all the essential effect types including distortion, reverb, echo, delay, chorus, flanger, equalizer, wah, phaser, tremolo, vibrato and noise reduction. The package comes with 2 different types of distortion and has various flavors of echo, reverb and delay. This free software works for both Windows and Linux.
Buy a kit if you want to make things easier. Several companies produce electric guitar kits that include all of the parts you’ll need, prepared and ready to assemble. If you just want to get your feet wet, these can be a good choice. While you won’t get the full experience of making a guitar from scratch, you’ll still get the satisfaction of putting it together and finishing it yourself.[6]
Ovation acoustic-electric guitars are unique, innovative and, for some players, almost addictive! Once you’ve played an Ovation, no other guitar may do. They have a different look and feel than most other acoustic guitars due to their design, which incorporates a wood top with a rounded, synthetic bowl shape instead of the traditional back and sides.
Fender California Coast Series acoustic guitars are already being used across multiple musical genres by top alternative, indie, punk and grunge artists/bands, such as: Culture Abuse, The Regrettes and Dear Boy, as well as singer-songwriter Aaron Lee Tasjan and guitarist Angela Petrilli – accompanying each on their musical journey toward exceptional artistry.
Praises and recommendations continue to flood the reviews of the Fender Super-Champ X2 HD, pointing to its great value for money as its main selling point. Even users who are not happy with some of the extra features agree that the amp gives you more than what you pay for. As expected from a Fender tube amp, clean tone is well received, while others are equally happy with the other voicings. Another plus for the Super-Champ X2 HD is that it gets good feedback from guitarists of different playing styles and instruments, be it single-coil equipped or even those with active humbucker pickups.
Fulltone’s popular Full-Drive pedal has the bonus of a switchable booster channel, while its overdrive channel goes to a fairly high gain and, unusually, uses asymmetrical clipping for a more textured sound that is quite different from the Tube Screamer’s. Asymmetrical clipping is also at the center of Boss’ SD-1 Super Overdrive (as used by Eddie Van Halen), generated by a circuit that uses two silicon diodes in series in one direction, and only one in the other, to clip each side of the waveform differently. Some players credit asymmetrical clipping with more richness, body and character; others say it sounds clanky and harsh, like an amp with mismatched output tubes. Then again, some guitarists—those in the former camp, probably—say they prefer the sound of mismatched output tubes for these same reasons. As ever, what works is up to you.
Many web surfers contact me looking for a wiring diagram for an unusual / no name / import guitar after having no luck online. And sometimes you aren't going to find it, however, if you have an electric guitar that is similar to lets say a Strat ... it has 3 single coil pickups (and they are 2 wire pickups), one 5 way switch, 2 tone pots and 1 volume pot then you can simply use a Strat wiring diagram. It's often easiest to think of the instrument in terms of components not brand.
The Effect: Boost pedals are essentially an extension of your guitar’s volume knob. Their main purpose is to give you additional gain to work with. This extra gain can be used to accentuate your solo sections, give you more girth in your clean channel, or even push your tubes into a slight overdrive. A great example of a booster pedal is the legendary Electro-Harmonix LPB-1.
Different people have different opinions on what makes a vintage guitar. For the purposes of this site, a vintage electric guitar or vintage bass is one that was produced in the golden age of rock and roll. From the very early 1950s when Fender first produced the Esquire and Broadcaster, and Gibson the Les Paul; to the early 1980s, when both of these companies sold to their current owners.
 You will not grow here or learn anything that will be useful in any other company unless they employ 1950's management techniques. Maybe a screenwriter for "Madmen" would find some material here but as someone trying to grow their career you won't learn anything useful. The pay will be no better than your last job minus your previous bonus and 401k match which to my knowledge they do not contribute. So next question, your not making any more money and probably less, not learning anything useful and will need to explain why you left after 6 months, how are you going to position this to beat the competition going after your next job?

The Kay guitar company's origins date back to the 1890's, starting with the Groeschel Mandolin Company of Chicago, Illinois. The company's name was changed to "Stromberg-Voisinet" in 1921, and shortlyafterwards, in 1923, Henry Kay "Hank" Kuhrmeyer (the origin of the name "Kay") joined the company and quickly worked his way up to the top. By 1928, Kuhrmeyer had bought the company and that same year the company started producing electric guitars and amps.
The old ones were SOLD as cheap guitars. These new ones, at their price points, are probably decent instruments at the very least, and possibly even very good ones. I doubt they have much in common with the Kays from the 70s aside from how they look, which as other people have detailed, is probably just for nostalgia purposes. Lots of aging rockers with fat salaries who might've learned on those guitars a few decades ago!
This depends on personal preference; changing the order of drive pedals changes how they sound when used together. For instance, a clean boost placed before a heavy distortion or fuzz will result in a louder boosted signal hitting the heavier distortion circuit which in turn works that circuit harder and you get heavier distortion. If you place that clean boost after the heavy distortion, it will just make the original distorted sound louder. Experiment with different placement order and you will find your own preference.

Cool guitar! You really don’t see many of these anymore. You are correct that it’s similar to the Washburn Wing series, specifically the Washburn Eagle from the late ’70s and early ’80s. In fact, aside from different fretboard inlays and brand names on the headstocks, when you compare the two they’re nearly identical. If this connection seems odd, the occurrence of very similar guitars with different brand names is more common that many of us would think.

