Personally, I don't like the fender and gibson knockoffs, and squire's aren't the best brand, but I have a squire telecaster, which is actually great quality, better than I expected, and it has a slightly more drier, shaky tone that an actual tele, which is a nice feature. My friend has a squire precision bass, and upon hearing it, I honestly thought it was an actual precision bass at first, so, if you must get squire, than consider either the tele or the precision.
The L-00 carries over the airy nasal tone and midrange emphasis of the original, making it great for tasty slide and classic rock riffs. Your favorite blues licks will also have more oomph when played through this blues box. For something so small, this parlor guitar can compete with standard size acoustics in terms of volume. Its solid sitka spruce top and solid mahogany back and sides work together well to give this seemingly diminutive instrument great clarity and good low end.
You may wondering how these chord shapes has been constructed. For now, you just need to know that a chord is based on the notes of a simple scale, which has 7 notes, and you finish on the original note, one octave up, for a total of 8 notes. A basic Major chord is made up of the 1st note in the scale of whatever key you are playing in, also called the root note, the 3th note, and the 5th note. We’ll get into that later, when we talk more about scales.
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A good question to consider at this point: What the absolute darkest tone you’d ever want from your guitar? I know the two times I’m likeliest to lower the tone pot are when I want a dark, jazzy neck pickup sound, and when I’m trying to get a clarinet-like sound using an EBow. These next examples show how the various caps behave in those situations. We’ll go from lowest value (minimum treble cut) to highest (maximum treble cut).

Enter the polyesters and the polyurethanes. These plastics can be made into synthetic resins which harden after application the guitar body, making them more durable than nitrocellulose finishes. In some cases, UV light can be used to initiate the curing process of the resin, making the finishing process much quicker than the application of nitrocellulose lacquer.
I use an EBTECH HUM X. I plug my Fender ’62 Re-Issue Deluxe Reverb into the HUM X and then I plug the HUM X into the wall socket. It works great for me. For my pedals, I use a Visual Sound One Spot to power my large board with no issues and I have a Boss BCB-3 pedal board/case with OD-3, CH-1, DD-3, and a TU-2 next to the OD-3 on the floor since my BCB-3 is really old it came with a 4 pin daisy chain. I power that with a Boss PSA-120S AC Adapter also with no issues. I read about keeping your signal as clean as possible and cable lengths no longer than is necessary. I would try everything mentioned above and make sure you have good quality and proper length cables. BTW, if you research cables, you may find that more expensive doesn’t always mean better. Check out Pro-Co. They are also made in the USA. Good luck!

Like a door that's repeatedly opened and closed, you'll sometimes need some basic maintenance. Ensure everything is tight, and get some electronic contact cleaner (available at any electronics store), various screwdrivers and wrenches and you can often solve your own problems. It's easier on a Gibson Les Paul (with backplate access to the controls) than on a Gibson ES-335, but it can be done.
Epiphone Les Paul Custom Pro Electric Guitar Look at this snazzy thing. The Epiphone Les Paul Custom PRO is one electric guitar you’d be proud to tote on stage with its sleek looks. Taking from the original Les Paul Custom - AKA the “Tuxedo” Les Paul - the Epiphone Les Paul Custom PRO is now packed with modern upgrades including a more slender neck and a modified stopbar design.
In 1931, Martin reintroduced the dreadnought with X-bracing and two years later gave it a modified body shape to accommodate a 14-fret neck, and it quickly became their best-selling guitar. The rest of the industry soon followed[citation needed], and today the “dreadnought” size and shape is considered one of the “standard” acoustic guitar shapes, iconic for its use in a wide variety of musical genres.
Best Answer:  first off, there are tuning knobs on the end of the neck of the guitar(the neck is the long piece protruding from the body of the guitar) they control the pitch of the strings. When you tune a guitar you want the first string(or the smallest string) to be tuned to the note e.The other strings going up should be the notes b,g,d,a,e. You only need to tune the guitar whenever it gets out of tune. The knobs on the body of the guitar are volume control for each pickup,master tone control, and master volume.The controls differ from each guitar , but they usually follow something like that.Lastly, on a Les Paul there is a switch on the upper part of the body that controls which pickup is being used.-(the pickup selector). A pickup is a magnet that collects sound from the strings and lets it be amplified through a amp.A good amp costs anywhere from 50 to 100 dollars. Good luck on your guitar.
Floor model Bugera 1960 infinium 150 watt all tube head. This amp never left the store until the closing sale when it was purchased by me. I have the shipping box, and all original packaging. Store owner had this in December of 2017, and used only as a store model. I gave it a thorough look, and checked everything out, and its all good. Do the research on these. They are very loud, and have had great reviews! Tube setup is auto bias ( so you dont have to send it to a certified tech to change out your tubes) three way switch to accommodate your speaker cabs in ohms. Really nice bang for the buck right here. I will accept any reasonable offer. Any questions please message me. Continental Us sales only.

When talking about 1920s Martin guitars, you hear people say this a lot (especially if they are trying to sell you a guitar!) Unfortunately there is no definative way to tell if a 1920s Martin is capable of handling steel strings. The term, "braced for steel strings", though is inaccurate. A better way to put it would be, "built for steel strings". For a 1920s Martin to be built for steel strings there were several small changes - the top, braces and bridge plate are all slightly thicker. Can you see this inside the guitar? For the most part, no, unless you really know what you are looking for (frankly I can't tell). So how do you know if a 1920s Martin is built for steel?


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Hopefully now you have a good idea of what to look for in a multi-effects pedal, and what criteria we judge one on. We made this list by going through dozens of forum threads asking for best multi-effects pedal recommendations (we ended up with an initial list of 45 different recommended pedals), and tallying up the ones mentioned the most. We then researched the top 5 by reading as many user reviews as we could find, and went out to test the top 5 ourselves. Here are the winners.
Drummers have their cowbells and double bass pedals, vocalists have their harmonisers and auto tune. We guitarists, however, are the luckiest: we get effects pedals. Ranging from subtle slap-back echoes to wild and crazy ring modulators; from simple boost pedals to drive your amp a little harder to insane distortion stomp boxes, we can have it all.
Early forms of the talk box, such as the Heil Talk Box, first appeared in Country Music circles in Nashville in the 1940',s 1950's, and 1960's, by artist like swing band pedal steel player Alvino Rey, Link Wray ("Rumble"), Bill West, a Country Music steel guitar player and husband of Dottie West, and Pete Drake, a Nashville mainstay on the pedal steel guitar and friend of Bill West. Drake used it on his 1964 album Forever, in what came to be called his "talking steel guitar." The device used the guitar amplifier's output to drive a speaker horn that pushed air into a tube held in the player's mouth, which filters and thereby shapes the sound leading to a unique effect. The singer and guitarist Peter Frampton made this effect famous with hit songs such as "Do You Feel Like We Do" and "Show Me the Way," as did Joe Walsh on "Rocky Mountain Way." On Van Halen's cover of "You Really Got Me" Eddie Van Halen uses a talk box after the guitar solo to make a sound similar to a person having sex. Newer devices, such as Danelectro's Free Speech pedal, use a microphone and vocoder-like circuit to modulate the frequency response of the guitar signal. Some Talk Boxes include: The Dunlop Heil Talk Box, Rocktron Banshee, and Peter Frampton's own company,Framptone.
A lot of amps, especially in higher price ranges, have a lot of effects and features. They catch an eye and are pretty fascinating, but in a lot of cases, they are … useless. Well, not all of them but I am pretty sure that if an amp has a hundred different features you won’t be using all of them or even half of them. Features on amps are like the stand at the registrar of a grocery shop. They just catch an eye and you want WANT WANT them (for no other reason than it is interesting and cool looking)! Well, if you are going for an amp is the $100 price range you won’t have as much luxury or freedom to choose from a lot of features. Most practice amps are pretty standard and basic (in the best of ways). And to be honest, I don’t think as a beginner you really need a lot more than the basic effects and functions.
Accompanying the Tempo guitar was the Merson Tempo Guitar-Amp. This was a tube amp with two instrument and one microphone input, heavy-duty 8″ Alnico 5 speaker, volume and tone controls, and a pilot light. The cabinet was covered in two-tone leatherette. The picture is in black-and-white, but the look is remarkably like Premier amps of the time, so a tan and brown color would not be a bad guess. The speaker baffle featured a classical guitar design (!) with “Tempo” written in little circles on the bridge! Substitute a lyre for the classical guitar and you’d swear this was a Premier, made by Manhattan neighbor Multivox, so that might, indeed, be the story there.
Squier is another brand that makes excellent starter instruments. Just as Epiphone is authorized to make budget versions of Gibson guitars, Squier is a guitar company that brings us quality, affordable versions of classic Fender guitars. A new guitarist can start out on a Stratocaster or Telecaster that looks and sounds almost (but not quite) as good as the Fender version. In fact, based on looks alone, Squier guitars are pretty close to Fender instruments.
To start off our list (albeit rather difficult to choose a specific guitar first), let’s take a look at the Fender Telecaster, a high-quality electric guitar for the musician out there who is looking to improve their amateur status to accomplished guitarist. With the clear tone and quality range that the Fender brand is known to famously provide, the Telecaster is equipped with shielded body cavities meant to limit reverberation and focus in on the individual notes. The dual single-coil pickups allow the musician to vary between sharp tones and strong treble, providing a unique sound to fit various genres of interest. The flat surface of the of the fingerboard makes it easy to switch between notes and chords, while the alder wood used for the body of the guitar provides and even and bright sound. With a ‘C’ shaped design meant for comfort for long wear use, the Fender Telecaster is one of the best electric guitars for the money. The sound? Very classic, biting, and clear. You’ll have to hear for yourself in this Telecaster video, since we can’t really find adjectives to truly portray this beauty.
An instant classic, and an easy guitar song that offers a simple, repeated section of just a handful of dyads, or two-note chords. It is one of the most recognizable guitar riffs of all time and it’s great for beginners to learn. The entire section is played with just two notes per chord, and it’s a progression that keeps your fretting hand in just a single section of the neck. Once you learn this riff, it’ll be tough to stop, since it sounds so good, and it’s easy to play. 
A list that's bound to be disagreed with, and I do. Although I love Hendrix, Clapton, etc. I'm still most impressed with Mississippi Fred McDowell. Bass line, rhythm, lead slide, and singing simultaneously and effortlessly. Several video performance on DVD are available, in case you listen to just an audio recording and wondered "who are the other guitarists playing, they're really good together?" nope, just Fred.
One of the newer brands on this list, Jackson Guitars was established in Glendora, California in 1980. However they’ve made a huge impact to the world of metal, and their guitars are used by some of the biggest names – Randy Rhoads, Adrian Smith, and David Ellefson to name a few. Some of their most famous models include the Soloist, and the Rhoads.

