Although acoustic guitars have recently surpassed electrics in popularity, the electric guitar is still the most prominent instrument in rock music, and it’s a key component in many country, R&B, pop, and jazz groups. If you want to play in a band, you’ll probably want an electric guitar. You’ll also want one if you want to develop the ability to play melodies and solos because electric guitars are, in general, better designed to accommodate fast fingering and more able to stand out in a musical group.
The EB-18 was not all that popular among bass players, and total production has been estimated at 874. The more expensive follow-up model, the EB-28, was even less popular with a total production of 217 units.[16] See also: E-18 series guitars[17] Martin did not resume building basses until 1989 (during the MTV Unplugged era), in which their approach was more consistent with company history:
Like a door that's repeatedly opened and closed, you'll sometimes need some basic maintenance. Ensure everything is tight, and get some electronic contact cleaner (available at any electronics store), various screwdrivers and wrenches and you can often solve your own problems. It's easier on a Gibson Les Paul (with backplate access to the controls) than on a Gibson ES-335, but it can be done.
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Why We Liked It - If you’re looking for an electric acoustic guitar that’s just great all round, and doesn’t have a large price tag, then this Yamaha has to come into consideration. It has all of the construction features you’d expect from a solid mid-range choice, with the addition of quality hardware, and nice touches like the scalloped x-braces. For those interested in Yamahas FG series, can always look at the alternative products, the yamaha FGX700SC.
As suggested by the numerical designation, Martin’s 28 Series was essentially an upgrade or refinement of the earlier 18 Series. Martin typically indicates fancier materials and appointments with a higher number (a D-28 is fancier dreadnought than a D-18, etc.). These consisted of one guitar, the E-28, and one bass, the EB-28. The first prototypes appeared in June of 1980; production began in January of 1981.

4.) Check the guitar’s string height by pressing down on the first, second, and third fret. You should be able to do so with minimal effort. Come to the 12th fret and press down. The distance from the top of fret to the bottom of the string should be no more than three times. If it is five times, the guitar may have a warped neck or too high of a bridge.


The downside of boosting the volume of an acoustic guitar this way is the fact that every microphone adds a color of its own to the end result, not to mention the preamplifier and any compression and equalization applied. In other words, not only do you have to position the microphone correctly, but you also need to be very careful when choosing which mic to use.
Installing pickups and wiring mods can be complicated, but learning to do common pot and jack repairs is almost more important, as they can save you time, money and frustration, especially before or even during a gig. That said, it can be daunting to know what to buy when jumping into the world of soldering, but for less than $80, you can have tools that will last for years.
But opposites not only attract—sometimes they also make groundbreaking music together. This is certainly true of Zoom’s collaboration with Doe and Cervenka. Since that band broke up, Zoom has gone on to do session work with everyone from the late John Denver to the Raconteurs. He’s also become semi-legendary as a guitar amp hotrod guru, having tweaked circuitry for Jackson Browne, the Black Crowes, Los Lobos, L7 and Social Distortion, among many others.
Pickup selectors can wear out over time. The lugs and the rotating switch can loose their tight connect with years of use. Also, many inexpensive guitars made today use cheap electronic parts. You may just want to upgrade your switch for more control and better selections. It is fairly easy to install a new pickup selector. Here are a few simple steps to replacing your pickup selector.
Moreover, it can hand a wide range of musical styles and techniques. In most cases they're more popular with classic rock and blues fans, perhaps the Stevie Ray Vaughan or Eric Clapton enthusiast. However, there have been players over the years who have used Stratocasters in much heavier styles of music. Billy Corgan and Jim Root are just a couple that come to mind.
We've watched Dan Erlewine repair this 1930s Kay over the previous 3 Trade Secrets. It's time to finish it up. Elliot John-Conry of EJC Guitars ages Dan's patch of new plastic binding so it blends in with the old binding around it. About the guitar in this video: This 1930s Kay Deluxe is a fixer-upper that Dan Erlewine repaired in order to sell. Now that it's in great shape again, maybe Dan'll keep it!
In the late 70’s digital technology boomed and made its way into the guitar community. It first entered in the form as rack units which were expensive and relatively large. As costs came down and the technology shrank, digital delay pedals were introduced into the market by Boss in 1984 with the Boss DD-2. Since then as technology advanced, delay pedals now offer many features in a very small box such as tape echo, analog, reverse delay, modulated delay, and loopers.
We carry many new and ‘lightly’ used instruments. So called “low mileage” instruments, in near mint condition, are our specialty. Currently in house: Santa Cruz, Bourgeois, Eastman, Fender, Larrivee, Martin, Epiphone, Gibson, Gretsch, Guild, Giebitz, Huss & Dalton, Sobell, New World Classical Guitars, Cordoba Classical Guitars, Loar, Recording King, G&L, LsL, Breedlove. Amps from Magnatone, […]

Why Martin electric guitars have never been more popular isn’t too hard to figure out. Martin, whose expertise has always been in top-notch acoustics, never really put a lot of effort into marketing its electrics. They were always well made, and, especially in the necks, clearly “Martins.” In the final analysis, however, it probably comes down to being victims of the success of their acoustic brothers, and players have just never seemed to warm up to the idea of Martin “electric” guitars. For the savvy collector with a taste for quality and relative rarity, Martin electrics remain excellent and attainable prizes.

Electronic crackling is a very common problem in electric guitars. Most likely, electronic crackling has very little to do with wiring. Usually the reason your guitar is crackling when you adjust the volume or tone knobs is because the pots are bad or dirty. Before you go and replace the pots on your electric guitar, I would try to use some Deoxit cleaner to see if the pots are just dirty.
Fender’s step-down Squier brand has offered unbelievably full-featured guitars, and the Bullet Stratocaster has classic American looks, a great sound and a price tag that will feel plenty comfortable for a beginner. It has a 21-fret neck (not the full two octaves of a pro guitar, but still pretty expansive) and a soft C-shaped neck that will make it easier for a player to get a feel for it. There’s a vintage hardtail bridge, so Fender has foregone the addition of a floating tremolo system, but that is probably better for a beginner as it will increase responsiveness and tuning stability.
Each option has a unique tonal quality, some may not seem all that useful in some situations.  2 adjacent pickups that are out of phase, can sound very tinny and weak but often cut through better in the mix as they occupy a different placement in the spectrum.  Consider Brian May's (Queen) tone as some of his selections rely on 2 single coil pickups being out of phase

Slightly out-of-tune strings on a bass may not jump out as much as on guitar (especially in chords), but when that bass line is sitting under other parts in the mix, even slightly off-pitch notes will make their presence known, and sometimes be harder to track down (why does this song sound a little “off”?). I’d use a tuner (h/w or s/w), but I’d also always verify by ear, before hitting record, and I’d check tuning periodically as the session progresses—just as with drums, hard players can easily put the instrument out after a few energetic takes.


I think the best is at DiGiSTORMERS :: Online Music Studio - Home digistormers website and there is an acoustic guitar vsti which sounds like the real one in the products plugins section. I never use anything else. I used to record live guitars, but using this it is not needed anymore. Also mistakes are recorded!!! It is not perfect then, so it sounds more realistic.

It’s obvious. No two people play guitar the same, and for all the woodshedding you do on your own, you’ll learn more by playing with others. They might have new ways of voicing chords, a unique rhythm style, or simply turn you on to new influences. Playing dual-lead guitar, honing your rhythm while someone else plays lead (or vice versa) or swapping licks. A guitarist’s best friend is another guitarist.


Chris Broderick (b. 1970) is the lead guitarist for Megadeth, formerly of Jag Panzer and Nevermore. His main guitar was a 7-string RG model. During the recording of Endgame, he started using 6-string Ibanez S series guitars, which are painted with artwork from various Megadeth albums. This is because Dave Mustaine didn't want Broderick to use his 7-strings in the studio. He has since switched to Jackson Guitars.
Schecter Hellraiser Hybrid C-8 Electric Guitar, 8-String   New from$1,089.00In Stockor 12 payments of $90.75 Free Ground Shipping Ibanez RGMS8 Multi-Scale Electric Guitar, 8-String   New from$599.99In Stockor 12 payments of $50 Free Ground Shipping ESP LTD Stephen Carpenter SC-608B Baritone Electric Guitar, 8-String (with Case)   New from$1,199.00In Stockor 12 payments of $99.92 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Jackson X Series Dinky DKAF8 MS Electric Guitar, 8-String   New from$699.99In Stockor 12 payments of $58.34 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING See All Electric Guitars: 8-String

Type – the dielectric used in the capacitor. Polyester and polypropylene are most common, with ceramic capacitors also being popular, especially in lower-end instruments. Reissues of vintage instruments often use reproductions of vintage paper capacitors, which are also popular aftermarket replacements. Finally, audiophile-grade polypropylene film and foil capacitors are sometimes used in custom instruments, although their size can prove problematic as they're designed for use in audio amplifiers and consequently have working voltages in excess of 500 V, far higher than anything encountered inside an electric guitar.[16]