Our professional guitar technicians inspect each instrument by hand, then perform a full, and precision setup. All brand new guitars need proper setup after shipment to suit your personal preference that would strongly correlate to your playing style. Truss rod adjustments are made to alter the straightness (flatness) of the neck. Truss rods often require adjusting when temperature and humidity change the amount of bow in the neck. Weather, specifically temperature and humidity, may have a dramatic impact on the way your instrument plays. All instrument woods expand and contract with seasonal actuations in temperature and humidity, and naturally, string height and playing action are affected. The neck needs a simple truss rod adjustment to correct any problems like fret buzz and bow neck which can be easily done by guitar experts. And also, you may adjust the bar of bridge. Please be advised that guitar necks are crafted from wood, and they will sometimes shift during shipping and as the temperature/humidity/elevation changes. An important part of maintaining your guitar is knowing how to adjust the truss rod. When a guitar experiences temperature and humidity swings, such as when seasons change, it can develop a slight bow in the neck that results in a guitar that plays buzzy or is suddenly much harder to fret. If this situation occurs, you can often correct the problem simply by tightening or loosening the truss rod. You may bring your brand new guitar in your Local Guitar Shop for proper setup and adjustment of the truss rod.
These are the most-used "building block" effects, and in combination, there are an infinite number of sounds you can make. The best thing to do is spend some time and analyze the sounds of your favorite songs and players. Once you have figured out that sound, head to your local store and give them a try. Then come back to Reverb to find a great deal! What were some first pedals that you found yourself loving when you got them?
Epiphone's offering in the low and mid-range segment has been pretty strong for years. The Epiphone Hummingbird Pro is their take on a legendary Gibson model and it brings much of the same qualities. What really makes this acoustic-electric stand out is the overall level of quality you get for your money. You can trust it as an accurate emulation since Gibson now owns and produces Epiphone's guitars.
These guys are great! I took my Martin in for a refret, and it might have been the cleanest I have ever seen it done. Played better than it did when I got it. So after that show of quality work I took... my old Guild to them. It had developed a little belly bulge and warped top. Mark got that thing sounding and playing like brand new. They are priced honest and fair, and do work in a very timely manner. I am done looking for my guitar shop. I highly recommend these gentlemen. See More
High-end builders of today have gone back to germanium en masse for their classic fuzz tones, and most of them test their transistors to sort out the few that will do the job correctly. They put them in anything from vintage-style units—like Fulltone’s ’69, Frantone’s The Sweet, and Roger Mayer’s Classic Fuzz—to way-out updates of the breed—such as Z.Vex’s Fuzz Factory.
The customer then tells me that it was the second brand new preamp that they failed to get working. The first one they couldn’t get working and blamed it on a defective preamp. Could have been, who knows? So the guy orders another new preamp and they still couldn’t get it working after 2 weeks. Sadly, they charged him anyway and he left with a bass that still was not working. So he brings it to me after being recommended by some of my very kind customers.
Bonnie Raitt: features an alder body, a narrow C-shape maple neck with a late 1960s large headstock, rosewood fretboard, 9.5″ radius and 22 medium jumbo frets. Other refinements included a 3-ply white shell pickguard, three Texas Special single-coils with 5-way switching and American Vintage hardware. Available in 3-color sunburst and desert sunset. Discontinued in 2000.

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Superb guitars. Lakewood have both standard and custom production of 12-fret cutaway guitars. Other producers do not offer standard production - except of Taylor, but Taylors at the same price level are made technologically cheaper, resp. at the same quality level are much more expensive. My impression is that Lakewoods have a little bit lively sound than Taylors. I am interested in well made, i. e. with high quality craftmanship, 12-fret cutaways and the brand is not so important for me.
The Marshall Mini Jubilee 2525C Combo amp is closely based on the highly-coveted Marshall Jubilee series of amps. The powerful preamp has been designed to the specifications of the original 2525 Silver Jubilee diagrams, making this an authentic reproduction of these now out-of-production monsters of rock. Don’t let this little beast fool you though, the ECC83 & EL34 valve set produces some seriously loud sounds through the single 12” Celestion G12M–25 Greenback speaker. Perfect for lead and rhythm, this great combo amp is ideal for both stage and studio!
Next up is another electric guitar from Fender Standard, namely the American Special Telecaster. This one has two Texas Special Tele pickups and it’s perfect for great American genres like country, rock and blues. This American Special Telecaster has a lovely alder body and the neck is maple. Just like number one on our list, the 50’s Stratocaster, it’s vintage-looking, but the Vintage Blonde model we’re reviewing looks vintage in a cooler, less sentimental way.
Bass chorus effects use a cycling, variable delay time that is short so that individual repetitions are not heard. The result is a thick, "swirling" sound that suggests multiple instruments playing in unison (chorus) that are slightly out of tune. Bass chorus effects were more common in the late 1980s, when manufacturers such as Peavey included chorus effects in its bass amplifiers. In the 1990s and 2000s, more sophisticated bass chorus effects devices were created which only apply the swirling chorus effect to the higher parts of the bass tone, leaving the instrument's low fundamental untouched.[5]
The Effect: Loop pedals essentially operate as recorders that have the ability to infinitely spin the recorded bits and possibly alternate them in a variety of ways. The main function of any looper is to be able to record a musical part, and then automatically put it on loop until ordered not to do so anymore. Depending on the complexity of the pedal, loopers can offer multiple layers, overdubs, as well as options of recording more than a single instrument. They range from simple single-switch stompboxes all the way to powerhouse loop workstations. Check out our full reviews to see which one is your perfect match. If you are looking for the quick winner, the Boss RC 3 is a great contender.
In the guitar’s electronics, the potentiometer and capacitor form a path to ground. The capacitor presents lower impedance to higher frequencies, and vice-versa, so the tone control works by “throwing away” high frequencies. How much of the highs get thrown away is determined by the tone potentiometer, which presents an equal resistance to all frequencies. As you turn down the tone, you decrease the resistance presented by the pot. Low frequencies still find this path to ground to be a difficult one (high-impedance) because of the capacitor, but high frequencies see an easier path than the one into the amplifier (which traditionally has a fairly high impedance load in the transistors of the “pre-gain” stage, around 1Megaohm), and to they take the easier path, reducing the presence of high frequencies that are amplified and output as sound.
Classical guitars have nylon strings, which are softer than steel strings, and easier to press down. However, the neck is much wider on a classical guitar, which can be a struggle for beginners. The action is likely to be higher, as well. In general, they are softer-toned and don't project as well as a steel string acoustic, which makes for quieter practising, which could be a consideration.
Welcome to the gallery of Silvertone guitars from the VintageSilvertones.com collection! The instruments are listed in chronological order from left (oldest) to right (more recent). The gallery will continue to grow as we get more Silvertones. The purpose of this gallery is to help identify all the Vintage Silvertone guitars from the 1950's through the early 1970's. We're major fan of Silvertones and have discovered that there's a lot of misinformation out there.
Ah, this is an interesting subject. I could never play a Rick, nor buy back my 1966 Fender XII, so I bought a Dano, then another which I kept and could play (nut width). Then around 2000 I bought a Yamaha Pacifica 12 -the blueburst with gold hardware. I had the nut intonated, like all my other guitars (this was before Earvana which I am about to try out my first "drop in" on a new parts Strat, Epi Night Hawk and a GS Mini on layaway). The Pacifica is good tho again only 1+11/16ths " and I am ready for 1+3/4 or even better 1+7/8ths. I bought a set of Duncan Designed lipsticks for it, thinking I could easily find a neck with 1+7/8ths nut. No joy, yet, tho I have talked to a builder about one and am trying to sort out whether to do that to the Pacifica or use a really nice looking cherry stained strat body that I've had for 31 years.

