In typical pedal effect chains you will most likely be running cable lengths that are much longer than 5.5 meters. The ME-80 allows you to keep your tone pure when running lots of effects. You can run a cable up to 5.5 metres into the input of the ME-80. The multi effects engine processes up to 8 effects in its internal signal chain. Then the ME-80 outputs your guitar signal as a 2,000 Ohm low impedance signal allowing you to run a much longer cable to the amplifier.
hi-can you put two caps on your two tone pots or will just the one do as is mormal-aslo on a push pull pot do you need two tone caps one for the bottom half as regular-if putting on the square part  of the push pull pot -can you put on any of the six lugs ie the ones not used -i have instaleed a push pull swich but when down the tone on the neck pickup does not seem to have any effect -when i pull it when usingn the pull pull it does have a effect is this normal-i have now neck-bridge-and all three in a row-when not pulled which would be normal five wat switch sound i seem to get a telecasster sound ,i thought this was the case when i pull it up=i have now a nice selection of sounds—thankls sean
• How to check frets: The easiest and quickest way to make sure a guitar’s frets are in good shape is to look straight down the neck of a guitar, from body to headstock. If the frets are at different heights (improper installation is the culprit here with new guitars) or askew, there are problems. They should look uniform and exhibit as little denting or wear as tolerable. 
Plugged into a Fender blue deluxe, this instrument immediately proved to be a love at first riff. The humbuckers sounds so amazingly, and coupled with great and rich percussive and natural full tone, that overall sound that emanates from this instrument is far beyond what is normally expected for a beginner’s piece. The fact that it is made in China has nothing to do with its quality. This might just be your favourite new ax.
The Hughes & Kettner Tube Meister 36 is a distinct looking tube amplifier head that's packed with features. For something that's compact, this amp can do quite a lot of what bigger amps can in terms of functionality, including having three channels that let you switch between clean, crunch and lead and a full set of complementary controls to tweak each channel to your liking. Another interesting feature of this amp is its TSC (Tube Safety Control), which automatically keeps the tube in bias and monitors them to extend their use. Finally, this amp head comes with a built-in Red box DI, so you can plug the amp head straight to any PA system or recording console without any problem. The people also installed a power attenuator into the amp, which lets you lower the rating to just 1 Watt for quiet practice. Wrapping up its features is the built-in reverb, which compliments the amp instead of distracting users.

Dr Doug Clark-"I stumbled onto your site while looking for an entry-level classical guitar for my grandson in Denver, Colorado. Regrettably, I'm not resident in England (though I've been there many times), otherwise I'd be on your doorstep tomorrow morning. That said, might you have any acquaintances in America (firms similar to yours) whom you could recommend? We're limited at this point (8th form next year, at Denver School of the Arts), to around $300 US. Any advice or recommendation you can offer will be greatly appreciated. Watched Harry and Meghan's wedding twice! Wish them both, and England itself, a wonderful decade ahead. PS: I took up steel string acoustic guitar at about age 60. Hence my email "handle". Still working on my skills and loving it."

In the past, buying an electric guitar wasn’t always as satisfying as it should be. In the days before the internet, you had to rely on the wisdom of your local guitar store, a couple of magazines, and your gut instinct. You may have ended up with something half decent – if you were lucky – but rarely would you have found your ‘dream guitar’. In fact, without the internet, you probably weren’t aware it even existed!
Hi, my cousin gave me a bass guitar, the brand is called Cyclone by EKS Technology Inc. I looked it up and I could find barely anything. the bass has been in his garage since the early '90s and he told he that Fender bought the brand sometime around then, but I still can't find anything about the brand, apart from that they also produce electric guitars. almost as if the brand has been wiped from history. Any information regarding this brand would be gratefully accepted!

Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Nut Width: 42mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24, Jumbo - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Earvana - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Hardware: Chrome, Grover Tuners - Circuit Type: Active - String Instrument Finish: Brown Sunburst

