The design goal of these hybrid micro heads was to provide usable power from a compact digital power amp section combined with a real analogue preamplifier in a very small and light metal chassis. The amps each weigh about 1.1 lbs, and fit in one hand (Dimensions (W x D x H): 135mm x 100mm x 75mm/5.31” x 3.94” x 2.95”). These amps are advertised as 50 watt heads, so the power section is a special Class D design as might be expected. What is unexpected is the preamp design that includes a new type of vacuum tube (valve) called the Nutube 6P1, which is the result of Korg working with Japanese vacuum fluorescent display (VFD) company Noritake Itron Corp.(Ise Electronics Corp). As such, the Nutube is a dual-triode vacuum tube packaged similarly to a VFD "chip" which makes it mountable on a circuit board using holes and pads not unlike a DIP. The miniaturised flat package topography, low power consumption, and low heat, long life attributes of the Nutube are key contributors to deploying an analogue tube preamp in such a small, lightweight footprint. Power consumption is only 3.43 Amps which is provided by a DC19VAC adapter, but Vox rates the MV50 power output at 50 Watts. However, note the 50W rating is for a 4Ω load; power output specs are as follows: Max 50W RMS at 4 Ohms, 25W RMS at 8 Ohms, 12.5W RMS at 16 Ohms.


Ibanez is a Japanese brand of guitars that have long been associated with progressive, jazz, and metal music. They offer a wide range of styles and models for all different playing types, and they have been around since the late 1950’s. Like Fender guitars, they have the wider string spacing, and the guitars often feature a whammy bar. Occasionally models incorporate a Floyd Rose Locking Tremolo system which secures the tuning of the strings.
Let’s kick things off in style. This guitar is one of Epiphone’s mid range semi-hollow models. As such, it has to meet much more refined standards. Many wondered if Epiphone was capable of delivering such a guitar, but the answer is a strong yes. With its three Dogear Alnico pups, this thing is a beast. If you know how to handle a semi-hollow, you will find that Epiphone Riviera Custom P93 brings a lot of range. At least that’s the type of impression it left on me.

Perhaps the most popular choice though is a paper in oil capacitor. I have tried so many brands and options, and truth be told, it's very hard to notice a substantial difference and you can, unnecessarily spend a lot of money on premium ones. I received so many requests for a PIO equipped harness, so in an effort to try and whittle my findings down to a good value, tight tolerance and good sounding paper in oil capacitor, I've settled with one made by WD Music USA which are superb. Compared to other PIO caps on the market, they're a reasonable price and importantly are tight tolerance meaning the key details about how it will react with a tone pot, is accurately presented. Again, no real right or wrong here, if your budget allows you to go crazy on capacitor choices, no one can tell you not too. But truthfully, just pay attention to the tolerances, as that will tell you the most about how it will 'sound'. 
The earliest extant six-string guitar is believed to have been built in 1779 by Gaetano Vinaccia (1759 - after 1831) in Naples, Italy; however, the date on the label is a little ambiguous.[37][38] The Vinaccia family of luthiers is known for developing the mandolin. This guitar has been examined and does not show tell-tale signs of modifications from a double-course guitar.[39] The authenticity of guitars allegedly produced before the 1790s is often in question. This also corresponds to when Moretti's 6-string method appeared, in 1792.
Every time I guitar shop I come back to Gibson. Pricey, but the look, feel and tone are to my tastes. A lot of classic songs have been recorded over the years on these guitars. Are they superior to Martins or Taylors? It's a matter of preference. I own a hummingbird custom and the aesthetics, tone and feel are unsurpassed, but it doesn't "cut" like a Martin. For chording though, it's a better balance. I also own a J-45 which is the ultimate acoustic blues guitar.
Players and rock historians alike will talk endlessly about who either created or discovered or recorded the first distorted guitar tone. They argue, pontificate, debate, and even break it down into categories of type and of geographical location. “So, do we mean distortion, overdrive, or fuzz tone?” or “Do you distinguish between North American and European ‘firsts’?” Dave Davies of the Kinks is often credited with the first appearance of a heavily distorted electric guitar sound in the British charts for ‘You Really Got Me’ in August 1964. 

