The phaser is an interesting pedal that has a surprising mix of uses across genres. What a phaser does is add an out of phase version of your signal with your original signal. This gives your sound a swirling effect that has many sonic possibilities. Eddie Van Halen famously used a phaser set a a low rate to add some “movement” to his solos. In funk, phasers are fundamental in creating the bright and terse rhythm sounds.
This guitar also features Epiphone’s patented Locktone Tune-O-Matic Bridge and stop bar tailpiece for serving the easiest string changes and increased sustain. It comes with master volume and master tone controls along with the long-lasting 3-way pickup selector for a bold and controllable performance. The most exclusive feature added by Epiphone is that by pushing a button you can mute all the outputs to add more rock and roll to your performance.
“This is a very complicated mix of economy versus market, demand versus what products are they putting out, versus are their products as good as they used to be, versus what’s going on with the Internet, versus how are the big-box stores dealing with what’s going on,” Smith says. “But I’ll tell you this: You put a magic guitar in a case and ship it to a dealer, it will sell.”
If the microphonic problem is not due to the cover, or is with a singlecoil pickup you have two options. First is to wax pot the pickup. The second is to pot the pickup in something else. Laquer was once commonly used, but it can cause a problem with some types of insulation (disolving it) and prevents future repair (other than full rewind). I have found a great alternative to both. It is vinyl sanding sealer. (I'm using Sherwin williams wood classics interior sanding sealer) This stuff penetrates deeply, dries solidly, and allows for repairs same as wax does. It requires no special equipment or care. Just submerge the pickup wait till bubbles stop appearing, pull it out and set it on a paper towel to dry. Once the excess has run off (a minute or so) wipe off the top and bottom of the pickup with a rag and allow it to finish drying. In it's intended use it dries fully in an hour. I leave them overnight.

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The music industry is one that has really felt the effects of the digitalization of the world over the last few decades. In the 1970s and '80s, recording, composing and production work would have been done manually with a complicated series of hardware mixers, synths, sequencers and other devices. Today, all you have to do is plug into a computer running the music software that's relevant to the task. These programs and tools don't only make it possible for you to work faster; you can also get started sooner, since a large selection of software packages are available to download directly. You won't need to wait for shipping: just download and start working.

And it took a long time because inevitably the tremolo would go out of time with the track because the tremolo doesn't stay in regular clock time. Also we would go out with each other's amps, so we had to keep looking up at each other after every fifteen second bursts and kind of fess up, "Oh yeah, mine kind of went out of time." It took long time, but I'm glad we did it that way because if we had cut and pasted two seconds of audio, it wouldn't have had the same dynamic quality throughout the six minutes of the song, or however long it is.
It comes with two 6.5-inch speakers, delving out 100 W each for a total of 200. Now, the small woofer diameter might make these units work less-than-perfect for rendering stomach-churning bass noise, but ZT Amplifiers never intended for them to be used as such. Instead, they are supposed to deliver loud and clear enough sounds in the treble and mid ranges to make the guitarist hold its own even when a loud drummer is present.    
SOLD OUT ! We are VERY pleased to present a very special example Alvarez Yairi Classical guitar . The condition of this high end instrument is excellent plus and this guitar is simply wonderful. This is hand built example by The Kazou Yairi himself, Japanese Master Luthier. For those of you not familiar with the Premier Japanese Master Luthier Kazou Yairi and his masterfuly built instruments you may enjoy this vidio introduction to YAIRI GUITARS http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPRyLPouYZM The model is CY116 and is a very high-end professional guitar and is in excellent Plus condition. Only the highest grade woods used as you can see ...choice AAA Flamed-Quilted and is 3-dimensional depth is a work of art as you can see by the pictures. This guitar plays and sound AMAZING and is truly inspirational. This guitar shows very little fret wear. There are just a few minor nicks or scratches which is normal wear for a guitar of this vintage that has been lovingly played. This one is a one owner adult owned guitar and comes with its high quality custom hard shell case too. General Specs: Alvarez Yairi CY116 Classical Acoustic Guitar The CY116's Solid Cedar Top is adorned by an elaborate wooden mosaic rosette. Burled Maple Back/Sides give this classical amazing clarity and warmth like the fiery Andalusian plains that inspired the music that this guitar was born to perform. With room-filling projection, the CY116 is a guaranteed conversation starter. You hear it in the elegant pacing of a classical air. You see it in the vivid charm of a folk dance. Specs: Burled Mahogany Back/Sides Solid Cedar Top Mahogany Neck Ebony Fingerboard Scale: 25 1/2" (650mm) Width at Nut: 2" (51mm) Rosewood Bridge Ivory Body Binding Wooden Mosaic Rosette Gold Vintage Open-Style Tuning Machines .
You can hear one all over Led Zeppelin’s debut record and all over Jeff Beck’s trademark “Heart Full of Soul” intro riff from the Yardbirds. He also used it extensively on the Jeff Beck Group sessions. Of course the most famous fuzz pedal is the Dallas Arbiter Fuzz Face. This pedal was favored by Jimi Hendrix and set the benchmark for fuzz tones that we are still chasing to this day.

