Playing different guitars in a music shop is a great way of familiarising yourself with each model's unique qualities but don't forget to take off any objects that could scratch the guitar. A music salesman will let you try as many guitars as you like but may not be too happy about the little scratch your coat button left. Your choice of guitar will usually be based on the type of music you wish to play and the aesthetic appeal of the colour and design.


For instance, during 1970s and early 1980s, Japanese manufacturer Tokai Gakki produced superb replicas of 1957–59 vintage Les Pauls, and replicas themselves were gradually highly regarded. In the 1980s, to respond to the high demand for vintage models, Gibson itself began to offer a line of “Custom Shop models”, almost accurate reproductions of early Les Paul crafted by the Gibson Guitar Custom Shops.
Maybe you'd rather check out the legendary "Marshall Sound" in all its glory? If so, flip the switch on the Marshall DSL40C 40W All-Tube 1x12 Guitar Combo Amp. This all-tube powerhouse is great for gigging guitarists, thanks in part to its fantastic projection and its Pentode/Triode switch that allows the performer to drop the power down from 40W to 20W on the fly for even more versatility. When only the best will do, nobody delivers like Marshall.
Nothing sounds as good as a tube amp turned up to 10. You can do this with some old amps, and they will sound fairly clean; others will explode. Use caution and keep an eye out for plumes of smoke. Newer tube amps generally have separate preamp and master-gain controls that can duplicate the gritty anarchy of yore, minus the lease-breaking SPLs. For jazz and other clean guitar styles, it's okay to turn the volume down a bit, as long as you don't "underdo" it.
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A Twitter follower once asked me what electric guitar I’d recommend for a beginner with a max budget of around $200 total (for guitar, amp, tuner, etc.). So, I wrote a blog post for her where I recommended two all-in-one “starter packs” that are a great value for someone with such a low budget. The guitars in those starter packs are worth around $150, give or take.
Potentiometers are used in all types of electronic products so it is a good idea to look for potentiometers specifically designed to be used in electric guitars. If you do a lot of volume swells, you will want to make sure the rotational torque of the shaft feels good to you and most pots designed specifically for guitar will have taken this into account. When you start looking for guitar specific pots, you will also find specialty pots like push-pull pots, no-load pots and blend pots which are all great for getting creative and customizing your guitar once you understand how basic electric guitar circuits work.
Silvertone was the “musical” brand for the Sears, Roebuck & Company, beginning nearly a century ago. The big boom was ukuleles in the ’teens and twenties. The first Silvertone product was a hand-cranked phonograph introduced in 1915. Silvertone radios were introduced in the early 1920s. Silvertone guitars appeared in the 1930s, with electric 6-strings appearing in the early ’40s
Lolol lame azz I knew if I kept reading your BS comment you would start nameing all your crapy azz guitars haha lol no one cares or gives a flying fuck what you have or own.... (What you must of sounded like when you were 12 and lame as today) Oohhh I'm sooooo cool I have jimi's guitar and eric's guitar cause I'm their nephiew ya there my uncles hmm mm both of them I own and play with there guitars all the time woooo hooooo...............
This is a great DVD, and Keith's style is very laid back, and easy to listen to. You can't help but like the guy, and once you start watching the DVD, you don't want to stop. He is extremely knowledgable, and it is like having an instructor right there with you. The DVD begins with the very basics, and works up to some quite complicated playing, so there would be something in this for everyone, from complete beginners (like me) to those looking for more challenges with their playing. For the price, I don't think you can go wrong.
In Vietnam, electric guitars are often used as an instrument in cải lương music (traditional southern Vietnamese folk opera), sometimes as a substitute for certain traditional stringed instruments like the Đàn nguyệt (two-stringed lute) when they are not available. Electric guitars used in cải lương are played in finger vibrato (string bending), with no amplifiers or sound effects.
Maybe it's time for you to start to think about what is comfortable for you to play. 10-46 is probably the most standard size used by players. Although, I'd put money on the fact that your Mockingbird came with 9s. Mine did, and they were the first things to go (very fast, but too floppy). While there is some merit to staying with 9-42 for familiarity's sake, making the move to a 10-46 set should be pretty easy to do while you're still learning.
German tonemeister and Vintage endorsee, the one and only Thomas Blug arrives in the UK for a promotional tour this weekend. Following an appearance at Northern Guitar Shows London International Guitar Show at Kempton Park Racecourse on Sunday, Thomas will perform the following in-store clinics to launch the brand new BluGuitar AMP1 Mercury Edition.
Have you ever heard a bridge pickup that made a guitar sound like a giant mosquito attack? If you've run into this problem, The Tone Zone is the solution. The Tone Zone is hot enough to qualify as a high-output pickup, but it has a wider dynamic range - hard picking will produce a lot of power, and softer picking will be much cleaner and quieter. It's got tremendous bass and low-mid response to reinforce the bottom end and make the overall sound bigger. The highest single notes have depth, and chords sound huge. Patented dual-resonance coils reproduce more overtones than you'd expect from such a fat-sounding pickup. It makes a great match with an Air Norton.
Vibrato: Vibrato effects produce slight, rapid variations in pitch, mimicking the fractional semitone variations produced naturally by opera singers and violinists when they are prolonging a single note. Vibrato effects often allow the performer to control the rate of the variation as well as the difference in pitch (e.g. "depth"). A vibrato with an extreme "depth" setting (e.g., half a semitone or more) will produce a dramatic, ululating sound. In transistorized effects, vibrato is produced by mixing an instrument's audio signal with a carrier wave in such a way that generates frequency variations in the sound wave.[81] Guitarists often use the terms "vibrato" and "tremolo" misleadingly. A so-called "vibrato unit" in a guitar amplifier actually produces tremolo, while a "tremolo arm" or "whammy bar" on a guitar produces vibrato.[83][84]
Bottom Line: The Boss ME-80 seems to be aimed at the beginner and intermediate guitarist who is getting into the effects game. What guitarists love about it is that it tries hard (and succeeds) at replicating the feel of messing with a pedalboard full of effects. Unlike the Line 6 POD HD500X, you won’t need the manual! We’re not necessarily taking a dig at the Line 6 pedal - that one very much has its merits, is FAR more customizable and editable, and arguably the effects and amp modeling sound a bit better. The Boss ME-80 is just a different style, and judging by the user reviews we read people really enjoy having all the knobs for all the effects immediately available. The Boss ME-80 is also a tremendous bargain considering how powerful it is. Sure, it’s not exactly cheap, but it’s a very well-made, intuitive, nice-sounding all-in-one multi-effects pedal which is great for practice, studio recording, and live use.

Though it gained immense popularity during the rock ‘n’ roll days of the 1950s and 1960s, the electric guitar was invented in 1931. The need for the amplified guitar became apparent during the Big Band Era as orchestras increased in size, particularly when guitars had to compete with large brass sections. The first electric guitars used in jazz were hollow archtop acoustic guitar bodies with electromagnetic transducers. By 1932, an electrically amplified guitar was commercially available. Early electric guitar manufacturers include Rickenbacker in 1932, Dobro in 1933, National, Epiphone and Gibson in 1935 and many others by 1936.
Dude everything your saying about Martin is basically true of Taylor. They are the two big brand names. Taylor is to acoustic guitars what Tagheur is to Swiss watches. The low end of an expensive world where thhe best stuff comes from tiny companies who don't advertise much or pay for all he shelf space at a place like guitar center. I'm not saying Taylor's aren't good-that would be ridiculous. I'm just saying your distinction between Taylor and Martin is laughable. They are both well known companies that can charge way more because of their names just like fender and Gibson can with electrics. For the same money think you get better sounding and lasting guitars from Takamine and Breedlove than Taylor and Martin just to name a few. But there are so many smaller luthiers that will make incredible stuff.
Cutting the RATE and DEPTH knobs too high will cause the effect to sound thick and chaotic. This is more so an attribute of the chorus effect in general and not a knock on the pedal itself. With that in mind, we would advise taking Roland's "formal" settings suggestions (pictured below) with a grain of salt, as long as you're using the CH-1 with an acoustic guitar. In most cases, we found that the pedal performed best on the lower settings, particularly with the RATE and E.LEVEL knobs cut before 12 o'clock.
Music Go Round® is your ultimate used gear resource—we buy used musical instruments all day, every day. We understand the value of your instruments and make it easy for you to sell or trade. Bring your used music gear, such as guitars, drums, amps, bass guitars and pro-sound equipment —we’ll pay you $$$ on the spot—and you take home that must-have piece to your collection.
Many music purists prefer analog effects. Since they don’t use digital conversion, the signal (purists argue) is less prone to loss, and is more pure as a result. It’s true that digital conversion can cause some natural artifacts of the original sound to become lost, and can sound more “processed.” However, as digital technology has evolved, this has become less of a consideration. Digital effects have the advantage of versatility and precision. Today’s multi-effects processors only exist because of digital processing; many effects can be achieved in a single unit through sheer processing power. Digital signals can also be used to control a wider range of parameters.

The woods used on the body and neck are worth considering too, although are unlikely to be a defining factor when you consider your purchase. Basswood features heavily as the body wood of many guitars in this price range because it’s affordable and has decent tonal properties. You will also find cheaper to produce woods like poplar and alder, although the traditionally more premium mahogany is also found on affordable guitars these days.
As the crowds at Beatles shows got louder, they needed louder amps. Jennings provided Lennon and Harrison with the first AC50 piggyback units, and McCartney's AC30/T60 rig was replaced with an AC100 head and an AC100 2×15" cabinet. Lennon and Harrison eventually got their own AC100 rigs, with 4×12"/2-horn configurations. In 1966 and 1967, The Beatles had several prototype or specially-built Vox amplifiers, including hybrid tube/solid-state units from the short-lived 4- and 7-series. Harrison in particular became fond of the 730 amp and 2×12 cabinet, using them to create many the guitar sounds found on Revolver and Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. Lennon favoured the larger 7120 amplifier, while Harrison preferred the 730 and McCartney had its sister 430 bass amplifier.
I doubt I can bring anything relevant to this discussion that hasn't been said already but since I liked the article so much and the subject has puzzled me since I got my first guitar, I jsut have to pitch in. My first guitar was a cheap Jackson-esque strat the brand was Cyclone. It was significantly lighter in weight than my friends Fender stratocaster and I liked it for that reason from the beginning. It was just much easier and more comfortable to play, esepecially while standing. Maybe because of this I've been biased to doubt the whole tonewood thing. My experience is that most 'guitar people' (at least here in Finland) seem to think that lighter wood is simply a sign of a bad quality electric guitar. I talked about this quite recently with a local luthier, who is very sience oriented and uses rosewood as the body. Guitars he makes are so light that when you pick them up at first, it is hard to believe they aren't hollow. So I asked him about his thoughts on the density and / or other qualities of the wood affecting the tone and his responce was pretty much consistent with the article. Anyhow he did mention the _theoretial_ possibility of the waves to traveling to the wood and reflecting back to the strings _possibly_ affecting the sustain. As someone stated, in real life physics there are never completely isolated phenomena but you can draw a line whether a factor is significant or not. John's comment above would support the more dense wood to be better but my guess is that when it comes to the sound that is audible to human ear, the material does not count. How a guitar feels is a totally different matter and shapes the way the player hears the sound drastically. My intuition says that lighter wood might convey the vibration to the players body which would partly exlpain Butch's experience with guitars with different materials. I've never thought about that before but do find anything else than the strings resonating (springs, screws..) uncomfprtable.
Wildwood Guitars is proud to be recognized as one of nine authorized online Gibson dealers. We invite you to browse our extensive inventory and discover the magic of one of the greatest American brands of all time. Located in the heart of Tennessee, the Gibson Memphis factory is known for crafting the majority of Gibson’s incredible semi-hollow and hollowbody instruments. These guitars are overflowing with the soul of the city they’re born in, and they represent the ultimate in both vibe and versatility.
So there you have it. An absolute workhorse with fantastic sounds, and just about a must-have pedal no matter what type of guitarist you are and no matter your skill level. Equally a perfect first pedal to buy as it is a perfect last pedal in your collection. The biggest downside is that it probably can’t be your only pedal, since you can only use one effect at the same time. Famous users include Russel Lissack of Bloc Party, James Edward Bagshaw of Temples, and Dave Knudson of Minus the Bear. At the “too good to be true” price that it sells for (seriously, we’re not just saying that, one of our writers immediately sold his DL4 and bought the M5), this is without a doubt the Best Bang for your Buck.
We love guitars, they are definitely one of the best instruments of all time. What we don’t love is spending crazy amounts of money. We decided to find out what the best electric guitar under 1000 dollars is. Most often when it comes to musical instruments, you can’t expect budget beginners’ instruments to be as good as the best ones that cost ten times as much, but that doesn’t mean that there aren’t bargains to be found. For any skill levels looking for new acoustic guitars click here. If you want the best of both worlds, consider looking at our review of the top acoustic electric guitars.