I play a Breedlove and it compares very favorably with Martin, Taylor, and Gibson while I prefer it to Fender acoustic guitars (I think Fender electrics are much better). Beautiful tone, and in one place where I play I'm not allowed to plug in. At that place, my Breedlove is the only one of my guitars I can get sufficient volume from. My other guitars are a Martin, an Ibanez, and a Schechter. Breedlove should be in the top ten.
The amplifier includes buttons for four different amplifier simulations: Clean, Crunch (a typical rock/blues sound), Metal (self-explanatory), and Insane (a version of Metal that our panelists found so distorted as to be nearly unusable). Like the Champion 20, it has a gain control (which is labeled Drive), and it adds a midrange control to its bass and treble controls.
Ibanez is considered to be one of the best-selling electric guitars and bass guitar brands. But, they also produce a quality acoustic guitar for acoustic guitar players. The V series is really popular for newbies, making it one of the best acoustic guitar brands for beginners. Their guitar uses mahogany wood on the neck, and back and sides of the guitar. It also includes a rosewood bridge and rosewood guitar fretboard.
Chabot Guitars - Paul Chabot used to offer quality hand made Classical guitars (Colorado, USA) "Paul first apprenticed und er guitar maker / repairman Robert Buchanan, where he became familiar with the aspects of guitar repair, and guitar refinishing. Furthering his ability and knowledge, Paul attended Roberto-Venn School of Luthiery where he learned the basics of wood, instrument design and guitar making. Not long after graduating from Roberto-Venn, Paul was fortunate enough to apprentice under world renowned Master guitar maker Augustino Lo Prinzi. Through Augustino Lo Prinzi, Paul was able to learn some of the most proven methods and advanced techni ques of fine guitar making."
Given the price tag, you’d expect the J-200 to be of a very high quality throughout, and we’re pleased to be able to say that it is. Every millimeter of the guitar has been expertly crafted, and nothing is an afterthought. The end result is a stunningly beautiful guitar that feels very special in your hands. No wonder everyone from Elvis to Jimmy Page has used a Super Jumbo in some form throughout history.
Most models come with single-coil Hi-gain pickups as standard equipment. Many post-British invasion Rickenbacker players such as Peter Buck, Paul Weller, and Johnny Marr have used instruments with these pickups. Rickenbacker’shumbucker/dual coil pickup has a similar tone to a Gibson mini-humbuckerpickup, and comes standard on the Rickenbacker 650 C. Vintage reissue models, and some signature models, come with Toaster Top pickups, which resemble a classic two-slotted chrome toaster. Despite their slightly lower output, “Toasters” produce a brighter, cleaner sound, and are generally seen as key to obtaining the true British Invasion guitar tone, as they were original equipment of the era.
John Fahey, who died in 2001 at age 61, was American folk guitar's master eccentric, a dazzling fingerpicker who transformed traditional blues forms with the advanced harmonies of modern classical music, then mined that beauty with a prankster's wit. "His music speaks of a boundless freedom," says ex-Captain Beefheart guitarist Gary Lucas. In the Nineties, Fahey switched to a spiky minimalism on electric guitar that made him a post-punk icon. "To be validated by John Fahey," says Thurston Moore, "was really special for our scene."
Now imagine the puddle again, but this time imagine some wood blocks (12 inch long 2x4's for those of you with rusty imaginations) that are placed on their sides in the puddle in the shape of a three-sided box with the open side facing the pebble's point of impact. The radiating lines go in to the box and bounce back or reflect off the walls. Soon, there are so many lines radiating around in that imaginary box that they all collide with each other and become a random, jumbled mess. Eventually, the size of the lines and the number of them diminish. That my friends is reverb.
Univox was not, as you might guess, just another isolated Japanese import, but was part of a much larger story of its importer, the Merson company. And in this context, Univox is a part of the much larger story that included names you probably see everywhere but know little about, since they’re off the beaten path, names such as Tempo, Giannini, Westbury, Korg and much more! You’re going to have to pay attention here, because a whole bunch of familiar and not-so-familiar names crisscross through this story.