Finding spare parts for vintage guitars is not always easy. Manufacturers come and go, very often changing specifications throughout the course of a guitar's production; identifying exactly the right specification part can be very difficult indeed - but we aim to help you find the correct part for your instrument. We have many years experience in restoring vintage musical instruments: if you need help, please do get in contact.
The transparent overdrive is the most natural sounding overdrive. Unlike the most commonly used multi-processing type overdrives, the transparent overdrive does not alter the tone of the input signal. The transparent overdrive's output signal will sound exactly the same to that of the input signal tone wise, just with added drive and boosted signal (dependent on the users settings). Which means there is no tone loss for more natural sounding drive. The transparent overdrive is typically priced higher due to it having nothing but the purest of sound and smooth drive.
While known primarily for their acoustic and acoustic-electric guitars, Takamine produced a limited run of very high quality solid body electric guitars in the early 1980’s.[1] These are the GX100 (Gibson Explorer body style), GX200 (proprietary type body style similar to a Stratocaster, stop tailpiece bridge), GX200-T or TB, (same as GX200 only with a tremolo bridge) GZ300 (proprietary design) and GZ340 (proprietary design). The GX200 and GZ340 contain factory DiMarzio made pickups.[2]
It wouldn't be called a tribute if it didn't follow convention, so having a mahogany body with an arched maple top is expected. Epiphone also designed the neck to mimic the playability of old LPs, giving this guitar a 1960s SlimTaper D profile. However, what makes the Epiphone Les Paul Tribute Plus stand out is the use of two Gibson USA '57 Classic humbucking pickups, which essentially gives this Les Paul a more premium Gibson voice, at a fraction of the price.
very recently I've been trying to get a band together where the Humbuckers of my les paul would suit the sound a lot more and decided to pull out my les paul, on trying to tune it, I noticed the intonation was a little off on all strings (not particularly noticeable by ear, but plugged into a tuner one could see it was off), but on the high E string it was very much off, from the third fret and higher it is very off sounding.
While most single-coil pickups are wired in parallel with each other, it is possible to wire two or more of them in series, producing a fuller and stronger sound not unlike that of a humbucker.[26] This is a popular modification for instruments with two single-coil pickups like the Fender Telecaster and the Fender Jazz Bass. For the former, special 4-way switches are available to replace the stock 3-way switch and provide a series wiring position.[27]

If you play an acoustic guitar but don’t own an amp and prefer not to (perhaps because you almost always play into a PA system) then this preamp is ideal for your situation. Not only does it give you the added control over your tone but, it also eliminates the need for an acoustic amplifier entirely, similar to the Venue DI. It’s also much cheaper than an amp.
I was interested in this book, and almost walked away after reading many negative reviews which complained about black and white photos and numerous typos. Then I noticed it was available in a Kindle version, for only $9.99. I ordered the Kindle version, and have no regrets. I have read it on my iPad, and gleaned a lot of useful information from it. I have not encountered any typos, and the colored wiring diagrams and numerous photos are just fine. It seems that the paperback version suffered from a poor layout and printing job, which is a shame, since it is obvious to me that Mr. Swike put in the effort to make a good product, which the Kindle version surely is. Anyone interested in a simple but comprehensive intro to wiring their Strat/Tele/Les Paul will find this a good reference. I also enjoyed the Varitone circuit presentation, and the explanation of how capacitor values affect treble/bass response.
The tone from a Bourgeois produced with master grade Cocobolo wood using hot hide glue is superior to any guitar I have played, I can get an incredible reverb sound by applying a light percussion on the body with my forearm, this guitar is expensive but worth it. I believe Bourgeois builds 400 guitars per year, the other major producers production is 400 guitars per week.
I estimate that fewer than one in a thousand of all Axe-Fx units in the word today are used on world-class stages with great PAs. In fact, MOST players probably don’t use a P.A. at all, or rely on one to bring their personal sound to the venue (with the same caveats they’d have when mic’ing a traditional amp). These players use personal stage monitors, power amp and speakers, or a traditional guitar amp. And all of the things I’ve just mentioned should also be placed next to the many guitarists who are not playing on stage at all, ever. Studio monitors—whether they are modest to magnificent—give you a really satisfying new way to play.