As someone else mentioned, it depends if this will just be a practice amp, or if it will be used to jam with others. Personally, I think a beginner should just get a small practice amp, but a good one. The reason is that you don't yet know what you will want tone-wise out of a gigging/jamming amp yet. So just get the best solid state modeling amp you can afford and worry about a bigger amp later.
The benefit of a compressor lies in that every note played will be at nearly the same amplitude, and therefore nearly equal in volume. This will help normalize tones that are sometimes lost in the mix because of complex overtones, and it will result in a more articulate sound. Notice that if you don’t pick all notes of an arpeggio at exactly the same pressure you will likely get a different sound for each note, especially if you are playing a tube amp. Tube amplifiers react dynamically to stronger and weaker signals it’s the allure of them and thus the non-uniformity of picking at different strengths will be exaggerated. A compressor will fix this problem and normalize all notes of the arpeggio regardless of the player’s technique and equipment, which is consequently why many soloists prefer them.
While the Boss MS-3 is a fairly recent release, it does have quite the number of reviews, most of them coming from users who have nothing but good things to say about their experience with the unit. One user summarized what most reviewers felt by saying that the MS-3 is a "game changer". But it's not just about its amp and effects switching, because many were just as impressed with the sound quality of many of its built-in effects, including its overdrive and modulation sections. It's compact and portable design is also very much appreciated, making it an easy addition to any setups.
That's right. It's neck first, then bridge height, then intonation (at least the way I do it). Nut height can be taken out of the equation by putting a capo on the first fret, so it can be sorted out later if there are any problems with it. Of course if you were to put a capo on the first fret, you'd need to compare that with the 13th fret when setting up the intonation.
No guitarist should ever be without a trusty amplifier to plug in and rock out. Without the invention and evolution of the amplifier, the world of popular music would be a very different place. Lucky for all of us, todays amplifiers are louder and more raucous than ever, filled with effects and features that will take you on a musical journey that you'll never forget. Some of our top brands in this category include: Fender, Acoustic, Bogner Marshall, Vox, Orange, and much more.
The fact that there are a lot of us belies a truth about learning guitar: It’s kind of frustrating. Unless you’re moving to guitar from some other kind of musical training, there’s a lot to adjust to right out of the gate. While a piano can sound reasonably good if you simply press a key, playing that same note on a guitar requires you to hold both hands the right way, situate the guitar properly, and make sense out of holding a pick.
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Goldburst, Redburst

Made of mahogany, just like the classics, the DT520 Destroyer's iconic body style has attracted many artists. Ibanez's biggest leap forward will continue to be appreciated by today's player: namely the mahogany slim neck grip and set-in neck that offer ultra-smooth playablity. No matter what the setting, the DiMarzio Air Norton pack this axe with a rich tonal palette. Gorgeous old school pearl/abalone block inlays make for a path back to one of rock's most dynamic chapters. The original Ibanez Tight-Tune bridge provides improved transfer of string vibration and better tuning stability.
5) BE KIND AND CONSIDERATE! /r/Guitar is a melting pot of people from different backgrounds and skill levels. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion. If you do not agree with something someone else said, please either have a polite discussion or do not comment at all. Remember that everyone is a beginner at some point. Any inflammatory, disrespectful, and/or hateful comments or usernames will result in a ban. We have a zero-tolerance policy regarding such comments/posts. Sub/mod bashing is not productive and will be met with a ban. Contact mods if you have a complaint. Please report any comments or posts violating these rules.
The pitch shifter is one of the most versatile effects in the pitch category.  Often used with a rocker pedal like a wah-wah or volume pedal, the pitch can be swept up or down by a specified amount in a smooth glissando-like bend.  It’s typical to hear a player use a range of one or two octaves for the sweep, so the shifted pitch lands back on its original note, but in a higher or lower octave.

This model comes in Takamine’s NEX cutaway guitar body, and features a slimline mahogany neck with 12”-radius rosewood fretboard. The result is an acoustic that plays really quickly, and is more than comfortable right up in the high frets. Ideal for virtuoso players. Takamine also use their own preamp system here, which includes three-band EQ and gain controls, mid contour switch, notch filter and EQ bypass. It all sounds great.

In his informative, yet relaxed style, Sean takes us on a complete guitar recording journey starting at the vibrating strings and ending at the DAW. You'll first learn how to tune and prepare a guitar for recording. Next you're off to investigate the world of the electric guitar. You'll see microphones and mic placement techniques followed by a deep look at amplifiers and what to do when you're working with combos and stacks.


My granddaughter really liked this book. I know it was used but the CD and the wall chart were missing. I wish that would have been noted in the comments. Some of the other book sellers noted that one or the other of these were missing so I didn't order from them. Nothing was noted in the comments on this. My granddaughter was happy with the book and wanted to keep it.
I'm only 3 months into this journey to become a musician, so a beginner, but absolutely love everything about this guitar. I messed around in the early 90's on old electric while in college, but never learned chords or any songs. When my wife acquired her old Sears-quality kids guitar from her Mom, I put new strings for something to mess around with on the weekends. Several weeks later, I got a cheap First Act electric for $25. Several weeks later a nice Takamine acoustic as the ears "learned" the notes and chords better. While switching from this quality acoustic guitar to the First Act, it was clearly apparent the First Act was a piece of junk. Notes and chords were just not clear and just not enjoyable to play. Well, this Epiphone is an awesome step forward combined with the Marshall amp. While I want to progress to blues scales in time, I've purposely focused on the major and minor chords and seamless transition between them. This guitar expresses the notes of chords so clearly. What I love most is the ability to slightly modify major chords like from Dmaj to Dsus4 and have it translate so clear as an example. Prior I never used the effects on my Marshall because it just sounded like a mess, but this guitar solves that issue. After a whole weekend of use, it felt like a big leap forward just because of quality. The fretboard layout helped refine the chords I've learned so far, so all strings were clear. Really helped practicing bending, hammer-ons and pull offs too. At any rate, for the money, it's hard to beat. I suspect that if this journey continues a more expensive guitar may be warranted in a few years, but as others have said, this will always be a quality practice instrument. Especially considering we spend every other weekend at our beach bungalow and it is nice not having to transport every time.
Photo: Pick up an acoustic guitar and what you have in your hands is mostly empty space! Inside, the large wooden body (which is called the sound box) is filled with nothing more than air. As you pluck the strings, the wooden body of the guitar vibrates, the air inside the body vibrates too, and it's the vibrations of the wooden body and the air that amplify the string sound so you can hear it. Acoustic guitars have those big holes in the middle of the case, under the strings, so the amplified sound can get out and travel to your ears. In other words, the hole works the same way as the hole in the end of a trumpet, flute, or any other instrument. Photo by Greg Pierot courtesy of US Navy.

Description: Body: Maple - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: Medium - Inlay: Acrylic & Abalone Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control - Pickups: GB Special - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Brown Sunburst - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case

Known for their distinctive jangle and chime, Rickenbacker guitars tended to be favoured by Jangle Pop, Power pop and British Invasion-style groups – bands such as The Who, The Byrds and The Beatles. The early Rickenbackers that made this sound famous were equipped with lower-output “Toaster” pickups. These pickups were phased out circa 1969-70 for newer “Hi-Gain” pickups, which had twice the output of their illustrious predecessors. This change was almost certainly due to the trend toward the louder “Rock” sounds of the 1970s, despite the earlier models being credited by Pete Townshend as being key to the development of “the Marshall sound” and his refinement of electric guitar feedback techniques[8]


John Mayer: features a select alder body, a thick C-shape maple neck with African rosewood fingerboard and 21 Jim Dunlop 6105 narrow-jumbo frets, American Vintage hardware and a trio of “Big Dipper” single-coils with a special “Scooped” midrange voicing and 5-way pickup switching. Available in a variety of finishes, including black with 3-ply mint green pickguard and gold hardware, 3-tone sunburst and olympic white with brown shell pickguard and as a limited-edition version with a cypress mica finish, white vintage amp knobs and a 3-ply parchment pickguard. In 2010, Fender also released a limited 500 run of John’s personal BLACK1 strat.

Overall length is 28 1/2 in. (72.4 cm.), 10 in. (25.4 cm.) width, and 1 5/8 in. (4.1 cm.) in depth, measured at side of rim. Scale length is 15 1/4 in. (387 mm.). Width of nut is 1 3/4 in. (44 mm.). All original and complete, and quite clean overall; there are a few small dings to the finish and some light checking-almost inevitable on the Eko-made Vox instruments. The only notable finish marring is one spot where a superglue repair to a cracked pickguard corner left a bit of residue behind. A very nice little player, with an awful lot of chime! Excellent - Condition.
The volume pedal is about as simple as a pedal can get. It is basically an external volume knob that you work with your foot. They are an excellent way to control the volume of your rig and can be placed at different places in your guitar chain. When placed first for example it can be great for volume swells (as we will see), reducing your amp gain by acting like your guitar’s volume knob. If placed after your gain section it will bring down your overall volume without reducing changing your tone or gain. You can really experiment with the placement of a volume pedal to see what matches your needs.
Some of the earliest electric guitars, amps-in-cases, pickups under the bridge, fiberglass guitars, built-in electronic vibratos. Sound curious enough for you? The subject of Supro guitars and amplifiers represents a profitable avenue for exploration by collectors and enthusiasts interested in the many curious and significant byways off the guitar superhighway, which can be enjoyed without having an oil sheik’s bankroll. While National resonator guitars have received superb attention by Bob Brozman, little has been written about this mysterious corner of the Valco universe. Well, with a little help from our friends (in particular, catalogs and invaluable information supplied by Mike Newton, Jim Dulfer, and Michael Lee Allen), let’s set the record straight.
If all other Telecaster models fail, the Standard Tele is a safe pick. The two Tele pickups provide a warmer tone and add more “twang” to your sound than the other pickup configurations we’ve seen. I’ve had some Telecasters get strangely noisy, with even the more expensive American models needing help from a good noise suppressor. It’s not a universal Telecaster problem, but the Tele pickups (especially the neck variation) can be susceptible to excess noise.
In one position, lug A and lug B are not connected (that is, the circuit is open). In the other, both lugs are connected (the circuit is closed). To use our seven-sound mod as an example: In one switching position, both lugs are not connected, so the neck pickup connected to the switch is not engaged. In the other position, both lugs are connected and the neck pickup is engaged.
Some bridges allow players to introduce vibrato into their performance by means of moving a vibrato arm (aka a whammy bar) that moves the bridge up or down. Bridges with this function are often called tremolos. (Note that this is musically incorrect since tremolo means a repeating variation in volume, not pitch, but has been used so long it is accepted terminology.) A tremolo system allows the player to rock the bridge back and forth to adjust the pitch of the notes being played. This is called a floating bridge, and is popular on many guitars. For beginners, it may be better to avoid a locking tuning system for their first guitar. They can be tricky to adjust properly, and can make even a simple string change frustrating for the inexperienced. However, if your budding Steve Vai has his heart set, don’t let that stand in the way.
The filters and shifters group also shapes the waveform but in a different fashion than the dynamics group. First and foremost, now that you've gotten rid of noise and extreme volume variances, you want to use an equalizer to tweak your tone. You may roll off extra bass frequencies and increase some high frequencies while dipping the mids. You want this done before you apply the more obvious effects in the next groupings.

And again. the no-brainer: your guitar just plain sucks.  If your bought your guitar at Wall-Mart for $19.99, PLEASE don't put my pickups in it!!!  Here is EXACTLY what you should do with it: keep it around until you are playing your first big club gig and you need to do something extraordinary to get the crowds attention.  As you thrash away on the final chord of the last song pick up THIS guitar, douse it heavily with lighter-fluid and light that puppy up!  Now that's getting more that 20-bucks worth of wow-factor out of that pile of Chinese dog-dung!
As his Tuareg brethren continue their separatist insurgency in northern Mali, the leader of Tinariwen again can lay claim to being one of the world’s few literal rebel rockers. Ibrahim gets credit for inventing the modern Tuareg electric guitar style adopted by Etran Finatawa, Bombino, and other Saharan musicians. He generates this gritty, grungy, churning sound by hammering open strings on his Fender axe in a laid-back desert boogie reminiscent of his late northern Mali peer Ali Farka Touré.