Many artists discovered that the 3-way pickup selector could be lodged in between settings (often using objects such as matchsticks or toothpicks to wedge it in position) for further tonal variety, resulting in a unique sound when two pickups are combined. Jimi Hendrix would also move the switch across the settings while sustaining a note, creating a characteristic ‘wobbly’ sound, similar to that created by the wah-wah pedal. This effect can be heard in the Woodstock recording of Star Spangled Banner. Since 1977, the Stratocaster has been fitted with a 5-way switch to make such switching more stable. This switch is the same electrically as the original 3-way, but with extra detents for the in-between settings. Other subtle changes were also made to the guitars over the years, but the basic shape and features of the Strat have remained unchanged. In the 1970s and 1980s, some guitarists began modifying their Stratocasters with humbucking pickups, especially in the bridge position, to create what became known as a Fat Strat. This was intended to provide a thicker tone preferred in the heavier styles of hard rock and heavy metal. The popularity of this modification grew and eventually Fender began manufacturing models with a bridge humbucker option (HSS), denoted and separated from the original triple single coil by the title of “Fat Strat“, as a reference to the humbucker’s distinct sound, as well as models with dual humbuckers (HH), better known as “Double Fat Strats“. Fender also started making Stratocaster pickguards specially designed for guitar bodies routed for HSH (humbucker-single-humbucker) and HHH (humbucker-humbucker-humbucker) pickup configurations.

Lets face it: when most folks first pick up the electric guitar, the only other gear they think they might need would be an amp, a pick, some cables and maybe some pedals if they are savvy. As these players become more experienced and move from their garage to live music venues and recording situations, they eventually run into some issues and realize there must be better ways to be heard than turning the amp to 11.


Otherwise, while the manufacturer is considerably shy when releasing specs regarding this product, customer reviews can give us a good idea of how well it performs under real-life circumstances. In brief, it performs well, particularly so for country music and slow rock, especially when paired with a couple more 12” speakers on top of the ones that are already integrated into its chassis.    




We noticed in our last article, 10 best Acoustic Guitars Under $500, some readers mentioned the Luna series of guitars. Thank you all for pointing these out! What a truly beautiful line of acoustic and electrics. The Luna Ash, an acoustic electric hybrid is a sleek, responsive guitar ready for any setting: playing live, recording, or jamming with friends. With a mahogany body and rosewood fretboard, this visually stunning guitar is just one in the line of Luna guitars that provides ridiculous eye candy and amazing sound quality and playability. The Ash goes for around $499, and that’s a steal! 

Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Quilted - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, Diecast, Nickel, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black, Blue