A common format of bass amplifier–the "combo" amp–contains the amplifier electronics and one or more speakers in a single wooden cabinet. Combo amps have been used by musicians since the 1920s, as they are convenient for transporting to rehearsals and for performances at small to mid-size venues. Combo amps range from small, low-powered "practice amps" used for individual practice, to mid- and large-size and more powerful combo amps which produce enough volume for rehearsals and small to mid-size venues (e.g., nightclubs). For larger venues, such as stadiums, bassists may use the "bass stack" approach, in which one or more separate speaker cabinets, each with one or more speakers (but not containing an amplifier) and a separate "head" containing the amplifier electronics are used. With a large "bass stack", a bassist can obtain a much higher wattage and onstage volume than a "combo" amp could provide. As with an electric guitar amp, a bass amp is not simply used to make the instrument louder; performers use the preamplifier and equalizer controls and, particularly in amps from the 1980s and 1990s onward, the onboard electronic effects, to create their preferred tone.
Several concert sound subwoofer manufacturers suggest that their subs can be used for bass instrument amplification. Meyer Sound suggests that its 650-R2 Concert Series Subwoofer, a 14-square-foot (1.3 m2) enclosure with two 18-inch drivers, can be used for bass instrument amplification.[23] While performers who use concert sound subwoofers for onstage monitoring may like the powerful sub-bass sound that they get onstage, sound engineers may find the use of large subwoofers (e.g., two 18" drivers) for onstage instrument monitoring to be problematic, because it may interfere with the "Front of House" sub-bass sound.
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Just for fun, try taking this inverted approach to setting string height: instead of getting them as low as you can without inducing serious buzzing, set your strings as high as you can have them and still be able to play with some reasonable facility. Doing this correctly might also require adjusting string intonation at the bridge saddles, because their angle and distance across their speaking length is now changing slightly, too, but for now just try it as is, in case you choose to return your action to point one. (Note that raising string height at the bridge might need to be coordinated with a tweak of neck relief at the truss rod, although I will leave that to your own best judgment as there is plenty of debated between the flat-neck/slight-relief crowds, and this determination will depend upon your own preferences.)

So, I’m 50+, I’ve never played a guitar, and I’m trying to decide on an electric guitar. I’m less concerned with the brand name, more concerned with high quality and workmanship, and last, I like the tone of the guitars played by the late Pete Ham of Badfinger (especially Baby Blue), and Joe Walsh. I know Ham played a cherry red Gibson SG standard, but I’m seeing quite a few mixed reviews on the quality control and workmanship of the current SGs. I listen to a lot of jam band music (i.e. Widespread Panic) and enjoy the rhythm guitar best. So, where to start and stay under $2000 to get a guitar that will produce the type of sound I’m looking for?


PRS really took off back in the ‘90s when it seemed just about everyone had swapped out their Les Paul for a PRS. Eventually they capitalized on this trend and made the PRS more accessible by introducing the SE line of lower-budget guitars. But these aren’t beginner’s guitars. Even though they cost less than a standard PRS, they’re still high-quality instruments.
And you should still be able to take it to a certified Martin repair person. There may be some issue given how long you have had the instrument, however, if there is no evidence of the problem existing when the guitar was new. But it is worth checking out. Martin has changed policy in recent years regarding what voids the warranty and what does not. But if things are as you say, they should have taken care of the issue a long time ago. And they may still be willing to under your warranty. If not, you may be able to find someone who really knows what they are doing to fix the issue – which may require a neck reset, but would be worth it in my opinion. Good luck!
Like any other electronic products, the amp as well has already gone into notable changes and updates over the years. However even the changes in amp technology happened, many still prefer a tube powered amplifier over a solid state and modeling amps. This is mainly because the sound of a valve is considered the organic or natural on how an amplifier should sound. While the other two is engineered to sound like a tube amp especially the modeling amps.
Footswitches allow for handsfree control of your multi-effects pedal, so having more of them is good, as long as you're OK with the added bulk and weight that they require. Some processors have a stompbox mode feature that lets you utilize footswitches much like a traditional pedalboard, but most of the time the switches serve as preset selectors, along with other secondary uses.
1947: Open back Grover Sta-tites on 0, 00, 000 models style 21 and lower. These post-WW2 open back Grovers have thin seamed buttons and the pointed baseplates which were never used on the pre-war open back Grovers. Also all the pre-war thin seamed button tuners were 6:1 ratio. The post-war tuners (and the thick-button open Grovers after 1937) were 12:1 ratio This makes post-war open back Grovers more easily identifible. Otherwise the post-war Grovers are direct drop-in replacements for the pre-war versions.
In January 2017, Vox introduced the MV50 amp head and amp sets. Described by Vox as a hybrid amp, the amp heads are called the MV50 AC, the MV50 Clean, and the MV50 Rock. When paired with the BC108 cabinet, each is then described as the MV50 AC set, the MV50 Clean set, and the MV50 Rock set respectively. Vox states the MV50 AC is designed to provide the sound of a VOX AC30, and that the MV50 Clean is designed to provide clean tones with a lot of headroom as inspired by the sound of American amplifiers. Vox states the MV50 Rock is designed to provide the more aggressive high gain sound of vintage British amps. In January 2018, Vox announced two new MV50 amp heads: the MV50 Boutique and the MV50 High Gain.
From top to bottom, this Hummingbird creates a buzz. Whatever your preference in size, colour, tone and playing style, it’s difficult to avoid picking this Cherry Sunburst up. It’s such a simple guitar to play that it’s rare to ever feel like you’re incapable of striking the right chord - especially on a neck that’s just 12” in radius. While the traditionally ornate decoration and blushing finish have been lovingly retained, this modern Montana incarnation offers a discrete LR Baggs Element VTC system for plug-in power. It is unlike many we have seen and produces one of the best sounds we’ve heard from an electric acoustic. Throw in the pleasure of playing such a superb guitar and it’s tough to say anything bad about the Gibson Montana Hummingbird Cherry Sunburst.  

Buying an electric guitar is a very personal process, with many things to consider before you make your final choice. It’s not just a case of picking something with a nice color – you are usually parting with a substantial chunk of hard-earned cash, ranging anywhere from $100 to $2000 – or more – for some guitars, and therefore patience is required to find something that really suits you.
Some guitarists find spectral overtone melodies inside sheets of feedback (see: Lou Reed’s Metal Machine Music, Sonic Youth), but British wunderkind James Blackshaw uncovers them in careful stacks of 12-string acoustic guitars and bright orchestrations. Minimal in his attack and classical in his drama, Blackshaw bears the acoustic guitar torch in the 21st century, his pieces unfolding in slow, formal shifts until they beam like a burning light through stained glass.
Shop Hourly Rate is $60.00 per hour. Since each guitar is unique, prices quoted are estimates and may be adjusted based on actual time involved. A final price will be submitted prior to actual work and price may need to be adjusted in the case of repairs that get more involved as the work progresses. (Please see the article on the 1975 Gibson Hummingbird for a good example of this.)
As an example of pre-distortion EQ, Eddie Van Halen places a 6-band MXR EQ pedal before the Marshall amplifier head (pre-distortion EQ). Slash places a Boss GE-7, a 7-band EQ pedal, before his Marshall amp. This technique is similar to placing a Wah pedal before the amp's preamp distortion and leaving the Wah pedal positioned part-way down, sometimes mentioned as "fixed wah," (pre-distortion EQ), along with adjusting the amp's tone controls (post-distortion EQ).
Due to the great sensitivity of some advanced vibrato systems like the Kahler, the Steinberger and the Floyd Rose, a light touch is required. Simply placing one’s hand on the bridge can cause notes to drift in and out of tune. So players — especially the heavy handed— would be wise to try a variety of vibrato-equipped guitars out before making an instrument purchase or modifying a valued six-string friend.
Whether you are a beginner or the pro guitarist, choosing the right guitar brand is always essential. We are sure you will find your desired electric guitar from the range of best electric guitar brands we review above. If you want something different or best acoustic guitar brands, do share with us your thoughts in the comments below. Maybe we missed out something that you would remind us.