In jazz big bands, popular during the 1930s and 1940s, the guitarist is considered an integral part of the rhythm section (guitar, drums and bass). They usually played a regular four strums to the bar, although an amount of harmonic improvisation is possible. Freddie Green, guitarist in the Count Basie orchestra, was a noted exponent of this style. The harmonies are often minimal; for instance, the root note is often omitted on the assumption that it will be supplied by the bassist.

I've been a guitar player for decades but only recently became serious about working on my instruments. In my research, I’ve found hundreds of articles about instrument repair, and while many are fantastic and chock full of information that’s invaluable to musicians, a lot is impractical or requires more space or specialized tools than most of us have. Plus, some repairs, such as fretwork, nut replacement, under-saddle pickup installation and finish repairs are best left to professionals.
One master's name that kept being repeated by the guitar experts was Roger Crisler of Crisler Guitar Repair in Carrollton. He's been in the business of repairing guitars for almost 40 years. Some of the best guitarists in the DFW area turn to him when their guitar is sick: Chris Watson, Bnois King, Zach Weeks, Drew Adkins, Smokin' Joe Kubek, the list just continues to grow. He's trusted, and his work is respected. "When you love what you do, it doesn't feel like a job," he says.
On entering a studio, some guitarists ask if they should leave off the effects they normally use and add them in later. Of course, this can be done; however, if the effects are integral to the desired sound and you are ‘playing’ the effect as much as you are the instrument – fuzzboxes, heavy spring reverb, long delays and so on – it might be difficult to create the right feel during the take without them. If there is uncertainty as to whether the effects are spot-on, split the signal to retain the option of reworking the sound during the mixing process.
The panel on top carries the controls for an old school look and feel overall, consisting of a master volume, gain, bass, treble and the model AC10 comes equip with a built-in reverb effect that makes it even more powerful and articulate to use. This amp is at top of its class when used at home, awesome for a recording studio and bringing it on stage to cover a small to medium size venues.

If you are buying a guitar for a kid, it might be good to know that there are smaller electric guitars especially for children. If it’s a small child, it might be really difficult to reach on a full-size guitar. The best way of determining what size you need is to try different sizes in a music shop or ask the guitar teacher what he or she recommends. If your kid grows quickly and you can’t be bothered or can’t afford to get a new guitar every year there is always the option of renting a guitar until your kid is big enough to play on a full-size guitar.

Playing Electric Slide is great. I use the neck pick up mostly or the bridge pick up with the tone turned down as not to blow out peoples ear drums, but you can adjust to the tone you prefer. Most people adjust the strings a little further from the neck. I prefer not so I can bend and play normal too. Great slide players. Jimmy Page, Joe Bonnamassa, Joe Perry hope this was helpful
Most guitar especially for those which have more than 1 pickup have selector switch. Attached on the body and normally below the 1st E string on the body of a stratocaster guitar. And on the top shoulder for Les Paul. Its a basic things to understand the switches on which pickups its toggling. First, you need to understand what is the switch for???
These acrobatic guitarists used humbucking pickups and the more aggressive Floyd Rose style tremolo bridge to create the hard rock edge that began to be defined in the late 70’s and 80’s more technical playing styles.  These instruments now include much higher output and even active electronic pickups, and their recessed cavities to allow the tremolo bridges to make the distinctive “dive bomb” effects that Van Halen made famous in his solo “Eruption.”  Other distinct features include thinner necks and larger frets with flatter fret boards that many technical players prefer for their flashier techniques.
{"product":{"id":"113478791","stock":"instock","price":"2099.99","name":"1967 FT90 El Dorado Acoustic Guitar","download":false,"sku_id":"113478791","checksum":"754513965000","rep_id":"site5113478791","displayId":"113478791","sku_display_id":"113478791","sku_rep_id":"site5113478791","gc_pro":false},"category":"Acoustic Guitars","pageName":"product_detail","subcategory":"6 String Acoustic Guitars","dept":"Guitars"}
Harmoniser pedals are also very useful. You put in the key you are playing and which harmony you would like (3rds for instance – just like in a lot of Iron Maiden songs) and as you play, the harmoniser automatically creates the harmony you have selected. This is great if you are the only guitar player in a band, or if you like to experiment with new harmonies on the fly.