Chord CG-10Classically styled guitar combo in a vinyl covered cabinet with metal corner protectors and basket-weave style grille cloth. Front control panel is recessed with retro "chicken-head" control knobs and additional features for Gain, EQ and outputs. Custom solid-state circuitry is voiced to produce authentic vintage-style clean and driven tones.•Headphone output for practice•Switchable clean and drive channels•Classic styling•Power supply; 230Vac, 50Hz (IEC)•Model: CG-10•Output: 10Wrms•Speaker; 165mm (6.5")•Controls: Gain, drive switch, volume, treble, middle, bass•Connections: Guitar input, headphones out (6.3mm jack)•Dimensions; 290 x 280 x 150mm•Weight: 4.0kg
Fuzz Box World – We are dedicated to bringing the highest quality components to builders of guitar and bass effects. We want to be the number one source of parts for electronics diyers. Whether you are a professional boutique pedal builder or a weekend hobbyist, your business is very important to us. We will do everything we can to make sure you are happy with your experience at Fuzz Box World.
Phase Three began in 1974, bringing some of the biggest changes to the series with it. Univox swapped in its own humbuckers, made unique in part due to their visible white bobbins. This change took the Phase Three Hi-Flier solidly out of the realm of Mosrite Ventures copy territory and into its own realm, considering the tone and high output changed the sound so significantly. The presence of these humbuckers – found on other Univox guitars of the same era – make the Phase Three versions some of the most highly sought after Hi-Fliers.
This truly is a pleasure writing about the best kept secret in the guitar world. The G&L Legacy Tribute. I own a USA Hamer Gold Top Archtop Standard with P-90's and it's stupendous guitar. But like all Les Pauls and high quality Mahoganies, it has a growl suited for certain kinds of Rock N Roll. However, there is another voice in my guitar arsenal and I only have one other. The G&L Legacy Tribute. This guitar can cover the other half. I bought this used for $299 and four years later I still can't put it down. So I have a $2600 guitar and a $299 guitar and love them equally. What does that tell you about the Legacy Tribute?
Polishing the frets is a whole instructable by itself, but I definitely recommend that you do it at least once a year. It makes the guitar look nice, and it gets some of the oxides off the frets(not sure if it really helps anything, but it sounds helpful, right?). Also, the tape pulls out some of the junk in the open pores of the wood(if your fretboard is rosewood).

Guitar culture was pervasive, whether in movie houses (“Karate Kid” Ralph Macchio outdueling Steve Vai in the 1986 movie “Crossroads”; Michael J. Fox playing a blistering solo in “Back to the Future” and co-starring with Joan Jett in 1987’s rock-band drama “Light of Day”) or on MTV and the older, concert films featuring the Who and Led Zeppelin on seemingly endless repeats.
3.  This one is not so much a customer fix as customer negligence.  A crack in the top of an acoustic that is not addressed right away.  Dirt and grime are allowed into the crack and oxidizes the surfaces so that what could have been fixed with a diamond patch on the inside has now become a fix that includes taking away the rotten wood and inserting a splint.  It can be very difficult to match the new wood with the old, and you better make sure the customer knows that his or her guitar will not look brand new.
There are only two Amazon reviews for this instrument, as it is at a higher price point than other guitars, but the reviews are very positive. The rich tone of the cedar as well as the ability to take this classical guitar into the world of electrical pickups makes this a fabulous option for the musician looking to upgrade to a more professional-sounding instrument.

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However, John Leckie states an interesting preference for an SM58 and U67 rig instead: "SM57s tend to be that little bit brighter than the SM58, which really isn't what you want when you're miking up an electric guitar amp. You really want to pick up a flat signal, an 'unstimulated' signal I suppose is the word... The U67 gives you the warmth and a broader sound."

As someone else mentioned, it depends if this will just be a practice amp, or if it will be used to jam with others. Personally, I think a beginner should just get a small practice amp, but a good one. The reason is that you don't yet know what you will want tone-wise out of a gigging/jamming amp yet. So just get the best solid state modeling amp you can afford and worry about a bigger amp later.


A Volume pedal is a volume potentiometer that is tilted forward or back by foot. A volume pedal enables a musician to adjust the volume of their instrument while they are performing. Volume pedals can also be used to make the guitar's notes or chords fade in and out. This allows the percussive plucking of the strings to be softened or eliminated entirely, imparting a human-vocal sound. Volume pedals are also widely used with pedal steel guitars in country music. It has also been used to great effect in rock music; the Pat McGee Band's live version of "Can't Miss What You Never Had" on General Admission illustrates what the pedal is capable of. Some volume pedals are:

The electric guitar was at the heart of popular music for the new generation. Fender released the Telecaster – the first mass produced solid body electric which made it possible for the average Joe to buy a guitar and start a band to express themselves.  With amplifiers and solid body electrics the volume could be cranked and every bit of emotion displayed through the music.
InstantDrummer provides tempo-sycronized drum loop sessions that can be accessed easily from within RiffWorks guitar recording software. Most RiffWorks InstantDrummer Sessions are loop recordings of professional drummers brought into the InstantDrummer format for easy manipulation by RiffWorks users. Play along with InstantDrummer sessions by famous drummers like Alan White (Yes, Lennon), Jason McGerr (Death Cab for Cutie), John Tempesta (Rob Zombie, Exodus, Testament, Tony Iommi, The Cult), Lonnie Wilson (Brooks and Dunn, Faith Hill, Tim McGraw), and Matt Sorum (Guns N Roses, Velvet Revolver). Use them in your recordings royalty free!
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Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Maple - Carved - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Richlite (Paper/Phenolic Resin Composite) - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Resomax - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Godin Tuner, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Seymour Duncan - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: High Gloss Cherryburst, Creme Brulee, Black, Burgundy
Slot Peghead vs. Solid Peghead (steel string models): Most models converted from a 12 fret slot peghead to a 14 fret solid peghead around 1934 (except the OM series, which went 14 fret in 1929/1930 and the style 17 and 18 models which were available in 14 fret style in 1932). Basically if the guitar has a 14 fret neck, it will have a solid peghead. If it has a 12 fret neck, it will have a slot peghead. Note there were some post-WW2 gut string and classical models (i.e. 0-16NY) and some post-WW2 special order steel string guitars (i.e. 1967-1993 D-18S) which always have a slotted peghead.
Personally, I don't like the fender and gibson knockoffs, and squire's aren't the best brand, but I have a squire telecaster, which is actually great quality, better than I expected, and it has a slightly more drier, shaky tone that an actual tele, which is a nice feature. My friend has a squire precision bass, and upon hearing it, I honestly thought it was an actual precision bass at first, so, if you must get squire, than consider either the tele or the precision.