Some delay pedals also come with full looping abilities, allowing you to play detailed multi-part melodies completely by yourself. A few artists to look to for great examples of delay pedal use are Angels and Airwaves, U2 and Muse. Reverb pedals are an entirely different animal. It brings its own unique type of sustain to a note, infusing the sound with strong texture and character through its distinctive echo. Creating a sound not quite like any other effect, reverb calls to mind the energetic surfer rock of the 1960s, such as Dick Dale's version of "Misirlou." You can stay true to those vintage roots or take the effect in a new, modern direction—it's up to you. With the added dimension they bring to your tone, you'll want to use your delay and reverb effects pedals at every performance. They make a unique contribution to the sound individually and even more so when you use them as a team.
So, here's the story I heard from the guys in this shop, one of whom claims to have met Trev at NAMM. He said Fender (and maybe Gibson?) owe him a bunch of money for custom parts and design fees and whatnot, so he started the Vintage line as a sort of f*** you to them. Don't know if it's true but they're so much like a real tele I could see him getting sued, assuming they're not afraid of him countersuing for unpaid invoices. Who knows, maybe it was all a sales ploy. In any case all the sales pitch I needed was playing one. Plays as nice as my MIM Deluxe for half the price.
Blueridge makes some excellent acoustic guitars, many of them based on historic designs. So, what does that mean? Many players feel that acoustics made in the early days after the dreadnought design had been created used better construction methods, qualities and materials compared to guitars produced today. In their historic designs, Blueridge attempts to capture some of that magic.
Distortion – A dynamic effect that sounds like your guitar is being played through a loud, distorted amplifier. This can range from a slight crunch to a full-on metal distortion. The first distortion tones boosted the gain of an amplifier’s pre amp to the point where the guitar signal begins to “clip”. This clipping changes the harmonic structure of the guitar sound and the additional overtones heard as distortion. Connecting distortion pedals to the “front” of the pre-amplifier helps create the break up sound before it reaches the power amp.
This beast features a classic Sitka spruce top with a rosewood back and sides combo. We have already mentioned a few guitars that feature these types of tonewood. However, the difference here is that the Martin DCPA4R is a handmade instrument that brings you the craftsmanship of Martin's top luthiers. If you appreciate craftsmanship, you'll love this instrument.
It mostly comes in black color. it is a right handed 6 string electric guitar. The body is given a polyurethane finish whereas the neck is given a satin finish. The fret board is composed of 24 frets and has a master white tone. The guitar is relatively affordable, with prices ranging from around INR 15,642. For stage performances, this guitar will give you a nice experience and a classical feel.
Before we begin, it should be pointed out that some time ago Guitar Player presented the history of Teisco, based on information painstakingly translated from a Japanese article penned by Mr. Hiroyuki Noguchi of Japan’s Rittor Music, editor of the Guitar Graphic book series. Unfortunately, the article used for reference was an older piece which has subsequently been totally revised and corrected by Mr. Noguchi based on later interviews with principals in the Teisco company. Some of the chronology in the GP story is inaccurate. What follows here is the latest and most accurate information on Teisco (in regards to company history), confirmed in repeated direct communications with Mr. Noguchi in Japan. This information also supersedes some incorrect facts in my own essay on Teisco Del Rey Spectrum 5 guitars in the first issue of Vintage Guitar Classics.
Gibson, like many guitar manufacturers, had long offered semi-acoustic guitars with pickups, and previously rejected Les Paul and his "log" electric in the 1940s. In apparent response to the Telecaster, Gibson introduced the first Gibson Les Paul solid body guitar in 1952 (although Les Paul was actually brought in only towards the end of the design process for expert fine tuning of the nearly complete design and for marketing endorsement [2]). Features of the Les Paul include a solid mahogany body with a carved maple top (much like a violin and earlier Gibson archtop hollow body electric guitars) and contrasting edge binding, two single-coil "soapbar" pickups, a 24¾" scale mahogany neck with a more traditional glued-in "set" neck joint, binding on the edges of the fretboard, and a tilt-back headstock with three machine heads (tuners) to a side. The earliest models had a combination bridge and trapeze-tailpiece design that was in fact designed by Les Paul himself, but was largely disliked and discontinued after the first year. Gibson then developed the Tune-o-matic bridge and separate stop tailpiece, an adjustable non-vibrato design that has endured. By 1957, Gibson had made the final major change to the Les Paul as we know it today - the humbucking pickup, or humbucker. The humbucker, invented by Seth Lover, was a dual-coil pickup which featured two windings connected out of phase and reverse-wound, in order to cancel the 60-cycle hum associated with single-coil pickups; as a byproduct, however, it also produces a distinctive, more "mellow" tone which appeals to many guitarists. The more traditionally designed and styled Gibson solid-body instruments were a contrast to Leo Fender's modular designs, with the most notable differentiator being the method of neck attachment and the scale of the neck (Gibson-24.75", Fender-25.5"). Each design has its own merits. To this day, the basic design of many solid-body electric guitar available today are derived from the original designs - the Telecaster, Stratocaster and the Les Paul.
Let’s kick things off in style. This guitar is one of Epiphone’s mid range semi-hollow models. As such, it has to meet much more refined standards. Many wondered if Epiphone was capable of delivering such a guitar, but the answer is a strong yes. With its three Dogear Alnico pups, this thing is a beast. If you know how to handle a semi-hollow, you will find that Epiphone Riviera Custom P93 brings a lot of range. At least that’s the type of impression it left on me.
My services include re-frets, fret dressing, fret end dressing, action adjustment, truss rod adjustment, intonation setting, nut replacement, bridge saddle replacement, acoustic pickup installation, electric pickup fitting/replacement, output jack replacement, pot replacement, re-wiring, sound post setting, tuner installation, brace re-gluing, broken headstock repairs, strap pin installation, re-strings, bridge setting, tremolo setting, Floyd Rose setting, custom scratch plate cutting, tuning problems, restoration, polishing, cleaning, wiring modifications...Get in touch I'm sure I can help!
The DD-5 offers four switchable delay ranges and 11 modes that give access to delays from 1ms all the way up to a walloping 2000ms. Delay time can also be set in real time using the Tap Tempo function and an optional FS-5U footswitch. With the Hold mode you can sample a passage simply by pressing and releasing the pedal. This item has normal signs of use/wear. Has been kept in clean, dry and smoke free environment.
 The type of guitar strings you choose, and how often you change them will not only dramatically affect your tone, but also impact the playability of your guitar. By learning about the different string options available for your guitar, you can find the strings which strike the best balance between great tone and playability. The key components affecting tone and playability come from string gauge, string winding method and the string construction material.
JVGuitars is very proud to present to you yet another wonderfully aged High end Law Suit guitars out of Japanese it is a hand crafted acoustic guitar built well almost 40 years ago, what many may not know is that Takamine on these high end exotic tone woods models were master built by using well aged tone woods of 25-30+ years of age at the time when built making this a true vintage guitar in its own right. This example has been very well maintained and taken care of as you will see, this is a California guitar and has not seen much of the ravages of extreme weather and other extreme changes that can damage 0 warp – dry our and Split – crack and otherwise severely damage a perfectly good instrument so this guitar shows no evidence of any of those common afflictions on the contrary this guitar is rather CLEAN over all,Its beautiful solid spruce top is pretty flat and its bridge is nice and tight as well and its bracing ( same as Martin D-28 ) is all good throughout so this guitar has good bones!, bindings too are all good, frets are good and we dressed and polished the frets and they are good for another 20+ years of play, its neck is excellent!.. Fresh install of a new Martin bone nut and compensated saddle and this guitar is set up with Martin Marquis strings and plays beautifully. The original tuning gears are in place and working excellently too. This guitar is a pleasure to play its action is very good at medium - low more on the lower side of medium and it plays with ease and sounds incredible and has even more saddle room to go lower in future if wanted . This guitar has the LOOK it just has it… its absolutely GORGEOUS with the breath taking 2-piece center seam Brazilian Rosewood back & sides - fingerboard and headstock overlay its truly stunning ,as stated it’s exotic TONE WOODS are of the Brazilian Jacaranda verity and its presence overall is stunning perhaps surpassing that of the Original Martin D-28 they copied/ I will suggest that you be the judge of that see for yourself and have a good look At some old Martins as well this guitar stands toe to toe with any of them. This example is nice and deep sounding and its volume is excellent. This guitar is JVGuitars condition rated at 9/10 vintage excellent , it is not new or mint it has a few minor dings as its over 40 years old, it has patina aging that of the color showing on the bindings have Ambered naturally with age this is what make a vintage guitar beautiful this is in the eye of the beholder. These exotic TONE WOOD series guitars in this kind of condition are hard to find these days this one is A real GEM!…… Let me know if interested Thanks for Looking Joe Email me at: JVGuitars@gmail.com excellent recording possibilities.. Pics soon to come ! any questions let me know: jvguitars@gmail.com .
sorry this has SOLD OUT: Poor mans Authentic Blues Parlor guitar from way back. This is the real deal used over 60 years this is what some poor share cropper genuine American Blues men would have been able to afford back in the day and subsequently used throughout the south by mostly poor Black folks where the berth of the blues was born of course this is from the place where great things happen BORN in USA baby and is widely considered and is acknowledged to be by most all of our greats in US or British Rockers - Jazz players & Country too all these greats players feel that these original US Southland blues is the truest of ART FORM's PURE and RAW ....you feel it in your soul... this original sounds was not overly sophisticated at all it was RAW that was its beauty this sound from this old Stella is Authentic like that and is RAW and its woods are good - solid Burch wood and actually is an excellent tone wood in fact in those days Burch was widely used and my belief is that is a characteristic in the tone of this Original blues... Classic sound to this guitar OK it has it.... I have a few of these Stella's and love them, when you want to record and lay down an authentic REAL old school style rhythm track or play it on your porch swing and sip mint julip from a mason jar to get in the mood you can do it with this guitar its the real deal. This guitar is old did I say at least 60 likely older that being said it plays well it really kinda does... with pretty good action for what it is as good as it was 60+ years ago I recon. Tuners work, body is in good shape it aint goin anywhere its prety well made it has surface cracks and they are there and not a problem they have been there 40 years and have not gotten any worse not in the 15 years I have owned Stella! Like the movie STELLA! I could not resist the reference but I digress, Condition is Vintage good obviously not new or mint but she is 100% cool Authentic bluesman material if you want that old time Mississippi Delta to Chicago raw blues this old vintage American Icon of a Poor mans Parlor guitar, this is a classic threw & threw... I suppose I could have simply said it sounds good.... ahow ow ow ow.
You can get a rough idea of what the All-Electric looked like in Gruhn/Carter’s Electric Guitars (Miller Freeman Books, 1995), although this example has been refinished and replated, with a new fingerboard, tuners and added tailpiece, and is an atypical 14-fret Spanish model, possibly assembled at the end of the ’30s from leftover parts. Toward the end of National Dobro’s presence in Los Angeles, a great many guitars were assembled and shipped from remaining stock, often as exports.
Fender’s MIM (Made in Mexico) Stratocasters are offered as an affordable option, buyable at about half the rates of their American siblings. Moreover, you can also select your preferred one from among the maple and rosewood fingerboards, SSS or HSS pickup configuration, and color variations. You can also find several models available with Floyd Rose tremolo and pretty tops. For those requiring American Fenders, the American Original Series is available with all essential features.
Having said this, if it’s for a child under 12 we normally do recommend a nylon string as it’s easier for them to press the strings down. Some children can have tougher hands than others, so if you have a rough and tumble child, they mght be able to handle steel strings earlier than usual. Check out our buying guide for Choosing a Guitar for a Child for more information.
A standard Squier Stratocaster is mass-produced in factories located in Indonesia or China. For its construction, Squier usually uses woods readily available in those countries, such asagathis and basswood. They also use stamped metal hardware and multiple pieces of wood in construction to reduce waste and to lower costs. In some cases, the body is laminated, much like a plywood, rather than consisting of two or three solid pieces glued together.
We would recommend that you, for your first guitar, spend between $500-$1000. This price range is good, because you know that you will be getting a guitar that is made for some serious music making (which the cheapest ones out there just aren’t). Of course you don’t want to spend this much money on something you’re not even sure you will be using a year from now, so if you aren’t that serious about learning to play the guitar it might be a good idea to go for an even cheaper option.
Depending on your choice of guitar kit you may be required to perform a small amount (or a large amount) of work wiring the guitar. This typically involves a soldering iron and a basic understanding of guitar electronics. You will also need to be able to follow schematic diagrams of pickup configurations. It’s not a one size fits all job either, wiring up a Telecaster is different to wiring a Stratocaster and a Les Paul or hollow body is different again.
I’ll give your guitar a thorough inspection inside and out, letting you know what is correct and what may need attention now or in the near future. Frets, neck, action, bridge and bridge plate, truss rod, tuners, and internal bracing are some of the things that are assessed. This service is provided as a courtesy to my customers and there is no obligation or pressure to buy anything.