After the retirement of Kuhrmeyer in 1955, the company was taken over by Sidney M. Katz. The product line of Kay was shifted toward electric musical instruments on demands, and in 1964, the company moved to a new factory in Elk Grove Village, Illinois. In 1965 Katz sold Kay to Seeburg Corporation, and he became the head of Seeburg's musical instrument division. In 1967, Kay was resold and merged with Valco, but dissolved in 1968 due to financial problems.[9]
Make sure that only the notes you deliberately play actually sound. Guitar strings aren't isolated systems like the tone generators of a synthesizer; if you simply leave them open they may ring even though you've never actually played them. Always watch out carefully for such “rogue sympathetic vibrations” and make sure you properly stop strings that sound in unintended ways.
The last guitarist to follow in Segovia's footsteps was Julian Bream and Julian Bream will be 73 years old on July 15th 2006. Miguel Llobet, Andrés Segovia and Julian Bream are the three performer personalities of the 20th century. Do not understand me wrong, we have many guitarists today that are very excellent performers, but none with such a distinct personality in their tone and style as Llobet, Segovia and Bream. In all instrumental areas, not just the guitar, there is a lack of individualism with a strong tendency to conformity. This I find very unfortunate since art (music, theatre or the pictorial arts) is a very individual and personal matter.[31]
In the fall of 1954, Daniel started production of solidbody guitars for Sears, under the Silvertone name. He also produced the same guitars under the Danelectro name, sold to other jobbers. These early models didn't have truss rods but had a 3/4" square aluminum tube beginning at the peghead and through the body to the bridge. The bodies were constructed of solid Poplar wood. The Silvertone models were covered with a dark maroon vinyl covering, while the Danelectro models were covered in a whitish tweed material. Both lines came with either 1 or 2 pickups, concealed under a baked melamine pickguard. Concentric stacked tone and volume knobs were used on the two pickup models only. Notably, when both pickups were used together, the tone was much stronger. This was due to wiring the pickups in series, instead of parallel like most other maker's two pickup guitars.
The 1934-’35 Dobro Hawaiian had the relief sections around a round central bridge/pickup “cover” with a Dobro “lyre” logo between the pickup and the neck. The more-or-less rounded lower bout (cutout at the butt) culminated in two little pointed shoulders, which then tape into the neck, giving it an almost “Spanish” look if you squint and ignore the cast designs. The tapered head had two cutouts in the middle and a triple-stepped top extended on the bass side. The principal difference between this earliest Dobro and the one shown in Gruhn/Carter is the tailpiece, which was a curved, cast-in affair, unlike the rectangular tail on the later version. Also, the side relief panels are painted black, with the whole thing clear-coated to seal it. On this first Dobro electric lap there is no volume control. The jack is on the but, in the bottom cutout, next to the strap button.
Conceived in the early 1930s, the electric guitar became a necessity as jazz musicians sought to amplify their sound to be heard over loud big bands. When guitarists in big bands only had acoustic guitars, all they could do was play chords; they could not play solos because the acoustic guitar is not a loud instrument. Once guitarists switched from acoustic guitar to semi-acoustic guitar and began using guitar amplifiers, it made the guitar much easier to hear, which enabled guitarists to play guitar solos. Jazz guitar had an important influence on jazz in the beginning of the twentieth century. Although the earliest guitars used in jazz were acoustic and acoustic guitars are still sometimes used in jazz, most jazz guitarists since the 1940s have performed on an electrically amplified guitar or electric guitar.
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Over the years in my travels, I've seen more Peavey amps on real working musicians' stages than any other amp manufacturer. The fact that real, everyday working musicians use and depend on them also dictates that Peavey amps are out there making more money for real working musicians in total, than any other amp out there. Yes, I know, the big act shows have huge backlines of Marshalls behind them, but they are in the minority, as there are more lesser-famed bands and musicians out there working than there are "stars". I "stepped down" to Peavey almost 20 years ago, when I was beginning to have reliability issues with my Fender amps...issues I couldn't afford to keep having while on the road. I still have my old Fender amps, but I've been gigging regularly and exclusively with only Peavey for the past almost 20 years now. I still get the tone I want and need and the reliability I expect in order to keep making a living in music. And by the way, I've been gigging since 1963.
I don't understand why everyone is so "Gibson is the best". They have been going downhill for years. Unless it's a custom shop job, it is hit or miss. the same with Fender. Everyone likes them because of the mystique of the players that played them over the last decades. It's a "lifestyle cult" with name recognition. If you want a guitar that plays and sounds like a Gibson of Fender is supposed to but want to be guaranteed of the quality you are receiving and spend for a fraction of the money, then get a used USA Custom Shop made Washburn. You will never look back. I say used because the Chicago custom shop has apparently closed. Anything made there from about 1993 - 2008 that looks like a competitors guitar will outmatch the competitors version every time. You will notice that it is hard to find a used custom shop Washburn around. That's because they are the guitar worlds best kept secret. The people in the know get them - at a massively reduced price - and keep them. People hang onto their USA Washurns for the most part and there i a reason for that. They are that good.
MAKING A TEMPLATE Once you have traced out your design to the wood you can start routing. I recomend making a template first for the body rout out of 1/4" hard board or something equivalent to that. The professionals use cnc machines to carve and rout the bodies but smaller shops will use templates made from acrylic. The hard board works just fine, but might not last as long. You can also rout the body by hand and forget the template but if you mess up there's no going back so be carefull if you do.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Diamond - # of Strings: 6 - 12 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Custom - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Natural, Brown
It has a wide dynamic range and a 20dB attenuator, which alongside a bass-cut filter should clear out any noise that’s not supposed to get over your guitar track. Add to this an integrated suspension to reduce any vibrations when playing on stage and you get a highly functional condenser microphone that won’t capture anything else than what’s supposed to.
Find a local music store to outfit you with a guitar suited to you needs and skill. Chords take a lot of practice and a skilled music teacher will save you a lot of time. I have played publicly with live bands and though each player’s skill levels were different we still made a good sound. Find a simple song with just a few simple chords and practice until you learn the chords and strumming pattern. Then move on to a new song. My catalogue of songs has over 1000 songs at different skill levels. Don’t give up or you will never be happy! The price for a quality instrument will be worth it in the long run!
Lyle guitars were some of the best COPY CAT guitars made during the LAWSUIT years - years where Lyle (made in Japan) attempted to COPY higher end American made Gibson and Fender guitars - hence 'lawsuit' guitars. There are some other companies that attempted to 'copy' American instruments but many of those were made in Korea or other countries and were not of the quality that the Japanese 'Lyle' copies of American instruments. They would have done well to make their own branded guitars - they're very well made. Another 'copy' company from that era is Ibanez - they made excellent instruments, too, and they paid quality guitarists to help them market their marque - George Benson, for example. Enjoy your guitar.
Make sure the notes you do want to play actually come out well-audibly. Good technique and dynamics go a long way here. Listen to your playing and take care that important melodic notes really come out, whereas accompaniment is often better subdued. Palm mute is useful so you can give notes a distinct loud attack without causing an indistinct muddle of cross-ringing notes. Also, make sure you play well in time and with good intonation.
Welcome to OvationGallery.com.  This is my personal website for displaying photos of my various Ovation guitars.  I have been a player and collector of these fine instruments for over 30 years.  Although I don't profess to be an expert on all things Ovation, I do have a passion for their artistic and sonic beauty which I hope you will share.  My collection is always evolving, at one point  numbering over 50 guitars.  At one time or another I've been lucky enough to own almost every type of Ovation and Adamas guitar as well as some one-of-a-kind and truly collectable specimens.  All of these guitars are wonderful and it is my pleasure to share them with you on this website.     Dave   

Guitar amplifiers generally incorporate at least a few effects, the most basic being tone controls for bass and treble. There may be some form of "overdrive" control, where the preamplifier's output is increased to the point where the amplitude overloads the input of the power amplifier stage, causing clipping. In the 1970s, as effects pedals proliferated, their sounds were combined with tube amp distortion at lower, more controlled volumes by using power attenuators, such as Tom Scholz's Power Soak, as well as re-amplified dummy loads, such as Eddie Van Halen's use of dummy-load power resistor, post-power-tube effects, and a final solid-state amp driving the guitar speakers.
Similar to the previous model we mentioned, Squier by Fender Bullet Strat represents the Stratocaster beginner family. It’s a guitar full of tradeoffs, but you are rarely going to find a model more capable in this price range. I’ve played a lot of these, and even have one which I use strictly for practicing at home. I like it, even though it’s somewhat limited.
I HAVE A P38-12E I BELIEVE MINE WAS MADE IN SPAIN ALSO. LATER THEY WERE MADE IN MIAMI AND LATER IN CHINA KEEP IT IN GOOD SHAPE I HAVE MANY GUITARS ACOUSTIC AND ELECTRICS. EXCELLENT ACTION AND SOUNDING GUITARS FOR THE PRICE I HAVE GIBSON,EPIPHONE,IBENEZ, THE BEST SOUNDING 12 STRING I EVER OWNED WAS A TAKIMINE. WHICH WAS STOLEN IN LAS VEGAS. EVEN HAVE A 12 STRING ACOUSTIC I MADE. I ADDED A FISHMAN AND MADE IT ELECTRIC I ALSO PUT A TUNEMATIC BRIDGE ON IT. THEY ALL HAD DIFFERENT SOUNDS BUT THE ACTION ON THE PALMER IS THE BEST. I EVEN HAD A VICTORIA VIOLIN BASS WAY BEYOND A HOFNER. JUST BECAUSE YOU DIDN'T PAY BIG BUCKS DOESN'T MEAN ITS NOT BETTER THAN A MARTIN. I PLAYED MY UNCLES MARTIN HE MADE AT THE FACTORY WHEN HE WORKED THERE. AND IT CAME NOWHERE CLOSE TO MY PALMER OR TAKAMINE. PALMER CAME CLOSE TO MY 1960s GIBSON DOVE. DOVE HAD A BETTER SOUND PALMER HAD BETTER ACTION. HOLLYWOOD PHIL. GUITARIST AND SINGER FOR THE GWB BAND. I'M ALSO HEAD SOUND AND LIGHTING TECH FOR THE METAL BAND BLACKFATE.
Except for the Epiphone Les Paul Express’s total domination of the mini guitar category, there was no clear leader among the guitars, and our picks are the guitars that got the best average ratings. Our testers found lots to like in many of the guitars we tried, and you may find an axe you like better in our competition section below, where we include comments on all the guitars we tested.
The filters and shifters group also shapes the waveform but in a different fashion than the dynamics group. First and foremost, now that you've gotten rid of noise and extreme volume variances, you want to use an equalizer to tweak your tone. You may roll off extra bass frequencies and increase some high frequencies while dipping the mids. You want this done before you apply the more obvious effects in the next groupings.
Ibanez brand guitars are manufactured at a variety of factories in several countries under contract from the brand's owner, Hoshino Gakki Group. The catalogs scanned and linked below represent output from the year 1971 through the present. During the 1970's and most of the 1980's, Ibanez guitars were made almost exclusively in Japan, and the majority of electric models were made at the Fujigen Gakki manufacturing plant.
By definition, distortion pedals are designed to adulterate the guitar’s signal in and of themselves. To use a rough analogy to tube amp tone, where overdrives are looking to take you into anywhere from pushed to cranked JTM45 or tweed Bassman, distortions aim to do the Mesa/Boogie Triple Rectifier, Bogner Ecstasy, or six-Laney-full-stacks trick in a 3"x5" box. These pedals unashamedly screw with your sound. They generally filth it up and slap their own notion of the ideal heavy rock or metal EQ all over your tone’s backside. But of course they will also boost the guitar signal as well (depending on the volume/output/level settings), and the sound we associate with them is still some confluence of pedal and amp, not to mention guitar.
The goal is to find the body shape and configuration that appeals the most to your eyes and ears. The most straightforward choice for beginners will be the solidbody for its durability. Players who are looking to expand their sonic palette are usually the ones who will take interest in semi-hollow and hollow body guitars. For more information on this topic read The Different Types of Electric Guitars Explained.
Having said this, if it’s for a child under 12 we normally do recommend a nylon string as it’s easier for them to press the strings down. Some children can have tougher hands than others, so if you have a rough and tumble child, they mght be able to handle steel strings earlier than usual. Check out our buying guide for Choosing a Guitar for a Child for more information.
You’ll find a full slate of dedicated bass stompbox effects as well as many multi-effects pedals and processors. Like their guitar-friendly cousins, bass effects offer most of the same tone shaping capabilities, including chorus, reverbs, delays, phasers, and tremolos. Because of the bass’s unique sound dynamics that reach deep into the lower frequencies, many bass effects are focused around compression and limiters that help keep a lid on destructive subsonic sound waves that can damage gear. Typically, many guitar effects are not optimal when used with a bass.
For guitarists who must have original-era Strat® sound, look and feel, the Classic Series '60s Stratocaster Lacquer epitomizes the instrument during its second decade, when musicians used it to conjure and create electrifying sounds never before imagined or experienced. With authentic features including a nitrocellulose lacquer finish in classic Fiesta Red, everything about it takes you back to a wildly creative time when rock music came into its own—from surf to psychedelia and more—and players started to discover in earnest just what a phenomenal instrument the Stratocaster really was.
In 1931, Martin reintroduced the dreadnought with X-bracing and two years later gave it a modified body shape to accommodate a 14-fret neck, and it quickly became their best-selling guitar. The rest of the industry soon followed[citation needed], and today the “dreadnought” size and shape is considered one of the “standard” acoustic guitar shapes, iconic for its use in a wide variety of musical genres.