If you love effects like we do, we hope you'll find this top-50 list a useful guide to discovering the classic effect boxes that have shaped the guitar sounds of rock, metal, blues, punk and many other styles. And if you're like us, it will undoubtedly compel you to plunk down a chunk of cash for a collectible pedal or two on eBay. Don't say you weren't warned.
The Professionals, just like the Standards before them, are designed to appeal to a wide range of players with a wide range of styles. These are not for vintage obsessives. Most of the changes are relatively subtle: a new 'modern deep C' neck shape; new narrow/tall frets; and the Teles revert back to three (compensated) brass saddles over the previous six Strat-style saddles. Both single coils here use Alnico 5 rods on the bass side and Alnico 2 on the trebles and we have a treble bleed RC network on the volume. A basic trio of sounds shouts 'contemporary Tele' from the biting harmonically rich honk of the flat- pole bridge, through the wider, less quacky pickup mix, to the less hard-hitting but not soft neck voice. It's like someone has EQ'd the sound to balance and maximise its Tele-ness. There's a very lively ringing resonance, too: all the planets seem to align, the maple neck/alder body perhaps pulling down a little edgy spike, while those brass saddles - not to mention the through-body stringing and the more classically voiced pickups - combine to create what seems like a modern Tele in spec but one that has plenty of classic, vintage reference.The colour/wood choices are wide and the subtle improvements to the build - on an already very well proven chassis - make a noticeable change, not least the new neck shape and the taller fretwire. Yes, we've played thicker, beefier-sounding Teles, and thinner, brighter ones, too, but as a foundation tone, which also includes a very smart and practical, lightweight moulded case, it all becomes a bit of a no-brainer.
B.C. Rich specializes in guitars for the heavy metal and hard rock crowd. They’ve produced some of the most legendary designs in the history of metal, including the Warlock, Bich, Virgin, and Mockingbird. Their instruments helped to mold the hard rock and thrash revolution of the 1980s and B.C. Rich is still a great choice for any guitarist looking for an instrument that looks and sounds as edgy as possible.
I finally had the chance to bring my les paul for Steve to look at an annoying fret buzz. First he said the guitar is too straight and adjusted it.  Then he quickly discovered the 4th string buzz was at the first fret but it had nothing to do with the buzz because the issue was at the nut, it was cut too low!  Steve redo the string while we were chatting about how the neighborhood has changed. Within 5 mins, Steve redo the with some filling and filing and voila!! The buzz was gone.  I was so happy and asked him how much, he said it was easy so he didn't want take any money.  But i have him some coffee money and he said it was too much, I said it was for a week and he laughed.  My last issue I brought to Steve as well and we had the same conversation. I highly recommend Steve as experienced luthier and for someone who loves guitars and someone who can solve guitar problems.  Steve is a hidden gem in the Boston guitar world.

These brands consist of guitars that are made up of high quality material including hardware stuffs, wood, etc with interesting features. Well, it not so that only expensive guitars are good for the learners. Music is such a wonderful pleasure that can make any one happy form inside. But all this is possible through excellent music instruments including guitar. Nothing can be powerful in sad situations than music played by guitar. The brands provided below are the most prominent guitars brands at economical prices. So, it is essential to select a perfect guitar which not only make your understand easily but also match to the style and requirements of your lifestyle. Some beginners think to choose a low quality and less expensive brand guitar but it’s all their misunderstanding.
A one of a kind 6 stringed electric guitar that is right handed and mostly comes in black. The body is made of bass wood where as the fret board is made of maple. The neck also consists of white dot inlay. The product price ranges from about 15,350.00 which is quite cost effective considering the adorable features of the guitar. More information concerning the product can be found by clicking on the following link.
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An overdrive is almost always at its best played through a tube amp set at medium to upper-medium volume, since the amp itself is doing a major part of the job, the pedal just being the boot that kicks its butt into juicy break-up a little quicker. Conversely, demo one DI’d into a mixing desk or portastudio as described earlier, and in most cases the breed sounds absolutely awful: harsh, raspy, cold, and artificial. It can be a shocking look at the evil side of that $350 vintage Tube Screamer you just bagged from eBay. Now stop crying, and plug it back into your AC30.
Use the numbers on the tab to fret spaces on the neck. Unlike normal musical notation, guitar tabs don't tell you which notes to play. Instead, they tell you where to put your fingers. Numbers on the lines correspond to frets on the fretboard. Each number represents a specific fret on the line it's written on. For instance, a "1" on the bottom line means to fret the first fret of the lowest string and play that note.
Ten is not enough. If you are not here for the first time and you already checked our article on the top acoustic guitars and the recommended electric guitars you know how we roll.And if we are going to review a lot more than just 10, why not split them into proper categories that will help you choose what is working best for you. As it will take a lot of time to write all these for you, please be easy on us. For the people that do not want to waste that much time thought and just want a quick list with some great effects we prepared the comparison charted listed below:
With JH’s encouragement, I’ve made the decision to produce my own line of premium acoustic guitars, handbuilt as before, to the same high quality, and with an extended option list including other rare woods, finishes, and trim options. The brand I will be using is “Madeleine”, in honor of my late granddaughter who passed away May 2, 2011 at age 1 month.
Yeah. He may have to sit down when he plays, but he’ll have you on your feet when he does. BB’s creamy yet piercing tone, his unique vibrato and his absolute flawless ability to express his emotions through the guitar earn him a spot in the top ten. King’s years of fame haven’t gone to his head. He is still as humble as ever giving front row seat tickets to fans waiting in a cold parking lot just to have a glimpse of him. BB King can’t play chords. Nor does he sing and play at the same time. But he has worldwide recognition of his accomplishments as an artist. That’s a mark of a truly great guitarist.
Tribute Legacy Electric Guitar Candy Apple Red Rosewood Fretboard. The G&L Legacy blends contemporary refinements from the Leo Fender-designed S-500 and Comanche models with classic Alnico V pickups. If your holy grail is faithful Alnico single-coil tone with modern refinements and superb craftsmanship, the Legacy makes for an excellent choice. The Legacy's vintage-spec CLF-100 Alnico V pickups have that unmistakable chime and quack reminiscent of the best examples from the late ˜50s, thanks to the work of Paul Gagon, G&L VP Engineering. Gagon found his inspiration reviewing original prints stored in Leo's private laboratory at G&L, but that was just the start. About 30 years ago, Gagon was an R&D engineer at another company when he was tasked with finding out what was so special about the early bolt-on guitars many players raved about. Gagon tirelessly analyzed many examples of what were considered holy grail guitars, spending time out on the shop floor talking to builders still working in the pickup department since the ˜50s, all on a quest to discover where the real mojo was - and wasn't. What he learned from the builders matched his own engineering analysis. You see, back in the day, the actual spec of pickups coming down that old production line varied considerably. That meant coming up with the right specs for the Legacy pickups was more challenging than simply following the prints. Gagon's persistence paid off as the Legacy garnered rave reviews from both players and magazines like Guitar Player and Guitar World. This axe is no slave to the past, however, starting with Leo's PTB (Passive Treble and Bass) system which functions on all three pickups for dramatically more variety than the vintage setup. What's more, the Legacy features a Leo Fender-designed Dual-Fulcrum vibrato, a work of engineering art which allows bending up or down with unsurpassed stability, while offering a silky feel through its beefy aluminum vibrato arm. The Legacy is...
A good guitar builder can pick materials that provide a predictable result. The process of making a guitar that costs $10,000 and one that costs $1,000 is identical, or at least very similar. The big difference is likely that in the more expensive one, personal attention has been put into selecting, drying, storing, and cutting the tonewood. The cheaper, which is mass produced by less skilled labor, consists of the same species of wood, but from a pile that came out of a container, in the order it was stacked. This means that two guitars from the same batch can sound quite different. They can sound exactly like the expensive guitar, but they can also sound different.
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Gibson’s new version of the Les Paul Standard was released August 1, 2008 and features a long neck tenon, an asymmetrical neck profile to make for a comfortable neck, frets leveled by Plek machine, and locking Grover tunerswith an improved ratio of 18:1. With the 2008 model Gibson has introduced their “weight relief” chambering, which includes routing “chambers” in specific areas of the mahogany slab body as specified by Gibson R&D. Before 2008, Les Paul Standards were “swiss cheesed.” In other words, it had holes routed into the body, but it was not chambered like most of Gibson’s Les Paul lineup now is.[17]