Roger McGuinn worked with C. F. Martin & Company to develop a seven-string folk guitar. McGuinn’s guitar (the D7) is tuned the same as a standard folk guitar with steel strings, but the third (G) string is augmented with a harmonic string one octave higher. The intention was to offer the six-string player the chance to play “jangly” twelve-string style lead guitar.
ACT TRMOLO ERSETZEN DER SAITEN Das ACT Tremolo erlaubt zwei Arten der Saiteninstallation. 1) Die Saiten werden durch Einsetzen des Kugelendes in den Saitenschlitz und Einhaken des Kugelendes unter dem Saitenfänger an der Rückseite der Tremolo-Einheit angebracht. 2) Die Saiten werden durch Einsetzen des Kugelendes in den Saitenschlitz und Einhaken des Kugelendes unter dem Saitenfänger an der Unterseite der Tremolo-Einheit angebracht.
I've been to a PRS factory and seen the precision and skill with which they are made. Their quality control is incredible: they test each one individually and make adjusments until it is perfect. They won't let a bad one get through so if you buy a PRS guitar, you are guaranteed a high quality guitar. I mean, with the high price you pay, how could they not be wonderful? Plus, they sound, feel, and look amazing. (I also got to see Paul himself; it was pretty cool. What a nice, humble guy.)
Kansas guitars has been around since 1927. They made some very nice guitars. Some expensive and some inexpensive. But the real question is whom makes the guitar for Kansas? And that is non other then Cort. Yes Cort makes guitars for just about everybody and you dont even know. the big secret is cort guitars themselves are very well made but cheaper then most brands, but same or better quality then highline guitars. Cort bailed out fender and also built Fenders for many years. So in short Kansas is a well made guitar and there set neck models are awesome and run about $400 to $600. You cant get a set neck today for under $800. And if you want to see how many guitar brands have cort making there guitars do some research on Cort and you will be surprized. They have been around for ever and are the elite company in the business.
This guitar master started building guitars when he was 12 in the early '80s when Eddie Van Halen's Frankenstein guitar inspired him to create his own beautiful monstrosities. Since then, McCarthy worked at several music shops, doing repair work on the side, and learned from master luthiers working in their dungeons before finding a home at Dallas Repair Shop. Paul also does warranty work for Fender in its custom shop, which led to repairing Buddy Guy's guitar and Ted Nugent's. "Selling guitars at a guitar shop, you really have nothing to show for it," McCarthy says. "But here at the end of the day, I can see what I've done. Work with my hands, fix problems, and it pays pretty good, too."
This workshop includes: lecture, demonstration and hands on experience in advanced guitar electronics.  Students will study alternate guitar wiring schemes demonstrated by instructor Scott Walker, and stereo wiring and Onboard Effects loop options will also be covered.  This class will focus on signal paths, diagrams, and component selection, in passive and active circuits.  Students will learn about basic preamp design.
An awesome acoustic-electric guitar at affordable price! I felt like this is one of my smartest purchase. I have an OM one with very beautiful look - ivory-color spruce top and chocolate-color back and side. The guitar comes with built-in Fishman pick-up and tuner. It has bright and sweet sound on picking, while having strong and resonant sound on strumming. With capo, the tone can be transformed to be soft and deep suitable for sad songs. Most importantly, it is a full-sized guitar playable by a lady with small hand and short arm like me!
The Epiphone ES-335 Dot was the world's first semi-hollowbody electric guitar, introduced in 1958. Today, it's made by Gibson, but it is still prized by jazz and blues musicians looking for a classic sound. Setting up the Dot involves adjusting the truss rod to correct for any underbowing or overbowing of the neck because of humidity changes. The bridge saddle on the Dot may also be adjusted to get the right distance between the string and the fretboard, called the “action.”
Mijn first guitar was a Epiphone by gibson sg, it was all right, then I got my gibson sg special(Around 550e), really good guitar, huge difference with the Epiphone. My next was, believe it or not another Epiphone, a Casino limited edition with bigsby, best price/quiality guitar ever(I paid 430e), beautiful guitar, and next week I’m getting a Fender Telecaster American vintage 58′(1755e), I’m very excited about it. I also own a Fender jazz bass classic 70s, it’s a mexican which plays like an american, very proud of this bass. First rate guitars are normally the best, you pay for the quality of the materials and the workmanship and experience, but there are exceptions with second range guitars, you can get very good ones, just good models or plainly good guitars, it’s nice to own both kind of guitars.
This is normally when I tell you about a crowdfunding campaign, but there isn't one currently running for this device, so if you're interested in getting a ToneWood-Amp when it's launched, sign up at their website to register for pre-ordering. There is no commitment to buy one for signing up, but if you sign up now, you can then order one at half-price ($90) when the pre-order campaign goes live (mid-October).
The world is full of amps. It is so full of them in fact that it is somehow hard to choose not because there is not enough good ones, but too many of them. Which is very unfortunate, as it raises the entry level requirement for understanding what you are buying. This means that a whole lot of people get intimidated when trying to pick an amp. Like if they want a mini amp that they would want to carry with them when they go somewhere. Which is why I sat myself down the other day, bargaining all the while, and compiled a list of the best small guitar amps, for the sake of all the big musicians trying to play them. Hopefully at least some of you will find it more or less useful, since I had to categorize these according to price, sound quality, tone quality, comfort of use and even the general usefulness. What I am trying to say is, it was a lot of work.

While vintage guitars tend to hold a reputation as the best ever made, there are more high-end boutique makers turning out truly magnificent instruments than ever before. Following the wake of trail-blazers like Paul Reed Smith, the current class of boutique guitar makers includes the likes of Knaggs, Kauer, Swope, Fano, Huber, Koll and many many more. Keep an eye on this page for the latest and greatest luthier-made new and used electric guitars to hit the pages of Reverb.
Some of the best guitar compositions come from simple experimentation; that's why jam sessions are so great. When you want to have your own personal jam session, using a headphone amp is a fantastic idea. That way, you can keep your genius to yourself until it's ready for its first audience. You'll have the freedom to experiment all you want without having to worry about unwanted ears listening in, and that'll give your new riff even more of an impact when you unveil it on your main amplifier.
Fender:  These guys have also been around for a long time and are just as iconic as Gibson. Especially for the creation of what could arguably be the most popular electric guitar of all time – The Fender Stratocaster. The Stratocaster may be one of the most popular guitars of all time, but it’s what led to it that really changed the guitar world forever. It’s the fact that the man responsible, Leo Fender, a visionary and dedicated workaholic, invented the first commercially successful solidbody electric guitar –an invention that has led to the incredible array of amazing electric solidbodies of today. It’s important to note that Rickenbacker had created a somewhat solid-body guitar back in 1935. However, it was small, kind of awkward and not completely solid or even actual wood. Some consider it the first solidbody, but by other standards most people still credit Fender for the design. There where still other semi-solidbody experiments at the time created by Les Paul himself as well as Paul Bigsby for Merle Travis but none of those actually caught on commercially the way the Fender (Esquire, then Broadcaster) did. Fender’s original solidbody guitar went through a number of refinements and name changes until it finally came to be known as the, Telecaster.

Not all guitars sound the same. The type of pickups, strings, wood, and body style all dictate the sound a guitar makes. One of the most important decisions a guitarist can make is whether to get a solid body, semi-hollow, or hollow body guitar. A solid body has a cutting tone with plenty of sustain, whereas a hollow body has a warmer, more rounded sound.


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An effects pedal signal chain is simply the order in which a series of pedals are connected. If you have ever seen a player use a pedal board, the order of his pedals make up his signal chain. And if by some chance you thought that you can simply place these pedals in any sort of order and still get the same results – think again! Even if you’re just working with two pedals, you will get a different sound depending on the order.