I also was amazed how well my Norma FG-7 played..its a parlor size acoustic guitar made of what looks to be all mohagony with a white pic guard kinda cool looking but it was a cheap guitar for the times.it was made in Korea...I acquired it in a small trade ...the bridge was broken on the peghead and luckily both pieces were still there as it still had 4 strings that looked original to me that held the two pieces together...lol....I re-glued the bridge...cleaned her up real well...re-strung her...and wow...I couldn't really contain myself as she sounded as well as a lot of other guitars out there today...although they aren't worth that much...it;s all in how they play and sound...so I believe they are a dandy for sure...but most will be a rebuild! have fun all and keep strummin'

Jazz guitars are big bodied, often semi-acoustic, and designed to coax out some wonderfully rich, warm tones. Historically, jazz was played on acoustic guitars. However, in the days before amplification, the guitar often became lost in the mix of the big band sound. Until, that was, the introduction of arch top acoustics. Containing a magnetic pickup, arch tops ushered in a new era of guitar manufacturing. This meant that players could be heard in the way they wanted.
Best Answer:  first off, there are tuning knobs on the end of the neck of the guitar(the neck is the long piece protruding from the body of the guitar) they control the pitch of the strings. When you tune a guitar you want the first string(or the smallest string) to be tuned to the note e.The other strings going up should be the notes b,g,d,a,e. You only need to tune the guitar whenever it gets out of tune. The knobs on the body of the guitar are volume control for each pickup,master tone control, and master volume.The controls differ from each guitar , but they usually follow something like that.Lastly, on a Les Paul there is a switch on the upper part of the body that controls which pickup is being used.-(the pickup selector). A pickup is a magnet that collects sound from the strings and lets it be amplified through a amp.A good amp costs anywhere from 50 to 100 dollars. Good luck on your guitar.
Sharlee D'Angelo (b. 1973) is the bassist for the metal band Arch Enemy, as well as the classic rock/AOR band The Night Flight Orchestra, the stoner metal band Spiritual Beggars and the blackened thrash/speed metal band Witchery. D'Angelo has also been in various bands in the past, either as a studio session player or full member. These include Mercyful Fate, Dismember and King Diamond. He switched to Ibanez in 2005. Ibanez now produces the Sharlee D'Angelo signature basses, called the SDB2 and SDB3,[11] which is tuned to D'Angelo's preferred C standard[12] (Low to High – C,F,Bb,Eb).
As such, a velocity-sensitive MIDI keyboard is a must here, and the more experience you have with string instruments, the more you will get out of this VST. It's knowing things like how the string all have different weight and tension behind them and how the volume changes when a plectrum thwacks against the strings that will give guitarists the edge here.
My mom just gave me a Norma FG12 acoustic guitar my father bought for her back in the day. It is in the original box and i honestly doubt it ever made it out of the box! It appears in pristine condition but I know absolutely nothing about guitars. I really don't care to learn how to play it. I would like to sell it but have absolutely no idea how much it is worth nor know the best place to try to sell (?ebay perhaps) Any suggestions/thoughts would be most appreciated. Thanks!
There are many different kinds of pickup selectors. The most common forms of pickup selectors are 3-way and 5-way switches. Obviously, a 5-way switch gives you more pickup combinations than a 3-way switch. Below are some diagrams of what 3-way and 5-way pickup selectors can do. In choosing a pickup selector, I suggest that you try to replace your pickup selector with the same kind of selector. Refer to the manufacturers website and wiring diagram to get the right specifications. Notice I said to get the same “kind” — not the same one. It would make no sense to replace a cheap selector with another cheap selector. Find out the specs on the old selector and buy a nice one.
I am a giging, solo acoustic musician from Ohio, performing in Western NY, Buffalo. I only had Acoustic Electrics, 6 and 12 strings until I bought my first Godin A6 Ultra. (Acoustic and Electric Pick-ups). The A6 was impressive in it's own right, so I started looking at other Godin products, and ran into a 5th Ave Kingpin 1. Acoustically it was a 3 star, as I have a couple of Taylors and an Epiphone Masterbuilt that this guitar is no match for unplugged. HOWEVER !! This guitar was designed to be plugged in, and the Tone and ease of Play come shining through when the p90 is in the loop.