While many electric guitar amp cabs have "open back" designs (actually partially open back, as part of the back is usually enclosed in panels), open back cabinets are rarely seen in bass amp cabs, except in the smallest, least expensive practice bass amps. The reason that open back designs are not used with bass amp cabs is that open back designs make it hard to reproduce low-frequency sounds, which are crucial for bass cabinets. On electric guitar amp cabs, the reduction of some very low-frequency sounds may be desirable, as it makes the cabinet less "boomy"; however, for a bass cabinet, this loss of bass frequencies is generally seen as undesirable.
Players who want to emphasize low volume and portability — especially the ability to discreetly pack their amp — will want to look for as small a unit as possible. Some of these can still create a decent sound, but you’ll find that their natural overdrive is going to sound considerably compressed, and there won’t be much dynamism in response to your picking or strumming pattern.
As the name implies, TheFretWire DIY 175 kit is based on the popular ES-175 hollow body guitar, following its shape and configuration, but using more cost effective materials. More importantly, it lets you customize your own archtop as you prefer - you can make it into a classic jazz box, or add some cool paint jobs to turn it into a rockabilly style instrument.
The 600 series pairs maple back and sides with a spruce top that has gone through Taylor’s torrefaction process, which accelerates the wood’s aging process through heat. We couldn’t find a single fault with this guitar’s build quality and the 612ce is an unbelievably comfortable guitar to play. The tone is still that of a maple guitar, but a more refined one than we’re used to. Likewise with the torrefied spruce: it’s immediately familiar, but with enough difference to cause a cocked ear. Strumming out chords and standard singer-songwriter fare was pleasing, and it put in a good shift with some country-style flat-picking, but it is fingerstyle playing that this guitar lives and breathes. By any token these models from the 600 series are stunning guitars. They have a laudable ecological footprint, they look superb and they have rich, unexpected tonal qualities. 
As a result of the improvements to PA systems and monitor systems, bass players in the 2000s no longer need to have huge, powerful bass amplifier systems to play stadiums and arenas. Instead of playing with two 8x10" bass stacks and one or more huge, powerful bass heads, in the 2010s, many bass players perform at large live venues with relatively small and less powerful bass amplifiers. The reason they can do so is that most higher-priced 2010s-era bass amplifiers usually have DI output jacks that can be patched into the audio snake cable, and then plugged into the mainstage mixing board and amplified through the PA system or sound reinforcement system.
Love love love this guitar! I ordered it because it reminds me of my Dad's old Kay archtop that I initially learned to play on. The retro jazz style of this guitar is awesome. My musician friends love it and and like the sound of it although they haven't heard it plugged in yet. It took me a very short while to get used to the strings (made by the company for this guitar) and while they have a tinnier sound than what I'm used to for an acoustic guitar, they do deliver when it is plugged in. Overall it really seems to be more of an electric-style guitar. The neck is narrow and the body is small - something that I am so happy with! It is extremely playable. I may switch to bronze strings to get a warmer tone, but for now I want to give these strings a chance to sing. I also ordered a case from the company that fits this guitar, and for the price, it is awesome as well! Very light and the guitar fits perfectly and securely. At a recent gig, a complete stranger came up to me to look at and admire this guitar - it truly is a beautiful instrument. The woodgrain is rich and not as red as the pictures make it look. I feel like Stu Sutcliff - don't really need to know how to play - I can simply stand in the background and look cool ;-)
Two-handed tapping was the hoariest of heavy-metal clichés until Marnie Stern reclaimed the concept on behalf of indie-prog bedroom shredders everywhere. No one would ever confuse Stern’s chops with Eddie Van Halen’s, but that’s kind of the point: If Stern’s shredding exudes the agreeably skewed internal logic of the self-taught, it also allows her to utilize the two-handed technique far more creatively than the pseudo-classical chest-puffing that usually comes with Dokken territory.
Cordoba is a fast growing guitar builder that specializes in nylon string acoustic instruments, played by artists like the Gypsy Kings and Bon Iver just to name a few. And with their ever increasing reputation, we find it only fitting to give them a spot on this list, specifically for the impressive quality and tone of the GK Studio. This nylong string guitar incidentally provides a refreshing break from the many steel-string acoustics that are featured here.
Silvertone starter pack is incredibly hard to beat. The candy blue finish gives the guitar a gorgeous aesthetic that looks fully professional. The pickup selector has 5 positions, and there are two tone knobs to give even more control over the sound. Stratocaster fans will love this guitar! Also included in the set is a gig bag, small Silvertone amp, strap, 5 picks, Allan wrenches, strings, a clip-on tuner, and a tremolo bar.
Replacing switch and jack covers. These are the plastic or metal covers that hold the jack and tells you witch switch is treble or rhythm. The switch cannot be repaired and will need to be replaced, however, a metal jack plate can never break and only will need to be cleaned. A plastic plate will need to be replaced or the screw holes need to be resized, do so properly and make sure every fastener is snug including screws and nuts.
The output transformer sits between the power valves and the speaker, serving to match impedance. When a transformer's ferromagnetic core becomes electromagnetically saturated a loss of inductance takes place, since the back E.M.F. is reliant on a change in flux in the core. As the core reaches saturation,the flux levels off and cannot increase any further. With no change in flux there is no back E.M.F. and hence no reflected impedance. The transformer and valve combination then generate large 3rd order harmonics. So long as the core does not go into saturation, the valves will clip naturally as they drop the available voltage across them. In single ended systems the output harmonics will be largely even ordered due to the valve's relatively non linear characteristics at large signal swings. This is only true however if the magnetic core does NOT saturate.[45]
The truth is that I've never known what it's like to not want to play music of my own because I come from an Irish family that all played instruments. Luckily for me, my parents were very young when I was born -- they were like sixteen, seventeen -- and they were from a tradition of people playing instruments, accordions, pennywhistles, guitars, harmonicas and things like that -- cheap little instruments. But because they were young and moved over to Manchester, they liked rock and roll and pop music of the day.
I'm sorry to disagree Merlin, but the woods used really do make a big difference to the sound of a solid body guitar. Both the neck and body are resonators, the string energy drives the woods which damp some frequencies and use that energy to emphasise the resonant frequencies. That drives the string's vibration through the bridge/nut/fretboard. It's a feedback loop.
This full-sized, 22-fret, single cutaway electric guitar features two single-coil pickups and is capable of producing a wide range of tones. With the bridge pickup, you can get that bright, rich, cutting tone known as the country "twang" made famous by artists such as Merle Haggard and Waylon Jennings. With the neck pickup you get a warmer, mellow, bluesy tone, such as that of Albert Collins or Muddy Waters. Additionally, rock musicians as diverse as Syd Barrett, Chrissy Hynde, and Keith Richards have found a way to make their own distinctive sound using this style of guitar.
One look at its distinct bowl-back body, and you already know that the Ovation Applause Elite AE44II is not your average wooden guitar. This distinct back is crafted from Lyrachord, the same material which is said to be used in helicopter blades and more. This results in a lightweight instrument that's not as fragile as wood. Still it does come with a solid spruce top and other wooden components, so it doesn't sound or look too out of the ordinary. Finally, the guitar comes equipped with an undersaddle piezo and preamp system, which features a 3-band EQ and built-in tuner.
Tonewood (basswood, mahogany, alder...) doesn't matter in an electric guitar unless you're getting ancient pickups for it. Older pickups used to act more like microphones and picked up sound resonating from the guitar body as well as from the strings. Modern technology has fixed that so the sound comes purely from the strings. Most guitar companies that market their guitars for tonewood are guitar brands that have been around since the times of these ancient pickups and based their marketing off of it. Most of them still haven't changed it. I recently read a scientific breakdown (experiment, analysis and all) that thoroughly proved the tonewood debate pointless once and for all. Every variable was accounted for-only tonewood was changed. So, don't worry about the basswood; it could be made from the least acoustic material on earth, and the pickups would give you the same sound as they would have on a different guitar material. I've spent months researching this in depth. (I play, too.)
As discussed, Delay pedals add so much more weight to your sound and gives your guitar a doubling effect, which is really useful to make it sound like there’s two guitars on stage. They’re also great for creating psychedelic sounds and experimenting with riffs. Again, you don’t have to dial in big delay effects and can use the pedal subtly to add resonance.
The tuner goes first. This one is pretty easy. It doesn’t want to hear an effected signal; it wants to see the direct input from the guitar. Another reason for putting the tuner first is that if you’re using any true-bypass pedals, the TU-3 will give them a buffered signal, which will protect your tone from loss of signal in the cables when other pedals are off. This is another one of the reasons there as so many TU tuners in pedalboards worldwide, even ones using nothing else but boutique true-bypass stompers.
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At the top of the fingerboard, just below the headstock, is a slotted piece of material called the nut. The strings are routed through the slots in the nut and terminate at the bridge, located on the far end of the body. When the strings are plucked or strummed, they vibrate between the nut and the bridge. This vibration is where the sound of a guitar begins. How that vibration translates into sound depends on whether the guitar is acoustic or electric, as we’ll see in a moment.
Octave ('Other' category): This effect really surprised me because it tracks well, but inserting the compressor before the Octave plug-in improves the tracking even further. Distorting the post‑octave sound with the AmpSimulator gives a big distortion sound, even with only the Octave 1 level turned up. If you want more of a brontosaurus guitar, turn up Octave 2 as well. In general, I like to leave a fair amount of direct sound in the output mix. You can just as easily go in a cleaner direction by using only the Octave 1 output, and bypassing the AmpSimulator. Select the neck pickup on your guitar, pull back a bit on the tone, and you'll hear a sound that recalls jazz great Wes Montgomery.