All of the guitars on this list except for the Blueridge BR-160 are equipped with an electronics system that make them stage- and studio-ready. You can simply plug and play when you need to perform in front of an audience in a crowded or big venue where there’s a lot of ambient noise. If you don’t need amplification – for example if you’re just practicing at home – these guitars sound great unplugged as well.
For one thing, the signal hasn't really "left the guitar" until the strings stop vibrating completely. In electrical sense, you can only say it's "left the guitar" for a given window of time. It's not unrealistic to think that what's happening ongoing in the guitar can affect the future signal (the pickups don't simply pickup an instantaneous signal then stop abruptly)
Ibanez' strategy to have virtuoso guitarists as endorsers have paid off big time, allowing them to not only produce signature instruments, but to also improve on their production line guitars using the ideas they compiled from various artists. Among their many signature instruments, the Ibanez JEM series is easily one of the most easily identifiable, thanks to its affiliation with guitar wizard Steve Vai and its unique monkey grip handle, which is carved into the body.
Jazz guitarists are not limited to single note improvisation. When working with accompaniment, chord solos are created by improvising chords (harmony) and melody simultaneously, usually in the upper register on strings 1,2,3 and 4. Wes Montgomery was noted for playing successive choruses in single notes, then octaves and finally a chord solo - this can be heard in his improvisation on the standard Lover Man (Oh, Where Can You Be?). When playing without accompaniment, jazz guitarists may create chord solos by playing bass, melody and chords, individually or simultaneously, on any or all strings - such as the work of Lenny Breau, Joe Pass, Martin Taylor and others. This technique can be also be incorporated into unaccompanied soloing: for instance Django Reinhardt's "improvisations", as he called his solo pieces.
While it was produced, Ovation’s super-shallow 1867 Legend was the recommended guitar in Robert Fripp‘s Guitar Craft.[22][23] Tamm (1990) wrote that the acoustic 1867 Legend has “a gently rounded super-shallow body design that may be about as close to the shape and depth of an electric guitar as is possible without an intolerable loss of tone quality. Fripp liked the way the Ovation 1867 fitted against his body, which made it possible for him to assume the right-arm picking position he had developed using electric guitars over the years; on deeper-bodied guitars, the Frippian arm position is impossible without uncomfortable contortions”.[22]
On Martin guitars, this is a really big deal. Martins all seem to have a problem with the "neck set" on many of their guitars before 1970. High string action is the result, making the guitar very difficult to play. This can only be fixed correctly by a "neck set" (removing the neck on the guitar, and refitting the neck at a slightly increased angle, which lowers the string action). If done correctly, this does not affect the value of the guitar (and in fact can make it more valuable, as the guitar is much more playable). Generally speaking, most players would agree if the "string action" is more than 3/16 inch (5 mm) at the 12th fret, the guitar needs a neck set. This measurement is taken from the bottom of the low-E string, to the top of the 12th fret.
3/4 guitars are fine for children under the age of 11, or as travel guitars, but if you want to learn properly, then buy a full-size guitar at the start. I started on a full-size classical guitar right back when I was knee-high to a grasshopper; initially, it's hard, but your fingers adapt fast enough and you will soon develop flexibility and dexterity. For children under 11, a 3/4 guitar is an option, but even then I still feel that full-size is better. Check out all the amazing 6-year-old kids playing amazing stuff on the internet, 9 times out of 10 they are playing full-size instruments.

A list that's bound to be disagreed with, and I do. Although I love Hendrix, Clapton, etc. I'm still most impressed with Mississippi Fred McDowell. Bass line, rhythm, lead slide, and singing simultaneously and effortlessly. Several video performance on DVD are available, in case you listen to just an audio recording and wondered "who are the other guitarists playing, they're really good together?" nope, just Fred.


When the tone pot is set to its maximum resistance (e.g. 250kΩ), all of the frequencies (low and high) have a relatively high path of resistance to ground. As we reduce the resistance of the tone pot to 0Ω, the impedance of the capacitor has more of an impact and we gradually lose more high frequencies to ground through the tone circuit. If we use a higher value capacitor, we lose more high frequencies and get a darker, fatter sound than if we use a lower value.


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The Fender Stratocaster features cutaway horns that give musicians access to higher frets. The back of the body is designed for comfort for longer performances. These guitars have three single coil pickups which transfer the string vibrations to the amplifier. They can all be turned on at once to produce a wide range of sounds. It also features a tremolo bar which allows you to lower or raise the pitch, much like tremolo pedals themselves, by pulling up or down on the bar to produce different effects. Stratocasters are the best option if you like to dabble in different playing styles and music genres.


Clean or replace switches. To clean switches use solvent such as contact cleaner in a spray into the toggle itself, you may also use other solvents such as WD-40, always work the solvent around by using the switch as indented. To replace switches first obtain a proper switch that applies with your guitar, then soldering in accordingly. Work in a well-ventilated space to avoid harmful fumes from solder or solvents.
Very difficult guitar to put down. I was browsing local guitar shops, looking for a deal on a used MIM Stratocaster, just to have, I'm an SG man. This guitar caught my eye and the store owner was kind enough to allow me a little play time with this visually stunning guitar. I think I was expecting another copy of Fender's Stratocaster, given the shape and three single coil pickups. From the first strum I knew this was something different, tonally like a cross between a Strat and a "Rick". That's a very big deal. Finish was excellent and setup close to ideal for me, so I wound up with a new guitar for roughly what I expected to pay for a used model. Getting home I immediately ran through my amps, trying to find something to complain about. I'm lucky to have a few tube amps known for excellent clean channels. This is my preference, and this guitar does not disappoint. Think 60s Ventures, dripping with reverb. Yeah! Overall this guitar gives a great range of tone, is comfortable though just this side of heavy and seems to be very well made. Moderate use of Leo Fender's brilliant trem doesn't seem to effect tune. The guitar came strung with 9s, though I've since moved to 10s, my personal preference. And it fits a Strat hardcase perfectly. To be crystal clear, this guitar doesn't replace any of the legends, such as my beloved SG's or Strats. Instead, it provides a beautiful and unique enhancement for guitarists that favor those instruments.
Very large cabinets, such as 8x10" cabinets, may have both wheels and a long "towel bar"-style handle to facilitate moving the equipment. Some 8x10" cabinets have handles on the top and bottom to facilitate two-person carrying of the cab. Some combo amplifiers have wheels and a retractable carry handle, to enable bassists to walk while pulling their bass amp; this can enable bassists to walk onstage with their bass and amp or walk to a venue with their gear.
Up for sale, a 1961 Fender Super in excellent condition and in perfect working order. And of course this is the most compact Brownface-era amp to feature the "Harmonic Vibrato" circuit. The circuit has just been thoroughly tested by our techs here at Mike & Mike's Guitar Bar and almost all of the original blue Ajax capacitors in the preamp are intact.
Fuzz gained much glory from the sixties and seventies when popularized by musicians such as Jimi Hendrix. Today, fuzz pedals have evolved into a staple for some bands and is capable of producing everything from a singing, warm sustain to a scratchy, velcro sound. The mainstay of a fuzz pedal's sound is produced by an electrical component called a transistor. Fuzz pedals today can be created from silicon transistors, or germanium transistors. Silicon is known to produce a slightly harsh or bright sound (some consider it sterile) while germanium typically accentuates the low end and produces a warmer sound. Just as extreme settings on a silicon fuzz pedal can easily produce a harsh, glass-like sound, extreme settings on a germanium transistor based fuzz can produce an overly warm, and muted tone.
Rule 4 - The technology further defines the order. Let's give a couple examples here. If you don't use your noise gate before your compressor, you'll increase the volume of your noise which renders your noise gate useless. If you send an impure signal like heavy distortion to a harmonizer, the harmonizer will be very inaccurate, thus you want to apply distortion to the harmonized signal and not the other way around. If you compress before using equalization, the compressor may act on frequencies you don't intend to keep in the signal, thus you should EQ first.

Unfortunately there are a few who are not too happy with with some of the default patches, they caution that the PODHD500X is not a plug-and-play unit. While you can get good tones with a bit of tweaking, you can get even better tones with more experience, so the learning curve can be a bit steep for some. For best results, you ought to research the actual gear that your favorite musicians use, along with their settings and use them as your starting points to creating your own tones. Thankfully, there are user made presets that you can also use as base for your own virtual signal chain.
The greatest all time innovative guitarist to come out of the UK. Such a distinctive style and sound which is most important. Many guitarists have a similar sound and tone to others. This guy got me hooked on the sound of the guitar from a young age and I have tried to find others in a similar vein to no avail and I own over 2000 rock/metal CD's and have followed the scene since the mid 80's. A totally under estimated guitarist in my opinion. Long live The Cult.
Are you seeking reliable information and or the evaluation of your vintage guitar's actual real world value today?.... JVGuitars has a simple solution and that is a Joe's Vintage Guitars E-Guitar Appraisal and they are only $45.00 per instrument its fast and its painless and will be conducted by email with no need for damage risk or shipping to and from. Help support JVGuitars service today and go ahead and just order your E-Guitar Appraisal NOW!.. We can send a quick Paypal invoice to you for this E-Appraisal and get started.... ORDER YOUR JVG- E-Guitar Appraisal TODAY! email us your request NOW for your Appraisal at JVGuitars@gmail.com
There’s a common belief that certain strings are better for beginners than others. While nylon strings can be easier on beginner’s fingers, the main thing that matters when it comes to guitar strings is the style of music you are planning to play, because the difference in feel and sound between the two materials is significant – even for a beginner.
Many recordings feature multiple guitar tracks playing simultaneously, but sometimes this can clutter up the mix. Another approach is to make each part sound distinctive by using different combinations of guitars, amps and effects. Panning the guitars to various areas of the stereo spectrum will create space for each part, while subtle use of ambient effects can create a sense of depth. EQ can be used to help guitars blend together. Try cutting certain frequencies from one guitar track and boosting those same frequencies in another.
The simplest guitar amplifiers, such as some vintage amps and modern practice amps, have only a single volume control. Most have two volume controls: a first volume control called "preamplifier" or "gain" and a master volume control. The preamp or gain control works differently on different guitar amp designs. On an amp designed for acoustic guitar, turning up the preamp knob pre-amplifies the signal—but even at its maximum setting, the preamp control is unlikely to produce much overdrive. However, with amps designed for electric guitarists playing blues, hard rock and heavy metal music, turning up the preamp or gain knob usually produces overdrive distortion. Some electric guitar amps have three controls in the volume section: pre-amplifier, distortion and master control. Turning up the preamp and distortion knobs in varying combinations can create a range of overdrive tones, from a gentle, warm growling overdrive suitable for a traditional blues show or a rockabilly band to the extreme distortion used in hardcore punk and death metal. On some electric guitar amps, the "gain" knob is equivalent to the distortion control on a distortion pedal, and similarly may have a side-effect of changing the proportion of bass and treble sent to the next stage.
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Personally, I chose the Everlast version of Folsom Prison Blues because I find that the Everlast cover is so much more fun to play along with. The Everlast version is a little bit faster to play along with, but I think of a twelve bar blues while I’m doing the chord progression with this song; it really helps me to keep up and maintain a steady tempo.