An acoustic-electric guitar has an electronic pickup that’s usually built into its bridge. This pickup is used to capture the sounds produced by the top’s vibrations. This is then transmitted via an onboard preamplifier to an external acoustic guitar amplifier or PA system. But plugging-in is strictly optional. Unplugged, an acoustic-electric guitar typically sounds just like a fully-acoustic guitar.


There’s been a steady evolution in effects signal processing since the 1940s. Guitarist-innovator Les Paul was among the first and most avid effects developers, experimenting with echo and multi-track recording to add sonic excitement to his music. The first foot-switched effect showed up in the late ‘40s with Harry DeArmond’s Trem Tol tremolo processor that was later used by Bo Diddley. In the 1950s and early 1960s other effects were developed, but they tended to be expensive and some had operational issues. Meanwhile amplifier makers such as Fender and Gibson were building reverb and tremolo effects into their amps. These tube amps also produced tasty distortion and overdrive effects when gain and volume were cranked up to maximum settings. Today, many effects are designed to reproduce those sounds.
The best acoustic guitar brands in India are available for beginners to buy. When buying a guitar at a beginner level, it is good to go with the acoustic guitar. This is the type of guitar that is easy to learn and play. The strings are available in various materials. The make, shape, style, and material used in the strings are the features to look at when you buy a guitar. Acoustic, Electric, Spanish Guitar, Steel, Bass, and Resonator guitars are available in India. You can also find twelve string guitars to buy at a few locations in India. You will find amongst this list, best guitar brands in India for beginners as well as advanced learners.
Without a doubt, dont even entertain the idea of getting one, I was given one by an unfortunate friend who bought one, to try and get it to at be semi playable.. the necks are not even straight, in fact , you could ski off them.....the frets stick out from the side of the neck, the strings are so far off the neck you cannot even fret them down.... There must be no quality control whatsoever in the factory..
It’s best to perform pickup adjustments while playing through a clean amp. You can more accurately hear the true tone and volume of each pickup when the signal isn’t being compressed or overdriven by a cranked amp or pedal. Listen to the tone of each pickup position, and try to balance the height of each pickup until the volume remains relatively the same when changing pickup settings.
Over the years, the Gibson Memphis factory has become synonymous with creating some of the most accurate recreations of timeless classics. From the ES-335, ES-345 and ES-355 to the compact magic of the ES-339, the Gibson Memphis factory has built legendary instruments that pay tribute to the vintage masterpieces of yesteryear. To up the ante, the Gibson Memphis factory is now offering Limited Edition runs, showcasing the creative talents of their phenomenal crew, while boldly moving forward into a bright future. From unique models to exclusive colors, features and options, Gibson Memphis Limited Runs are redefining the concept of what makes a Gibson so unique, taking things a step further. With limited availability and an incredible demand for these unique instruments, Gibson Memphis Limited Runs have become highly collectible, sought after instruments with features us unique as the players who own them. Wildwood Guitars is honored to present our selection of these prized instruments to our exceptional customers. We invite you to find your own unique treasure among our inventory, just don’t blink… you might miss it!
I have tried many different wiring schemes as well, with 3-way switching, 3-way with coil taps, and even bypassed the tone control (since I never dial back the tone in my playing anyway). I have played this guitar through high-gain amps (Carvin V3, all three channels, Carvin Vai Legacy), through VOX AC15, Vox AC30 (both with Greenbacks and with Celestion Blues speakers), and an Orange 2x12 combo. In all of these excellent amps where my Carvin SC90 guitar sings and sparkles and does whatever I want it to, this Frankenstrat with Duncans or with Carvin P'ups sounds like a fart after 12 glasses of cheap Charles Shaw wine.
Two more guitars were introduced in 2008. Gibson USA issued the Slash Signature Les Paul Goldtop, modeled after a 1991 Gibson Les Paul Goldtop that was stolen from Slash’s collection in 1999 and never recovered.[37] It features a mahogany body and a hand-carved maple top with Gibson’s classic Bullion Gold finish. Production was limited to 1000.[38] Epiphone introduced a more affordable version of the Gibson model, featuring a traditional Les Paul body with a maple top, a mahogany neck with rosewood fingerboard, and Epiphone’s classic Goldtop finish. Production was limited to 2000.[39]
Guitar pedal multi-effects units comprise several effects in just one package. Multi-effects units utilize digital processing to bring out different sound effects when playing guitar. These digital multi-effects pedals come with internal memory in order to save your individual settings. Among the top-rated multi-effects brands you might want to check out are the DigiTech RP and GNX series, the Boss ME-20 and ME-50 models, the Boss GT-6 and GT-8, the Zoom G2, G3, and G5, various Behringer models, and the Line 6 POD.
Processed Pitch Shifts: Few pitch-shifting algorithms are transparent enough to allow you to transpose anything by more than a couple of semitones without obvious side-effects. If what you're processing is going through an amp modeller, however, you can get away with much more radical changes. You can even do effective swoops and dives in pitch by progressively increasing the amount of pitch-shifting you apply to a note, and pitch changes of an octave or more can sound good, although they probably won't sound natural at these extremes. Sam Inglis