Here we have a well made in Japan kinda rare to see these vintage Fender Japanese acoustics now days... interesting well built and is still beauty ..its all mahogany body & neck are very well constructed , offering good cross braced body ala D-18/28 seems to be awfully similar?..to my vintage Yamaha FG180 or 200 Nippon Gakki.....that is to say pretty darn nice!.. almost the same guitar but for the Fender's more stylistic headstock top shape that differs from the vintage Yamaha... this was clearly built for Fender as there import in those days Japan offered more competitive pricing to us manufactures to produce there line...this offering is really quite a nice guitar in its own right... so now its nicely aged well over the years..nice ring tone to it now, its very good overall condition, but sometime in its past history it received a doink to the binding on the back side lower bout a binding touch up repair has been done ...to the back lower bout and is about a foot long area -replaced ..its on the back bottom like I said so its really out of sight and is out of mind the remainder of bindings are otherwise 100% very nice beautiful actually nice looking tortious style..the rest the body has a few nicks or scars not to bad looking though a real vintage Vibe to it with no major cracks or warpage the bridge & top are tight and flat so its a very sound playing instrument, 1 changed tuner. The minor abraiions had been lacquer filled to preserve the original finish integrity ..we just built up low spots with matching lacquer to level off to prevent further degradation pealing or chipping those areas have been french polished built up and then excess has been removed elsewhere leaving only the low spots filled then we polished to gloss and well it looks ... pretty darn GOOD now.. she's preserved & fully ready for another 30 years of play... this example has a NICE NECK and she plays great....Worth preserving?...I think so See pics please... This guitar has no abrasions wood cracks or issues at all just a vintage guitar thats surprisingly such a fine player...action is good not too high at all and it still has room to lower the saddle or nut even more you so the neck set is very good for many years no worries..its a nice sounding & playing 25 years old vintage Japanese guitar...and is overall a nice looking vintage example..stays in tune nicely and is a joy to play... nice vintage Japanese guitar this guitar is JVG Rated: 8.5/10 very good used guitar as described ...still after 25 years it looks & plays good. Interested in this beauty let me know..Thanks for looking, Joe JVGuitars@gmail.com Pics soon to come stay tuned!.
Control knobs and buttons are typically on the front of the cabinet or chassis, though in some cases, the knobs are on a recessed panel at the back of the top of the amplifier. The most basic amps only have a few knobs, which typically control volume, bass and treble. More expensive amps may have a number of knobs that control pre-amp volume (or "gain"), distortion or overdrive, volume, bass, mid and treble, and reverb. Some older amps (and their re-issued versions) have a knob that controls a vibrato or tremolo effect. The 1/4" input jack is typically mounted on the front of the amplifier. In the simplest, least expensive amplifiers, this 1/4" jack is the only jack on the amplifier.
Some effects produced dramatically weird sounds that were largely impossible to pull off. The peculiar 1948 DeArmond Trem-Trol (used extensively by rock-and-roll pioneer Bo Diddley) altered the volume of the guitar signal by exposing the connecting pin to a brass-and-glass canister half-filled with shaking, water-based electrolytic “Hydro-fluid.” The shaking—and often leaky—fluid washed over the pin and would bend the signal’s volume, causing an oscillating, watery tone. In the words of Chris Gray, one of its few remaining owners, “This is not a subtle effect—it adds all its personality to your sound whether you’re ready for it or not.”