The electric guitar is a staple in the music industry. Over the last several decades, the use of the best electric guitar has evolved across many music genres. The electric guitar has made grand entrances in the likes of Rock, Pop, Hip Hop, and more. Today, it is considered one of the most essential instruments in pushing musical creativity forward. Whether you are a beginner or an expert electric guitar player, the variety of sounds and distinct musical styles will surely take any music genius to the next level. We’ve reviewed electric guitars & compiled a guide on how you can best spend your money on the perfect electric guitar.
The Dean Vendetta pack offers a sharp looking metallic red super Stratocaster style guitar with dual humbuckers, a tremolo bridge for fun dive tricks, and a 24 fret neck. This is perfect for players that want to start learning lead guitar as soon as possible. The neck is quite fast for a guitar in its price range. Also included with the purchase is a 10-watt practice amp, gig bag, instrument cable, picks, a tuner, and a fairly comfortable strap.
Think of Stevie Ray Vaughan, and you’ll have a good idea of what overdrive effects can do. They’re based on the ‘broken’ sound that vintage tube amplifiers would make when they were fed a signal too strong for them to handle smoothly. Modern overdrive pedals can also have circuitry that emulates the same effect even when connected to a solid-state amp. Because they work by boosting the signal, experimenting with the effects of an overdrive pedal can be as simple as adjusting the volume and seeing what happens.
This pickup is a solid choice for those who might want to keep their options open in terms of style or who have a responsibility to multiple genres and music types. Typically you’ll use the JB model for the bridge and the Jazz model for the neck, matching the configuration for notable users such as Seymour Duncan himself, Randy Rhodes and Jeff Beck.
It’s a good idea to make a template for your wiring on any guitar where the controls aren’t mounted to a pickguard (like a Strat) or a control plate (like a Tele). To make the template, put a piece of non-corrugated cardboard over the guitar, use finger pressure to find where the control holes are, and very carefully poke through the cardboard with a punch or a nail to make a hole for your template. You can enlarge the holes with a pencil or a round file until they are big enough for the controls to be mounted snugly. It’s also a good idea to write what is supposed to go where on the template with a marker.
2.      Weight – a LOT less. This is important if you’re leaving the garage for the first time and don’t have roadies, if (like me) you’re trying to not injure your back anymore lugging equipment), if you’re a touring band trying to spend less on cartage and more on crew, or if you’re a worldwide act who needs to truck and fly your stage rig between continents.
A Wiki is a web page that anyone can make changes to. The job of maintaining accurate information is far too monumental for one person, but a community of enthusiasts can maintain many thousands of pages quite easily, each person adding a bit at a time. That's the idea behind iGuide?s "What's It Worth Wiki". The most famous example of a Knowledge Wiki is Wikipedia, of course. But, our vision is that someday iGuide?will become the Wikipedia of Art, Antiques, Collectibles, Memorabilia....and Guitars.
The tone selector on an electric guitar controls the capacitor, which basically filters out high frequencies. The same way a high-cut filter (or low-pass-filter if you prefer) works on a standard equalizer. By dialing down the tone, you remove brightness and treble. The pickup selector does just what it's called.. Selecting which pickups being used to capture the vibration of the strings, and translates the energy into electric current, though the configuration and number of "presets" can vary from guitar to guitar, depending on how many pickups it has etc. If you're a handyman you can even configure this yourself.
What equally contributes to the Entourage’s place on our list of the best acoustic-electric guitars is its nuanced and bright acoustic sound. This signature tone comes courtesy of a select pressure-test solid cedar top and wild cherry back and sides. The electronics on this model are easy to use and compact, highlighted by a pewter plate giving the entire package a stylish appearance.​
If you want to splurge just a bit more and opt for an instrument with a little more stylistic range, the Ibanez Talman guitar vault accessory kit might be right up your alley. It includes a lovely seafoam green Ibanez TM302SFG, 12 high-quality Dunlop Tortex picks, a strap, a gig bag, a Kyser capo, a polishing cloth, and a tuner. This is off the beaten path a bit, but for some players, that’s going to be absolutely perfect.
Okay, choose from the best electric guitar brands to suit your needs and look great too with this helpful guide for guitarists of all levels! Would you rather get the proven model, or trust a relatively unknown brand? This is especially true for those who are looking to buy their first instrument. With that in mind, we have compiled a list of top 10 electric guitar brands which you can trust. We will talk about each, and explain why they are the best guitar brands. On top of that, we will mention some models which we have had the chance to handle in the past.
Ibanez is considered to be one of the best-selling electric guitars and bass guitar brands. But, they also produce a quality acoustic guitar for acoustic guitar players. The V series is really popular for newbies, making it one of the best acoustic guitar brands for beginners. Their guitar uses mahogany wood on the neck, and back and sides of the guitar. It also includes a rosewood bridge and rosewood guitar fretboard.
I have a Palmer P 33 acoustic (hand-crafted etc), that I bought second hand about 20 years ago for £80. It still sounds and looks superb and rarely loses its tuning. (Probably better than my newer Tanglewood.) I can't find out anything about it. However, somebody out there must have made it. Surely that somebody knows something about them! Do they never go on the internet! Pete.
If you see "PM," play using palm muting. For standard right-handed guitar playing, gently lay the edge of your right palm across the strings near the guitar's bridge. When you strike the notes (with the same hand as is providing the mute), you should hear the tone of the note, but with a subdued, dead quality. Move your hand slightly up the strings toward the neck to deaden the notes more.
I had this guitar handed down to me. It is in pretty rough shape. I think it is in good enough shape to restore to good condition/used shape. Before I attempt such a thing I would like to know more about the guitar itself. I know the history of Lyle and "Lawsuit" guitars so that part is done. The body has a cherry red finish with 2 "f" openings. The neck has had some stress on it, enough to have the wood lift a little on its grain pattern about 2 inches long from the nut to the fret board. I am not sure if injecting glue into this will keep the neck from breaking in the future. The fret board is loose at the nut but I believe I can glue it again. This is not the first restoration I have done. I have restored a flute and a grenadilla wood clarinet. Any comments regarding how to or if I am wasting my time will be welcome.
In 1932, John Dopyera left Dobro and came back into the National fold, regaining control of the company. We can only speculate that the absence of Beauchamp has something to do with his decision. National and Dobro merged in 1935, becoming the National Dobro Company. However, until the end of the ’30s, when National Dobro finally completed its relocation to Chicago, Dobro instruments continued to be made in L.A. by what had been the separate Dobro Corporation, even though it was a part of National Dobro. Got it? Hmmm…
Yamaha Company is known as the largest music instrument production firm in India. It offered huge variety of guitars at starting prices around Rs 8,000.The topmost guitar models of this firm are SG 7, RGX, SG 5 and Yamaha RGZ. This brand is earning good reputation by offering high quality guitar to its customers. So, if you are a new learner, then may buy this best guitar at fewer prices.
Dan Erlewine first saw this Tele back in the 1960s, before Mike Bloomfield recorded with it on Bob Dylan’s Highway 61 Revisited album. That was also before Bloomfield and Dylan were booed for going electric at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival. And before Bloomfield recorded the first Paul Butterfield Blues Band album with this guitar. There’s a lot of history in this Telecaster!
At least one company, Audiovox, built and may have offered an electric solid-body as early as 1932. Audiovox electric guitars were built by Paul Tutmarc[1] who is also credited as the co-inventor of the magnetic pickup along with Art Stimpson, and the fretted electric bass guitar. Bob Wisner worked for Paul converting tube radio amplifiers into guitar amplifiers and eventually developing his own amplifier circuits so Paul's instruments could be sold along with their own amplifiers. Paul was unsuccessful at obtaining a patent for his magnetic pickup as it was too similar to the telephone microphone coil sensor device. Audiovox production was handed over to Paul's son, Bud Tutmarc, who continued building these instruments under the brand, "Bud-Electro" until the early 1950s. Bud Tutmarc had been delegated by the senior Tutmarc the task of winding the pickup coils used on his father's and he continued producing them for his own guitars. He used horseshoe magnets in a single-coil and later a hum cancelling dual coil configuration. Bob Wisner was hired by Rickenbacher, later spelled Rickenbacker and may have passed on Tutmarc's magnetic pickup technology and helped them develop the more familiar bar magnet and pole-piece pickup construction still widely used today for their cast aluminum electric guitar, nicknamed The Frying Pan or The Pancake Guitar, beginning in 1933.
The No. 140 Supro Capitan was a handsome f-holed archtop, which was Regal-made. It sported an arched spruce top with a maple body. The hardwood neck had an ebonized fingerboard with pearl position dot and jumbo frets. An oval Supro logo plate sat on the faceplate. A single rectangular metal-covered pickup (with holes exposing the poles) sat just to the bridge side of the middle position. This pickup had six separate coils! It had a “crystaline pick guard,” probably tortoise, and adjustable compensated bridge, National-stamped trapeze tailpiece, and one volume and one tone control situated just behind the �guard. It came with a grey Servitex tweed case, and in ’42 cost $71.50.
Welcome to Lefty Vintage Guitars, a site specializing in buying, selling, trading, and consigning high-end lefty guitars. I have been collecting vintage guitars for over 20 years, including Fender and Gibson electrics and acoustics primarily from the 1950s, and 1960s. I also collect high-end modern era lefty guitars, including Gibson Historics and Fender Custom Shop guitars. The rarer, the better! Please browse the Sold Gallery and Showcase Instruments to get an idea of the wonderful guitars I have acquired and sold to happy clients!
But having at least a very basic foundation to build upon - such as learning some basic chords, will allow you to learn more songs faster. My best advice is to abandoned any idea of instant gratification and commit to the idea that learning guitar is a slow process in the beginning. It gets exponentially easier to improve your skills after you get past the huge hurdles you encounter in the beginning.
-have any of you ever heard of chet atkins. he could play anything the guys you mention but, they could not or can,t play any thing he played-hell non-finger style players you have to go with nokie edwards from the ventures. you guys are obviously rock only players and listen to only them only -do yourselves a favor and get his albums-mister guitar and workshop-they show just how good he was and then make a comment here
Besides the recognizable brand, there’s the sound quality, that earned it good appreciation even from experienced guitarists who are used to more expensive units. It has a standard 12” speaker that allows it to render treble and bass equally well, for a good range of sound which should make it suitable for country, blues, and jazz, as well as softer rock.
Look for lyrics or chord changes. Many songs have guitar parts made up solely (or mostly) of chords. This is especially true for rhythm guitar parts. In this case, the tab may forgo typical tab notation in favor of a simplified list of chord changes. These chords are almost always written in standard chord notation (Amin = A minor, E7 = E dominant 7, etc.) Simply play the chords in the order that they're listed - if it's not noted otherwise, try playing one chord per measure, but if the changes don't sound right, listen to the song for the strumming pattern.
Description: Body: Nato - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Bronze, Black
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Besides the guitar just being fantastically sampled and recorded, Silk owes a lot of its realism to the controls in the upper right-hand corner on the main screen. Swing, Timing, Feel, and Variance can all be effortlessly adjusted and do a fantastic job of recreating that natural human touch or really the human flaw.  Timing is my favorite because the ebb and flow of the tempo between individually picked notes really reminds me of my own fingerpicking technique (or lack thereof).
yea seriously as the other reply said especially when it comes to Japan you can no longer just go with the American is better mantra. Tell that to all the amazing musicians who play top of the line regular or custom models from yamaha and Takamines. IMHO especially Takamines are on the cutting edge and even some of their cheaper guitars which are now made in china(the topshelf ones that are typically roughly $1200+ are Japanese made) . Your selling yourself short and also in many cases overpaying if you'll only look at American made. Not to mention many of the American companies even on the $30000+ models mix and match where their supplies come from and or where the labor/construction of the guitar takes place. Martin is one of only American companies that does everything in America but they are an increasingly overpriced guitar. I love any old Martin I touch at a yard sale or older family members house but I'm totally underwhelmed by the newest ones I try at guitar center.
Of our five testers, three picked the Fender Champion 20 as their favorite, one ranked it second, and one ranked it the best of the three amps that included digital processing. It simply has everything a beginning guitarist needs. Even if you don’t know much about guitar amps, it’s easy to get a good tone fast. At 12.2 pounds, measuring 13 by 13.7 by 7.5 inches (HWD), it’s easy to carry around or tuck into a corner of a small bedroom.
Founded by a father and son, Ryohei Tahara and the unknown Tahara. I do not know which was the father and which was the son. The company existed until the late 1979 when it was bought up by Saga Musical Instruments. In all, the company existed less than a decade as Tahara. Both the Maya and El Maya badges are attributed to Tahara. Saga Musical Instruments exists to this day.