You aren’t likely to really know what works best until you get the song a little further along in the mix, when you can hear how the guitar sound sits with the vocals and other instrument tracks. Sometimes, what sounds like the best guitar tone in the room isn’t always the most effective guitar tone in the track, but as ever, at this point you can only take a stab at what you think will work. Through experience, you’ll build a tool kit of go-to mic positions that achieve what you are seeking.
Giannini guitars were (and are) made by the Tranquilo Giannini S.A. factory, Carlos Weber 124, Sao Paolo, Brazil. They are generally known for being well-made instruments featuring very fancy Brazilian hardwood veneers, as well as for the strange-shaped asymmetrical CraViola models. Probably the most famous, indeed, perhaps only famous, endorser of Giannini guitars was José Feliciano. No reference materials were available on the early Giannini guitars. A catalog from 1971 is available, with a snapshot of the line that probably goes back at least a decade, and certainly forward.
NOTE: Due to the nature of electric guitar construction, it is extremely common for these instruments to need fret work to play well. 80% or more of electrics, especially those with bolt-on necks, have high frets in the tongue area that must be addressed in order to play without excess buzzing. This includes most new electric guitars right off the shelf. Please see the section below for fret work pricing.
Winner of the prestigious Music Inc. Product Excellence Award, 2017, the HeadRush Pedalboard Guitar Amp And FX Modelling Processor wholeheartedly deserves a spot on our best multi FX pedals list, thanks to the huge amount of effects within as well as its vast array of amplifier, cabinet and mic models. This is one of the best options for working musicians, yet still remains affordable.
8dio sampled a 200-year-old Italian made mandolin to create a gorgeous sounding VST that simply rules, and will fool even the most well-trained ears into thinking it’s the real deal.  Like with the others in the series, we have our usual clean legato, artifacts, effects, tremolos, mutes — basically, you have everything you need to get the job done 99% of the time.
Gibson guitars do tend to run on the high end of the price spectrum, but for an experienced player it’s not hard to understand why. Their guitars offer top notch craftsmanship and tone that is favored by a large segment of players. However, this does make their line of guitars less practical for beginners, who will likely want to improve in skill before making that level of investment.
While experimenting with the Vortex for this article, I was impressed by quite how well the ambient mics seemed to turn a close-miked guitar sound into something that sounded like it was on a record, but the downside of this approach for most home recordists will be that the Vortex is not easy to recreate in a smaller studio — so I thought I'd pass on some ways I found to make it more manageable on a smaller scale. One problem most small studios have is that they don't have large numbers of screens, but in practice I found that I was able to get decent results by putting the guitar cab in the corner of the room and using one or both of the room boundaries in place of the screens. Visconti's trick of aiming ambient mics at the studio glass also turned out to be handy to increase the apparent distance of the farther ambient mic.
For players who want an incredible palette of tones for a low entry cost, this is the amp for you. Experiment with 128 tonal presets, or create your own sounds with digital models of over 200 amps, cabs and effects. If you’re into playing different styles of music and you don’t want to invest in different rigs, look to this versatile solid state amp first.
About a year ago (or maybe more) I was in a real Marc Bolan/T Rex phase, and I came across a Lotus Les Paul copy in my local Sam Ash used for $199. Like the idiot I am, I played it, and it played and sounded good, so I bought it. Well, that did not sit well with my folks, who made me take it back a few days later. It had a bolt-on neck and was quite heavy, but other than that, it looked sweet. I even was smart enough to take a picture of it:
The search never stops for the best acoustic guitar to play during jamming sessions, recording sessions and live gigs. Every year, guitar brands keep on coming up with awesome acoustic guitars to take your playing to the next level. So what’s the latest? We have scoured through various models released in recent years all the way through 2018 and picked out 7 of the very best, chosen for their impressive build, unique tonal character, incredible value and overall winning quality. If you’re looking for the best acoustic guitar for your needs, consider this your short list.
Next was Eunice's ‘electric guitar’. It was beautiful and hardly used. However a common problem with guitars of this era were the horrible pickguards made from celluloid that would off-gas while in storage and then wreak havoc over the guitar’s other parts. Upon closer inspection the guitar was actually dripping wet from the many years of storage in the hard case.
Ibanez is a Japanese guitar manufacturing company, which is famous for being the first to mass-produce the seven-string and eight-string variants of guitars. The perfect size, great projection and beautiful tone offered by AEL, PF and EWP series of Acoustic guitars are remarkable. RGX and the GRX series of electric guitars come with the Ibanez brand at an affordable price. The mid-range GRG series include offers greater precision, high performance and playability.
In 1977, Gibson sued Hoshino Gakki/Elger Guitars for copying the Les Paul.[21] In 2000, Gibson sued Fernandes Guitars in a Tokyo court for allegedly copying Gibson designs. Gibson did not prevail.[22] Gibson also sued PRS Guitars in 2005, to stop them from making their Singlecut model. The lawsuit against PRS was initially successful.[23] However, the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit reversed the lower court decision and ordered the dismissal of Gibson's suit against PRS.[24]

Do these sites harm the artists, or do they spread the understanding of music? Do they generate more sales of music, or reduce it? Do they provide education and stimulate participation by young people in the creation of music? Do they remove the incentive for artists and publishers to faithfully reproduce official versions of TAB, lyrics, or music notation or do they encourage people to seek official versions when they find the unauthorized versions lack the detail or accuracy they demand?
What’s the point in having these lists anyway? There’s always going to be anger over people who were left out/included on the list when they didn’t deserve to be… And to say that any of the musicians mentioned so far aren’t talented is ridiculous, there’s no limit in the world on how much talent there is, so why does this list have to be limited to 10? Just saying…
For 2017, they introduced (or re-introduced?) the Firebird Studio. The Studio has regular tuners with protruding keys, and it has regular humbuckers instead of minis. It is not a Firebird, it is a Les Paul with the body of a ‘bird. This lie of a guitar sells for a whopping $1300, and the real version of the guitar - which is identical in every last detail to the cheaper 2016 model I own - now retails for $1500!
Fender is well known for producing excellent quality musical instruments. Not just today, instead it always has topped the list of best guitar brands as an icon in the music history of America. It produces a brighter tone, accompanying single coil pickups rather than the humbuckers. The single coil pickups are specially designed in a way scratching through the mix with the glorious sound to produce the characteristic tone. The unique part of Fender guitars may cause issues with humming.

The modern classical guitar is usually played in a seated position, with the instrument resting on the left lap - and the left foot placed on a footstool. Alternatively - if a footstool is not used - a guitar support can be placed between the guitar and the left lap (the support usually attaches to the instrument's side with suction cups). (There are of course exceptions, with some performers choosing to hold the instrument another way.)
The 1960s were the Golden Age for guitars in America. The folk music boom was followed closely by the British Invasion and the demand for guitars skyrocketed as young people by the millions started making their own music. The Silvertone Amp-In-Case model 1457 was the entry point for thousands of them. Some of the most sought-after Silvertones are from this era … more
Boutique pedals are designed by smaller, independent companies and are typically produced in limited quantities. Some may even be hand-made, with hand-soldered connections. These pedals are mainly distributed online or through mail-order, or sold in a few music stores.[98] They are often more expensive than mass-produced pedals[99] and offer higher-quality components, innovative designs, in-house-made knobs, and hand-painted artwork or etching. Some boutique companies focus on re-creating classic or vintage effects.[100][better source needed]
Passive pickups are similar to internal microphones that essentially just pick up the vibrations and soundwaves and send it straight to the amp. You bypass the need for a preamp that means you typically lack the ability to enhance, shape, and change sound and tones. Simply put, if you just want the ability to plug in for acoustic goodness, a passive pickup is a decent device. However, if you want to achieve more controlled volume and other features, you’re going to need to install a preamp at some point or simply opt for a guitar with an active pickup.
Five string guitars are common in Brazil, where they are known as guitarra baiana and are typically tuned in 5ths. Schecter Guitar Research produced a production model 5 string guitar called the Celloblaster in 1998.[43] A five-string tuning may be necessary in a pinch when a string breaks on a standard six-string (usually the high E) and no replacement is immediately available.