Chorus: Chorus pedals mimic the effect choirs and string orchestras produce naturally, by having slight variations in timbre and pitch, by mixing sounds with slight differences in timbre and pitch. A chorus effect splits the instrument-to-amplifier audio signal, and adds a slight delay and frequency variations or "vibrato" to part of the signal while leaving the rest unaltered.[71][72] A well-known usage of chorus is the lead guitar in "Come As You Are" by Nirvana.[61]


If you want to measure the fret size on existing instruments, a good way to do it is to get an inexpensive dial caliper (think Harbor Freight etc).  You can measure the width with the outer jaws (make sure to zero out the calipers for accurate measurements), but for the height (unless you are going to notch the depth rod and subtract the difference), use a piece of something of a uniform thickness and drill a hole in it to accomodate the depth rod, place it across two frets and measure thru the hole (usually near the crown) to the fingerboard and subtract your piece's thickness.  When measuring fret height, it is always good to measure a few different places on the neck as the height may vary according to leveling and wear. On many guitars (but not all) the upper frets (if there is not a neck joint area hump that was accounting for during leveling) will be a good indicator of fret height.
Sure, we could get technical, and think about how the guitar pickups are used to capture the vibration from its strings (usually steel-cored) and convert it to an electric current. Such current is then modeled and altered through speakers and instrument amplifiers; there are several possible effects that can be applied to the audio signal that originates from the vibration of the guitar strings: reberbs, distortion, assorted gimmicks. But that's just the technical side of it, and it barely explains the unique sensations that can be offered by a good electric guitar.
The F-50 was the bottom of the line, a single cutaway with a single DeArmond humbucker pickup, like those on the previous acoustic hybrids, in the neck position. Controls were one volume and one tone control mounted along the edge of the lower treble bout, with black, chrome-topped knobs. This had a trapeze tailpiece with a sort of Cabinet of Dr. Caligari “M” cutout of the center. This was finished in a brown to yellow two-tone sunburst. The first prototype bore the serial number 179828. 1,165 F-50s were built from the middle of 1962 to the spring of 1965.

This vintage Teisco Del Rey Japanese guitar was made in the 1960s and has a classic sunburst finish and tulip shaped body. Manufactured in Japan by the Tokyo Electric Instrument and Sound Company (yeah, you got it…TEISCo!), the Del Rey measures 37 3/8 inches x 11 1/4 inches at widest and longest points. The fretboard measures 18 3/8 inches in length from the nut to end. My dad bought this one from some guy at his work, who later supplied him with the original whammy bar and headstock hardware which he found later! The relatively small body size of the Teisco Del Rey was appealing to my wife, who was on the lookout for a smaller-sized guitar she could play. My dad replaced the original tuning pegs with much nicer chrome ones from a 1980’s Gibson SG and we took it home. However, she realized that she didn’t care much for electric guitar, so we decided to clean it up and sell it. Everything was in excellent shape, but it did have some electrical issues. The volume/tone pots were filthy and you could hear a wall of white noise as you turned the knobs. At the time, I didn’t know the marvels of Deoxit and contact cleaners, so I didn’t know how easy it would have been to clear that problem up. One of the pickups or pickup selectors also didn't seem to be working. It played OK without noise or distortion when the volume and tone knobs were set to 10 and the pickup selectors set to "black up, white down", but the sound could still fade in and out sometimes if you bumped the buttons or switches the wrong way. Again, simple issues that I could have cleared up with a soldering iron and contact cleaner. In any case, we meticulously cleaned it and put it up for auction. Despite the minor problems, a bidding war ensued and now this Teisco Del Rey Japanese guitar lives in Australia! Overall, the Teisco is a good playing trashy guitar with loads of funky style. Scroll down for more Japanese Guitars from our collection!


Speakers and speaker stacks are a necessary partner for standalone amplifier heads. Take the total power level into account when you're looking at speakers, ensuring you're getting a stack with the muscle you need for the venues you play. Speaker configuration is also important, with larger woofers delivering more powerful bass and smaller tweeters bringing through the high-end.
Other notable effects include the tube-driven Leslie speaker series, which originally modified the sound of electric organs (such as the Hammond B3) until guitarists like George Harrison (and the Beatles more generally) began to use it for spacey chorus, tremolo, and phaser tones. The classic 60s model, the Leslie 122, was housed in a huge 41-inch wooden laminate casing and comprised of two motors (essentially two electromechanical horns) that had been rotated to create a Doppler-effect-based vibrato. These horns were, in turn, picked up by the dual speaker units. The Leslie 122 wasn’t even built to connect to a guitar, but bull-headed technicians fudged the electronics and made it work anyway. The laminate wood wasn’t just for aesthetics, either: It functioned as a partial enclosure, ensuring mellower tones, and different woods created different vibratos.
In the ever-changing world of jazz music, you shouldn’t be surprised to hear of some big changes to the jazz guitar market either! To reflect this we’ve tweaked our chart, removing a couple of models such as the Ibanez AF95FB and the D’Angelico EXL101, and adding five new six-strings. These comprise the faithfully reproduced Epiphone Masterbilt Zenith Classic and the thinbody LH-302T from The Loar. In the semi-hollow section, we added the Ibanez AM93AYS Artcore Expressionist and the beautiful Hagstrom Tremar Viking Deluxe, while the solid-body section saw the arrival of Fender’s Classic Player Jazzmaster Special.
The whole point of having a DIY guitar kit is to build a guitar that you like, so make sure that you get one with you're preferred shape and profile. Kits with classic guitar body shapes are the safest choice, as evidenced by their continued popularity in the market. But don't limit yourself with just the familiar, spend time looking at other designs to see if you're missing out on something cooler, something that better matches your personality.
The double-neck guitar is designed so that two guitar necks can share one body. This design allows the guitarist to switch between either neck with ease. The double-neck guitar will normally have a standard six-string neck and a twelve-string neck. Other combinations, such as a six-string neck and a fretless neck, are available. The double-neck guitar may be used in live situations when a guitarist needs a twelve-string guitar for the rhythm part and a six-string guitar for the solo break.
Originally started as a replacement parts shop in Japan, ESP Guitars – which stands for Electric Sound Products – got their guitar manufacturing business off to a rocky start here in the United States. They were taken to court by Gibson guitars for producing instruments that too closely resembled the American brand’s guitars. But, they settled out of court in 1978 and ESP’s reputation eventually grew, thanks in part to George Lynch, the guitarist for the 80s metal band Dokken, and his signature axe pictured here – The Kamikaze Model 1. Now, ESP guitars are wildly popular amongst metal and hard rock clientele and you can hear their instruments on the records of some of the brand’s loyal artists – including the likes of James Hetfield and Kirk Hammett of Metallica, Page Hamilton of Helmet, and the guys in Children of Bodom.

We spent 46 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top choices for this wiki. If you want to become a real guitar hero, you'll need the right ax. Our selection of electric guitars includes something for everyone, from simple, inexpensive options best suited for beginners to top-tier models coveted by amateur and professional musicians alike. We've ranked them all here by playability, tonal range, durability, and style. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best electric guitar on Amazon.
Family Owned and Operated, Lamb's Music has been serving the musical metroplex for over 30 years. Offering warranty on almost every brand of stringed instrument, Lamb's Music has been the go-to spot for repairs and customizations for companies like Guitar Center, Gibson, Gretsch,Taylor Guitars, and Fender Musical Instruments as well as many others.  

Let's now look at two real-life examples of what this would look like with a realistic setup. Our first example will be a linear sequence without an effects loop, while the second will use an amplifier effects loop. It should be noted that many pedals themselves can host their own effects loop, so how you set it up is up to you. It functions the same either way.
“The V100MU is everything I want in a guitar. The variety of tones from the Wilkinson W90SK pickups combined with the vari-coil enabling me to go from single coil to quasi double coil whilst the roller bridge and ‘classic’ vibrola is something I’ve never seen before on a contoured topped guitar. It really is a thing of beauty not just to look at but to play.”
Students and expert alike describe this guitar as a fun instrument, and goes further by commenting that it has exceeded their expectations. From its fast action playability to the quality of the finish, the Epiphone SGSpecial continues to rake in compliments. Several people even said that it comes surprisingly close to the feel and sound of a Gibson SG.

The best electric guitar isn’t one that just sounds good (however you may define good as) — it’s how it feels in your hands. We remember when we could barely start forming memories, going to our dad’s shows and him using his telecaster on stage. He had been playing since he was 5 years old (which we actually used his opinion for in this guide as well) and continues to play today 50 years later. As we grew up and learned guitar ourselves, it was more about what was comfortable and felt as natural as possible. Paired up with the sound and feel, there are a few more factors to take into consideration when you’re looking for the best electric guitar.