It has a sensitivity of 96 dB, just two units short of the M50x’s 98, but the maximum input power is less than half of that model’s, at 700 mW. The impedance is somewhat higher at 47 W vs. the M50’s 38 W. Besides the price, another identifiable upside would be the lower weight, of 6.7 oz, a feature that won’t be easy to discard after spending the whole day with the headphones on.
Rickenbacker has produced a number of uniquely designed and distinctively trimmed acoustic guitars. Although a small number of Rickenbacker acoustics were sold in the 1950s and were seen in the hands of stars like Ricky Nelson[9]and Sam Cooke,[10] the company concentrated on their electric guitar and western steel guitar business from the early 1960s onward. From about 1959 through 1994, very few Rickenbacker acoustic guitars were made.

In some ways, the Champion 20 isn’t quite as versatile as the other digital amps. For example, the Line 6 Spider Classic 15 has two effects selector knobs, allowing a guitarist to mix modulated effects such as phaser, flanger, and chorus with different types of reverb and echo. However, our panelists generally felt the Champion 20’s ease of use outweighed this disadvantage, and the Champion 20 does offer 12 different amp models as opposed to 4 on the Spider Classic 15. The Champion 20 also doesn’t play as loud as the Stage Right 611800, but all of our panelists thought it played plenty loud enough for beginners.


I bought a Yamaha EC-10 classical at a garage sale for $5.00. It was still in the cardboard box and never played according to the seller. The guitar is full size and looks cool and has real good volume and good bass, but I'd still like to get more bass out of it. I'm thinking of making some modifications to my guitar so that I can fit it with actual bass guitar strings, nylon ones. A friend of mine said I'd wreck up my guitar if I did this. Would I wreck the guitar putting bass strings on it or could I make a bass out of it?
It's Mal - i posted the comment ref the muted G string on my Epi Les Paul 1960 Tribute - thanks for your response it was very good of you. I'm going to be playing (when i say playing i really mean faffing with) my guitar later so i'll have a look at the saddle, though i have rubbed my finger over it to see if there were any obvious issues which there wasn't. I have also rubbed the graphite from my clutch pencil over it when changing strings - no improvement; i'll get magnifier out and take a closer look and let you know, i may take you up on your kind offer if i'm still stumped.
Listen, I realize I’m recommending a lot of Yamahas here, but I swear they are just that good when it comes to QUALITY and PRICE. I don’t know why that is, but it’s something a lot of guitar players have discovered. They’re just really good and very affordable. You’ll find a lot of guitars that are better, but they will cost you. I’m recommending every single guitar here for a reason. Keep that in mind.
Oh, did you say you like lots of switches and pickups and knobbies?  Hell, welcome to our club!  Yes, the Norma 421-4 was the proverbial “king” of the catalog from 1968 to around 1970.  Similar guitars were sold in Japan at this same time, mostly carrying the brand name Liberty.This model was sold alongside a 12 string (EG412-2T) with a tremolo(!!!!!), a bass (EG467-2B), and a two pickup version (EG450-2).  Reading the catalog from 1968 is a real trip!  Here’s the description of the 412-4:

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While Laney brand might not sound as familiar to the “uninitiated”, this brand has been producing quality amps for very good prices. The  LG12 is a combo amp with 12-watts. While 12-watts isn’t much it seems to kick in a punch when needed (and plus, you want it for practice and more practice amps don’t have a lot of wattages). Apart from that this combo offers  LG12 12 single channel with switchable drive, CD input, headphone socket (a much for practice) as well as Bass, Middle and Treble control. The tone of this amp is pretty crisp and clean. That’s partly due to the 6.5″ custom-designed speaker. The speaker is not only functional but looks pretty nice. Looks wise this model has top mounted construction, rubber feet for sturdiness and leather handle for ease of transportation. Apart from being a great practice amp, it is also great if you travel around and want a model that can take a punch or two.
Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic Bass - Body Size: Grand Concert - Top Wood: Solid Sitka Spruce - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Nut Width: 43mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Binding: Tortoise - Frets: 22 - # of Strings: 4 - Scale Length: 32" (81cm) - Headstock: 2+2 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Pickups: Fishman Sonicore - EQ/Preamp: Ibanez AEQ-SP2 - String Instrument Finish: High Gloss Natural

Hi Chris. That doesn’t ring any bells I’m afraid. If your customer wants a new scheme I wouldn’t be afraid to replace the stock switch with a standard 5-way and then you know where you are. There’s always a chance that the Vigier switch is doing something funky and it started with slightly different pickup selections so the sound might change with a new standard switch. Obviously make sure you’ve got notes and photos so you can revert back to the stock wiring! Have you tried to buzz out the Vigier switch with a multimeter to see how it works? Alternatively, have you tried touching the pickup magnets with a screwdriver to see which pickups/coils are on in each switch position, that might give you some clues?