If you love the Telecaster look and sound, then here’s a great entry level Tele for beginners. In fact, “entry level” really doesn’t do this Telecaster justice. I’ve considered buying this exact model for myself–for times when I need to record some true single coil tones. If country twang is your thing, this is the guitar to get started with. But the Telecaster isn’t a one-trick pony. Plenty of rock (and even metal) players have used Telecasters over the years. Swap that bridge pickup with a single coil-sized humbucker and you’ve got a guitar that can do rock and metal with the best of ’em.
You don’t have a single Guild in your list, but you have Washburns that totally lack any sort of bass response. In fact, I’ve never understood how Washburn could take perfectly good materials like sitka spruce and mahogany, and produce such inferior guitars. You list the Fender fa-100 and stratacoustic, both firewood as far as I’m concerned, but don’t list the outstanding Alvarez AD60 and AD70, two amazing sounding guitars for the money. The Hohner and Oscar Schmidt OG2 are beginner guitars, but I know a lot of people with Yamaha FG800 and FG830 guitars who would be very offended by you saying one of their favorite guitars is for beginners. They are serious instruments, even if they only carry a sub-$300 price tag. They are certainly better sounding than that Taylor Big Baby thing, which I was shocked to hear at GC. Talk about over-rated. But you did get many things right. You gave the Blueridge d160 high marks, though I think the D140 should have been up there, too. Good to see that you gave the FG800 such high marks, but I actually like the FS800 a little better. It’s easier to play and better for fingerpicking. The Ami, Jim Dandy, and Recording King are all over-rated and over-priced. You need to take the Washburns down and put up the Guild M-120, D-120, and D-150. The D-150 may be the best guitar you can buy for under a grand.
Sune, you should know that there is no "right" or "wrong" string gauge for any guitar - it's all based on what you prefer in terms of feel and tone. It's good to try different gauges at first to find out what fits you the best. All my guitars are tuned to a drop-C tuning with 11-50 gauge strings, and I've only come to that perfect balance for me after a bunch of experimentation.
Cool guitar! You really don’t see many of these anymore. You are correct that it’s similar to the Washburn Wing series, specifically the Washburn Eagle from the late ’70s and early ’80s. In fact, aside from different fretboard inlays and brand names on the headstocks, when you compare the two they’re nearly identical. If this connection seems odd, the occurrence of very similar guitars with different brand names is more common that many of us would think.
Alembic | Baldwin | BC Rich | Burns | Crucianelli | Danelectro | Egmond | Eko | Epiphone | Fender | Framus | Futurama | Gibson | Goya | Gretsch | Guild | Guyatone | Hagstrom | Harmony | Hofner | Ibanez | Kalamazoo | Kay | Kent | Kramer | Levin | Martin | Magnatone | Microfrets | Mosrite | National | Ovation | PRS | Rickenbacker | Silvertone | Supro | Teisco | Yamaha | Valco | Vox | Wal | Zemaitis

Schecter's C-6 Plus belongs to their basic line of guitars. It features their own Super Strat body shape which is finished with a glossy charcoal burst finish. The tonewood of choice for this build is basswood, an inexpensively sourced wood, which is what allows such a nice guitar to be priced at this range. There are some aspects of basswood which work great with guitars designed for heavier genres, and on top of that, it is light weight. Don't take this for granted since it'll be hanging on your shoulders and back for long periods of time.
The Blue Midnight was released in 2011 with a limit to the key of C, also on the less expensive side of the market. It features stainless steel cover plates with a wider back gap for enhanced volume while playing. The unique feature of this harp is the comb, which is made out of translucent blue plastic. The comb allows for brighter tone than the black combed models. It also has a special just intonation (JI) "Chicago tuning". It is also now available in other keys.[23]
The main reason this exists is because some players prefer to drive their amplifier's preamp with high gain to achieve distortion instead of using an emulation through a pedal. This means that you can't push modulation and time-based effects into the preamp since distortion will come after them. Again, you can do this but it will sound horrible because it breaks our four main rules above. Nobody wants a muddy, smeared, and washed out tone, and thus the effects loop exists.
Maybe the pickups that came with your guitar are just cheap and not up to your standards. At that point, an upgrade might be less of a stylistic issue and would done for the purpose of improving the overall sound quality of your instrument. In most cases, upgrading the pickups on your guitar are the single most effective way to improve the overall tone and sound quality.
Updated! Now has complete information on how to set up a guitar with a tremolo bar including the Floyd Rose Tremolo System. A complete step-by-step guide to maintenance and setup of your electric guitar. This guide, packed with images, will show every aspect of essential electric guitar care such as changing the strings, adjusting the neck, and setting the action to match your playing style. It will also show you how to fix common electric guitar problems such as buzzing strings, scratchy pots and much more. Electric Guitar Repair and Maintenance is a great resource for any guitar owner. Now at a lower price!
Gibson sells guitars under a variety of brand names[5] and builds one of the world's most iconic guitars, the Gibson Les Paul. Many Gibson instruments are highly collectible. Gibson was at the forefront of innovation in acoustic guitars, especially in the big band era of the 1930s; the Gibson Super 400 was widely imitated. In 1952, Gibson introduced its first solid-body electric guitar, the Les Paul, which became its most popular guitar to date— designed by Ted McCarty and Les Paul.
Now we’ve got the basics down, let’s have a look at some simple modifiers to the circuit. This article first shows you how to add a “killswitch” to the guitar, then uses the lessons learned from that process to change that killswitch to a volume control instead. Finally, we’ll find out how capacitors are used in guitar circuits and install our first tone control.

Guitar technicians must be proficient in not only playing the guitar, but also in the construction of the instrument. They need to know how to repair and rebuild guitars from scratch as well as stringing and tuning the instruments. They need to understand how all the parts of the guitar interact to produce clear musical notes. This knowledge can be obtained through formal education, experience, working under a knowledgeable guitar tech or with other experienced musicians.


Although Yamaha are a better known Japanese musical instrument company, Ibanez stands out from the crowd in rock guitars, not just in Japan - but the world over - with a number of big name guitarists such as Joe Satriani, Steve Vai, and Paul Gilbert having signature models. They originally built their American presence in the 1960s on the back of Gibson and Fender copies, however the RG series introduced in the 1980s was a more original design, based on Steve Vai's JEM Universal, and became one of the biggest selling metal guitars of that period and beyond.
I gave some relief to the guitar, just enough to be able to move a business card on the 8th fret. I think the truss rod adjustment is ok now. Strangely it's still buzzing. I compared the height of the bridge to my Navigator N-LP-380LTD and i have the same height on the RLG-120 the same. The string that buzzes the most is the D string!!! E and A string buzz too but less than the D. Don't know if i want to raise the bridge more. G B E are ok! Don't know if the D slot on the nut is too low. Seems like the slots on the nut on my guitar are higher than the ones on your Burny. Don't know what to do. Frets seem even. Any chance it's the saddles or something? Do they play a role on buzzing. I will raise the bridge tomorrow morning and see how it goes. Any idea what should be a standard string height on these guitars? Lets say height on 1st fret, 5th fret, 8th fret, 12th fret, 16th fret, 22nd fret. Can we say that? Can you tell me yours to check with mine?
There have been several changes in the amplifier world since we last took a look at this mega amp article, spurring us to refresh a lot of content. We have replaced some models in our top ten chart, such as the Bugera Trirec and the Vox AV15, with a host of new additions. These include classic combos like the Fender Champion 100 and the Vox AC15C2, with some awesome heads such as the EVH 5150III and the Boss Katana, as well as the super portable Roland Cube Street.
THe 3 way switches is normally placed on the guitar with 2 pick up. For easy reference the Gibson Lespaul, that has 2 humbucker or soapbar type pickups. 1 near the bridge and one near to the neck. As it has 3 way switches it has 3 types of selection. 1st toggle normally for the bridge pickup, 2nd toggle is for the neck and bridge pickup. the 3rd toggle is for the neck pickup
SCALE LENGTH What is a "Scale Lenght?" The scale lenght is the lenght the string travels between the nut at the top of the fretboard and the bridge at the mid section of the base of the guitar. To determine the scale length of your guitar you would measure from the front part of the nut where it meets the fretboard to the center of the 12th fret on the neck and multiplying that by 2. Add about 3/16" to that on the low e string and taper that to about 1/16" added to the high e string. This is called compensation and that is why you see that tapered line on a bridge. Go to Stewart MacDonnaldfor more info. They also have a Fret Calculator that helps you determine your particular scale length in addition to a page dedicated to helping you out with tons of free info for your guitar building projects.The fret is the metal of nickle wire that is raised up off the fretboard. I would suggest buying a neck that has been pre made from a manufacturer that fits the design concept that you want to go with. I bought mine from Guitar Parts USA for about $70. You can pay anywhere from $50 to $300 for a neck at online retailers, but surf around and make sure you are satisfied with what you get. Guitarpartsusa will tell you to buy an expensive neck if you are building an expensive guitar, not a $70 neck. But for mine the $70 neck works just fine. Once you get the neck in and you determine what the scale length is you can lay it all out on paper. I recomend buying all your hardware, pickups and knobs before you draw your final template. This will allow to place everything where you want it and know what size holes to drill for the electronics and how big the cavites will need to be for them and the pickups.
A marvelous acoustic guitar with 6 strings and natural color. it has its body made from mahogany and a spruce top. The fret board is also made from mahogany. It one of the most beautiful guitar producing incredible sound. It is designed to suit the needs of the beginner in guitar playing. The price ranges from around INR 14,760 depending on available offers. To find more product information relating to Epiphone DR-212, click on the link below:

When buying your first guitar, the cost is always a matter of consideration. Be careful not to let this become the focus of the search otherwise you run the risk of compromising on quality. Think about it, you don't want to learn on the shoddy piece of equipment. You can usually get a good value with proper research. If you have a friend who plays the guitar; find out if they are willing to give you the benefit of their experience.
this is literally the worst piece of cow dung in the industry. I wouldn't even call it a guitar, it's so poorly made. Management, especially the CEO, don't care a bit about quality, the only thing that matters is their unrealistically high production numbers. the production processes are so archaic they are amateur, and they have the audacity to call it the worlds finest guitar. all of this stems from the CEO and his manic psychotic neurotic management style (he has to sign off on EVERYTHING: new hires, transfers within the company, promotions, raises, budgets, any funding for new parts or machines.
So where do you start in a section as massive as this one? From acoustic to electric, nylon to steel stringed, hollow body to solid body, all styles are represented here, so having a good idea of what you're looking for will definitely help. The best place to start is usually with the brand, as each one has a reputation for something different, allowing you to narrow things down from there. For example, you'll instantly recognize names like Fender, Gibson and Ibanez as trailblazers of the electric guitar, while others like Martin, Taylor, and Breedlove are more famous for the unparalleled quality of their acoustic instruments. After that, you'll want to look at things like body type, tonewood, strings, size, orientation and performance level. Once you have a general idea about each of these, your decision gets that much easier. Just remember, it all comes down to personal preference, so as long as you're happy with the guitar you choose you can't go wrong. The guitar is a special instrument, with a different meaning to every player. Whether you're taking your first steps into the world of music or you're a professional rocking out in front of sold out stadiums all over the planet, strumming, plucking and picking on a guitar is a way to express yourself that can't be duplicated with anything else. So pick up a guitar here and start playing... you'll be glad you did.
Lest anyone think left-handed guitarists are at a disadvantage compared to their right-handed contemporaries, consider this list of some of the best known lefties: Paul McCartney, Dick Dale, Jimi Hendrix, and Albert King are just a few of the world’s most esteemed left-handed guitar players. In the 1950s and ’60s, though, left-handed guitars were often difficult to come by, especially for guitarists on a budget. This makes left-handed...Continue Reading
I have a epiphone sg 50th edition and it does great by me in all I do. I play a lot of 60's music and otherwise all I want. It's very versatile and not to mention the cherry red wood grain finish makes it looks really awesome. Everyone I've ever met has bragged on it and I've been offered all kinds of guitars from Washburns to fenders. Just recently I went to a old guitar player of 30 yearsiin my grandfathers neighborhood and he absolutely loved the tone and playability. He said the only thing it might need to make it better was a professional setup which I'll soon be getting. When I first got it I complained a lot that the strings were a bit harder to push down due to the longer scale of the neck (the neck on it is pretty long) however. If you' work with it for about 2 days off and on its no problem. I love epiphone and judging from what I've played in ibanez guitars I might soon invest in one of them.
Here we have another Vintage Japanese GREAT find this example a beautiful pretty much exact copy of a vntage Martin D-45 ... this is a very High Quality built Lawsuit era Aria Pro II Model AW40. Made in Japan. From information on the Internet concerning dating these, the guitar's serial number would lead to 1976 manufacture. However, I could not find the AW40 model cataloged until the late 70's... but its a 76.. is consistent with all others. THIS is one beautiful guitar! it exudes fine detailed craftsmanship this was Aria's flagship dreadnought of this time period with D41-ish features. From an original vintage Aria catalog, AW40 features include: "Dreadnought sized, Solid Sitka Spruce top, Solid Brazilian Rosewood back and sides, bridge fingerboard and veneer headstock overlay with MOP logo, Marquetry Purfling" ( Top looks to be solid with the sides & back appears to me to be laminated )The catalog can be viewed at matsumoku.org, a site that deals with the history of Matsumoku made instruments like Aria, Electra and others. This guitar has the Martin classic snowflake mother of pearl inlays, abalone binding and rosette, and fully bound headstock and gorgeous rosewood fingerboard. Headstock also has a Rosewood overlay. The bookmatched rosewood on the back side is especially easy on the eyes. The guitar is all original with no repairs and with original tuning keys. It is in JVG Rated condition as excellent used vintage 8.8/10 WoW...its 35 years old and the woods have opened up now like fine wine the tone is richer & mellowed as only time can provide. No cracks or repairs ever. It plays very well with good action and has a nice warm rich tone. The Neck is arrow straight. Frets have minimal wear with no buzzing anywhere on the fingerboard....this is the one! At this link you can view more pictures of this guitar please cut & paste the following link: https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/AriaPro2AW40D45BrazilianRosewood?authkey=Gv1sRgCOmS2c3RvMGpUg#slideshow/5609409732594635106.
Iloveannie touched on the substance versus style aspect and I think you're trying to pin Prince to a wall using his lack of playing certain styles. Doesn't matter he doesn't play all those styles if the styles he has down are pro. And they are. I hear people say Prince is sloppy, but I think that's a little off. Or rather, the sloppiness is explained by his overall musicianship and performance chops.
By the late 1970s, costs of manufacture in Japan had risen to such an extent that it was difficult to make student-grade guitars over there. It was far less expensive to manufacture instruments in Korea. Numerous factories were built, and existing facilities in Korea were expanded. Samick built a factory capable of producing one million instruments a year. Japanese companies invested heavily in Korea so that they would be able to produce their low-end models in Korea and high-end models under the same brand names in Japan. The early Korean-made instruments were not as good as the Japanese ones, but it did not take nearly as long for Korean quality to improve as it did for the Japanese to go from making crude low-end models to sophisticated instruments suitable for professional use. The Koreas had the benefit of all of the Japanese experience especially in the cases of factories with Japanese ownership or management.
Pitch correction/vocal effects: Pitch correction effects use signal-processing algorithms to re-tune faulty intonation in a vocalist's performance [96] or create unusual vocoder-type vocal effects. One of the best known examples of this is Autotune, a software program and effect unit which can be used to both correct pitch (it moves a pitch to the nearest semitone), and add vocal effects. Some stompbox-style vocal pedals contain multiple effects, such as reverb and pitch correction.
Effects and effects units—stompboxes in particular—have been celebrated by pop and rock musicians in album titles, songs and band names. The Big Muff, a fuzzbox manufactured by Electro-Harmonix,[49] is commemorated by the Depeche Mode song "Big Muff" and the Mudhoney EP Superfuzz Bigmuff. Nine Inch Nails, Pink Floyd, George Harrison, They Might Be Giants and Joy Division are among the many musicians who have referenced effects units in their music.[50]
The smallest bass amps, which typically have 10 to 20 watts of power and a small 6.5" or 8" speaker, are known as practice amps. They amplify the instrument enough for individual practice in a small room, such as a bedroom. Practice amps do not typically produce enough volume or low-frequency sound reproduction to be used in a band rehearsal or show. As such, they are mostly used by beginners or, when used by professionals, for warm-up or individual practice. They are more likely than full-size combo amp cabinets to have an open-back design, like an electric guitar combo amp. The use of an open back cabinet in small practice amps makes these models different from most bass combo amps and speaker cabs, which are closed-back (often with bass reflex ports or vents, or less commonly, with passive radiator speakers, both of which are designed to boost the low-frequency response). Some buskers playing on the street for tips may use battery-powered practice amps, a feature available on some models.
Another way to set up your pedals is by placing them within the effects loop of your amplifier.  An effects loop is an audio input and output loop that is placed after the preamp and before the power amp section of your amplifier, using the Effects Send and Effects Return jacks. On some amplifiers, these can be labels Preamp Out (Effects Send) and Power Amp In (Effects Return).  Not all amplifiers have effects loops, but those that do allow for you to place some of your effects within the loop.
To learn how to practice correctly, you can sign up for a FREE No B.S. Guitar membership below. I’ve created this free course to teach you everything you need to know on how to practice correctly (Pit-Stop Practicing). I go much more in depth on the “how to learn” side of things, and you’ll avoid making all the same mistakes I made when I got started.
This Duo-Jet has the typical brown back and neck finish, original tuners, bone nut (which has never been off), ebony fingerboard and original frets, lefty thumbprint inlays, original Pat. Applied For Filter’Tron pickups with original wire harness including switches and capacitors. All solder joints are original. Original bar bridge. The lefty Bigsby tailpiece does not appear to be original to the instrument, and is probably a late 60s Bigsby, as there are screw-holes from another tail-piece on the bottom. The second to most recent owner acquired the guitar with its current tailpiece in 1971, and the only change he made to the Bigsby was in removing the black paint. The guitar was recently sent to Curt Wilson at Old School Guitar Repair(www.oldschoolguitar.net) at the recommendation of Gretsch guru, Edward Ball, where the front of the headstock was refinished to the correct black(previously Orange) and the center portion of the Bigsby was repainted black. Sadly, the previous owner removed and discarded the original lefty pickguard many years ago.
Here we have a well aged Vintage Washburn D12/br from 1989 its a D-18 type with a cedar top and man does this cedar top sound great…it was surprisingly sound and deep for a late 80s it has a mature balanced tone…I like it with its pretty good bass response and all. Its structurally great no cracks and no playability issues what so ever its neck and alignment integrity is also excellent as the action is good and the guitar is as a result easy to play. Cosmetically this guitar has been around the block its no sissy its stood the test of time and its previous owner and still all in all with all its obvious nicks and scratches and various doinks man it looks pretty darn vintage COOL and I loved it I thought you might like it too just take a good look for yourself if your the type that likes a well warn in vintage guitar and you don't really mind that it has some extra character and soul this just may be a guitar you might appreciate….. its own beauty from life playing and enjoying the music experience this guitar has been well loved and played yet it is no where near warn out it has years of life left in her she just wants to really sing for someone and in my assessment she’s ready to be enjoyed for another 30 years or more! Very cool vintage Washburn Dreadnought guitar. Its neck is straight and has the proper relief its Tuners are real good sealed gears and doing an excellent job to this day, This one has the medium slim taper neck with the Diamond volute like the old Martin style…nice touch Washburn. Mahogany Back and sides and neck with rosewood fingerboard its neck width is 1-11/16ths at the nut. This a a well built good player folks if you don’t mind it not being exactly mint cosmetically its actually beautiful in its own vintage appeal. Any questions or to make the purchase you can contact Joe at: JVGuitars@gmail.com.