Second, the right side of the pedal is a feedback controller and a series of knobs that allow you to adjust the Sonic Maximizer feature. This hallmark of the Acoustimax basically streamlines your guitar's tone, matching up the lows and highs of your acoustic's resonance and projecting them at the same time. Without this feature, the tone of an amplified acoustic can be inconsistent, projecting higher frequencies earlier than the low end resonance.
Primarily, people also use Mahogany wood to construct the guitar neck. Since it’s able to prevent the neck from warping, you’ll never have to worry about any impact that can deteriorate the quality of sound. Furthermore, the body ends up with a spruce top. In comparison with cedar, spruce is much brighter and provides better echoes through the instrument.
Specs for your guitar include an ash body and carved maple top (rosewood was an option) bound with an abalone border, and a 5-piece maple/rosewood through-body neck. Other features include the bound 22-fret ebony fretboard with brass circle inlays, a matched-finish headstock with abalone border, 3-per-side tuners, two exposed humbuckers, and controls for each pickup. Its ivory finish is probably the most desirable color for this model, but the guitar was also available in a natural finish that highlighted the maple or rosewood carved top.
Maintaining these items does help though, perhaps every year or so remove the cover plate or pickguard and clean out any dust building up on the switch and contacts, it'll make them last for years to come so it's worth the minimal effort. You'd perhaps clean the fretboard and frets, so it's worth thinking about the other, hidden, functional parts too. 
While close-miking can indeed be punchy and muscular, you’ll often find it doesn’t capture the full breadth of your electric guitar tone – that is, it simply doesn’t sound the way your amp sounds in the room. That’s because when you stand somewhere near the middle of any room and play an amp that’s placed a few feet away, several other elements affect the sonic picture. The distance between your ears and the speaker (the “air”), the shape and size of the room, materials used to make the walls, ceiling and floor and/or their coverings, the ways in which sound reflects from them, along with other factors all contribute to how your amp really sounds in the acoustic environment. Most engineers find, therefore, that they need to use some form of distant miking when the aim is capturing a realistic amp tone.
Alternatively – and often most effectively – you can fix phase issues in the digital realm. Record your two-mic signal on two separate tracks, then zoom in on the sound waves in each of the two channels in your DAW’s editing window until they are huge and you’re seeing the full up-and-down crests and troughs of the waves. Now, drag or nudge the sound wave of the ambient mic forward (i.e., to the left of the screen) a few milliseconds at a time until the sound waves line up perfectly. Listen again, and you should hear a very different blend that is fuller, richer, and more “together.”
Another chord you come across every day, the E major chord is fairly straightforward to play. Make sure your first finger (holding down the first fret on the third string) is properly curled or the open second string won't ring properly. Strum all six strings. There are situations when it makes sense to reverse your second and third fingers when playing the E major chord. 
Ampeg was swallowed up by Japanese electrical giant Magnavox in 1971, when they wanted to get in on the electric guitar copy craze of the 1970s. Magnavox produced electric and bass guitars under the Stud badge as well as the successful Ampeg brand. It's been suggested that Magnavox was also responsible for producing Selmer acoustic guitar badges during this time, but that has not been verified. Selmer was sold to Magnavox around the same time they bought Ampeg, so it certainly seems plausible they could have made Selmer acoustic badged guitars as an offering for that market. Stud badged guitars were made until '75, with Ampeg guitar production continuing until 1980. Opus was another badge made by the company. Magnavox lost their interest in Ampeg shortly thereafter and the brand languished until it was resurrected over a decade later by another American company.
GuitarFX™ guitar software (it's on the market since 1997!) enables you to turn your computer into a guitar effects processor. Simply plug your guitar into the microphone or line input of your sound card, run this software, then press "Start" button. To stop playbacking pre-recorded guitar sounds click once on a picture of a small red lamp placed left to fx-slot with "Playback wav" title. Enjoy real-time crazy distortion smoothed by power filters and shaped by multi-band equalizers! Author of GuitarFX™ offers several presets, including "hard rock", "high gain lead" and "solo" effects. However, you can click through several menus to easily create custom tones. They can be saved as pre-sets for future use. Pre-sets can be assigned to "hot keys" F1..F12. Among the effects, you can apply 4 types of distortion, noise gate, wah-wah, compressor, EQ, flanger, reverb, chorus, delay and a number of other filters and effects. You can save your recordings to your hard drive. GuitarFX has the "software effects chain builder" with 16 fx slots. Clean guitar signals go to the top fx slot, then they are passed through all fx slots from the top to the bottom and go to the sound card output from the bottom fx slot. You can move any fx slot up. To do this place your mouse cursor on the top part of the appropriate "Tune" button and then do right mouse button click. Also you can move any fx slot down. To do this place your mouse cursor on the low part of the appropriate "Tune" button and then do right mouse button click.
You are bidding on a previously owned and in good playing condition Breedlove Atlas Series AD25/SM acoustic electric guitar. This auction is for the guitar and case you see pictured. No battery is included. Nothing else is included. It comes as pictured. Please take a moment to look at the pictures and get a better idea of what you are bidding on. There is a nick on the face of the guitar (see picture 3 for a better look). This guitar has scuffs and scratches from use. It could use a good cleaning. The electronics have been tested and are in good working condition. The neck is straight and the frets have plenty of life in them. The guitar is in good playing condition. Please take a moment to check out my other great items! Thanks ccloan.
The Fender Stratocaster is the iconic counterpart to the Gibson Les Paul. The smoothly contoured body is very comfortable to hold and play, and it’s one of the lighter popular guitar models. Usually produced from alder wood, they have a particularly rich, warm tone. Unlike most Gibson models, Fender Stratocasters make use of a floating tremolo system, which allows the player to produce a vibrato effect with a “whammy bar”.
The best way to get this sound out of an Octavia is by using the neck pickup on the guitar and by experimenting with the tone knob to get a more pronounced octave effect. Some other famous Hendrix tunes using the Octavia are “Who Knows” and “Machine Gun” from Band of Gypsies. If you want to put together a Jimi Hendrix pedal board, the Octavia is a must. There are many great reissues of this pedal on the market, but if you get a chance, like fuzzes, try a few of them next to each other. Even a few of the same pedal, as they often sound very different. One may have more of an octave effect, or be warmer sounding etc. This is due to the use of the transistors that can often have slightly different values that can make big tonal changes.
Visit “mom and pop shops,” big-name musical instrument retailers, Craigslist, eBay & Amazon to compare the reviews and prices of various models. The ability to make an educated decision based on the feel, sound quality and playability is important. Consider renting a guitar for the first month of lessons. A good teacher will serve as a guide throughout the buying process and will teach you to play well enough to “test drive” your options.
We as a team are always extremely inquisitive and wondered about something, which can be anything, happening around us. One day we planned to share these things which are enough to spice up soul of internet freaks and we made Coolexample.in. Here on Coolexample.in, we pick, research and display some really cool examples which hit us somewhere in our daily lives. The website let the visitors to explore chunk of daily stuff they may need to know about. You will get a bunch of trending information from around the globe. Every latest buzz, from footpath to limelight, we have it all, in Article, Charticle And Listicle way with the categories- Taza Khabar, Hottest In Cinema, Top Tenz, Education, Jobs & Career, Tech In Trend, Sports. So, if you’re a viralmaniac, quench your thirst here!
I myself own an Ashton and I think that they are overall really great guitars. I own an Ashton SL29CEQLTSB Acoustic Electric and it is simply amazing. It comes with a built in tuner and the strings last for quite a very long time. I have owned a couple guitars in my time and I am happy to say that the sound is impressing. So all of the other people who put down this guitar either know nothing about guitars, are super spoiled and want the best of the best, or just had bad luck with them.
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CHEVALET HARDTAIL Pour remplacer les cordes, faites passer les nouvelles cordes à travers les passe-cordes qui se trouvent au dos de la guitare et faites-les ressortir par-dessus les pontets. L'intonation peut être réglée en déplaçant le pontet vers l'avant ou vers l'arrière, en utilisant un tournevis cruciforme (+) pour ajuster la vis de réglage de l'intonation, située à...

Hopefully, this guide has given you all the info you need in order to go out there and find the perfect guitar for yourself. We went into some aspects of electric guitars that will shape your decision the most. Beyond the ultimate considerations discussed between "this or that," the rest is a matter of preference that only develops after you've had time to gain that much experience. Until then, we hope you score the best electric guitar you can from above, as they'll carry you the distance until you've traversed the path long enough to start getting peculiar and picky.  Happy shredding!
If you've ever opened up a non-digital pedal - for example, a fuzz pedal - there's a good chance you will have seen a dizzying array of tiny components. However overwhelming this looks, however, there's probably only a relatively small number of component types present - and on boutique or older pedals, these should be even more clearly identifiable.
Guitar effects pedals can range from just £30 each for cheap, Chinese-made copies to over £200 for boutique hand-made pedals with unique sounds. For the average good-quality pedal (made by a company such as BOSS, for example), you’ll be looking at around £50-£100. This might seem like a lot for one effect, but if you’re careful that one pedal could last years.

As an aside, people talk about “gold foil” like it’s some sort of rare mineral!  I see auctions all the time dropping words like “GOLD FOIL” pickups, and “As played by Ry Cooder!!!”  So far, I’ve identified 12 different kinds of pickups that had gold foil somewhere on them, and many of them are made differently!  What’s the point?  Don’t buy the hype!!  You have to play these guitars, or check out our videos to get an idea pertaining to sound.  Poor Ry Cooder gets attached to every darn gold foiled guitar ever made, geesh!  And I don’t even know who Ry Cooder is!
When creating your tone with effects, understanding the order in which you connect your effects is very important. Creating an effects chain is a lot like making a sundae. The Ice cream is the base of your sundae, followed by toppings and finally sprinkles. If you put the sprinkles and toppings in before the ice cream, the flavours will still be there and it may still be a delicious sundae but it is a lot harder to see what extras you added underneath all that ice cream.
Note that the information presented in this article is for reference purposes only. Amplified Parts makes no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the contents of this article, and expressly disclaims liability for errors or omissions on the part of the author. No warranty of any kind, implied, expressed, or statutory, including but not limited to the warranties of non-infringement of third party rights, title, merchantability, or fitness for a particular purpose, is given with respect to the contents of this article or its links to other resources.

STEM educators take part in a five-day institute focused on how to manufacture guitar parts for their classroom or for the nationwide network of schools that are implementing the project. Modularized curriculum with assessments will cover the content provided as part of the institute. The primary focus of the institute will be the application of CNC technology as it relates to manufacturing guitar components. The participants leave this institute with the modularized curriculum and a custom guitar body they have designed and fabricated. The additional parts necessary to complete the guitar are also provided.
I have 12 years whit my SL3 Jackson and 12 years whit my RG7420, so far I have replaced both POTs on the jackson, the frets are really worn out and FR chrome is peeling.. great guitar crappy components. oh, I havent had to replace anything on the Ibanez yet other than the stock pickups for something better. both are made in Japan =). So dont tell people that Ibanez sucks before actually owning one...
Aimee, by Pure Prairie League, Love,Me by Collin Ray, Where have you been, Kathy Matea, Landslide, Fleetwood Mac, The Reach, Dan Fogelburg, The Seven Bridges Road, The Eagles, Longer, Dan Fogelburg, Fire and Rain, James Taylor, Your The Lucky One, Allison Krause & Union Station, Time in a bottle, Jim Croce, Whenever You Come Around, Vince Gill, Man of Constant Sorrow, (as performed by Union Station),
Let’s start off with a guitar’s signal. As the driving force behind the entire effects chain, a guitar’s signal (more importantly, it’s voltage) must travel through the input cables and all of your effects pedals before it can reach the amp. As you can imagine, by the time a guitar’s signal finishes making its way all the way to the amp, the signal will undoubtedly suffer from a bit of degradation, losing its tone and body in the process. It's not your guitar's fault, it's simply the nature of electricity.

The RockJam RJEG02 is coming from the hills of RockJam’s successful 15 years of producing some of the best and highly selling brands in the market. This full size, quality guitar contains a whammy bar, a guitar strap, a 10-watt amp, spare strings, electric guitar picks and a gig bag—making it a complete package suitable for the beginner and professional electric guitar player.


Some types of wood that were commonly used in the 1950s are close to extinct today, and can no longer be used for mass production. For instance, import and usage are restricted for certain types of Mahogany, Rosewood, and Ebony, and large guitar manufacturers in the US have been raided by the justice department on suspicion of using illegal materials.
Amazingly well made and a beautiful guitar. The finish is incredible, it looks like a guitar that should cost a $1000 and up. Mine is the red color and found it in a pawn shop looking very rough, price on it was $99 and at first I thought it looked like a $99 guitar so I didn't pay any attention to it. I was looking a some Epi SG400s and a couple of Gibson's but for some reason I went back to the Samick. I had some cleaner with me and I grabbed a rag and started cleaning it up, after a few minutes of scrubbing this beautiful guitar appeared. I plugged it in along with the Epis and Gibson SGs and played them side-by-side and I was amazed at the sound I was getting from the Samick. I compared it along with the other SGs and the finish and the build quality smoked the others. I am all about American made guitars but this Korean made SG has completely changed my opinion about Asian made guitars, especially when I compared it to a $900 Gibson. I wasn't even looking for a new guitar but I couldn't let this one get away. I bought it and have played it for hours every day for the last week. It's amazing, the neck is the smoothest and easiest to play that I've ever seen, I like it much more than my Ibanez RG with the Wizard II neck I've got. I am now looking out for other Samick Artists Series guitars and if you see one for a good price try it out.

achieved by the creators. A lot of YouTube channels can be very amateurish and suffer from poor video quality, muffled audio and presenters who don’t work well with a camera. And it doesn’t matter if the lesson is coming from someone in the same room or from a studio on the other side of the world, the guitar teacher needs to be good. Someone who communicates clearly and makes you feel welcome.

The Line 6 Spider IV is the most fully featured beginner amps out there, yet is surprisingly inexpensive, only edging out the Orange Crush PiX CR12L a little bit on cost. The Line 6 Spider IV 15 offers four amp models, six built in effects, a built in tuner, a headphone jack, and a CD/MP3 player input. Everything a beginner needs to practice in one compact package. These features aren’t completely necessary for beginners to have, but they do serve as a nice convenience and the Spider IV does not cost that much more in the process to add them. On top of that, the Spider IV still manages to be straight forward and easy to use, despite all the built in options.
Reverb is a sound effect used both in music and audio engineering, which adds a spatial dimension to the original track. To put it into more simple terms, a reverb gives you an impression that the sound is originating in a large room. You are hearing the source sound but also its numerous iterations as it bounces off different surfaces. Reverb guitar effects pedals offer a simulation of this phenomenon.
But is the Fender Deluxe really as good as the name suggests? We certainly think it is! Even though it would be easy to just write it off as an electric guitar for country music, it’s actually really versatile and can be used for any other genre as far as we’re concerned. This is thanks to two vintage noiseless pickup configurations, one on the neck and one on the bridge, and a strat pickup in the middle.
The body is pre-drilled and crafted from basswood, while the maple neck is meant to be glued into the neck joint, something that requires a bit of care and precision. Because of its hollow body design, installing electronics can be a bit of a challenge, but very doable as attested to by reviews. Note that wood is raw and unfinished, so you'll need a bit more sanding and patching before you paint on it.
When it comes to combo amps, the speakers included will usually give you a good idea of what to expect in terms of power and performance. While bass amps are in a category of their own, guitar combos tend to use speakers of anywhere between 3″ right up to 15″. Obviously, the bigger the speaker, the better suited it is for the stage, while having more than one is an instant upgrade to the power available.
List of acoustic guitar brands that include the most reliable models available. Acoustic guitar brands include those from major manufacturers of musical instruments, including Yamaha, Gretsch, Gibson, and more. What are the best acoustic guitar companies? Users looking for a new guitar will want to research a variety of different brands to find the one that best suits their needs, based on function and features.
A free, guided tour of the Taylor Guitars factory is given every Monday through Friday at 1 p.m. (excluding holidays). Taylor’s expansive 145,000 square foot manufacturing facility is located east of San Diego (about 20 minutes from the downtown area) in El Cajon, California. No reservations are necessary for the tour, although the company asks that large groups (more than 10) call in advance at (619) 258-1207. Taylor encourages guests to arrive at its Visitor Center, where the tour begins, 10-15 minutes prior to tour time to sign in at the reception desk. The tour lasts approximately one hour and 15 minutes. While not physically demanding, it does include a fair amount of walking.
Our congratulations and deepest thanks on making Ibanez your choice of instrument. Ibanez standards are second to none. All Ibanez instruments are set up to our strict quality control standards before shipping. The purpose of this manual is to explain how to maintain your instrument’s finish and to keep your guitar playing as well as it did when it...
Multi-effects processors come in various configurations, too. Some are floor units that have built-in foot pedals and controllers so they can be operated while your hands remain on your guitar. There are rackmount processors (these can be fitted into a rack of recording gear in line with your signal chain) that incorporate a preamp for your guitar. The more sophisticated models have MIDI I/O for connecting guitar synthesizers to keyboards, modules, computers and other MIDI devices and include a divided pickup to attach to your standard guitar. These processors pack effects libraries that offer combinations of effects, amp models and stompboxes that can number in the thousands. Switching can be controlled by onboard knobs, foot controllers or guitar-picking technique. Expect to pay considerably more for a rackmount effects processor, in a range of three- to four-digit prices. 
I spoke with Matt “M@” Picone, of Fractal Audio, about the increasing use of modelers for today’s biggest acts. Their flagship modeler, the Axe-FX II XL+, is used by bands as diverse as U2, King Crimson, and Taylor Swift. Increasing numbers of top-level guitarists are discovering Fractal’s dozens of effects/amps/cab/microphone models and the obsessive tweakability inherent in their designs. In the credits of Fractal’s products, Matt Picone is listed alongside Cliff Chase, the company’s founder, president and DSP/Hardware engineer, as contributing to “everything else.” He says that title suits him because it spans a range of duties including support, artist relations, brand development, sales, marketing, PR, sound design, docs & manuals, e-commerce, business development, infrastructure and much more. Their products are not just for ultra rock stars, as Matt explains:

The Hummingbird Pro's unique look breaks the typical monotonous appearance of conventional acoustics, and it does so without straying too far from the familiar. It is easily identifiable by its uniquely shaped ornate pickguard, which matches the guitar's faded cherry sunburst finish. Whether you are on stage or just jamming with friends, you can be sure that this acoustic will stand out.
We guitarists can be slow to come around to new ways of doing things, heck we still prize the 1904 technology of the vacuum tube in guitar amplifiers, so it's a huge testament to Ovation's success that they've managed to be so successful while breaking the most sacred rules of guitar material and construction. Great examples of this are their Celebrity Elite CE44 and their entry-level Applause Balladeer AB24.

The 10.5mm string spacing allows for easy picking across strings, such as string skipping and hybrid picking. The snap and hold tremolo arm socket can makes it easy to load a tremolo arm, and the arm torque adjuster enables fine torque adjustment without any tools. The stud lock screws lock the stud bolts in place, for better tuning stability and resonance. The 2-point floating tremolo system allows for super smooth tremolo motion when either raising or lowering the pitch.

When Levon Helm of The Band sang "I pulled into Nazareth, was feelin' about half past dead" in "The Weight," he wasn’t alluding to a weary pilgrim’s desire for salvation. Rather, he was singing about a mythological trip to Nazareth, Pennsylvania, home of C. F. Martin & Co., makers of Martin flat top acoustic guitars. Founded in 1833 by a German immigrant named Christian Friedrich Martin, whose father was also an instrument maker, Martin...Continue Reading
What type of environment are you playing in? This is an important consideration when determining how many watts your amp should have. If you practice in an apartment surrounded by neighbors, a low wattage combo option is going to minimize potential conflicts. If you play live gigs in small club environments, it is possible to get by with as little as 50 watts. Larger venues require a larger amp that can move more air with its speaker. You should also take in to account how many other musicians you are playing with, and if there is a second guitarist, as you will want a tone cuts through the mix as opposed to getting buried.
Epiphone was once among the most significant competitors of Gibson. Later on, Gibson acquired them and, now, Epiphone form sits budget-friendly. However, the popularity of Epiphone as one of the best electric guitar brands was always there owing to their affordability and near to top-notch quality. Thus, choosing an Epiphone Les Paul guitar doesn’t mean you have to compromise much on the tone and specs. In fact, you get a guitar with specs comparable to Gibson – that too – on a much cheaper rate.
Adding to their already good value, most multi-effects come with built-in features that are essential to gigging and practicing, first of which is a built-in tuner. Looping is also a good feature to look for, thankfully it now comes standard for most units. Having the ability to record straight to a computer is another handy features that should be considered, as well as the ability to edit the settings via your computer or mobile device. Built-in metronome/rhythm is also a nice plus, especially for those who want to take their skill to the next level.

Practical - These sessions will involve exercising your fingers. For example, fingering chords would fall under this category, as the focus will be on getting physically comfortable with positioning and changing between chords, or experimenting with new strumming patterns. With lead guitar, the physical side covers techniques such as legato (you'll learn what that means soon enough!), string bends, speed drills and anything that involves the physical side of playing guitar.
While there are some obvious quality gaps, they do appear to be closing as time passes on. The hardware used on Epiphone is getting better, and the presence of the new ProBucker Pickups helps to elevate the brand to new heights. The fact of the matter is, while Epiphone is viewed as just being a cost friendly alternative to Gibson, guitar players gravitate to the brand anyways for its own special sound. While it may use the same Specs as a Gibson, they are far from equal guitars, including in the sound department (4).
At the more reasonable end of the price scale compared to other Gretsch guitars, sits the Gretsch G2655T Streamliner. While not an arch top like the guitars listed previously, this guitar does feature a hollow bodied design. As such, it perfect for clear, ringing chords and lead lines. Also in its favour is the G2655T Streamliner’s thinner body depth. This makes it more comfortable and slightly less cumbersome than the bigger, more traditional jazz guitars. You’ll also get more versatility from a ‘regular’ semi acoustic, meaning you can dabble in blues, rock and country with the Streamliner models.
Different forms of manipulation of similar bucket brigade delay chips were also at the center of the more advanced chorus and flanger pedals that emerged in the late 1970s. With ICs that themselves were capable of creating a controllable time delay in any given signal, the job of harmonically modulating part of a split, delayed signal to produce a warbling chorus or swooshing flange sound became a lot easier.

Hi! In this instructable I will be showing you how to fix and/or upgrade guitar electronics. This is applicable to most electric guitars, but I will be using a Fender Stratocaster. It is easier than most people think, especially if you know how to solder. Before you start, find a wiring diagram for your guitar and purchase the parts that are needed.


If you've ever seen an electric guitar, you'll have noticed that most of them have solid bodies that are thinner (and sometimes much smaller) than those of acoustic guitars. Although most electric guitars are wooden, the material from which they're made is not critical. As George Beauchamp (pioneer of the modern electric guitar) pointed out in his patent back in the 1930s: "The body may be varied considerably in size, shape and construction, and may be constructed of various materials without departing from the spirit of the invention"; his original design suggested the body could be made from "a simple integral casting of metal such as aluminum." Early electric guitars were made from all kinds of materials, including molded Bakelite (one of the first plastics) and sheets of soldered brass.
One cool thing about liking oddball old guitars is they always contain hope…and a challenge. By which I mean, no matter how obscure or exotic, you always live with hope that you’ll someday figure out what the heck they are and thrive on the challenge of trying to do so. At least that’s been my repeated experience over the last quarter century or so of playing guitar detective. That being said, this 1967 Apollo Deluxe was kind of the exception that proved the rule, in that it followed a reverse pattern, sort of backing into discovery.

That’s not an overstatement, as traces of T-Bone’s influence can be heard in the early recordings of Albert, B.B. and Freddie King, Muddy Waters, and especially Chuck Berry, who adopted many of Walker’s signature licks as his own. A sharp-dressed, flamboyant performer who played the guitar behind his head and did the splits without missing a note, Walker helped reposition the guitar player from the sidelines to center stage, inspiring Buddy Guy, Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan to copy his impossible-to-ignore moves.
I started to learn how to play guitar about 1.5- 2 years ago. My instruments are on the cheap/ lower cost side. I am disabled with a long life expectancy. I wanted a hobby that I can/ learn to do for the long run. I have five different guitars now ( all on the lower cost side ), They all sound good to my ear. One of them a Squire strat sounded horrible when I purchased it. I pretty much over a little time change just about everything but the wood. The Squire is a very light electric guitar as compared to my Epiphone Les Paul ( which actually strains my disabled spine ). So, It has to sound good to your own ear, and as equally important you have to be able to hold it for a period of time while playing to get the full enjoyment of the skill known as a "guitar player". Enjoy and be Proud. God Bless.
We would also recommend starting off with a DIY guitar pedal building kit. We created a list of the best DIY pedal kits here. Places like Mammoth Electronics and Build Your Own Clone (BYOC) have some fantastic sounding kits available – they even come with a step by step guide to lend you a hand along the way. Even Amazon has a killer tube drive pedal kit!
Fretsizes can be confusing.  They are small measurements but have a big impact on feel and the size designations can vary.  Its best in my opinion to think and talk of frets in their actual crown widths and heights rather than the old Dunlop numbers (the originator of the 6xxx numbering system) as they can mean different things to different people; i.e. Warmoth lists 6105 as .095-.047" while USACG has is at .090-.055" - these are two very different feeling fretsizes. 
An enduringly popular effect, with all sorts of uses for vocals, drums, guitars and synths, is genuine reverse reverb. This is where a reverb tail appears to increase in volume ahead of the sound that gives rise to it — a completely unnatural sound and something that's impossible to create in real time. It's easy enough to do in a DAW application though. First, find the section of audio you want to treat and reverse it. In the DAW I use, Digital Performer, there's an offline plug-in for this. Now apply conventional reverb to this 'backwards' audio — either by playing it through a reverb plug-in and recording it to another track, or by rendering it using an offline process (if your DAW offers this). In either case make sure you allow enough additional time at the end of the audio to capture the full, final reverb tail. In the screen grab I've done this by allowing 1500 milliseconds of post-roll processing.
An overdrive is almost always at its best played through a tube amp set at medium to upper-medium volume, since the amp itself is doing a major part of the job, the pedal just being the boot that kicks its butt into juicy break-up a little quicker. Conversely, demo one DI’d into a mixing desk or portastudio as described earlier, and in most cases the breed sounds absolutely awful: harsh, raspy, cold, and artificial. It can be a shocking look at the evil side of that $350 vintage Tube Screamer you just bagged from eBay. Now stop crying, and plug it back into your AC30.
Subtlety: You don't always have to make longer echo or delay effects obvious in the mix for them to be effective. Once you've set up the delay times and panned them to suit your song, try dropping the delay levels until you scarcely notice them during most of the mix (listening on headphones often helps set the most suitable level). This generally results in intriguing little ripples of repeats that you notice at the end of verses or during pauses, that add interest and low-level detail to the mix. Martin Walker
The Japanese copy juggernaut got off to a fast start, and the second major Univox guitar was the Lucy, a lucite copy of the Ampeg Dan Armstrong, again produced by Arai, introduced in 1970. This guitar had a surprisingly thin bolt-on neck (especially compared to the Ampeg original) and a slightly smaller body. The fingerboard was rosewood with 24 frets and dot inlays. This had a fake rosewood masonite pickguard with volume, tone and three-way select. Like the Ampeg, the Lucy had a Danelectro-style bridge/tailpiece with little rosewood saddle. Unlike the Ampeg – which had Armstrong’s groovy slide-in epoxy-potted pickups – this version had a pair of the chrome/black insert pickups jammed together at the bridge. Other Japanese manufacturers also made copies of the Ampeg lucite guitar, notably carrying the Electra (St. Louis Music) and Ibanez (Elger/Hoshino) brand names, with versions of the slide-in pickups. In ’71, the Univox Lucy (UHS-1) was $275 including case. Just how long the Lucy remained available is unknown, but it probably did not outlive the original and was gone by ’73 or ’74.
Electri6ity has been around for a while now, but I think it's still the cat's meow of sampled guitar libraries because of how deeply sampled and deeply controllable it is. Its wealth of articulations will allow you to create stunningly realistic guitar tracks, but the trade-off is that there are a lot of keyswitches and keyswitch combos to learn at both ends of the keyboard, and it's a big library that costs $400. For that reason, it may be a little overwhelming to be a "go to" library, but if you have the ambition to learn and use it, your guitar tracks will have no competition.
The interface does get the job done well, it’s just that I’ve seen better looking free VSTs. But for me, this is completely fine because while flashy interfaces are nice, problems like software issues and hard to see text occur.  None of that is here, and within a few hours, most users will feel fairly comfortable creating moderately difficult, but realistic sounding guitar parts.