Leo Fender’s simple and modular design was geared to mass production, and made servicing broken guitars easier. Guitars were not constructed individually, as in traditional luthiery. Rather, components were produced quickly and inexpensively in quantity and assembled into a guitar on an assembly line. The bodies were bandsawn and routed from slabs, rather than hand-carved individually, as with other guitars made at the time, such as Gibsons. Fender did not use the traditional glued-in neck, but rather a bolt-on. This not only made production easier, but allowed the neck to be quickly removed and serviced, or replaced entirely. In addition, the classic Telecaster neck was fashioned from a single piece of maple without a separate fingerboard, and the frets were slid directly into the side of the maple surface—a highly unorthodox approach in its day (guitars traditionally featured rosewood or ebonyfingerboards glued onto mahogany necks). The electronics were easily accessed for repair or replacement through a removable control plate, a great advantage over typical construction, in which the electronics could only be accessed through the soundholes in the case of hollow-body instruments, or by taking off the pickguard after removing the strings (in a design popularized by Fender’s own later guitar model, the Stratocaster).
Along with the Dobro name, OMI was acquired by the Gibson Guitar Corporation in 1993. They renamed the company Original Acoustic Instruments and moved production to Nashville. Gibson now uses the name Dobro only for models with the inverted-cone design used originally by the Dobro Manufacturing Company. Gibson also manufactures biscuit-style single-resonator guitars, but it sells them under names such as Hound Dog andEpiphone. The Dobro was first introduced to country music by Roy Acuff.
Input kewords into the searchbox at the top of each page, then click the WHAT'S IT WORTH button. The search engine will find matching pages based on keywords you type into the Search Box. The engine searches all categories of objects, not just this particular category, so you may get some irrelevant items in your search results. Too many results? Be more specific. Not enough results? Be less specific.
OK, when the list started it was hard to tell if the author was knowledgeable on the subject because of the automatic “Go To” names. Unfortunately, by the time I got to the end I realized this was the author’s favorites list versus the Top 10 Greatest Guitar Players. Kirk Hammett, Slash, Jack White, Chuck Berry??? You can’t put them on any list and not mention the guy who influenced so many, and who Eric Clapton called the best guitarist in the world, SRV. Richards biggest claim to fame it the amount of drugs he’s done that haven’t killed him,… Read more »
I don't need freaky pointy demon guitar graphics or anything like that.....this $249 Agile makes my mouth water. For the price of two cheap pedals or one great pedal it's a guitar that you could work with. Ibanez makes the stylish P90 Jet King for about $375...If I were on a tight budget I'd rather have the basic Agile. Yes I'm aging! Get off my lawn you Jet King kids!!
The Teisco brand name stands for 'Tokyo Electric Instrument and Sound Company'. Teisco was founded in 1946 by renowned Hawaiian and Spanish guitarist Atswo Kaneko, and electrical engineer Doryu Matsuda. Teisco guitars sold in the United States were badged "Teisco Del Rey" beginning in 1964. Teisco guitars were also imported in the U.S. under several brand names including Silvertone, Jedson, Kent, Kingston, Kimberly, Tulio, Heit Deluxe and World Teisco. While guitars manufactured by Teisco were ubiquitous in their day, they are now very collectable.
Hybrid picking is a technique that makes use of both the pick and the remaining pick hand fingers. On the surface, it’s more versatile than playing with just with a pick. Digging deeper, you’ll learn hybrid picking has the same, yet different mojo than fingerpicking as well. At the end of the day, this technique is a very powerful one that will enable you to play things that would be otherwise impossible. Be it oddly accented phrases to wide interval licks to more intricate chordal ideas, hybrid picking opens up in credible options.
Jump up ^ Miller, Jim (1980). The Rolling Stone illustrated history of rock & roll. New York: Rolling Stone. ISBN 0394513223. Retrieved 5 July 2012. Black country bluesmen made raw, heavily amplified boogie records of their own, especially in Memphis, where guitarists like Joe Hill Louis, Willie Johnson (with the early Howlin' Wolf band) and Pat Hare (with Little Junior Parker) played driving rhythms and scorching, distorted solos that might be counted the distant ancestors of heavy metal.
Since affordable guitars are designed for students, manufacturers know that playability is of utmost priority. This is the reason why many of these budget-friendly guitars don't stray from familiar neck and body measurements. This ensures that they feel as close to premium guitars as possible, albeit utilizing more cost effective materials and production methods.
As with drive tones, many guitar amplifiers will come with reverb built-in. As such, you may have an idea of the type of effect it is already. In pedal form though, there are companies taking things to new heights by embracing reverb as a gloriously creative tool in its own right. Not just something you add on as an afterthought. Strymon, the American pedal brand, are the masters of this as you’ll see in their Blue Sky (reviewed here) and Big Sky (reviewed here) pedals. Both offer a host of unique, interesting and quite incredible sounding reverbs which will alter your tone in all kinds of wonderful ways.
This mod revolves around the concept that adding mass to the headstock lowers its resonant frequency, while reducing mass will raise that frequency. The theory at work here is that vibration is absorbed or reflected back into the strings and body based upon this frequency. Depending upon the harmonic makeup of your particular instrument, changing this can enhance or degrade sustain and accentuate or attenuate certain harmonics. All of this is dependent not only on your guitar’s construction, but also on how large your headstock is to begin with. If all of this seems a bit hazy, that’s because it is. I don’t have a handy-dandy answer like “more mass equals more sustain” because it isn’t always true. Suffice it to say that you can make a difference in a guitar’s character by following this path. I usually go through this exercise with my builds because I have the luxury of time and the resources at hand. It’s like fine tuning a race car’s suspension settings to your liking.
Music Go Round® is your ultimate used gear resource—we buy used musical instruments all day, every day. We understand the value of your instruments and make it easy for you to sell or trade. Bring your used music gear, such as guitars, drums, amps, bass guitars and pro-sound equipment —we’ll pay you $$$ on the spot—and you take home that must-have piece to your collection.
Adjust the volume and tone and engage the gain when you want to bust out some distortion riffs or throw your headphones in via the 6.3mm Jack headphone output which also doubles up as a preamp out. Enjoy silent practice anywhere or hook it up to your audio interface for studio recordings. A powerful little amplifier relied upon by guitarists when inspiration strikes. At under £30 it’s actually an essential purchase for musicians and one of the best music gifts ever – it’s certainly cheap, but it certainly doesn’t suck! Available in a range of different colours and as a double stack for extra volume.
C.F. Martin was born in 1796 in Markneukirchen, Germany and came from a long line of cabinet makers and woodworkers. His father, Johann Georg Martin, also built guitars. By the age of 15, C.F. Martin was apprenticed to Johan Stauffer, a well-known guitar maker in Vienna, Austria. Martin returned to his hometown after completing training and opened his own guitar-making shop. However, he soon became embroiled in a controversy between two guilds.
This is also an amazing choice for kids and guitar novices. It comes in many different colors and it is quite easy to set up and tune. Once you manage to tune it, it will run for a long time. It has four tone modes and you can select one of them using a switch. It has one tone knob adjustment and one volume adjustment. It is quite easy to play and also highly comfortable.
The Effect: Pedalboards are not guitar effects, but are an essential piece of equipment for every musician utilizing more than 2 or three pedals. Essentially, a pedalboard is a casing for guitar pedals, specially crafted to house a number of effects – typically ranging from 4 to 12. In some cases, boards come as just casings and it’s up to the player to sort out the electronic department and powers supply; in other cases, all the electronics are included in the mix and even cables are included. So in a nutshell, boards make your pedal use far more convenient and practical. In our opinion, they are an absolute must-have for any player who has more than two effects in use. For a first pedalboard I would recommend the Donner DB-2 as a great option.
Notch filters (also called band-stop filters or band-rejection filters) are sometimes used with double basses. Notch filters are filters that allow most frequencies to pass through unaltered, while attenuating those in a specific range to very low levels. Notch filters are used in instrument amplifiers and preamplifiers for acoustic instruments such as acoustic guitar, mandolin, and bass instrument amplifiers to reduce or prevent feedback. While most notch filters are set manually by the user, there are also automatic notch filters which detect the onset of feedback and notch out the frequency before damaging feedback begins.
Personally, I chose the Everlast version of Folsom Prison Blues because I find that the Everlast cover is so much more fun to play along with. The Everlast version is a little bit faster to play along with, but I think of a twelve bar blues while I’m doing the chord progression with this song; it really helps me to keep up and maintain a steady tempo.
Different types of guitars have different sound aesthetics, e.g. different colour-spectrum characteristics (the way the sound energy is spread in the fundamental frequency and the overtones), different response, etc. These differences are due to differences in construction; for example modern classical guitars usually use a different bracing (fan-bracing) from that used in earlier guitars (they had ladder-bracing); and a different voicing was used by the luthier.
So, how to use the tone knob? Open it to get a trebley sound, and roll it off to get a warmer, darker tone. Experiment. Some guitars sound best with the tiniest roll back on the tone knob, some songs require a certain combination of tone and pickup settings to sound best. Try to listen to the John Mayer DVD “Where the Light Is” and try to emulate the guitar tones there using only your pickup selector and knob. He uses different guitars and settings, but a lot of those can be emulated just with your guitar’s controls. Experiment.
Although fairly small in size, this packs a serious punch thanks to the overdrive control which can produce that classic orange crunch to smooth and creamy British distortion. The Orange Crush 12 is definitely a great small gig and rehearsal amp, but it also makes a fantastic amplifier for practice at home thanks to the headphone/line output which features the Orange CabSim technology. This allows you to plug your headphones in and enjoy a faithfully emulated sound of a mic’d Orange 4×12" cabinet directly to your headphones – ideal for silent practice. This can also be used in conjunction with your audio interface for direct recording and the capturing of authentic Orange tones without dragging a massive cabinet into a room (or destroying your windows!).
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But the guitar store? They always remember me and treat me like a guest even if I'm not there to buy shit. Everyone there is a genuinely good dude. They're all honest too, which can be hard to find in this industry. I took my guitar in for a check up and they told me doing anything to it would be unnecessary. They could have easily charged me $80 for a set up and taken my guitar.
When B.B. King heard T-Bone Walker, he "thought Jesus Himself had returned to Earth playing electric guitar." Walker invented the guitar solo as we know it, building a new style on fluid phrasing, bluesy bends and vibrato. It was the clear tone and melodic invention of his 1942 single "Mean Old World" that blew everyone's mind, and Walker refined his approach through hits like "Call It Stormy Monday." "I came into this world a little too soon," Walker said. "I'd say that I was about 30 years before my time."
An Auto-Wah is a Wah-wah pedal without a rocker pedal, controlled instead by the dynamic envelope of the signal. An auto-wah, also called more technically an envelope filter, uses the level of the guitar signal to control the wah filter position, so that as a note is played, it automatically starts with the sound of a wah-wah pedal pulled back, and then quickly changes to the sound of a wah-wah pedal pushed forward, or the reverse movement depending on the settings. Controls include wah-wah pedal direction and input level sensitivity. This is an EQ-related effect and can be placed before preamp distortion or before power-tube distortion with natural sounding results. Auto-Wah pedals include:

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"The library has a huge amount of great samples covering every nook & cranny of the electric guitar, and it really is of the highest quality... I could tell that they must have put in a gigantic effort into the scripting, sampling, and design... It’s easy to use, has extensive options for articulations, sounds even better with its effects, and yet it can have a pristine, clean sound as well. I highly recommend it... When they say 'Absolute Electric Guitar' on their website, those words are a lot to live up to [and] they achieved this with a brilliant product and awesome sound." Rob Mitchell (SoundBytes Magazine)
In addition to acoustic and electric guitars, the company now also makes mandolins and ukuleles. Their mandolins are highly regarded, they “more or less rule in the bluegrass market” in the United States.[5] As of May 2012 the company has about 85 employees and manufactures six to seven acoustic guitars, three electric guitars, two mandolins, and two ukuleles per day.[4]
Many arguments can be made for Peej’s gifted lead guitarist (and corn-dogging, cheese-mongering Stevie Ray Vaughan acolyte) Mike McCready, but it’s Gossard whose songwriting and toothsome licks propelled the Seattle grunge icons early, record-setting releases. The winsome chords of both “Daughter” and “Black,” the white-knuckle smash of “Animal” or “Deep” or “Do the Evolution” — all were anchored by Gossard, a quiet type more invested in classic-rock craft than classic-rock showmanship.
you put in a lot of work, its not biblical correct, pretty good...but take with a grain of salt. but some guitars are made in Korea. I bought a Yamaha 3 piece back like a Kiso Suzuki, I would it was made in Japan The tuners said made Japan. I thought the pawn shop was crazy. I got it for $100 Love this guitar and then one day I looked at the the decal in the sound hole and in the tiniest print "Made in Korea" I felt a pang like o' crap I bought a Korean guitar. But I have a few Acoustics High end a Guild made in the 80's and this Yamaha is incredible. better or just as good as my old Suzuki
The only guitars that I have been able to find pictures of that have the little curly thingie on the headstocks have been Kents, Kawais and some kind of no-name guitar that looks like the factory took a red Kent 820 and sprayed black around the edges to create a “redburst” finish. The example above appears to has started as a regular sunburst finish with more red and black added. The neck, headstock, pickups, and body are identical to the Kent 820 except the name ‘Kent’ doesn’t appear on the guitar anywhere. Note that the hardware on it is the same as on the 820 shown. That bridge and tailpiece configuration is a little unusual for Kent 820s. (the 820 there is mine) The bridge and tailpiece on the Kent 823 is the more common configuration.
Who among us doesn’t relate to Nigel Tufnel in This Is Spinal Tap when he tried to explain to “Meathead” that having an 11 on his amp made it louder than – and hence superior to – one having a mere 10? That’s just how I felt back in the day when, after nearly two decades of owning one – that’s only one – guitar, a classical, I decided I ought to get an electric guitar again. Who could have known how slippery that slope would turn out to be?!
• Sound Judgment: Consider the sonic characteristics of the various materials used in making electric strings. Stainless steel strings are the least glamorous, but offer plenty of bright bite and sustain. Pure nickel has a warm old-school sound, for vintage tones. And nickel-plated steel is a bit brighter than classic nickel and responds more adroitly to picking attack. Chrome guitar strings are typically the province of jazz players or blues artists who are looking for the kind of warm retro tones chiseled into history by the likes of Charlie Christian or swinging Gibson ES-250, ES-5 and ES-335 bluesman Aaron “T-Bone” Walker. And then there are coated strings – the most expensive and theoretically the longest lasting. They are, however, not really the best, sonically speaking. Coated strings tend to have less sustain. Also, their Teflon exterior surfaces are slippery, which might take some getting used to for particularly aggressive electric guitar players. And when the coatings wear off, they rust like any other string.
While Fender specialize in the single-coil pickup, it’s Gibson who are masters of the pickup in general – and it shows when you browse the chart in our dedicated Gibson pickup article. However, you’ll quickly discover that there is no ‘one Gibson pickup’, as the brand offer a wide range including single-coils and humbuckers, medium and high outputs, and vintage and modern tones. You’ll find different pickups on all of Gibson’s famous models, including the Les Paul, Firebird, SG and Flying V. Perhaps they are best-known for their PAF-style humbuckers – an awesome vintage tone that is well-replicated in their famous Gibson ‘57 Classic Plus.