The Schecter Hellraiser C-1 Electric Guitar features a solid mahogany body that guarantees durability, along with a set-neck having ultra access. There is hardly a guitar which sounds great in regular, single-coil configuration, also in humbucker mode, but that’s what the Schecter does; having excellent sustain. The set of this guitar was great out of the box, while the fingerboard is good, smooth and quick.

Time to turn our attention back to the guitars themselves. The following are some of the better low-cost electric guitars available on the market today; refer to an anatomy of electric guitars to see definitions of guitar pieces and places. When you're deciding, go to a store and try them out for heft, comfort, stability, sound quality, and appearance. Shop around, comparing, for instance, online prices against local store prices. This is an investment, so choose wisely.
Artist Studies are available that explain the specific playing style of a guitar hero or band like Van Halen, Albert King, AC/DC, B.B. King, Chet Atkins, Iron Maiden, David Gilmour, Eric Johnson, Freddie King, George Lynch, Jack Johnson, Jeff Beck, Jimi Hendrix, Joe Pass, John Prine, Keith Richards, Metallica, Megadeth, Randy Rhoads, Ritchie Blackmore, The Edge, Tony Rice, Wes Montgomery
Quality-wise, they range from complete and utter crap, to OMG! Acoustics, tend to fall into the former range. Electrics, mostly the hollow bodies, were somewhat, but not always better. Solid bodies, mostly made from plywood, BUT they do have their own feel and sound. I happen to love them, others despise that cheap feel and sound. Remember, they were built to fill the growing demand of guitars, that the kids saw on tv, with the Monkee's and the Beatles

Similar to the previous model we mentioned, Squier by Fender Bullet Strat represents the Stratocaster beginner family. It’s a guitar full of tradeoffs, but you are rarely going to find a model more capable in this price range. I’ve played a lot of these, and even have one which I use strictly for practicing at home. I like it, even though it’s somewhat limited.


Many modern processors have such great presets you'll never need to get delve any further to create your own. However, almost all units with presets allow you to easily create your own favorite presets. You can start with a factory preset, tweak the sounds to your taste, then save it in your own location to be recalled at the touch of a button while you're playing.
The XB-40, (short for Extreme bending-40 reeds), is unlike any other diatonic made. Released in 2003, it was specifically designed by harmonica specialist Rick Epping to simplify proficient bending of the notes. To make this possible, the XB-40 uses forty reeds as opposed to the usual twenty found in most ten-hole diatonics. With these bending capabilities, the XB-40 gives access to all the notes on the chromatic scale through bending the natural tones of each hole. This model was discontinued in 2013. Shortly before production officially ceased, Suzuki Music released a similar model the SUB-30.[28]
We all have heard that tone starts in the hands of the guitarist.  Different players can play thru the exact same amp and guitar rig and produce sounds on opposite ends of the spectrum.  I like to refer to this base sonic level as the DNA of a player.  Thanks to mad scientists tinkering in their evil laboratories of sound, we now have the ability to alter a guitarist’s tonal genetic code with effects pedals.

One master's name that kept being repeated by the guitar experts was Roger Crisler of Crisler Guitar Repair in Carrollton. He's been in the business of repairing guitars for almost 40 years. Some of the best guitarists in the DFW area turn to him when their guitar is sick: Chris Watson, Bnois King, Zach Weeks, Drew Adkins, Smokin' Joe Kubek, the list just continues to grow. He's trusted, and his work is respected. "When you love what you do, it doesn't feel like a job," he says.
In late 1929, Martin built a prototype batch of six OM guitars. The very first of these had pyramid bridges and no pickguard. Martin soon realized that with the vigorous strumming required in a band setting, a pickguard would be required. Hence all OMs after the prototype batch had a small teardrop-shaped pickguard. The new OMs were not highly sucessful. They sold, but not as well as Martin had hoped. In 1933 the OM designation was dropped and was now called the "000" model. But infact the 1933 "000" models were the same as the 1933 "OM" models, retaining the OM body style and 14 fret neck. Then in 1934 the standard 000 models were modified to the shorter 24.9" scale (for unknown reasons, as the 12 fret 000 body had a 25.6" scale length its inception in 1902 to its demise in 1931). Yet the OM's longer scale was a major factor in the OM's tone. The strings on an OM must be tuned to a higher tension to get concert pitch. This extra tension translates into more drive on the top, hence providing more volume and tone. The OM's scalloped braces and a small maple bridgeplate give the OM a great sound. Although these features were common to other Martin models of the time, the OM's top brace under the fingerboard was missing. This design is unique to OMs making the top very lightly braced. This does lead to some problems with cracks in the upper bout along the side of the fingerboard, but it also contributes to the great sound of the OM models.

When you hit a string it will vibrate. It will continue to vibrate until the energy put into it is expended. Where does that energy go? Well, it is expended through movement. That movement is what the pickup "sees" and translates into sound. In a world where 100 % of the initial energy imparted by the strum to the string was expended through movement, wood doesn't matter.
Unintentional phase cancellation can also occur if a guitar's pickups are wired incorrectly, or if a new pickup installed in the guitar has different magnetic or electric polarity from the one it replaced. To fix this, the pickup's magnetic or electric polarity needs to be reversed (which one exactly depends on the respective polarities of the other pickup(s) and whether or not hum-cancelling combinations are desired). While the latter is usually a small matter of reversing the pickup's hot and ground wires,[24] the former may be more difficult, especially if it requires the magnet(s) to be removed and reinstalled in a different orientation, a process which can damage the pickup and render it unusable if not done carefully.[25] This is the case with most humbuckers. On the other hand, single-coil pickups with magnetic polepieces can simply be repolarised by applying a strong enough external magnetic field.
We recommend you choose the headstock shape that appeals to you most. The shape of the headstock does not significantly affect the sound or performance of the instrument. Some of our headstock shapes are pointier, which means they can get damaged more easily when dropped or bumped. Choose from our existing shapes, or, send us a drawing of your original design - we can build that, too!
A friend lent me this banjo and I got it working and sampled it. Its a 5 string closed back banjo. The fifth string being tuned to a high "g" note (half the length of the neck). Its this string and the closed back that helps give you the bluegrass sound (the high string ringing the "g" note throughout each of the chords with syncopated fingerpicking patterns). This has a standard mapping with variations of long release (to hear the whole sample) and reverb.

Are you running it through a cab simulator? That or proper eqing. Turn up the mids and drop a high pass filter on that sucker. If you're finding it still lacking check out the KeFir cab simulator and then just use the preamp you have now. I've had wonderful results with that. If you're not liking your preamp try out The Anvil by Ignite amps. Best clean tone I've had out of freeware.
The Orange Crush PiX CR12L is another fairly standard style beginner amp. It has the same standard features as most beginner amps. The Crush PiX CR12L is a little more expensive than some similar featured amps, like the Velocity V10, but it makes up for the extra cost with a better build quality, better tone, and a well designed control layout. The Crush PiX CR12L gives a lot of control over the tone, but manages to do so in a clear, easily understood control panel.
The XB-40, (short for Extreme bending-40 reeds), is unlike any other diatonic made. Released in 2003, it was specifically designed by harmonica specialist Rick Epping to simplify proficient bending of the notes. To make this possible, the XB-40 uses forty reeds as opposed to the usual twenty found in most ten-hole diatonics. With these bending capabilities, the XB-40 gives access to all the notes on the chromatic scale through bending the natural tones of each hole. This model was discontinued in 2013. Shortly before production officially ceased, Suzuki Music released a similar model the SUB-30.[28]
GUITAR RIG 5 PLAYER is the free, modular and expandable effects processor from Native Instruments, combining creative effects routing possibilities with ease-of-use and pristine sound quality. The included FACTORY SELECTION library provides one stunning amp with 17 cabinet emulations, plus 13 effects and sound modifiers to shape and enhance any audio signal.
The Epiphone Joe Pass Emperor II is the signature guitar of one of jazz music’s great guitarists. Joe Pass played on records with Ella Fitzgerald, and his influence has cemented his name among the greats of the genre. The guitar which bears his name is a fine example of a guitar geared precisely towards one genre. It won’t win any awards for versatility, but it is a fantastic instrument for jazz fans of any skill level. Featuring the classic hollow body arch top design of old but with two high quality Burstbucker pickups for a range of silky tones.