Lastly, we have the bread and butter of Schecter’s mid-range selection. Schecter Omen Extreme-6 is one of their oldest and most popular models to hit the market. This guitar brings a decent balance of price, performance and build quality. While it’s not as fancy as the previous models we have mentioned, as soon as you pick it up you know it’s made for serious business.

Mahogany is a durable wood, often described as dense and that is used in the construction of guitars. The main advantage of purchasing an instrument made from this material is the fact that it highlights the unit’s bass and midrange. Therefore, if you are into mellower tones, this is the material that you should pay attention to. The resulting guitars made from this material are usually brown.


Larry Robinson Fine Custom Inlays - They produce one-of a kind shell inlays for all kinds of guitars. One of a handful of inlay practicioners in the country, Larry has done exquisite work for major guitar manufacturers (Fender, gi bson, Yamaha,...), small production shops (Santa Cruz, Collings, etc.), single luthier shops (Klein, Ryan, Olson, Megas, and more), collectors like Tsumura and people who just want something to personalize their guitar.

You know Eddie Van Halen, that legendary guitar player who pretty much knocked the music world on its ear with his innovative sounds and playing style back in the late ‘70s. For years he partnered with brands such as Kramer, Ernie Ball and Peavey to create signature models of his guitars, as well as the real guitars he used onstage. Now he has his own company: EVH.


Finally, amidst all the considerations about tops and shapes and tones, don't underestimate the importance of choosing a guitar that you like. Choose one that feels comfortable, whether you are sitting or standing. Make sure you pick a guitar that responds to the way that you play, and don't settle on a "good" guitar if you don't like the way it sounds to your ears.


A free, guided tour of the Taylor Guitars factory is given every Monday through Friday at 1 p.m. (excluding holidays). Taylor’s expansive 145,000 square foot manufacturing facility is located east of San Diego (about 20 minutes from the downtown area) in El Cajon, California. No reservations are necessary for the tour, although the company asks that large groups (more than 10) call in advance at (619) 258-1207. Taylor encourages guests to arrive at its Visitor Center, where the tour begins, 10-15 minutes prior to tour time to sign in at the reception desk. The tour lasts approximately one hour and 15 minutes. While not physically demanding, it does include a fair amount of walking.
The Kay Musical Instrument Company grew from the Groeschel Mandolin Company (or Groeshl Instrument Company[8]) in Chicago, established in 1890.[9] In 1921, the company was renamed to Stromberg-Voisinet. In 1923, later president Henry Kay "Hank" Kuhrmeyer joined the company, and in 1928, with the help of an investor,[9] he bought the company and started producing electric guitars and amplifiers.[10]
The company has been run by the Martin family throughout its history. The current chairman and CEO, C.F. ‘Chris’ Martin IV, is the great-great-great-grandson of the founder. The firm was the first to introduce many of the characteristic features of the modern flattop, steel-strung acoustic guitar. Influential innovations include the Dreadnought body style and scalloped bracing. Some time in the 1970s, Martin bought Levin guitars[1] and around 200 D-18’s were apparently built in Sweden; they are stamped LD-18[citation needed].
The key to capturing any kind of ambient tracks is a good reverberant space, although a narrow or dead room can also work, as long as there is sufficient distance between the guitarist and the amp. I usually put the air mic at least ten feet from the amp, positioned off-axis, or in an omnidirectional pattern to pick up as much reflected sound as possible. Placing a baffle between the guitarist and the amp will increase the apparent room size, as will making the amp sound pass through a doorway or turn a corner into another room.

On the way folks arriving soon stay tuned pics of this made in Japan hand crafted beautiful Exotic Vintage Martin copy will be uploaded soon ... in great players condition original and stock Takamine pickup installed you can plug in at the strap pin jack and go electric and sounds amazing or fully acoustic of course unpluged. You know theses are know for the ultimate beauty of them as well as the Rich complex tone they offer well seasoned instrument of this caliber Japan had to offer in the Lawsuit series days 70-85 or so that have been discontinued decades ago as they say they don't make um like this any more... Stay tuned for another exotic Brazilian Rosewood guitar at JVGuitars.com any questions for Joe email: jvguitars@gmail.com.
000-15: Base model of the upper end Martin Guitar line. All mahogany orsapele construction. ‘A Frame’ “X” top bracing, 14 frets clear, Optional model 000-15S 12 frets clear. All -16 and -16 series 000 instruments have long scales (25.4″) and 1-11/16″ nut widths, in contrast to the -18, -28, and -45 series, which have the ‘traditional’ 24.9″ 000 scale, retaining the 1-11/16″ nut width.
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This is one of the most frustrating questions from the MIJ collector. As I've read many different guitar collector/enthusiast forums and spoken to local guitar dealers, it's clear that the layperson has little to no idea who made their badged guitar from the 1960-1980 period, also known as the MIJ golden age of guitar manufacturing. People often make the mistake of citing the American or European importer as the 'maker' of the guitar, when in fact several Japanese manufacturers were producing badged guitars out of their plants and shipping them to America and Europe to sell. Japanese manufacturers made multiple badges at the same plant, many of whom resemble each other closely. Some manufacturers merged or changed hands over the years which added to the confusion, sometime merging with another maker, only to pick up their name later. In some cases a manufacturer would farm out production to various manufacturers, making it still more difficult to know who made the guitar in your hands. Parts from other guitars would be used in the making of a particular badge for a period of time because it was all the manufacturer had to hand...which doesn't always help in identifying a maker. And sometimes, the guitar which is supposed to be an MIJ guitar is actually made elsewhere (Korea, Indonesia) because production was moved during this period in history. Sounds hopeless, right? Not always!


The exciting thing about the Kemper is that you can use it to capture the sound of your JTM45, right where it hits that sweet spot, with the microphone you prefer and that mic preamp that just adds a certain something. Then you can refine the 'profile' you've made while A/B-ing the digital signal with the original using the Kemper's onboard EQ, and save the sound alongside the library of 200 or so profiles that comes pre-loaded, with access to hundreds more via the Rig Exchange section of the Kemper website. If you fancy a little more spice you can clean up or crank the KPA's onboard gain control to go way beyond the level of drive available on your original amp, adjust sag, tweak the audible effects of pick attack and even, thanks to what Kemper claims is "digital alchemy", alter the size of your virtual cabinet from a huge stack right down to a cigarette packet, while there's also a fully loaded set of effects. We've heard various approaches to digital modelling sound good in the studio before but this is as close to a 'real' mic'd valve amp sound as to be indistinguishable. If you're the type of guitarist who records regularly, or a producer who wants 24/7 access to a personal library of refined and tested guitar sounds wherever you happen to be on the planet at any given time, the Kemper Profiling Amp is the product of the decade so far.
Here’s one more British amp company, and one that might fly a bit under the radar for a lot of guitarists. Check out the Ironheart, Lionheart, VH and GH series for awesome British tube sound. Laney’s Linebacker or PRISM series of modeling/emulation amps might be just what you need if you’re in a situation where you have to nail a lot of different tones. No matter what your style or genre there is probably something in the Laney lineup to meet your needs.
Martin & Co is without a doubt one of the most reputable acoustic guitar makers in the world, so if you or someone you know is planning to spend a lot of dough on an acoustic guitar - it best be a Martin. One of the more recent releases from Martin that deserve special mention here is the 00-42SC John Mayer, a signature guitar inspired by the classic Stage Coach(SC) design, which were prevalent in an era where small bodied parlor guitars were highly favored.
To create a fairly live, in-your-face sound, a short reverb or ambience program with a fairly bright character is ideal. A hint of slapback echo or a little pre-delay before the first reflection can enhance the sense of power and intimacy, as when a guitar is played in a small club. More generous reverb can be combined with repeat echo effects to create a lush, spacious sound, but you need to leave space in the instrumentation and arrangements for these sounds to work, otherwise they just sound confused and messy. Feeding the effects send through a chorus or flanger before the reverb gives a nicely complex twist to the sound without being too obvious.