While most single-coil pickups are wired in parallel with each other, it is possible to wire two or more of them in series, producing a fuller and stronger sound not unlike that of a humbucker.[26] This is a popular modification for instruments with two single-coil pickups like the Fender Telecaster and the Fender Jazz Bass. For the former, special 4-way switches are available to replace the stock 3-way switch and provide a series wiring position.[27]
If you're in need of some assistance, you've come to the right place. At BestReviews, our goal is to help you find the perfect products to fit your individual requirements. We test items in our labs, gather feedback from existing customers, and consult experts. The result? Fair and thorough reviews that help you cut through the jargon. Read on for our full guide to electric guitars to learn all you need to know to pick the right one for your next jam session.
For those of you out there with a stereo or home theater system, you'll be fine as long as you run the audio directly from the xbox through that. But since I have neither, I was stuck. I ended up bringing down my old CD player from my bathroom, just to see if that would work. SO much better. But since I didn't want to leave that ugly thing sitting under my TV in my living room I went out and checked around for speaker prices. After the money spent on the game and the guitar, I didn't really want to put too much more money into this. I ended up with a Turtle Island headset for $40. It seems to be doing the trick. Just be prepared for this extra expenditure if you don't have an external speaker system in place.

Aside from what brands to choose from and finding out the right budget to spend on an amp. Initial search for a guitar amplifier generally leads beginner players on figuring out that there are actually different types of guitar amps in the market. This is where they start to care deeply enough to know which amp sounds better and what will fit their playing the best.
Same woods sounding different? OF COURSE!!! Look, I’ve been a carpenter for over 30 years and can absolutely inform you that there is a marked variation of characteristics of wood in the same species…density, tap tone, characteristics of how the individual piece reacts to being worked with tools…heck for all anybody knows internal stresses (for example as indicated by how a 12″ wide piece of wood reacts to being ripped down the center…many times both pieces end up being bowed and such) might play a big factor in how said piece of wood sounds musically…shrugs shoulders…