The auditorium style is a standard mid-sized acoustic guitar, with a lower bout that is generally the same width as a dreadnought, but with a smaller waist. Sometimes referred to as an "orchestra" body, these guitars balance volume, tone, and comfort, and have been regaining popular ground in recent decades. In 1992, Eric Clapton used an acoustic guitar of this body size, when he appeared on MTV Live to record his Unplugged album.
Finally, there were some twelve Hawaiian lap steels in ’55, the EG-NT, EG-K, EG-Z, EG-A, EG-S, EG-R, EG-L, EG-7L, EG-P, EG-8L, EG-M and EG-NW. Again, since I have no reference materials, there’s no point in attempting any description. However, many of these guitars continued on into the ’60s where we’ll discuss them in detail, and you can probably extrapolate backwards to these mid-’50s models, allowing for pickup changes, etc.
History aside, modern-day Ibanez guitars are amazing instruments. They offer a very distinctive value and bang for your buck that is simply hard to match by other manufacturers. Ibanez has become huge in shred (fast lead playing) guitar and metal circles. High profile virtuosos like Joe Satriani, Steve Vai and Paul Gilbert have been greatly responsible for securing Ibanez’s place in super-fast, incredibly technical, shred guitar playing. Not to mention that Ibanez electric guitars simply feel “easy” to play, fast and comfortable. As far as ergonomics and playability, Ibanez guitars are hard to beat. Plus, you can get some very good inexpensive models too. If I where going to call a brand, “the Toyota of the guitar industry,” it would be Ibanez.

1. Examples. There are a handful of examples in this book and that's about it. I expected much more in the way of alternate wiring examples but they were only mentioned in passing it seems. Additionally if you're looking for good step by step instructions you wont find it here. The instructions are average at best and never really go deeper than "put this wire here and that wire there" . It's step by step,but just barely. Don't expect any deep explanations on the theory behind why certain wirings do what they do or why they sound the way they do. It's cursory at best.


Boasting the title of the “world’s largest guitar manufacturer,” Fender is responsible for the creation and production of a number of the most iconic guitars ever conceived. The one Jimi Hendrix set on fire on stage? That was a Fender Stratocaster – similar in shape to the one pictured above. The one Bruce Springsteen plays at every concert? That’s a Fender Telecaster. Look at nearly any band on stage around the world and the likelihood is you’ll see a Fender guitar up there. And that’s no accident. Founded by Leo Fender in Fullerton, California in 1946, this brand hasn’t just pioneered iconic looks – they pioneered iconic sound. And that’s what keeps musicians like Eric Clapton, David Gilmour of Pink Floyd, and Jeff Beck so viciously loyal to the brand: unrepentant quality.
Want to write blazing leads and screaming solos? Crank the pitch bend up, use one of four vibrato modes, and shred to your heart's content. Need some ultra-chunky rhythm chugs? S2 features both single-note and powerchord palm mutes with up to 5 layers and 8 variations each, offering superior realism and maximum options. While it excels at rock & metal playing (both lead and rhythm alike), it is also well-suited for many other genres thanks to its clean tone and huge range.
The Neoclassical Speed Strategies for Guitar is another book we’d recommend more for the seasoned player. This one provides an excellent introduction into fingerpicking with helpful illustrations of exactly how to position yourself for the quickest and most efficient playing. It includes lots of helpful examples and exercises to make it easier to master.

Flamenco technique, in the performance of the rasgueado also uses the upstroke of the four fingers and the downstroke of the thumb: the string is hit not only with the inner, fleshy side of the fingertip but also with the outer, fingernail side. This was also used in a technique of the vihuela called dedillo[40] which has recently begun to be introduced on the classical guitar.


The early Silvertone electric guitars were made by Harmony and Danelectro, with a few exceptions. Danelectro had been making amplifiers since the 1940's for Sears, Epiphone and it's own brand. Their manufacturing facility was in Neptune New Jersey. The Dano's started mainly with the infamous "U" series which had the Lipstick pickups and "Coke-bottle" headstocks. Jimmy Page, Jimi Hendrix and many other rock stars got started and continue to play the Dano's. Aside from the very first Danelectros for Sears they all had the Lipstick pickups. That's how you can tell a Dano from the other manufacturers. Danelectro also manufactured the infamous "amp-in-case" models of which I have two examples: a 1964 and a 1968. If you want more info on Dano's go here.
I have owned a lot of amps over the years. I am also a dealer in music accessories. Please note that we do not sell these amps, so I am not endorsing and using something my shop sells. I recently have bought a couple of amps in a series (I bought one first and then bought another) and have been really impressed. The Vox AV series. http://www.voxamps.com/AVSeries
Dive bomb is a guitar technique in which the tremolo bar is used to rapidly lower the pitch of a note, creating a sound considered to be similar to a bomb dropping. One of the most recognized pioneers of this technique is Jimi Hendrix. Other notable musicians who are widely known for using this technique are Eddie Van Halen and Joe Satriani. - winner333

Most, if not all of us have at least given some thought to learning to play the guitar. It is, after all, an instrument which takes the leading role in virtually every genre of popular music. No matter what type of music you aspire to play, there is almost certainly an important part there for you as a would-be guitar player. Of course, learning to play begins with actually owning a guitar. 
CALIFORNIA CLASSIC models feature superb playability, distinctive looks and an unmistakable Fender vibe. The fully-painted solid Sitka spruce top and natural solid mahogany back and sides, as well as a matching painted 6-in-line headstock and koa binding and rosette, give them an elegant two-toned aesthetic that was made for the stage. California Special and California Classic acoustic guitars are equipped with a Fender- and Fishman-designed PM preamp specifically tuned to complement the unique shape and voice of each instrument—complete with tuner, frequency and phase controls.