Fender (380) Fender Custom Shop (110) Gibson (455) Gibson Custom (314) Epiphone (256) Ibanez (881) ESP (705) Dean (389) Jackson (431) Music Man (50) Gretsch Guitars (243) Daisy Rock (36) Paul Reed Smith (273) Washburn (142) Yamaha (50) EVH (7) Schecter (589) G&L (92) Squier by Fender (97) Danelectro (8) Peavey (49) Steinberger (11) Brian May Guitars (3) B.C. Rich (156) Rickenbacker (39) Laguna (11) Godin (105) Dan Armstrong (1) Parker (45) Traveler (26) Kramer (27) Hamer (55) Michael Kelly (61) Hagstrom (81) Jay Turser (44) Disney by Washburn (1) Fernandes (78) Taylor (41) Italia (48) DiPinto (15) Axl (34) Hohner (5) Spector (7) Wilson Brothers (7) Moog (1) Valley Arts (6) Breedlove (3) Hallmark (11) Minarik (4) Hofner (18) Rogue (5) Vox (9) Kay Vintage Reissue Guitars (1) Charvel (75) Richmond by Godin (6) Sterling by Music Man (22) Aria (62) Normandy (11) Luna (9) Cort (106) Guild (20) Alvarez (5) Saga (9) Johnson Guitars (9) Mitchell (7) Conklin (22) DeArmond (13) Voyage-Air (2) Lace (5) Silvertone Guitar (13) Titanic Guitars (4) Fret King (101) Ruokangas (13) Framus (129) Collings (15) Leather Guitars (7) Vigier Guitars (38) Jarrell Guitars (23) Peerless Guitars (36) Reverend (93) Carvin (54) Benedetto (14) Maton Guitars (12) DBZ Guitars (102) Line 6 (12) Boulder Creek (3) Stagg (1) Flight (3) Cruzer (5) Behringer (1) Vintage (38) Chapman Guitars (39) Legator Guitars (139) Caparison (44) Heritage Guitars (26) Ashton (1) Strandberg (37) Kiesel (98) Aristides (5) D`Angelico Guitars (29) Wylde Audio (15) Solar Guitars (23)
Effects pedals, or stompboxes, are effects units designed to sit on the floor or a pedal board and be turned on and off with the user's feet. Typically, effects pedals house a single effect. The simplest stompbox pedals have a single footswitch, one to three potentiometers (knobs) for controlling the effect, gain or tone, and a single LED display to indicate whether the effect is on or not. More complex stompbox pedals have multiple footswitches, numerous knobs, additional switches and an alphanumeric display screen that indicates the status of which effect is activated. An effects chain, or signal chain, may be formed by connecting two or more effects pedals together.
Every time I guitar shop I come back to Gibson. Pricey, but the look, feel and tone are to my tastes. A lot of classic songs have been recorded over the years on these guitars. Are they superior to Martins or Taylors? It's a matter of preference. I own a hummingbird custom and the aesthetics, tone and feel are unsurpassed, but it doesn't "cut" like a Martin. For chording though, it's a better balance. I also own a J-45 which is the ultimate acoustic blues guitar.
The Fender Stratocaster may be the most widely recognizable electric guitar and the one most associated with the rise of rock and roll music. It featured a distinctive double-cutaway design that allowed musicians to play higher notes by reaching higher on the fingerboard, three pickups (which allowed for a greater range of sounds since previous guitars which had two pickups at most), and a patented tremolo system that allowed players to raise or lower the pitch of the strings. In the hands of guitarists like Buddy Holly, Eric Clapton, Bonnie Raitt, and many others, the Stratocaster became an icon of American rock and roll that took the world by storm. The Stratocaster, the Gibson Les Paul, and other solid-body electrics were nothing if not versatile, and rock guitarists were obsessed with versatility. Guitarists could not only change the tone, volume, and pitch, but they also could manipulate the sound by playing close to the amplifier, grinding the strings against things, and using special effects accessories like the wah-wah pedal. Jimi Hendrix was this instrument’s master of manipulation, influencing generations of guitarists to experiment creatively with their playing techniques and equipment.
One of the first solid-body guitars was invented by Les Paul, though Gibson did not present their Les Paul guitar prototypes to the public as they did not believe it would catch on. The first mass-produced solid-body guitar was Fender's Broadcaster (later renamed the Telecaster) first made in 1948, five years after Les Paul made his prototype. The Gibson Les Paul appeared soon after to compete with the Broadcaster. Another notable solid-body design is the Fender Stratocaster, which was introduced in 1954 and became extremely popular among musicians in the 1960s and 1970s for its wide tonal capabilities and comfortable ergonomics.
×