One question I get asked incredibly often, specially from beginner guitarists is: “What are the best guitar brands.” It’s a pretty valid question given that in just about every industry there are brands that are known to be the most desirable and most reliable (not always at the same time) and therefore, the best. However, it works a little bit differently in the guitar industry. Sound quality often goes on par with price. Reliability is measured a little differently than say, cars, as most guitar companies easily make very reliable instruments. Finally, desirability is usually based on price, looks, artist endorsement and more importantly again, sound-quality.
An effects unit is also called an "effect box", "effects device", "effects processor" or simply "effects". In audio engineer parlance, a signal without effects is "dry" and an effect-processed signal is "wet". The abbreviation "F/X" or "FX" is sometimes used. A pedal-style unit may be called a "stomp box", "stompbox", "effects pedal" or "pedal". A musician bringing many pedals to a live show or recording session often mounts the pedals on a guitar pedalboard, to reduce set-up and tear-down time and, for pedalboards with lids, protect the pedals during transportation. When a musician has multiple effects in a rack mounted road case, this case may be called an "effects rack" or "rig". When rackmounted effects are mounted in a roadcase, this also speeds up a musician's set-up and tear-down time, because all of the effects can be connected together inside the rack case and all of the units can be plugged into a powerbar.

I have $100 guitars that play and sound great. I have $15,000 guitars that play and sound great. That said, a great middle of the road guitar that won't break the bank is an Epiphone Masterbilt. I find them to sound remarkable AND play great, ESPECIALLY for the money. I like buying guitars used and save about half from the retailers. A good used Masterbilt will cost about $300 on Ebay or Craigslist.

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Ask yourself this question right at the beginning. Before buying a guitar you have to make sure of the kind of style you are comfortable in- be it the jazz and blues or be it country, soul or pop. Only once you are sure of the kind of style you are in for, you should move forward to buying your new guitar. Make the wrong choice, and you will have to regret for it later on.
For players who want an incredible palette of tones for a low entry cost, this is the amp for you. Experiment with 128 tonal presets, or create your own sounds with digital models of over 200 amps, cabs and effects. If you’re into playing different styles of music and you don’t want to invest in different rigs, look to this versatile solid state amp first.

Guitar wiring refers to the electrical components, and interconnections thereof, inside an electric guitar (and, by extension, other electric instruments like the bass guitar or mandolin). It most commonly consists of pickups, potentiometers to adjust volume and tone, a switch to select between different pickups (if the instrument has more than one), and the output socket. There may be additional controls for specific functions; the most common of these are described below.
Like Ibanez, Jackson is known for targeting the metal crowd. They have a variety of instruments available from affordable lower-cost guitars to high-end pro/enthusiast guitars. Jackson likes to keep their designs unique. Think of an 80s metal band and what they might be playing. If you thought of pointy guitars with sharp angles, Jackson might be what you’re looking for. Jackson not only sounds metal, it looks metal too. The Jackson King V, for example, is a staple instrument. If you know who Dave Mustaine is, you’ve heard of Megadeth. Because he was a co-founder and its guitarist. He is one of the people who made the Jackson King V as famous as it is. However, the design can be a bit too over the top for some people. Not everyone wants their guitar to be as “loud” as the sound it produces.
This specific review is for the full-size guitar, which is 40”, so if you read all the reviews on Amazon, many of them are for the ½ and ¾ size. If you’re an adult with smaller hands, purchasing the smaller sizes may be a better bet than trying to wrestle with a full-size instrument. Size doesn’t necessarily have to do with this guitar model’s tone, which many reviewers say is quite good for the price.
Whether you are a beginner or a professional, you can find the right strings for your level and guitar type. Thinner string gauges are typically better for beginning musicians because they are easier to bend with an uncalloused hand. If you are looking for strings to stand up to heavy shredding and produce more volume, then thicker gauges are what you are after.

Great sounding pedal reasonably easy to assemble. First, if you havent much experience, take the time to study up on PCB's, it's not step by step. If you have trouble reading the resistors there are apps that tell you the values by scrolling through the band colors. My only problem was wiring the jack outlets because the print isn't that great in that area. 2 or 3 components didn't match the PCB's labeling but I looked at the product's pic and figured it out. It took about 3 1/2 hrs with eating dinner in there somewhere. Now some friends want me to make them one also! 4 stars because of the jack outlet picture and no green wire
An alternative solution to raising the tailpiece is to pass the strings through from the FRONT of the tailpiece (heading towards the back of the guitar) and then passing them over the top of the tailpiece before they go over the bridge. Here you can see evidence of someone having set up the guitar in this way in the past (scuff marks from the strings passing over the top). Personally, this is not something I’ve ever needed to do, but the option is there should you choose to take it.
Pedals of this template offer a sound that’s considered “natural,” “warm” and “tubey” partly by achieving smooth, symmetrical clipping, and partly by reining in harsher high harmonics that can result in sounds that are heard as jagged and spikey in other pedals. The truth is, opamps really don’t clip in the same way that tubes do, but they are manipulated in these designs to simulate a generally “tube-like” sound. Other early overdrive pedals were designed around discrete transistorized clipping and boosting circuits, though many leaned toward distortion units as properly defined, and added more artificiality to the sound—hence the Tube Screamers’ near-instant popularity when it was introduced.
: I have located a semi-hollow body electric Kent guitar that has a body some what like a 335 and the neck like a fender strat. The body is a beautiful natural birdseye maple. She is in awsome shape and plays well. I have the ser# (xxx) 3 digits and I believe that it was made in Japan in the Sixty's. I have no Idea what model it is or value because I can't find out any thing about Kent guitars. I've seen Kent amps guitars & drums but no info. I welcome anything.
Epiphone Broadway Electric Guitar Make way for the Broadway, Epiphone’s big, bold and blindingly beautiful hollow body archtop guitar. The Epiphone Broadway has been a jazz club staple since the 1930s and it continues its soulful career with new appointments. The big-bodied Broadway features a laminated maple body with a select spruce top, a hard maple neck, a rosewood fretboard and Alnico Classic Humbucker pickups.
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The Fender Stratocaster may be the most widely recognizable electric guitar and the one most associated with the rise of rock and roll music. It featured a distinctive double-cutaway design that allowed musicians to play higher notes by reaching higher on the fingerboard, three pickups (which allowed for a greater range of sounds since previous guitars which had two pickups at most), and a patented tremolo system that allowed players to raise or lower the pitch of the strings. In the hands of guitarists like Buddy Holly, Eric Clapton, Bonnie Raitt, and many others, the Stratocaster became an icon of American rock and roll that took the world by storm. The Stratocaster, the Gibson Les Paul, and other solid-body electrics were nothing if not versatile, and rock guitarists were obsessed with versatility. Guitarists could not only change the tone, volume, and pitch, but they also could manipulate the sound by playing close to the amplifier, grinding the strings against things, and using special effects accessories like the wah-wah pedal. Jimi Hendrix was this instrument’s master of manipulation, influencing generations of guitarists to experiment creatively with their playing techniques and equipment.
Les Paul DID NOT design the guitar that bears his name! Ted McCarty and his team at Gibson came up with it and took it to Les at Delaware Water Gap where he was living and recording (no planes flying over). Ted showed it to Les and he said, "They're getting too close to us, Mary, we better join 'em." The only contribution that Les made to the original guitar was that lousy wrap around the bottom trapeze tailpiece that was quickly dumped...
1. (n.) A sweet or agreeable succession of sounds.2. (n.) A rhythmical succession of single tones, ranging for the most part within a given key, and so related together as to form a musical whole, having the unity of what is technically called a musical thought, at once pleasing to the ear and characteristic in expression.3. (n.) The air or tune of a musical piece.
Yeah there is no double about it the Epiphone Special 11 is unreal value for money and even though I have over the years filled my Den with guitars some worth a lot of money the Epiphone Special 11 is my go to guitar. I just cannot fault, great tuners, pickups and basically the only guitar I have that stays in tune 90% plus of the time. It is also the lightest of my guitar collection weighing in at about 5.5lbs. For $299 Australian they are an absolute steal. If I could only have one guitar I would go to this Epiphone Les Paul Special 11 ever time.

Probably one of the greatest is Glenn Schwartz, formerly of the James Gang and Pacific Gas & Electric. Considered to be a "white" Jimi Hendrix, he was asked by Jimi to play at what was to be his last birthday party. Glenn played behind his back and with his teeth (now with his gums) before Jimi ever did. Now out of the limelight (and out of his mind) Glenn plays (and preaches) on Thursdays at a blue collar bar in Cleveland. ONE F*CKING INCREDIBLE PLAYER. Should be on any list.
Since affordable guitars are designed for students, manufacturers know that playability is of utmost priority. This is the reason why many of these budget-friendly guitars don't stray from familiar neck and body measurements. This ensures that they feel as close to premium guitars as possible, albeit utilizing more cost effective materials and production methods.

But there are more questions – are you a beginner, or do you have 20 years playing experience under your belt? Are you on a tight budget, or is money no object? Do you prefer funk, or are you a full-on metalhead? Somewhere the perfect guitar is waiting for you, and – with hundreds of reviews on this site – chances are we have featured it on these pages!