Six full steps (one octave) down from standard tuning. The Low E has the same fundamental frequency as a bass guitar, essentially the same standard tuning as a bass guitar but with a high B and E added to mimic a regular guitar. This tuning is used on the Fender Bass VI and similar instruments. Notably used by John Lennon with The Beatles, Robert Smith of The Cure and Jack Bruce of Cream. In his early days with Ronnie Hawkins, future Band bassist Rick Danko was also seen with a Fender Bass VI. This is the tuning Earth used on their seminal drone doom album, Earth 2. Also used in some Doom Metal and Sludge Metal bands such as Thou.
Along with these effects are 10 guitars: Strat Marshall, Valve ODX, Garcia Guitar, Bleeding Guitar, Blues Guitar, Power Guitar, Mondo Guitar, Synth Guitar, Clean Guitar, and Electric Sitar. The sound of each somewhat matches the guitar it’s supposed to be, but more importantly, there is a notable change in tone with each and since it’s free, I was happy just to have that.
A friend lent me this banjo and I got it working and sampled it. Its a 5 string closed back banjo. The fifth string being tuned to a high "g" note (half the length of the neck). Its this string and the closed back that helps give you the bluegrass sound (the high string ringing the "g" note throughout each of the chords with syncopated fingerpicking patterns). This has a standard mapping with variations of long release (to hear the whole sample) and reverb.
• We'll add EQ to give some polish and let the guitar cut through a little better in a mix. Enable a stage in the standard channel EQ (which comes after the inserts in the signal chain), and choose the Parametric II response. Add a boost of around 4‑5dB at 3.5kHz, with a Q of 0.2.This screen shows the VST Audio Channel Settings and the roster of effects used to create our basic guitar rack.
Buddy Guy: ash body with a V-shaped maple neck featuring a 22-fret fretboard, three Lace Sensor “Gold” single-coil pickups and a 25dB active midrange boost circuit (USA, discontinued as of 2010), alder body with a V-shaped maple neck featuring a 21-fret fretboard and three standardalnico single-coil pickups (Mexico). Available in a variety of finishes, including black with white polka dots (Mexican Artist Standard), 2-color sunburst and honey blonde transparent (USA Artist).
And how does adding a pedal, basically one more optional pre-amplification stage that you can turn on or off at your leisure, make somebody less “real”? Imagine some old-school guy is just using guitar to a (insert amp brand)? Great! I love them too. Which one? Ah, nice amp! Did they know that amp has one more gain stage than that amp over there? If I plug into that one while they play theirs, did I make them less real or genuine, or did I become SUPER-real? Are they going to start fading like Marty McFly when the outcome is in doubt at the end of Back To The Future? Will they spring back to life and start playing “Earth Angel” properly once I unplug?
The K-4L (Teisco Del Rey ET-460 Super Deluxe) had four of the large, chunky, single-coil pickups with chrome sides and black center insert revealing six square poles. These were controlled by four sliding on/off switches, plus a 3-position switch for solo, rhythm and super bass sounds, as well as volume and tone. The roller bridge had a spring-loaded muffler/mute.
The S670 QM is a speedster's guitar, with locking tuners and a razor thin "Wizard III" Maple neck, developed by Ibanez to be specifically fast and easy to play. Players with smaller hands or those who like to use their thumb to grab notes on the sixth string will find the neck particularly accommodating. So this model (and many of the Ibanez designs) score high marks for playability.
Aside from what brands to choose from and finding out the right budget to spend on an amp. Initial search for a guitar amplifier generally leads beginner players on figuring out that there are actually different types of guitar amps in the market. This is where they start to care deeply enough to know which amp sounds better and what will fit their playing the best.
In ’71, Univox introduced what are arguably their coolest-looking amplifiers, the B Group, covered in nifty two-tone blue vinyl. Remember, this was the tail end of the heyday of Kustom, with its colored tuck-and-roll amps, and the two-tone blue with a red-and-white oval logo was boss. The lettering was the same uppercase blocks as on the outline logo. These new Univox amps were hybrids, with solidstate power supplies and lots of tubes – lots! The Univox B Group had two combo and two piggyback guitar amps, two piggyback bass amps and a piggyback PA. It is not known how these were constructed, but because previous amps had Japanese chassis put into Westbury-made cabinets, these were probably built that way also.
I think Washburn is one of the best out there, From their A series, to HM to x series they all rock. I've had a a-10 since 1980 and it plays great! I have also got the reissues still great quality over the years. The only issue I've seen is Washburn's commitment to catch/keep some artist. Either they can't keep um or they don't want to. Can't see it being the later. Its very difficult to try one of their pieces out as their are very few stores that even stock them. In the 80's early 90s they were everywhere, now?
Before Gruhn Guitars puts out any of our fine instruments for sale, they go through our repair shop to get them ready to play. Some older instruments require extensive repairs and restoration, while others just need new strings and basic setup. But every guitar, mandolin and banjo has to meet the high standards of the repair crew before it's released for sale. Our repair staff has over 75 years combined experience repairing, restoring, building and designing guitars.
I like most of the the 814's I've played though they seem just a bit brighter than some other guitars along that range. I prefer Collins guitars they're kind of in between the Martin sound, and the Taylor's brighter sound. After recording with several different ones. My favorites productions are Collin's OM1A , and more affordable Blueridge, and Recording king. I prefer Rosewood back and sides, Adirondack top, mahogany neck, with ebony fingerboard. Although mahogany back and sides with Sitka/ Engelmann tops sound nice too. When recording I think (might just be me) that I get better note separation from the Collins