Before diving in, it’s also worth mentioning the “crap in, crap out” rule, which dictates that any recorded track is only going to sound as good as the guitar and amp that it captures, however good your mic or skilled your engineering. You can’t expect elevated studio technique to convert junk tone or a mediocre performance to stellar sounds in the mix; the best you can hope for is to accurately capture the sound being made by your amp, and to do so with optimum depth, dynamics, and fidelity. Of course, it’s possible that the crappy, low-grade junk tone you capture from a scuzzball rig is exactly what the recording demanded (Jack White or Dan Auerbach, anyone?), but it will usually benefit the tune to capture it as powerfully as you can!
Gibson makes authorized copies of its most successful guitar designs. They are less expensive than those bearing the Gibson name. A former competitor, Epiphone was purchased by Gibson and now makes competitively priced Gibson models, such as the Les Paul and SG, sold under the Epiphone brand,[69] while continuing to make Epiphone-specific models like the Sheraton, Sorrento, and Casino. In Japan, Orville by Gibson once made Gibson designs sold in that country.[70] Gibson has sought legal action against those that make and sell guitars Gibson believes are too similar to their own.
The list of musicians who are (or who have been) in love with their vintage Fender Bassman amps—especially the 4x10 tweed variety made between 1957 and 1960—is pretty much endless. Just for starters (past and present), there's Eric Clapton, Buddy Guy, Mike Campbell, Mike Bloomfield, Jimmie Vaughan, John Fogerty, Josh Homme, Brian Setzer, the guy up the street from me... . Again, this is just the tip of the iceberg, people. After all, many professional music industry analysts have heralded Fifties 4×10 Bassman amps as the greatest amps—ever.
At the end of the day, this is obviously far from a perfect example, but this is an extremely hard-to-find factory left-handed 1958 Gretsch Duo-Jet, and provides a very rare opportunity for the vintage guitar collector, lefty or righty! I have seen far fewer left handed 50s Gretsch guitars as compared to Fender, Gibson, and even Martin over the years. Lefty 50s Gretsch guitars are insanely rare, especially in the Duo Jet model!
JHS distributes them and they get really over the top cheesy reviews in the free magazine "gear" which is really just a JHS catalogue. Their endorsers include lists of "has beens" and "up and coming next big things". Trev Wilkinson no doubt has some good designs but gets more credit than he deserves for some of these copies. I've seen a few in the shops, and they range from not bad looking to absoloubtly terrible. I think they're very inconsistant, some I've picked up had very sharp fret ends.
I’m going to be doing a pickup upgrade in the next few months on a Strat-style HSS. I have an idea, maybe a crazy idea, about how I’d like to wire it but so far I have been unable to find any indication that it is even possible. This site seems like the best place to get an answer. The single coils in my guitar will be replaced with another set of single coils (Seymour Duncan SLS-1 lipsticks). The humbucker I plan on installing (DiMarzio Tone Zone) is capable of being coil-split, which I want to take advantage of BUT I would rather not install a push/pull pot. My wiring idea… Toggle Position: 1) Full Humbucker, 2) North coil only of humbucker for single coil performance, 3) middle coil only, 4) middle and neck, and 5) neck only. Is this even possible using the 5-position toggle switch I already have, or is there no way to do it besides using a push/pull pot or installing an additional mini-toggle?
To build an electric guitar, start by cutting out the guitar body from a piece of wood like maple or swamp ash. Then, bolt a pre-made neck onto the body and attach the bridge. Next, install the pick-ups, volume control, and guitar cord. Finish by putting your strings on the guitar and testing out your instrument. If you want to make the process easier, you could try purchasing an electric guitar kit.

Twelve-string electric guitars feature six pairs of strings, usually with each pair tuned to the same note. The extra E, A, D, and G strings add a note one octave above, and the extra B and E strings are in unison. The pairs of strings are played together as one, so the technique and tuning are the same as a conventional guitar, but they create a much fuller tone, with the additional strings adding a natural chorus effect. They are used almost solely to play harmony and rhythm parts, rather than for guitar solos. They are relatively common in folk rock music. Lead Belly is the folk artist most identified with the twelve-string guitar, usually acoustic with a pickup.


Soft and soulful is the second name of Fender guitars and basses. They are famous for their fruitful and enchanting tone. It is one of the most recognized brands in the world. Every note that is played on this guitar is pleasant and pure. There are two factors that contribute to such a thrilling tone. Firstly, the majestic shape of the 'strat' in resonating wood and secondly, the perfect configuration of three pick ups. The pick ups are usually singe coiled. However, there are cases where double coiled third pick ups have been used. Fender is a very popular guitar brand, and artists like Eric Clapton who plays extremely soft music, and heavy metal bands such as Iron Maiden have also used the same brand. Models like Stratocaster and Telecaster have etched their names among the greatest guitars ever made. Fender offers myriad of designs, styles, and configurations. If you are a beginner, then go for any Fender model, it's probably the best guitar for novices or amateurs.
The size and shape of the ME-80 is comparable to the Line 6 POD HD500X, though the Boss measures a few inches smaller, and also weighs a few lbs less. This is a Boss product, and as such it’s built like a tank. No worries whatsoever over the build quality of the chassis, knobs, and footswitches. Starting with the rear of the ME-80, you can see the I/O is pretty basic - mono input for your guitar, stereo output, a headphones jack, AUX in (so you can plug in your iPhone and jam along to your favorite tracks), and a USB port. Like the Zoom G3X and the Line 6 POD HD500X, you can use the Boss ME-80 as a USB interface for your computer and record your guitar straight into your favorite DAW. Oh and one small inconvenience is that you’ll need to buy the power supply separately. Why Boss doesn’t just include one for a unit of this quality and price, we don't really understand. If you do end up getting the ME-80, this is the power adapter you want. It can also use 6 AA batteries which is good if you need to use this on-the-go, but we don’t recommend it as it will suck those batteries dry in no time.