The best electric guitar isn’t one that just sounds good (however you may define good as) — it’s how it feels in your hands. We remember when we could barely start forming memories, going to our dad’s shows and him using his telecaster on stage. He had been playing since he was 5 years old (which we actually used his opinion for in this guide as well) and continues to play today 50 years later. As we grew up and learned guitar ourselves, it was more about what was comfortable and felt as natural as possible. Paired up with the sound and feel, there are a few more factors to take into consideration when you’re looking for the best electric guitar.

There’s still a lot of confusion over Japanese- and Korean-built guitars from this era in regards to trademarks, who built them, when they were offered, and the connection between them all. However, many of these guitars are high quality and you should always pay close attention when encountering an unknown trademark. If a guitar was produced at one of the aforementioned factories, it could very well be a treasure, just like your Lotus.
AmpliTube Free is a cool entry level program for those that want to experience software based guitar effects and amp modeling without spending money. It only comes with 9 stompbox and 2 rack type effects, but it covers essential effect types which are good enough for various musical genre applications. Should you need more, AmpliTube offers an upgrade system in which you can shop for additional amps, cabinets, mics and effects. Each model can even be tried out for free for two days prior to purchase, quite impressive for a free software!
We’ve already shown you how you will sometimes want more than one mic on your amp to achieve ideal sound in your tracks. Many semi-distant and ambient techniques will be most useful, along with a close mic, but on a separate track, to retain the option of blending a more-direct tone to create your overall sonic picture. Any single-mic positions discussed thus far can be combined into multi-mic sounds in the mix when recorded to different tracks. There are also several other approaches to multi-miking that might come in handy now and then, and which are worth some exploration.
There are also companies like Eastwood Guitars that are releasing their own versions of the Hi-Flier. Available for a pretty low sum, you can get Eastwood’s recreation of a Phase 4 Hi-Flier in both right-handed and lefty configurations. If you don’t find the world of vintage guitars too appealing, but you dig the look and feel of the Hi-Flier, this might be a prime option for you.
Southpaw Guitars has over 900 Left Handed Guitars and Basses In Stock at any time. At Southpaw Guitars you will find a knowledgeable friendly sales staff to provide Service, Assistance, and Guidance as you purchase your Dream Guitar. Furthermore, You will not be greeted by hold music, transferred between departments, treated discourteously, or given the sell what we have routine. We are conveniently located in Southwest Houston. 713-667-5791
Later, in 1955, Gibson launched the Les Paul TV model, which was essentially a Junior with what Gibson called a natural finish. This finish was actually more of a translucent mustard yellow through which the wood grain could be seen, and was not unlike the finish that competitor Fender called butterscotch yellow. The idea behind this TV Yellow was that white guitars would glare too much on early black and white television broadcasts, whereas TV Yellow guitars would not cast a glare.

Read Full Review The brand ESP that we all know today started its roots as a shop in Tokyo Japan selling custom replacement parts for guitars that quickly gained a good reputation for its high quality. Soon came after the brand manufactured fully assembled guitars that burst in the trash metal seen of the 80’s signing in big name bands to carry their guitars and basses.

You've come to the right place.  We offer a wide range of vintage and used guitars and basses including a great selection of Fender instruments.   We're guitar players who recognize and appreciate how important Fender has been to the evolution of Rock and Roll.  Please browse our web site, give us a call or visit our Chicago show room.  We're constantly searching for Fender guitars, new gear is arriving daily and they often sells before we have a chance to list them on our web site.  

BOSS also has a few pedals that make your instrument sound like some other instrument. The AC-3 Acoustic Simulator will do the job. Some effects change your sound with filtering. This effect type can be used in different places in the signal path, so we’ll use the GE-7 Graphic EQ. A few BOSS effects defy categorization, but are nevertheless very useful in any signal path. The most common of these is the CS-3 Compression/Sustainer.


Bought a Tubemeister 18 Twelve about three years ago. Love the size, and options of this amp. Primarily use it at home. Replaced a Fender and a Marshall combo amps with this one. Really like the sound, but recently blew a power tube as well as a fuse, and capacitor as a result. Replaced the Chinese power tubes with JJ's, when professionally repaired. All seems well, but wonder about the reliability of this amp in the long run. My tech recommended changing the tubes every year or two, especially if using the power soak feature. Running it really hard by doing so. Also, read that it generates more heat inside the cab (no vents. closed back). Overall still like the amp, but after dropping $200 to repair, after spending $800 on the amp.. having second thoughts of long term reliability. Not using the power soak very much any longer, and keeping a better eye on the TSC (tube safety control)... not sure if it actually did what it is suppose to. To me... less features and simplicity could be ...more
There have always been slight variations in the color of the cream plastic parts used on Gibson and other guitars. It's not uncommon to see brand new and vintage guitars with bindings, pickup rings, toggle switch rings and pickguards that don't perfectly match in color. We do our best to match all our cream products, but there's no absolute control from batch to batch, or from supplier to supplier.

The Acoustic Resonance control gives you the option of adding life back in to your sound. Where some pickups, Piezos in particular can sometimes sound “quacky” and hard, due to the fact they only pick up the sound of the bridge area, the AD-10 analyses your pickup signal and recreates the missing body and string resonances accurately to ensure the subtle tonalities of your playing qualities of your guitar are intact.
His tone is incredible and he is capable of an extreme vibrato that is perfect for his style of playing.  It’s obvious he’s not working hard for it.  His choices of strings benefit his economy of motion.  Even though he maintains low action on his Fender Stratocasters and even scallops the frets for acrobatic, tight-rope string walking, his ability is only strengthened by the ease of playing light string gauges.
Always use more than one mic, and when possible, double down on the amp as well. This will give you additional options in the mixing phase. You can split the signal to the amp by employing a stereo FX pedal or a DI. The second mic doesn’t necessarily have to be close to the cabinet and can be placed as far as 3 ft away to give you more tonal range.   
Peavy amps are especially well appreciated by the metal community, thanks to their good overall reliability and the high volume of sound some models produce. The 6505 Series is a favorite of metal guitarists due to its power and versatility. This is most often used as a head for double stacks of speakers, but it can also be purchased as a 2×12” and 1×12” combo for convenience.
If you think you might build more than one of a pedal, it’s helpful to keep a list of your preferred parts and their specifications in a spreadsheet. In manufacturing this is called a BOM (Bill of Materials). Some online stores will let you import a BOM direct into their web store and will build a purchase order for you based on the information. It’s a big time saver each time you need to order parts, and lets you compare different vendors stocks easily.

I don’t recall how I got his number, but when I called Dana Sutcliffe to talk about what is probably his most famous—at least known famous—guitar, he said we should do lunch. Dana lives just down the road from me in Delaware, so it was an easy meeting. I asked if he’d ever had Vietnamese pho (beef noodle soup, one of the world’s most perfect foods), and since he hadn’t and since he loves to eat, we met one day in one of South Philadelphia’s numerous pho parlors to discuss the genesis of the Alvarez Dana Scoop. It was, as it turns out, all the result of an accident.


These are the settings I use as my basic rack for adding rock guitar sounds in Cubase, and you might also find it handy as a point of departure, so it's worth saving as a track preset. To do this, right‑click in the audio track containing the 'rack', and choose 'Create Track Preset' from the context menu. When the Save Track Preset dialogue box appears, simply name it and save it: now you can call up your rack for any audio track in any Cubase project!
Sensitivity: Valve amplifiers (current drive) are sensitive to crossover resonances and speaker impedance variations. Quality speaker systems often used passive crossovers that were second-order, constant impedance, and critically aligned to avoid resonant effects. Some quality speakers had copper caped pole pieces, which helped damp impedance variations. Note:- With solid-state amps in voltage drive, power decreases as the speaker impedance rises. With valve amps in current drive, power increases as the speaker impedance rises. Therefore a flat speaker impedance is synonymous with a flat frequency response.
But add some effects to the blend and the results can be even more interesting. Keyboard-like tones can be generated by rolling off the tone pots and employing digital delay, expanding the sound of your band without overstuffing the van, and the gentle application of a phase shifter or wah-wah can bring an interesting voice to warm, low tones. Jimi Hendrix’s “Pali Gap” is a classic example of the latter.
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In 1971 Larrivee began adding inlay designs to their guitars and in 1977 inlays became a standard for their guitars. Beginning in 1978 their inlay designs took on a more romantic style. Since 1979 all engravings were designed by Wendy Larrivee except for a 1998 inlay called the “Joker.” In 2007 Larrivée began using laser engraving for their inlays.
Tremolo can be a subtle effect, as heard in “Born on the Bayou”by Creedence Clearwater Revival and Gimme Shelter by The Rolling Stones, or more distinct as heard in “Crimson and Clover” by Tommy James and the Shondells and “Bones”by Radiohead. Tremolo has been around since the earliest days of the rock era, and was popular with rockabilly and surf guitarists.
I found one at a local shop, 60's Norma, resembles a Strat LIKE guitar, but with a sweet design... It has two switch where you would fidn hte pickup selector on a gibson les paul. Its got a few nicks and such, but it sounds REALLY good and the guy only wants 60 bucks, I plan on buying it, re-fretting, and doing some custom fix up on the body. And He said pretty much everything is original... A pretty sweet guitar if you ask me... If and when I buy it I'll get a picture, email if interested!