In the late 1950s, Guitarist Link Wray began intentionally manipulating his amplifiers' vacuum tubes to create a "noisy" and "dirty" sound for his solos after a similarly accidental discovery. Wray also poked holes in his speaker cones with pencils to further distort his tone, used electronic echo chambers (then usually employed by singers), the recent powerful and "fat" Gibson humbucker pickups, and controlled "feedback" (Larsen effect). The resultant sound can be heard on his highly influential 1958 instrumental, "Rumble" and Rawhide.[17]


The OO-18E was basically the small-bodied OO-18 acoustic with mahogany back and sides, spruce top, and the ring-mounted DeArmond tucked right at the end of the fingerboard. These featured one tone and one volume control, with large two-tone plastic knobs situated down on the lower treble bout. The first prototype was serial number 166839. OO-18Es were produced from 1959 to 1964. Around 1,526 of these were produced.
Much of a B3's magic comes from good mic placement and the player (the right drawbar settings are game changers). EQ should be applied sparingly and mainly as a corrective measure. Usually it's good to look to anything clashing with the bass (80 to 180 Hz), and if it's feeling a little "chubby" in the middle and either can't get out of its own way or doesn't play nice with other mid-heavy instruments or guitars, look to make cuts somewhere between 300 to 500 Hz.

While the Line 6 PODHD500X is no longer the flagship guitar processor, it is still very much in demand in the market, as evidenced by the overwhelmingly positive response that it continues to get from users and expert alike. It follows after its predecessor, albeit with a more powerful CPU and improved interface via colorful LED rings around the footswitches.

When it comes to its dimensions, all interested buyers should know that it is quite sizeable on the exterior (the unit has the following external measurements 40″ length x 12″ (upper bout)/ 15″ (lower bout) width x 3″ height). Likewise, the bag is quite spacious on the inside (39.5″ length x 12″ (upper bout)/ 14.5″ (lower bout) width and 2.5″ in height).

There’s 12 footswitches for you to control all your sounds and effects as well as a smooth expression pedal that can control swells, wah and even make parameter changes. A looper with 20 mins of record time is ideal for songwriters, buskers and those who need to be able to write music anywhere. It especially shines when coupled with the HeadRush FRFR-112 2000 Watt Powered Speaker.
"Rocksmith" came out in 2011, following in the footsteps of "Guitar Hero" and "Rock Band" in look if not in game play. Developer Ubisoft claims that it can teach you to actually play the guitar. Unlike its predecessors, where you play along with any number of hit or classic rock songs, pushing the right button at the right time to earn points and unlock rewards, "Rocksmith" requires an actual guitar that you plug into your console. Thus, you're playing the actual notes to the songs, which increases the difficulty of the game.
Because any acoustic guitar can be made into an acoustic-electric, from what I’ve seen — and this is simply an observation, not a blanket statement — most of these sacrifice both quality of guitar and quality of pickup to sell affordable instruments in the name of convenience. So for the introductory acoustic player, here is my advice: Skip the acoustic-electric section and find a plain ol’ acoustic guitar that you like. When the time is right, plenty of companies make a variety of pickups designed for acoustic guitars, which will give you more options when selecting a method of amplifying your acoustic.

Electric guitar pickups provide a great way to customize your sound. They offer you the option of creating more sustain and enjoying stronger harmonics, and depending on the music genre or venue, pickups can make your tone warm or bright and allow you to add more or less distortion. Where you place you electric guitar pickup has an impact on the desired sound you want to achieve. If you're looking to create a bright or trebly timbre, place the pickup at the bridge. Neck pickups provide a warmer sound with a little more bass while multiple pickups together in one area help to produce additional vibrations. There are a variety of electric guitar pickups to choose from that can help you amplify your rockin' riffs or scorching solos.
A distortion box produces what we call hard clipping, as opposed to an overdrive pedal that produces soft clipping. What does that mean? If we were to look at a note on an oscilloscope we would see a wave (hence the term sound wave) with a nice rounded top and bottom. When we overdrive or distort a note the top and bottom of the sound wave flattens out, or clips. The more clipping of the wave the more distorted the note. A fuzz pedal produces so much clipping it is seen as a square wave, completely flat on the top and bottom of the wave. There are many excellent distortion boxes on the market but some classic industry standards are the Rat distortion box, the Boss Super Overdrive (a bit more of a distortion box really), MXR Distortion +, Boss Distortion, and the Boss Heavy Metal Pedal.
Anyway, as the Strat-style guitars have three pickups, the selector switch works like this: all the way to the left (relative to the Jimi pic) would limit the guitar’s output to the sound of the neck pickup. One position to the right will blend the neck pickup with the middle pickup. Put the switch in the middle, and you’ll get just the sound of the middle pickup, as you may have guessed. The next position will blend the middle and bridge pickups, and all the way to the right, it’s all bridge pickup.
Wow, didn't expect a budget-priced instrument to perform this beautifully! I had planned to use this as an introduction into nylon-string (from electric), then upgrade to a better (i.e. more expensive??) model. That won't be necessary! The NTX700C is absolutely perfect for me and will remain the nylon-string guitar in my stable. I am a professional solo jazz guitarist and ventured into a nylon-string for my Brazilian jazz set. Being an electric player, the transition with this model has been much easier than a traditional classical. The onboard electronics are great with my Bose L1 system. I have the cedar top, and the tone is very mellow, and already opening up with only three weeks of playing.
The use of "full range, flat response" (FRFR) amplification systems by electric guitarists has received an extra impetus from modeling amplifiers. Before widespread availability of modeling, guitarists did not commonly plug electric guitars straight into PA systems or powered speakers, because most genres relied on the tonal coloration of a regular guitar amplifier setup—from the preamplifier, equalization filters, power amp, guitar speakers, and cabinet design. The FRFR approach assumes the tone is shaped by sound processors in the signal chain before the amplifier and speaker stage, so it strives to not add further coloration[20] or dedicated combo-style amplifiers with a broad frequency range.[21] Such processors can be traditional guitar effects, a modeling amplifier (without power amplifier), or a computer running tone-shaping software.[20] Using a modeling amp or a multi effects pedal used with line level output, a guitarist can plug in the guitar into a flat response mic input or into a keyboard amplifier.
Number of Effects: All multi-effects units have a number of effects to choose from; that’s the entire point of them! However, make sure the pedal you go with has plenty of selection that will meet your needs. Typically, the more effects there are to choose from, the better. Chances are over time you’ll narrow the selection down to a few of your favorite ones. The top 5 multi-effects pedals on this list all have plenty of effects to choose from (the lowest has around 40, and a few have 100s).
It's not subjective. When you're setting up a guitar you measure the height of the strings, typically you're at about 4/64" for the high E and 5/64" for the low E. You can go above or below the recommendation but if you go too low you can start to get a bit of fret buzz. How low you can go is not a function so much of what guitar you own, but how level your frets are and your neck relief. Most good guitars can be set up to play "fast". Obviously they don't get faster when you paint them fluorescent orange, or make the headstock pointy.
Nice-4-Bass-V1.5 This is an sf2 simplified version of three different basses - all with 4 velocity layers.  It includes the 1958 Otto Rubner double bass played and mapped by Drogomir Smolken, recorded by Ludwik Zamenhof. The samples are exceptional and some percussive effects have been mapped to some high notes. Royalty-free for all commercial and non-commercial use. Copyright 2016 Karoryfer Lecolds (Karoryfer Samples). The original Meatbass sfz version for Sforzando has round-robin sampling and includes arco as well as pizzicato presets.  (http://www.karoryfer.com/karoryfer-samples).
Here are our choices for the five best YouTube channels. We made sure they all have plenty of content for novice players, but you’ll find lots of videos for advanced musicians, too. Some of them are hosted by people who are simply passionate about playing guitar and want to share that passion without trying to make a million bucks out of you. Don’t forget to show them support.