We’ve all been there, and it’s actually pretty easy to fix once you know how. The reason we hit those walls in our playing or get bored with what we’re currently doing is that we start falling into set patterns with our playing (pentatonic scale over and over again, anyone?). Whatever we’re playing starts to feel stale and derivative because we’ve gone over it so many times, and it can end up being a pretty frustrating experience.
ZPS (ZERO POINT SYSTEM) OF ZR TREMOLO Ressort principal Butée Bloc de vibrato Tige d'arrêt Une fois la guitare correctement accordée, réglez le ressort principal pour faire en sorte que la tige d'arrêt soit en contact avec le bloc de vibrato et la butée. Si la tige d'arrêt n'est pas en contact avec le bloc de vibrato et la butée, réglez la vis de réglage du ressort principal jusqu'à...
You can think of these pedals like modulation effects that change nothing but the timing. They split up the signal in the same way, but time-based effects don’t usually make any major changes to the copied signal. Instead, they hold it back by a certain length of time before mixing it back in. This makes a few different varieties of pedal possible:
Pressing a string against a fret reduces the vibrating length of that string to the distance between the pressure point and the bridge, thereby controlling pitch. On nearly every Western fretted instrument, the distance between frets is a semi-tone of equal temperament, assuring the easy achievement of strong sounding chords and single notes that fit our hemisphere’s usual expectations for rhythm sounds and melodies. Understanding the virtues and limitations created by the order of frets opens up the door to ways to escape their constricts, like bending strings, playing slide, using whammy bars, delving into extended technique or trying fretless instruments.

Acoustic has never had much of a following amongst guitar players, but they made (original company out of business) some of the best bass amps that were ever made. Advanced solid state construction and creative speaker design finally gave bass players something besides Fenders lame sound and Ampegs wall of mud. To top it all, they are durable, ask my 30+ year old 360. Mosrite and Gibson basses and Acoustic amplifiers, life just doesn't get better.
The Orange Crush PiX CR12L is another fairly standard style beginner amp. It has the same standard features as most beginner amps. The Crush PiX CR12L is a little more expensive than some similar featured amps, like the Velocity V10, but it makes up for the extra cost with a better build quality, better tone, and a well designed control layout. The Crush PiX CR12L gives a lot of control over the tone, but manages to do so in a clear, easily understood control panel.

DISCLAIMER: Hoshino owns the copyright to all of the catalogs scanned in here. This website has NO RELATIONSHIP with the Hoshino Gakki Group and makes no claims to ownership of the linked scans. These catalog scans are provided solely for personal academic/research purposes, so that collectors and others who own one or more of these fantastic guitars can properly identify the model and year of manufacture.
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When it comes to guitar amps, American Musical Supply carries iconic cornerstone brands such as Fender, Marshall, Vox, and Orange. These are the names that have formed the foundation of guitar rigs worldwide for decades. We also stock the most innovative new models from such brands as Blackstar, Fuchs, Line 6, Paul Reed Smith, Supro, and a host of other incredible companies anchored by passionate engineers, technicians, and designers. With the myriad of choices available from AMS, how does one decide? All it takes are a few questions to get started.
Another negative I found was that this book focuses more on traditional music notation, and places guitar tablature into the background. As a guitar teacher, I believe that tabs are the next best thing to sliced bread, since it makes learning soooo much easier for beginner guitarists. And since learning the guitar is hard, anything that makes it simpler is more than welcome. On the other hand, if you want to learn to read standard music notation, this will be the way to go for you.

OK, when the list started it was hard to tell if the author was knowledgeable on the subject because of the automatic “Go To” names. Unfortunately, by the time I got to the end I realized this was the author’s favorites list versus the Top 10 Greatest Guitar Players. Kirk Hammett, Slash, Jack White, Chuck Berry??? You can’t put them on any list and not mention the guy who influenced so many, and who Eric Clapton called the best guitarist in the world, SRV. Richards biggest claim to fame it the amount of drugs he’s done that haven’t killed him,… Read more »
He or she might even graduate to an acoustic guitar with steel strings long before ever obtaining an amplifier for the acoustics in question, let alone an electric guitar to plug into it. And who are the heroes of the guitar? For the last 50 years it's been Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, and Tom Morello, to name just a few innovative names. All of these players made their reputations on electric guitars pumping through amplifiers, and at least one of them–or one like them–is likely the reason you picked up a guitar in the first place.
You've bought most ANY new guitar that sells for less than about 700-bucks.  Seriously.  These days there are LOTS of really decent guitars out there in the $300-$500 price range.  Guitars designed well (and by that I mean ripped-off from Leo Fender), with bodies and necks that have been cut precisely by high-end CNC machines, decent hardware, and again a nice CNC-finish on the frets and good-looking automated paint jobs.  All in all, a guitar that plays well, intonates and stays in tune well, and looks great.  But ... sounds mediocre!  Yep, ALL manufacturers skimp on the pickups today, at least on any guitar less that about  $700-$1000.  Great guitar with midlin pickups?  Yea, fix that!
Reverb is one of the most popular guitar effects in use. It’s so subtle, natural and valuable that it can easily turn a mediocre track into something more profound. The pedals we have listed above are by far some of the best you can get at the moment. They are not all the same, and each offers its own take on reverb in general. However, all of them will serve you more than well in your search for that tasty reverberation. Lastly, we hope that this guide has helped to clear up some misconceptions about reverbs you might have had.
Admit it. You’ve slow danced to Stairway To Heaven before. Page’s playing have influenced so many guitar players of today, and Led Zeppelin revolutionized Rock and Roll blending acoustic guitars, banjos, and mandolins while still staying with the same gritty rock image. His guitar riffs are forever etched into Rock and Roll’s hall of fame. How influential was he? Step into a guitar store, and you’ll see. Thousands of 12 year old kids across the globe are playing the intro to Stairway. Now that’s how you know you’ve made it.

Anyone who has a Tempest XII probably needs a pick guard. I have a 1966 which was in the case for much of the past forty years. The plastic apparently dried out and "shrunk," causing the two corners to pop off at the screws near the neck. Some guitar repair technicians are good at fabricating pick guards, but most are either woodcrafters or electronics geeks. Please advise how your search has gone. Maybe I'll replace mine, too. RED
In 2003,[73] Gibson debuted its Ethernet-based[74] audio protocol, MaGIC, which it developed in partnership with 3COM, Advanced Micro Devices, and Xilinx.[73] Replacing traditional analog hook-ups with a digital connection that would, "...satisfy the unique requirements of live audio performances," may have been the goal of this project.[74] This system may require a special pickup,[73] but cabling is provided by a standard Cat-5 ethernet cable.[73][74]
: Decca's flat-top acoustic guitars seem to usually sell for $50-75. They're not highly regarded because (a) acoustic guitars don't have the collecto-mania of electric guitars, except for certain brands (Martin, Gibson, etc.), and (b) the tonewoods Decca used were inferior to solid spruce as used by the aforementioned makers. Indeed, Decca often used plywood, which doesn't yield very good tone in an acoustic.
Fulltone’s popular Full-Drive pedal has the bonus of a switchable booster channel, while its overdrive channel goes to a fairly high gain and, unusually, uses asymmetrical clipping for a more textured sound that is quite different from the Tube Screamer’s. Asymmetrical clipping is also at the center of Boss’ SD-1 Super Overdrive (as used by Eddie Van Halen), generated by a circuit that uses two silicon diodes in series in one direction, and only one in the other, to clip each side of the waveform differently. Some players credit asymmetrical clipping with more richness, body and character; others say it sounds clanky and harsh, like an amp with mismatched output tubes. Then again, some guitarists—those in the former camp, probably—say they prefer the sound of mismatched output tubes for these same reasons. As ever, what works is up to you.
Higher-cost amps for professionals with an XLR DI out jack may also have a "ground lift" switch (to be used in case of a humming ground loop), a DI out level control knob, and a switch which determines whether the DI out signal to the PA or recording mixing board is pre- or post- the amp's internal preamplifier and equalization circuitry. The pre-/post- switch enables a bassist to decide whether to send the audio engineer just the signal from her bass, or to send the signal once it has been pre-amped and equalized by her amp settings. Some higher-cost amps may have a parametric equalizer (or a semi-parametric equalizer) for some frequency ranges (typically the middle frequency range), which can be used to modify the bass tone to suit different styles or performance venues. Some bass amps have a 15 or 20 dB pad which can be used to attenuate "hot" signals, such as basses with an internal preamplifier (depending on the model of amplifier, some brands may provide two inputs (high and low gain) instead of providing a "pad". This pad can be turned on using a button. Some bass amps have an even stronger pad, a 40 dB pad.
Although most acoustic guitars have steel strings, classical and flamenco guitars use nylon strings. Nylon strings produce a mellower, softer sound. It is a common misconception that a new guitar player should start with nylon strings because they are easier on fingers or easier to play. Nylon strings and steel strings are not interchangeable on the same guitar, so it’s not a matter of progressing from one kind of string to another with experience. What should really drive your decision is what kind of music you want to play.
It comes with a single coil pickup in the neck position and a humbucker at the bridge - switching between the two pickups gives you both a strat like sound and an LP like tone. The pickup selector is 3-way so you can play with both pickups at the same time. It sports a shorter 24.75" scale length and smaller 12" radius on the rosewood topped mahogany bolt-on neck with a 1.6875" nut width making it very playable and accessible to guitarists of all levels of experience. Many customer reviews suggest the Empire HG feels and plays like a more expensive guitar.

I was thinking about my personal favorite and it’s just too hard to choose only one. There are too many brilliant creations and all unique in their own way. I love the simplicity of “highway to hell”, the beautiful, mysterious, wah wah riff of “Voodoo child”, I have a weak spot for almost every guitar riff by John Frusciante or Slash and not to mention the zillion riffs that aren’t even on the list. Thank god it never stops.
There were actually two bolt-neck DT-250s, both with basswood bodies and the very nice locking Powerocker vibratos. The regular model came in black or white and had a rosewood fingerboard. Well, a little boring. But the Transparent Red TRs came with a maple fingerboard stained red. Yes, that’s what we’re talking about! If you’re going to have a red guitar, you ought to have a matching red fingerboard. Hard maple, made slick with the red polyurethane.
So what did I buy? A late 1940’s FIDELITY, of course. Haven’t heard of FIDELITY? Me, neither. But it met the needs. It was very light an easy to carry. As for meeting my volume needs…it was VERY quiet. Dead quiet. As in, silent. So, that part needed some work. Sixty bucks. Not bad. Less than an assembly-line stomp box. It looked like a 50’s space heater in crap brown with tootsie roll brown and vanilla cream paint and chicken head knobs. Score, Daddio
The truth is that you can play any genre of music with just about any type of electric guitar. Many blues players run Gibson Les Pauls with beefy humbuckers, while Iron Maiden completely broke the stereotype that you can't play metal with a Stratocaster.  Guitar effects pedals really changed the game too. However, some guitars do actually deal better with certain music genres.

Developed by Martin in 1916, the dreadnought shape changed the landscape of acoustic guitars. Thanks to its punchy sound, loud volume and improved bottom end, dreadnoughts quickly rose to popularity and has since been copied by virtually every acoustic guitar manufacturer. Today, if you're thinking acoustic guitar, the most probable image in your mind would be of a Martin Dreadnought or one of its many clones.
The intonation here refers to the forward/backward position of the individual string saddles. By moving the saddles forwards or backwards, we are actually adjusting the length of the strings. Without going into too much detail, if the string is the wrong length, the positions of the frets will not be correct and the guitar will be out of tune on some of them. Adjusting the intonation is not difficult. All you need is a guitar tuner and a tool to move the saddles forwards or backwards. Play an open low E string and make sure it is in tune (using the guitar tuner).
Modern electric guitars most commonly have two or three magnetic pickups. Identical pickups produce different tones depending on location between the neck and bridge. Bridge pickups produce a bright or trebly timbre, and neck pickups are warmer[when defined as?] or more bassy. The type of pickup also affects tone. Dual-coil pickups sound warm, thick, perhaps even muddy[citation needed]; single-coil pickups sound clear, bright, perhaps even biting[citation needed].
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