We avoid providing inaccurate ratings and recommendations that can arise due to the tested product or method of testing being flawed by analyzing large numbers of user and expert reviews to produce our ratings. This has the effect of reducing the impact of single opinions, including potentially flawed ones, in our results. We only end up with a high rating for a brand or product if the majority of reviews are positive and in the case of Seagull the overwhelming majority of reviews of all types are indeed positive.


From the outset, wooden bodies had been sourced from existing guitar manufacturers, particularly the plywood student guitar bodies made by theRegal Musical Instrument Company. Dobro had granted Regal a license to manufacture resonator instruments. By 1937, it was the only manufacturer, and the license was officially made exclusive. Regal continued to manufacture and sell resonator instruments under many names, including Regal, Dobro, Old Kraftsman, and Ward. However, they ceased all resonator guitars production following the U.S. entry into the Second World War in 1941.
Hollow Body Guitars: Guitars with hollow body construction were the first mass-produced round-neck models built, in the 1930s. Jazzman Charlie Christian was the most-fiery champion of the early hollow body electric, using a Gibson ES-150 — a model first released in 1936 — to record vastly influential sides with Benny Goodman, Lester Young. Buck Clayton and as a leader in his own right. He also used the ES-150 to help invent the art of single-note lead guitar.
His kustom masterpieces like “Slow Burn” (a 1936 Auburn boat-tail speedster), “Skyscraper” (a 1953 Buick Skylark) and his daily driver known as “The Grinch” (a 1952 Oldsmobile) are drivable works of art that defy the bland Toyota Priuses, Lexuses and Land Rover SUVs of his Northern California environs like a stiff middle-finger salute wearing a skull ring.
Compared to, say, an Epiphone Dot, the Coupe offers a ‘woodier,’ more acoustic timbre. “Sparkly,” “bell-like” and “jangly” are descriptors often associated with the guitar and its stock pair of P-90s, and cranking the gain up elicits more a sizzle than roar. Be careful with the distortion, though—without a center block like those you’ll find on semi-hollows, the Coupe is still fairly susceptible to feedback.
thanks for your note. We are not drawing any conclusions whether one is better than the other, just that they are different, which I think is apparent from the samples. Also, we did use only one pickup that we moved between the samples, and mounted it in the exact same location in relationship to the bridge. I would claim that the only variable that could have been controlled to a greater extent is the picking attack.