Setting up an electric guitar will bring out the true potential of that specific instrument. A poorly setup guitar will be harder to play due to high strings and neck bending, and will sound subpar with improper intonation. Electric guitar setup cost will cover all of these adjustments and more. For a price close to $50, your guitar will also have its neck adjusted so that the playability is as good as possible over the entire fret board. In the ideal setup scenario, the string height will be optimized so that playing is easy. The height of the strings should also provide for the best sound as they are able to ring free of the frets, allowing for the cleanest and strongest possible signal for the pickups to capture.
Oh and you play really great sounding exercises in blues, rock and country that encourage you to noodle around and find your own riffs and leads to play over the tracks which is something that I had never really been inspired to do before with any other book. The author doesn't just throw a bunch of tired, boring, public domain yankee doodles and scarborough fairs because he is too cheap to pay royalties or some crappy tunes that a kindergardener could write but actual original pro sounding tunes and riffs. Yes, I HAVE been around my fair share of crappy guitar lesson books, thanks for asking!
Entitled Fine Electric Instruments, the 1964 1965 Fender catalogue was circulated from mid 1964, and despite being just eight pages long, contained a large number of guitars, amplifiers and other instruments. This was the first catalogue to show the new Fender Mustang guitar, which was available in normal or 3/4 scale at that time. This catalogue was included in the 1964 annual guitar issue of Down Beat magazine (July), massively increasing the potential readership, both in America and worldwide.
There is some debate about who actually designed the solid-body, arch-topped Gibson Les Paul, which was introduced with a trapeze tailpiece as a Goldtop in 1952. To hear the guitarist Les Paul tell it, he was the man responsible for his namesake, pushing his prototype on Gibson executives as early as 1940. But guitar author and collector George Gruhn believes the great musician may have had little do to with the electric guitar's final...Continue Reading
Before we begin, it should be pointed out that some time ago Guitar Player presented the history of Teisco, based on information painstakingly translated from a Japanese article penned by Mr. Hiroyuki Noguchi of Japan’s Rittor Music, editor of the Guitar Graphic book series. Unfortunately, the article used for reference was an older piece which has subsequently been totally revised and corrected by Mr. Noguchi based on later interviews with principals in the Teisco company. Some of the chronology in the GP story is inaccurate. What follows here is the latest and most accurate information on Teisco (in regards to company history), confirmed in repeated direct communications with Mr. Noguchi in Japan. This information also supersedes some incorrect facts in my own essay on Teisco Del Rey Spectrum 5 guitars in the first issue of Vintage Guitar Classics.
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The first Merson guitar advertised in The Music Trades appeared in the December, 1948, issue. This was the Tempo Electric Spanish Guitar which listed at $59.50 plus $11.50 for a Dura-bilt case. The Merson Tempo was an auditorium-sized archtop with a glued-in neck, a harrow center-peaked head which looks almost Kay. The guitar was finished in a shaded mahogany with a pair of widely separated white lines around the edges. Available source material is hard to see, but these appear not to have any soundholes. The fingerboard was probably rosewood with four dots (beginning at the fifth fret). This had a typical moveable/adjustable compensated bridge, elevated pickguard and cheap trapeze tailpiece. One Super-Sensitive pickup sat nestled under the fingerboard, and volume and tone controls were “built-in.”

The components are adequate. The electronics are good, have good tolerances, but the off board components are cheap and flimsy. The hardware is quite good, especially the enclosure. The PCB is well designed and well labeled. The big problem is that the layout instructions are quite poor and mislabeled in a number of places. There is no bill of materials so the components can be quite difficult to distinguish even when they're labeled. Additionally, product only includes one color of wire and does not include digital instructions as indicated in the product description.
One of my friend's first "good" guitars was a Lotus LP copy with a set neck. Your typical heavy brown 70s with a plain top LP copy but it had binding like a custom and real inlays. I helped him put dimarzios in it and we set it up. It was a pretty good guitar except for the color. His mother bought it new, and it was a medium priced guitar back then (not cheap really, it was $400 or so in the 70s).
The pickup coils are wired to the amplifier through an electrical circuit. The circuit usually also contains volume and tone controls, which allow the basic sound to be adjusted by turning knobs on the guitar body. A guitar with two pickups will have four knobs on its body: one to adjust the volume and the tone of the sound from each pickup. More complex circuits can be added to change the sound of an electric guitar in all kinds of interesting ways.

I've been to a PRS factory and seen the precision and skill with which they are made. Their quality control is incredible: they test each one individually and make adjusments until it is perfect. They won't let a bad one get through so if you buy a PRS guitar, you are guaranteed a high quality guitar. I mean, with the high price you pay, how could they not be wonderful? Plus, they sound, feel, and look amazing. (I also got to see Paul himself; it was pretty cool. What a nice, humble guy.)
Lets face it: when most folks first pick up the electric guitar, the only other gear they think they might need would be an amp, a pick, some cables and maybe some pedals if they are savvy. As these players become more experienced and move from their garage to live music venues and recording situations, they eventually run into some issues and realize there must be better ways to be heard than turning the amp to 11.
Electri6ity has been around for a while now, but I think it's still the cat's meow of sampled guitar libraries because of how deeply sampled and deeply controllable it is. Its wealth of articulations will allow you to create stunningly realistic guitar tracks, but the trade-off is that there are a lot of keyswitches and keyswitch combos to learn at both ends of the keyboard, and it's a big library that costs $400. For that reason, it may be a little overwhelming to be a "go to" library, but if you have the ambition to learn and use it, your guitar tracks will have no competition.
Another way to set up your pedals is by placing them within the effects loop of your amplifier.  An effects loop is an audio input and output loop that is placed after the preamp and before the power amp section of your amplifier, using the Effects Send and Effects Return jacks. On some amplifiers, these can be labels Preamp Out (Effects Send) and Power Amp In (Effects Return).  Not all amplifiers have effects loops, but those that do allow for you to place some of your effects within the loop.
Clear and easy to follow instructions. I re-wired my Gibson Les Paul 60's Tribute for new pickups after removing the easy connects and circuit board that came stock. I ended up re-using the 3 way switch that came in the guitar instead of the one in the kit since it was shorter and the guitar didn't have room for the full length switch in the kit. They were both Switchcraft so same quality. I'm very happy with the results. After shopping prices, the kit is very reasonable versus buying the components separately.
The Gibson L5, an acoustic archtop guitar which was first produced in 1923, was an early “jazz”-style guitar which was used by early jazz guitarists such as Eddie Lang. By the 1930s, the guitar began to displace the banjo as the primary chordal rhythm instrument in jazz music, because the guitar could be used to voice chords of greater harmonic complexity, and it had a somewhat more muted tone that blended well with the upright bass, which, by this time, had almost completely replaced the tuba as the dominant bass instrument in jazz music.
For electric guitar amplifiers, there is often[vague] a distinction between "practice" or "recording studio" guitar amps, with output power ratings of less than one watt to 20 watts, and "performance" or "stage" amps of 30 watts or higher.[citation needed] Traditionally,[according to whom?] these have been fixed-power amplifiers,[jargon] with some models having a half-power switch to slightly reduce the listening volume while preserving power-tube distortion.
Unfortunately there’s not really any good way to get around that issue. You can get strings that ease the pain on your fingers, like Elixirs or D’addarios that are coated but as for the guitar itself you’re going to have to tough it out and build up your callouses and endurance/tolerance. I had the same problem with my fingers, it would happen after playing for longer than an hour usual but over time it went away and now my fingers are rough and hardened. It’s worth the effort and pain, enjoy!

Featuring a scalloped X, a Fishman Isys III System, a Rosewood bridge with compensated saddle and chrome die cast tuning keys, a body with laminated Mahogany back and sides and laminated Maple top, a cutaway design with dreadnought body shape with a wide choice of color and design, and to top it all off, a Fender FTE-3TN Preamp with Tuner, this guitar surely has it all and it’s not even that expensive!
If you were a fan of almost any kind of contemporary popular music when you were growing up, there was probably a time when you thought that it might be cool to learn how to play guitar. Whether you admired the road-going, globetrotting, fly by night lifestyle of rock stars or you just thought it might be a good way to pick up chicks, there’s something viscerally desirable about garnering even a modicum of instrumental mastery. And that very well might have something to do with the allure of the instrument itself.

Setting up a mic to record the natural acoustic sound of the guitar strings can add percussive character when blended with the amp sound, especially if you are capturing old-school archtop sounds. For best results, the guitar needs to be isolated from the amp to prevent excessive bleed. This technique gives a good front-end attack to the sound and plenty of definition. A small condenser is the best mic for the job, and it’s worth using a high-pass filter as well.

In the first part of this two-part article, we look at the original five-way switch and find it lacking for some uses. The 2-pole super-switch steps in to help, and we look at how we would go about wiring a Strat in the standard way using that switch. Once we’ve understood that, we go on to create an interesting alternate wiring scheme for a Strat that wouldn’t be possible with the standard 5-way.