When it comes to buying an electric guitar there are a lot of options available, and choosing one can be confusing. This guide will help you understand the basic differences in electric guitars so you can make an informed decision. And remember, we’re here to help with friendly Gear Heads available at 1-800-449-9128 who can guide you to the electric guitar that best meets your needs.
I’m not sure if you’re right about Joe being wrong. My memory of exactly how tone controls are usually wired is kind of failing me, but I think I remember that what you’re saying would be true if the output was taken from the node connected to the capacitor, but it’s not–the output node is the node on the opposite end of the tone pot from the capacitor, unless I’m remembering wrong. I think that filter-characteristics of guitar tone circuits are easier to visualize if you imagine them as reacting to a current source. Meaning “a big resistor in series with a capacitor” reacts the same way that “a big resistor” does. Basically, current above the cutoff frequency is shunted to ground through the tone pot–so if the tone pot is high, very little percentage (compared to if it was just a capacitor) of this current gets shunted, whereas if the tone pot is low, a high percentage gets shunted.
While a straight DI approach can work for clean sounds, simply plugging a guitar into an overdrive pedal and then routing the output of the pedal into your recording system will sound unnaturally thin and raspy because there are no speakers to take away the unwanted high end, but that hasn't stopped some people using it as a 'trademark' sound! For a more conventional sound, a speaker simulator is needed to filter out the unwanted higher harmonics. A passive speaker simulator, such as the original Palmer Junction box can be placed directly after an overdrive pedal or a regular guitar amp preamp output, but it will need to be recorded using a mic input rather than a line input (passive filtering always results in a reduction in level). Active equivalents (usually battery or phantom powered) are also available, which may offer a greater range of tonalities.
Keep focused on one goal at a time. For example, you could spend a week or two really getting to know 5 chords (why 5? Just pick a realistic number for that window of time and go with it!). Then, in the next week or two, practice changing between those chords using different combinations. In the next week, work on your strumming or picking, using the chords and chord change combinations you've learned.
Gibson guitar are among the best in the world, but they can also be a little expensive. You can go with an Epiphone, but Gibson always has a few good options under the $1,000 mark as well. If you love the idea of owning a Gibson Les Paul but you’re struggling with the cash part of it, check out the Les Paul Faded. A little while back I grabbed the 2016 version and it’s been a fantastic guitar with the tone and feel of a Les Paul, minus the big price tag.
I'll be honest .. my Washburn N4 is hands down the best I've ever known. To me, Les Pauls sound amazing but are heavy and play like a log cabin. A buddy of mine's Suhr Strat felt/sounded clinical and small. An old Gibson SG felt like a cigar box jobbie. I remember in the early 90s looking at the Vai Ibanezes and the body was great despite the zany colors but the neck was too thin and whispy. I had the frets leveled and crowned and the action on mine 10 years ago and it just plays and feels like butter .. maybe 2 - 2.5mm at the 12th fret. The neck I sanded with 2000 grit now slighty reflects light so it glides beautifully feeling like 'satin wooden glass'. My aftermarket pickups puts the tone squarely into a modern fusion rock camp of sorts .. Oh yea and I think it's the neck shape of these Davies N4s that might make them so cool. The nut is a wider, more comfortable 1 11/16 inches with a flat fingerboard radius .. so may of the others seem like 1 9/16 with a cramped, rounder fringerboard. I did try a JP6 I didn't care for the feel of .. tl;dr ymmv :)
In 1941, CMI became the national distributor for National Dobro products. In ’42, Victor Smith, Al Frost and Louis Dopyera purchased controlling interest in the company. By this time, however, the world was at war and almost all instrument manufacturing ground to a halt as all segments of industry converted to production of materials to support the war effort. In October of 1943, with builders in wartime hiatus, the new owners changed the company name to Valco Manufacturing, incorporating the first initial of each partner’s given name (V-A-L-Co).
Guitar from Spain is the best online store to buy the best spanish guitars online: Classical guitars, Flamenco Guitars, Acoustic Guitars and electro acoustic guitars made in Spain from the best spanish guitar makers at spanish local prices. These unique guitars will be delivered from our warehouse or from the manufacturer's bench to your door, avoiding extra costs or double margins. Because we only sell guitars from the most reputable Spanish manufacturers, you will be assured to buy only the best spanish guitars available with 2 years warranty and certified from origin. Spanish guitar brands like Alhambra Guitars, Raimundo Guitars, Ramirez Guitars, Admira Guitars, Camps Guitars, Rodriguez Guitars or Prudencio Saez Guitars are among the most reputable and best sounding guitars in the world. These guitars are manufactured in Spain, the land of the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar. At Guitar From Spain you can also buy steel stringed acoustic guitars, western guitars and electro acoustic guitars made with the same traditional craftsmanship and know how acquired through centuries of guitar making. We also have special guitars as Bandurria (Spanish mandolin), Laud (Spanish lute), Cuban tres, timple canario and special sized guitars as Cadete (guitar 3/4) Requinto (Guitar 1/2) and Senorita (Guitar 7/8). Compare our Spanish Guitars with any other "asian made guitars" at the same price and you will be amazed with the diference in quality and sound that you can get. Do not settle for imitations, buy the original, buy Guitars from Spain.
Here we have a well made in Japan kinda rare to see these vintage Fender Japanese acoustics now days... interesting well built and is still beauty ..its all mahogany body & neck are very well constructed , offering good cross braced body ala D-18/28 seems to be awfully similar?..to my vintage Yamaha FG180 or 200 Nippon Gakki.....that is to say pretty darn nice!.. almost the same guitar but for the Fender's more stylistic headstock top shape that differs from the vintage Yamaha... this was clearly built for Fender as there import in those days Japan offered more competitive pricing to us manufactures to produce there line...this offering is really quite a nice guitar in its own right... so now its nicely aged well over the years..nice ring tone to it now, its very good overall condition, but sometime in its past history it received a doink to the binding on the back side lower bout a binding touch up repair has been done ...to the back lower bout and is about a foot long area -replaced ..its on the back bottom like I said so its really out of sight and is out of mind the remainder of bindings are otherwise 100% very nice beautiful actually nice looking tortious style..the rest the body has a few nicks or scars not to bad looking though a real vintage Vibe to it with no major cracks or warpage the bridge & top are tight and flat so its a very sound playing instrument, 1 changed tuner. The minor abraiions had been lacquer filled to preserve the original finish integrity ..we just built up low spots with matching lacquer to level off to prevent further degradation pealing or chipping those areas have been french polished built up and then excess has been removed elsewhere leaving only the low spots filled then we polished to gloss and well it looks ... pretty darn GOOD now.. she's preserved & fully ready for another 30 years of play... this example has a NICE NECK and she plays great....Worth preserving?...I think so See pics please... This guitar has no abrasions wood cracks or issues at all just a vintage guitar thats surprisingly such a fine player...action is good not too high at all and it still has room to lower the saddle or nut even more you so the neck set is very good for many years no worries..its a nice sounding & playing 25 years old vintage Japanese guitar...and is overall a nice looking vintage example..stays in tune nicely and is a joy to play... nice vintage Japanese guitar this guitar is JVG Rated: 8.5/10 very good used guitar as described ...still after 25 years it looks & plays good. Interested in this beauty let me know..Thanks for looking, Joe JVGuitars@gmail.com Pics soon to come stay tuned!.
What if you don’t have a music shop nearby and need to order a guitar online? Our recommendation is that when you have read through our list of the best guitars, select a few that you’re interested in, and look them up on YouTube. There you can watch (and listen to!) great reviews where you can hear the guitar be played and get someone else’s opinion on it. Try listening to the different guitars directly after each other so you can determine which one sounds the best.
to heat up the tubes in certain amplifiers , when the tubes are heated up you get a better sound and the tubes last longer is what I've been told. remember to change your tubes and have them adjusted on a yearly bases to keep the amp sounding great if you're an experienced player this really comes in handy. Get a pro to do it the first time so nothing bad happens.
Our basic no frills guitar Denny designed to go head to head with $1000+ guitars. Magazine reviews and customer testimonials say it actually outperforms many well known $1500 models. If you want the look, feel and sound of a high dollar acoustic with 50% easier playability this is the best guitar we offer. Shipped wholesale direct from our workshop in Lincoln, Nebraska. 100% money back guarantee, lifetime warranty.
Gibson’s offerings also differ from Fender in that they largely employ scale lengths of 24.75, resulting in a warmer, more rounded out sound that has come to characterize the brand’s output (3). Playability is also affected by the shorter scale length size, with reduced tension making string bending a bit easier. Gibson’s generally utilize mahogany in their construction, which contributes to a darker tone with increased sustain and warmth.

Now, these are known as Shaggs models because they’re what the Shaggs played, not because of some big corporate endorsement deal! No one knows who sold the Avalon brand. Mailorder? An area music store? An auto supply store? All possible. Nor who made them. Nothing like them shows up in the reference books. I’m not even sure when they were made, but 1967 or ’68 is a good guess. Japanese guitarmakers were competing with the Europeans early on in the 1960s and some of the earliest ‘copying’ was of European models.
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