Boombox Guitar Tuner will get the party started. Just play a note, and it shows. Other guitar tuners don''t use the microphone, like Boombox Guitar Tuner, because it''s written with cutting-edge Flash 10.1 technology. Boombox Guitar Tuner is free to download or use online, so why waste your money on other expensive guitar tuners at the music shop? Try tuning your guitar once using Boombox Guitar Tuner, and you''ll see that it takes just seconds .

Enough with the American brands, haven’t the rest of the world got something to offer? Well, Japan has come up with a few! Ibanez for example offer amazing guitars, and when they first started out the original idea was actually to offer good copies of American electric guitars! Today they have moved on to doing their own thing, and produce excellent guitars.

So there you have five good beginner’s guitars. Bear in mind that while the quality of these instruments is good—it’s a fiercely competitive area—they’re at the bottom of the market. You get what you pay for (as they say). At the same time, “cheap” guitars like these have come a long way in the last ten years and they’re excellent for starting out, before deciding to mortgage your house on that expensive vintage Fender or Les Paul Gibson mentioned earlier.
Eventually, silicon transistors replaced germanium ones, helping to combat the inconsistent sounds of the germanium version (each circuit varies, and they were often affected by hot temperatures). Silicon completely changed the distortion, making it brighter, edgier, and more aggressive, as exemplified by the famous Electro-Harmonix Big Muff. The later introduction of the integrated circuit provided even more stability. Digital emulators can now universalize effects in a standalone unit. Materials don’t lie, however; when compared to their analog ancestors, the digital units lack the unique wildness of the germanium effect.
Here’s one more British amp company, and one that might fly a bit under the radar for a lot of guitarists. Check out the Ironheart, Lionheart, VH and GH series for awesome British tube sound. Laney’s Linebacker or PRISM series of modeling/emulation amps might be just what you need if you’re in a situation where you have to nail a lot of different tones. No matter what your style or genre there is probably something in the Laney lineup to meet your needs.

The “fatter wire = fatter tone” equation is nothing new. Ever since jumbo frets have been available, many great players—Rory Gallagher, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Kenny Wayne Shepherd— have been known to re-fret their Fender Stratocasters in particular with jumbo wire (vintage-spec Strats arguably provide a more dramatic before and- after picture than some other guitars, since they were born with narrow frets). More metal in any fixed component usually means a greater vibrational coupling between string and wood, so there is presumably something to this theory. But what else changes with fret size?


For strumming, I've recently been using Virtual Guitarist Iron. They have a lot of similar strum types in each preset, but different enough that you can switch between them and it almost sounds like a real guitarist if you time it right and it is easy to use. They do a power chord type of strum. I also find if you run them through something like Guitar Rig, they sound a lot better also.
Today we are going to show you some of the best effects pedals from this category, which you can get right now. We have chosen a variety of flavors as well as price ranges, thus making sure that anyone can have access to a good reverb no matter what. More importantly, we want to use this opportunity to familiarize you with reverb as a guitar effect.

That’s not an overstatement, as traces of T-Bone’s influence can be heard in the early recordings of Albert, B.B. and Freddie King, Muddy Waters, and especially Chuck Berry, who adopted many of Walker’s signature licks as his own. A sharp-dressed, flamboyant performer who played the guitar behind his head and did the splits without missing a note, Walker helped reposition the guitar player from the sidelines to center stage, inspiring Buddy Guy, Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan to copy his impossible-to-ignore moves.
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