Some of the best pedals in this segment, like the TC Electronic Sentry, will allow you to set both the volume threshold where the noise gate kicks in, and the type of interference you want to filter out. The important thing to remember about noise gate pedals is that they only eliminate hissing when you don’t play. As soon as you do, the pedal disengages and the noise comes back. With that said, noise gate pedals are essential for a good tone.

There is clearly a great deal that the guitarist can do for the sound by changing guitars, strings and amps, but from the perspective of the recording engineer it's also important to think about how the guitar cab is interacting with the room it's in. For example, Roy Thomas Baker mentions that he sometimes sets up the same guitar cab in different rooms because of the effect on the sound. Even if you're restricted to one room, a number of producers suggest trying out different positions of the amp in the room. Tony Visconti: "It's not so much that you're miking a guitar — you're miking a guitar in a room. I had a cellist in here recently, and I moved her until I got a good sound. Once I put her in one particular corner, her cello just sang — the room just filled up with the low end, and the sound exploded! A person who hasn't had years of experience might not have thought of doing that, but I could tell there was something lacking when she was in the centre of the room. That's mic technique. It's not so much the instrument; the room is very much part of the sound."


I have a 12-string Lyle in really good shape. Bought as a b-day present from me back in late 1970's from a pawn shop. I need to take it to a luthier to have it set up better, but it sounds really good. Just right now the action is a little high, but not that much wear. For a long time, I put it away, finding it hard to chord as a relative newbie back then. But now, I am more than ready. It does say it was made in Korea ~ which makes it seem a little more rare. The sound is still great or maybe even better! Wish I knew what it was worth, but I hope the guy I find to set it up will know more.
Anyway, here’s how you adjust the truss rod. This must be done with the strings tuned to whatever pitch you usually use. If your neck is too bowed (the gap you just measured is too big), you tighten the truss rod by turning the socket clockwise. It is recommended that you only turn the tool a quarter turn at a time (or even one eighth) and then give the neck some time to settle. You will also need to make sure the strings are still properly tuned after each adjustment.
The Destroyer is an Ibanez brand electric guitar model (originally) manufactured at the FujiGen-Gakki musical instrument factory for the Hoshino-Gakki Company. The Destroyer model was first introduced by Hoshino-Gakki in 1975 and was based on the Gibson Musical Instruments' Explorer design. The Destroyer has since undergone several design and line changes and has been available in both 6-string and bass versions.
Busker? If you're a busker, you're better off with an amp that does not require a power supply. The Roland Micro Cube is a great little amp, very popular with buskers who require amplification due to its portability, cheap price and the fact it can be powered by batteries! It's pretty loud, too! Here's a great blog on some of the best amps for busking.
ESP is a Japanese company, which focused on the production of electric guitars and basses. This brand was established in 1975 in Tokyo. They produce instruments under the label of “ESP Custom Shop”, “Navigator”, “Grassroots”, “ESP Standard”, “LTD Guitars and Basses”, “Edwards Guitar and Basses” etc. Available price is Rs. 9,270/- onwards (approx). For more information, visit Espguitars.com (Global) or Espguitars.co.jp (Japan).

The Air Norton started out simply to be the Airbucker version of the Norton. DiMarzio thought it would make a distinctive-sounding bridge pickup with high-gain amps, but they soon discovered that it's a radically neat neck pickup, too. The tone is deep and warm, but not muddy. It's hot, but not distorted. It's even got cool harmonics, which are really unusual for a neck humbucker. The patented Air Norton magnetic structure reduces string-pull, so sustain is improved; and pick attack and dynamics are tremendously controllable and expressive. Combine the Air Norton with The Tone Zone in the bridge position for a perfect blend of power and tone.
Apollo, Aquarius, Arbiter, Atlas, Audition, Avar, Ayar, Barth, Beltone, Black Jack, Cameo, CBS, Cipher, Concert, Cougar, Crown, Daimaru, Decca, Diasonic, Domino, Duke, Emperador, Heit Deluxe, Holiday, Ibanez, Imperial, Inter-Mark Cipher, Jedson, Kay, Kent, Kimberly, Kingsley, Kingston, Keefy, Lindell, Marquis, May Queen, Minister, Noble, Prestige, Randall, Recco, Regina, Rexina, Sakai, Satellite, Schaffer, Sekova, Silvertone, Sorrento, Sterling, Swinger, Tele Star, Top Twenty, Victoria, Winston
Now as for flipping the whole bridge, yes, in some cases this may help you. Try it out and see what happens. Just an extra mm or two could make all the difference. One thing to watch out for, though. The notches on your saddles might not all be the same. Often you will have wider notches for the wound strings and thinner notches for the unwound strings. So you might have to swap these all around.
If you are inexperienced, it is only recommended that you attempt to setup a guitar that is of little value to you, both financially and sentimentally. If you don’t have one that fits these requirements, then it is best to pay the cost of a guitar setup as performed by a professional. The primary risk while setting up the instrument is over adjustment. Working any part of the bridge too much will cause wear and tear, and irreparable damage to the neck is often the result of improperly adjusting the truss rod. It is always hard to justify ruining a perfectly good instrument in order to avoid guitar setup cost.
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