There are no frills: a single channel controlled with a Volume, Tone and Gain knob. You can switch between 15 and 7 watts, and don’t forget that for an all-tube amp, that is a lot of volume! While not having effects may sound like a bummer, the stripped-down circuitry helps your guitar signal to maintain its purest tone. Simple, raw and with attitude, cool looks and a mere 5.5kg; be prepared to rattle your brain with an authentic “British” sound.
Use the numbers on the tab to fret spaces on the neck. Unlike normal musical notation, guitar tabs don't tell you which notes to play. Instead, they tell you where to put your fingers. Numbers on the lines correspond to frets on the fretboard. Each number represents a specific fret on the line it's written on. For instance, a "1" on the bottom line means to fret the first fret of the lowest string and play that note.
This type of acoustic electric guitar is pretty simple and is actually the oldest system in use. The whole thing is based on a small microphone that is located inside the body of the guitar, right under the sound hole. Once you pick strings, the microphone sends the tone it picks up to the preamp, which is then fed into an amplifier through the guitar cable.
The ultimate rock/metal electric guitar instrument is here! Shreddage II covers the entire range of lead AND rhythm playing – every fret, every string, and tons of articulations. A powerful interface allows for easy playing and deep customization. With the included Kontakt Player and ReValver HPse, you’ll have everything you need to SHRED. Now includes Shreddage 2X update!
Some types of wood that were commonly used in the 1950s are close to extinct today, and can no longer be used for mass production. For instance, import and usage are restricted for certain types of Mahogany, Rosewood, and Ebony, and large guitar manufacturers in the US have been raided by the justice department on suspicion of using illegal materials.
Flanger pedals are based on a studio sound made when two tapes were mixed together and one was delayed. What this does is add shifting harmonic content to your signal, as well as modulation. Flanging is a very distinct effect that adds a unique whoosh or airplane-like sound. Used with restraint, the flanger adds an interesting dimension to your sound, almost synthesizer-like sound. Used at extreme settings, flangers will over take the tone and bring a solo to completely different sonic level.
Made of mahogany, the Destroyer's iconic body style has been attracting artists for years. It features a mahogany slim neck grip and set-in neck that offers ultra-smooth playablity. Electronics include DiMarzio Air Norton and The Tone Zone pickups for a rich tonal palette. Gorgeous old school pearl/abalone block inlays make for a path back to one of rock's most dynamic chapters.
This legendary thinline electric guitar has been in continuous production since 1958 and has been updated for 2019. The new Gibson ES-335 Figured has the classic semi-hollow body construction with a chambered maple center block with a three-ply AAA-grade figured maple/poplar/maple top and back. Its bracing is made of quarter-sawn Adirondack spruce. The center block and bracing are both thermally engineered.
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The primary means of identifying the model number of Kent guitars is via a label on the back of the headstock. Through the years many of those labels have fallen off or been peeled off. They do not add anything to the appearance of the guitar. The 700 and 800 guitars had a round foil sticker with the model number and sometimes serial number pressed into it, kind of like Dymo tape labels. The look a lot nicer than the white paper one used on earlier models, but they still can fall off over the years, and they are harder to read.
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Except if, like George Gruhn, you know better. The 71-year-old Nashville dealer has sold guitars to Eric Clapton, Neil Young, Paul McCartney and Taylor Swift. Walking through NAMM with Gruhn is like shadowing Bill Belichick at the NFL Scouting Combine. There is great love for the product and great skepticism. What others might see as a boom — the seemingly endless line of manufacturers showcasing instruments — Gruhn sees as two trains on a collision course.
There have been plenty of attempts at different types of semi-hollow guitars from nearly every guitar manufacturer, and some are more successful than others. In my experience, even though Gibson does offer a fairly consistent output, there is still a fair amount of discrepancy from one instrument to the next, and as always I recommend playing a guitar before passing any judgement on it. But try and be discerning in your assessment of the guitar — versatility is king, only capable of being knocked off the throne by an absolutely golden, irreplaceable tone. Trust your ears!
The Model EP-17-T was a regular-sized thinline with a single round cutaway, bolt-on neck, non-dipped three-and-three head, dots, three pickups, adjustable bridge, plain trapeze tail, elevated guard, three rocker switches plate-mounted on the upper shoulder, and controls on a rectangular strip on the lower bout. All three were offered in shaded mahogany finish.
Those who appreciate a more vintage design will love the Schecter S-II CUSTOM. It’s an original design which borrowed a lot of ideas from Gibson’s legendary SG series. Pickups are also in line with the overall theme, and they sound pretty great. There’s balance in the tone, the kind you don’t really expect to get from a Schecter. It definitely took me by surprise, a very pleasant surprise.
Developed by Martin in 1916, the dreadnought shape changed the landscape of acoustic guitars. Thanks to its punchy sound, loud volume and improved bottom end, dreadnoughts quickly rose to popularity and has since been copied by virtually every acoustic guitar manufacturer. Today, if you're thinking acoustic guitar, the most probable image in your mind would be of a Martin Dreadnought or one of its many clones.

STEM educators will take part in an intense five-day electric guitar design/build institue. Each faculty member will build his/her own custom electric guitar and will engage in student centered learning activities that relate the guitar design to specific math, science and engineering topics. Participants leave this weeklong experience with their custom-made guitars, curriculum modules with short term assessments that can be immediately integrated into the faculty team school curriculum.
The Yamaha LL16 gives you high-end features for a lot less money, starting off with its solid Engelmann spruce top and solid rosewood back and sides. This all solid body results in richer and more detailed acoustic tone, something that you will have to pay top dollars for from other acoustic brands. It also sports a slightly smaller body that gives it an elegant appeal, adding to its already favorable affordable price and top-tier specs.
The Fretted Synth website has mysteriously disappeared (the likes of Native Instruments not happy that they’re giving away so much goodness for free??), so we’re linking to the Rekkerd page that still seems to host the plugins. FreeAmp3 really shouldn’t be free: it features masses of sound-shaping potential and the user interface looks great. If you just want one (free) VST guitar plugin, get this.
when I started playing, if you wanted distortion, you "cranked up" the volume on the guitar and the amp. my old Gibson amp had reverb and tremolo. I used to play without reverb or tremolo. nowadays, in my old age, I use a little reverb for flavoring. I have pedals, but it's too much hassle to set everything up. so, I just plug into the amp with a little reverb. I'm happy and that's all that really counts. isn't it ?
Type – the dielectric used in the capacitor. Polyester and polypropylene are most common, with ceramic capacitors also being popular, especially in lower-end instruments. Reissues of vintage instruments often use reproductions of vintage paper capacitors, which are also popular aftermarket replacements. Finally, audiophile-grade polypropylene film and foil capacitors are sometimes used in custom instruments, although their size can prove problematic as they're designed for use in audio amplifiers and consequently have working voltages in excess of 500 V, far higher than anything encountered inside an electric guitar.[16]
Lastly, if you fancy yourself the next Slash, Jimmy Page, or Pete Townshend… you’ll want to pick up a Les Paul style guitar. It’ll get you that classic rock sound that you’re looking for. Les Pauls are equipped with “humbuckers” which produce a fat, meaty sound that’s rounder and less sharp than the single-coil pickups of a strat. The signal is also stronger so you’ll get more sustain.