In the 1920s, the earliest combo amplifiers had no tone controls. The first tone controls were simple, mainly providing treble adjustment. The limited controls, the early loudspeakers, and the low amplifier power (typically 15 watts or less prior to the mid-1950s) gave poor high treble and bass output. Some models also provided effects such as an electronic tremolo unit. In confusion over nomenclature, Fender labeled early amplifier tremolo as "vibrato" and called the vibrato arm of the Stratocaster guitar a "tremolo bar" (see vibrato unit, electric guitar, and tremolo).

The Axe-Fx II is also the world’s most powerful hardware multi-effects. To use it with an amp, just create presets with no AMP or CAB blocks. Some people run separate chains of effects —some before the amp and others in its loop. This is called the “four cable method.” Or better still: match the sound of your amp and send THAT to front of house while you use your amp on stage in all its glory.
The 5-position switch controls which pickups are activated. On a standard Strat, the position closest to the neck activates only the neck position pickup. The position next to that activates both the middle pickup and the neck pickup. The middle position activates only the middle pickup. The next position activates both the middle pickup and the bridge position pickup. The last position activates only the bridge position pickup.
If your volume and tone knobs start to make crackling or popping noises through your speaker whenever you’re plugged in, or if the signal is weak, inconsistent, or cuts out altogether in certain positions on your controls, some foreign matter (however minute) has probably lodged itself in your controls. Dust and rust pose the greatest potential threat to any electronic connection.

As a musician, learning songs for whichever instrument you are playing is one of the best exercises. Not only do you get to practice your chops but you also get to learn exactly how a particular song is played. As a beginner/intermediate guitar player, learning songs is all about knowing where to put your fingers on the fretboard, listening to the strumming patterns used, and taking note of any special techniques or chord combinations. Being aware of these things as you learn songs will help you become a better guitar player and composer. However, as a new/intermediate guitar player, you


Gibson’s electric guitars generally sport humbucker pickups, known for their thicker, rounder tone. You also get less feedback, which limits the types of delay and overdrive tones you can experiment with, but ensures a cleaner and more consistent sound. Gibson mainly uses mahogany for their guitar bodies, which is what gives it that slightly darker sound.

In the late 1950s, Guitarist Link Wray began intentionally manipulating his amplifiers' vacuum tubes to create a "noisy" and "dirty" sound for his solos after a similarly accidental discovery. Wray also poked holes in his speaker cones with pencils to further distort his tone, used electronic echo chambers (then usually employed by singers), the recent powerful and "fat" Gibson humbucker pickups, and controlled "feedback" (Larsen effect). The resultant sound can be heard on his highly influential 1958 instrumental, "Rumble" and Rawhide.[17]
I just purchased a Lyle acoustic guitar in excellent condition. It's Serial # 204 and Model # 712. The top of the guitar says Lyle with a gold cross-like design up by the tuning keys. It looks like it was painted on the wood by the manufacture. The top tuning key head and neck are the color of milk chocolate with pearl-type fret inlays. The body of the guitar is a light tangerine color showing the natural wood grain under the clear lacquer finish. It has a dark chocolate bridge, and a black pick guard with a white pearl engraved inlay of a floral sprig or vine-type design. There is a set of three circles around the center opening (1 thin black line, a wide band of black and white lines and another thin black line. It has light tangerine and milk to dark chocolate stripped sides and back which is the natural wood grain showing through the clear lacquer finish. JAPAN is engraved on the back of the tuning key head in back.
Ten is not enough. If you are not here for the first time and you already checked our article on the top acoustic guitars and the recommended electric guitars you know how we roll.And if we are going to review a lot more than just 10, why not split them into proper categories that will help you choose what is working best for you. As it will take a lot of time to write all these for you, please be easy on us. For the people that do not want to waste that much time thought and just want a quick list with some great effects we prepared the comparison charted listed below:
Consideration of this takes us back again to Kink Dave Davies: “The blues players were the first to crank it up, and the music had that spirit, that anguish. We used to listen to all those guys. Like John Lee Hooker—he had that buzz, that drive. I used to listen to him and think, ‘What’s he doing there? That’s amazing—how do you get that sound?’ I think all those elements led to me messing around with amplifiers, because all the amplifiers were clean, soulless.”
A well-reviewed electric guitar with a high-quality design, the ESP LTD EC-1000 is the best electric guitar for the musician looking to upgrade their sound and achieve an exaggerated tone associated with the world of rock-and-roll. Both the body and neck of the guitar are made from mahogany with a rosewood fretboard, making this guitar lightweight in feel and balanced in design. The 24 frets come in an extra-large size for ease and comfort in chord changes, while the tailpiece and locking bridge make tuning  both easy to achieve and maintain. Output of the sound is well controlled with the toggle switch, and the model comes with two volume controls for different modes of play. Designed for the musicians with years of experience and a desire to play with a harder edge to their sound, the ESP LTD EC-1000 offers high-end features for a reasonable price. We’re huge fans of their entire EC series.
Yamaha is considered as among largest music instruments selling company in India, which provides a wide variety of guitars. S series, Yamaha RGX, RGZ electronic series, SG series (SG 5,SG 7) etc are the best models of guitar. Now they become the world’s largest manufacturer of a full line of musical instruments. They earned good name by providing super quality guitar at an affordable price. Available price is Rs. 8,000/- onwards (approx).

To capture the best “dry” performance, an active DI such as the Radial J48™ is recommended as it produces more level which is useful for standard guitar pickups. As a rule of thumb, when using a passive instrument, select an active DI and when using an active instrument (such as a bass with powered pickups), a passive DI should be used. The DI makes the guitar signal suitable for recording by changing the impedance and converting it to a balanced signal. For a more affordable option there is the Radial Pro48™ which uses Eclipse transformers, while the JDV MK5™ is Radial’s flagship DI and can be optimized for any instrument.
This list is called "best guitar techniques" not hardest guitar techniques, people are looking at some of more shreddy elements first, but many other things are far more important. I think alternate picking is one of the most important because it is the technique that truly gives you control over individual notes (not chords). It is commonly used in both rhythm and lead guitar unlike sweep picking which is only used by shreddicus maximus/l0rd 5hr3dd0rz. All these techniques are important but think of some more basic techniques first.
There was a question from Benhur about Cort. If you lived in England you may know them better. They are an Indonesian company who builds many of the lower price point guitars for the big names like G&L and Fender just to name a. Few. Lower price doesn’t always mean less quality. Cort has a following in their own skin, and many with other well known names just may not know they are playing a Cort.
Just so you know, if you’re not a big fan of black electric guitars, Davisson has rolled out several colors like blue, vintage sunburst, red and pink for you to choose from. My choice was classic black, though! Now, my first impression of the 39” guitar as I unpacked it, was of sheer wonder. I mean, it was really tough to visualize the sturdy construction in terms of the menial cost. Of course there are letdowns, such as the body that is made of basswood instead of maple (that is used in premium guitars), which gives you sort of a mediocre feel. Even the material used for crafting the chrome bridge, humbucker pickup, pickguard and strings, is pretty average. But if you look at the overall feel, design and ergonomics, this model definitely deserves a round of applause!
There are more expensive versions of the Alex Lifeson signature available, but the SE that we’ve chosen has a really nice balance of price and specification. This is a firmly mid-range guitar, and is really good value at that. It’s a slightly thinner body style, but with PRS’ nice traditional acoustic hybrid shape, and comes with all of the high quality hardware and electronics that you’d expect from PRS.

Interestingly, the neck is crafted from maple, topped by a 20-fret walnut fingerboard which complements the back and sides nicely. Following the specs of older Gibson guitars, the scale length is shorter at 24.75", while the nut width is 1.725", which gives the instrument a comfortable playing feel. Adding to the already good vale of this guitar is the built-in LR Baggs Element electronics for stage performance, with discrete soundhole mounted volume control. If you are looking for a handcrafted workhorse acoustic guitar that will not break the bank, then check this out.


In the late 50s, McCarty knew that Gibson was seen as a traditional company and began an effort to create more modern guitars. In 1961 the body design of the Les Paul was changed due to the demand for a double-cutaway body design.[17] The new body design then became known as the SG (for "solid guitar"), due to disapproval from Les Paul himself. The Les Paul returned to the Gibson catalog in 1968.

Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Wood: Maple & Walnut - Fingerboard: Maple - Frets: Jumbo - Inlay: Black - Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line, Reverse - Bridge: Lo-Pro Edge - Hardware: 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 5-Way Switch - Pickups: DiMarzio - Pickup Configuration: H-S-H - String Instrument Finish: White


The #1 cause of fret wear is the fretting hand pressure exerted by the player.  I have some clients that grip very tightly and wear frets quickly (Rob Fahey), and some that grip very lightly and take forever to exhibit significant wear (Jasan Stepp, Dog Fashion Disco/PolkaDot Cadaver).  Fret material hardness, string hardness and frequency of use all contribute to wear as well, but hand pressure is still the leading cause since frets do not wear themselves out.  Technique is different for every player, unique and personal and habits can be hard to change.  Just like brakes in a car, how hard and how much something is driven directly impacts wear and longevity.  Please see the refrets page for further thoughts on this topic.
went to great lengths to get here for a basic set up on a vintage les paul. after 3 months of long waiting guitar was no better off, it was different, but just as bad and completely unplayable. he may have spent 30 seconds tweaking the truss rod, but didn't do the necessary or requested fret leveling to resolve all the dead areas up high. unbelievable after 3 months to have a guitar unplayable after traveling such lengths to get here & back.
The one-string guitar is also known as the Unitar. Although rare, the one-string guitar is sometimes heard, particularly in Delta blues, where improvised folk instruments were popular in the 1930s and 1940s. Eddie "One String" Jones had some regional success.[citation needed] Mississippi blues musician Lonnie Pitchford played a similar, homemade instrument. In a more contemporary style, Little Willie Joe, the inventor of the Unitar, had a rhythm and blues instrumental hit in the 1950s with "Twitchy", recorded with the Rene Hall Orchestra.
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