When we take a look at a guitar neck, it is important that the guitar is under string tension and in playing condition when measured. The PLEK measures the instruments neck and fret height with the instrument strung up to pitch. The computer ascertained a 3-D like graph of the fret board surface, including the position and height of the strings. Thanks to the PLEK SCAN the relief of the neck made by the string tension is taken into account while calculating the process-parameters. The operator then has the ability to manipulate the parameters to give the player an optimal playing instrument.


Plug one in, and you'll understand what an acoustic instrument is supposed to sound like while playing live. Unplugged they sound great as well, especially the deep bowl models. I hear from my friends that they think those rounded backs feel awkward to play while sitting down. I have a deep contour bowl, that is way more comfy playing relaxed in my couch than even my little 000-martin.
You’d be hard-pressed to find a more distinctive guitar tandem in modern metal than Zacky Vengeance (Zachary Baker) and Synyster Gates (Brian Haner, Jr.). From their sound, to their look, even to their names, the duo routinely go down guitar paths other metal axmen don’t dare travel, spicing up Avenged Sevenfold’s otherwise dark and aggressive attack with, among other things, hooky, major-key melodies, laid-back acoustic picking, buoyant, carnival-esque rhythms and a whole lot of style.
Compressor effects help you control the volume variations of your guitar. The compressor basically makes the loud parts softer and the quiet parts louder. This can help you fatten up the sound of your guitar as the overall sound will have much more sustain and often the low-end becomes more pronounced. Some compressor pedals are also sold as sustain pedals, which certainly does give a clearer idea of one of the ways the effect can be used.  
Iloveannie touched on the substance versus style aspect and I think you're trying to pin Prince to a wall using his lack of playing certain styles. Doesn't matter he doesn't play all those styles if the styles he has down are pro. And they are. I hear people say Prince is sloppy, but I think that's a little off. Or rather, the sloppiness is explained by his overall musicianship and performance chops.
"We strive to offer our clients the highest level of service in guitar sales, repair and consulting. We will, as keys to attaining this objective, conduct our business according to a high standard of excellence. We are dedicated to earning our clients' trust through our professional conduct, our many years of experience, and our extensive preparation for their needs."
That said, however, the volume knob can help you conjure a variety of tonal characteristics that can come in handy provided you play with dynamics. Using a volume knob in this context can allow such cool maneuvers as having different tones for verses and choruses, or for various styles of music. To get a handle on how your guitar’s volume dial or dials can affect tone, plug in and fire up your amp until it’s growling with overdrive. Start with your guitar’s volume pot at 10 and begin rolling the dial back in increments. As you go, you’ll hear not only a decrease in loudness, but your sound will clean up and experience variations in its harmonic characteristics.
We perform within include rings. Personal big assortment of pedals, a few I really like, a few foul odor. I quickly discovered how the just people who worry about the results tend to be additional music artists. The actual people( ladies dance mostly) might treatment much less. Therefore right now I acquired the tuner, as well as generate your pedal with regard to single sculpt.... that is this, as well as my personal sculpt rocks ! as well as straight forward. With regard to facilities felines it might be another tale.

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If you want to get really technical, the electronics “on board” a basic non-battery-powered guitar form an “RLC” circuit, the letters standing for resistance (R), inductance (L, since I is used for current) and capacitance (C), three key values in an AC circuit that determine the relative “impedance” of various frequencies. The inductor is the magnetic pickup (which “induces” voltage/current based on the vibrating metal string), the resistor is the tone knob (a potentiometer or variable resistor), and the capacitor is a tone cap, in this example 0.05 uF (about right for a humbucking pickup like in a Gibson Les Paul).
From beginners to seasoned professionals, most guitar players will experiment with effects at some point in their musical journey. While learning to play your instrument well should be a top priority, messing around with effects can be a fun way to engage with your instrument and start learning its sound possibilities without a lot of hard practice. There's a huge variety of stompboxes out there, many with very low price tags that make great gifts and can add a new dimension of fun for beginning players.

Unlike acoustic guitars, solid-body electric guitars have no vibrating soundboard to amplify string vibration. Instead, solid-body instruments depend on electric pickups and an amplifier (or amp) and speaker. The solid body ensures that the amplified sound reproduces the string vibration alone, thus avoiding the wolf tones and unwanted feedback associated with amplified acoustic guitars. These guitars are generally made of hardwood covered with a hard polymer finish, often polyester or lacquer. In large production facilities, the wood is stored for three to six months in a wood-drying kiln before being cut to shape. Premium custom-built guitars are frequently made with much older, hand-selected wood.
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