The output of the rails is a crunchy, high sustain rock tone that turns your Strat into a much heavier and hard-hitting instrument. The pickguard, pots and five-way volume selector are all included with the wiring taken care of. It’s also really easy to change pickups using a solderless method that allows you to remove and add pickups by simply using screws.
The Venue DI is essentially an amplifier without a speaker cab. If you go straight into a mixer or PA system this unit lets you customize your acoustic's tone in every way imaginable. While it's particularly ideal for someone who doesn't have an existing preamp in their acoustic rig, it outperforms most preamps that come standard in an acoustic guitar or even in an acoustic amp.

This is our new cross-reference between classic pedals (e.g. a Fuzz Face) and who makes kits or boards to build it yourself. In some cases the kit or board is for an exact clone. In others, it is for a circuit based on the original but with improvements or combinations with other pedal designs. Read the description specifics by clicking the link and visiting the maker’s site.


This depends on a number of things. Are you looking for placement in a series of pedals? If so, it should go towards the end of your chain. Are you looking at it as a functional point? If so, using an octave lower can give some hugeness to heavy guitar or might pull a fatter sound out of some higher solos, whereas an octave up is almost always great for a layering effect.
Early proponents of the electric guitar on record include Alvino Rey (Phil Spitalney Orchestra), Les Paul (Fred Waring Orchestra), Danny Stewart (Andy Iona Orchestra), George Barnes (under many aliases), Eddie Durham, Lonnie Johnson, Floyd Smith, Big Bill Broonzy, T-Bone Walker, George Van Eps, Charlie Christian (Benny Goodman Orchestra), Tampa Red, Memphis Minnie, and Arthur Crudup. According to jazz historian James Lincoln Collier, Floyd Smith can be credited as the first person to rig up an amplified guitar. According to Collier, "Floyd's Guitar Blues" may be the first important use of the electric guitar on record.[17]
Electronics, guitars and otherwise are as standardized as this book would have you believe. My problem was the 5-position switch. The one I took off the guitar was not the same as the replacement and the descriptions in the book were not sufficient to help me understand how to hook up the different switch. Fortunately, the rest of the circuit descriptions were right on and I got the guitar running (I had to use the old switch). If they author had described the signal flow through the switch I might have been able to figure it out. But the book is an invaluable resource for the DIY'er. I'm sure I'll be using it a lot more.
Based both in Japan and the USA, this Japanese manufacturer produces guitars under different brand names: "ESP Standard," "ESP Custom Shop," "LTD Guitars and Basses," "Navigator," "Edwards Guitar and Basses," and "Grass Roots." Hisatake Shibuya opened his "Electric Sound Product" store in 1975 where he used to sell guitar spare parts. He then started to build his own parts and became a Kramer and Schecter subcontractor. His first signature guitar went to George Lynch (the Kamikaze), while the powerful Gibson Explorer copy designed for metal heads and adopted by a certain James Hetfield (Metallica) became almost as popular as its owner in the late 1980's and early 1990's.
Through the late 1960s, Westheimer offered a wide range of Kingston instruments including electric basses and hollowbodies (and even amplifiers). By the mid-1970s, it was becoming increasingly expensive to build guitars in Japan, so Westheimer shifted production to Korea by building a factory there, which became Cort. Kingston guitars existed in one form or another through the 1970s and even in the early 1980s, but Westheimer was finding great success building budget and entry-level guitars in his Cort factory for big U.S. guitar companies such as Kramer, B.C. Rich, and Epiphone.

The top of the archtop line featured two very nifty new models called the Vegas 40 and Vegas 66. The Vegas 40 (Teisco Del Rey EP-11T) double-cutaway thinline was promoted both in Japan and the U.S. It was a full size ES-335-style with two pickups (the large rectangular type with chrome sides and black insert, square poles), bound f-holes, volume and tone controls on the lower bout (no plastic plate) and a fancy new angular archtop Bigsby and roller bridge. The pickup selector was a rotary switch on the lower horn with a new round knob with a lever (versus the old chicken beak). The bolt-on neck had a new three-and-three head with a flared “check mark” indentation in the top, with wide wings on either side, a shape that would characterize a number of other models later in the decade. The fingerboard was bound, with dots. On the Japanese version, the headstock carried a zippy new typeface proclaiming “Vegas 40,” while the pickguard used a similar angular script for the Teisco logo. The Teisco Del Rey carried its regular sticker.
Tube amps are appreciated for their high fidelity, which allows for the player’s ability and the quality of the guitar to be put to full fruition, and for their equally natural overdrive, which is achieved easier than with most solid state amps. However, besides being more expensive as an initial purchase, tube amps will also prove harder to maintain since lamps have a tendency of blowing up and are themselves quite expensive.
@Michele – Thanks for checking out our blog! 🙂 If you are going to be using both multi-effect units in your setup, you will need to decide which of these has a better compressor that you will be using. If you like the PEU5’s Compressor and Overdrive, I would place it near the beginning of the chain in front of your existing MojoMojo overdrive. This way, you can use the RP100A’s Delay and EQ within the effects loop of your amp. But keep in mind, there is no wrong way to set this up. I encourage you to place them in different locations of your signal chain to find what sounds best for you.

A diagram showing a wiring modification for a Les Paul or a similar electric guitar with two humbuckers. Wiring schemes using four push-pull pots for additional pickup combinations were made popular by Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page and later produced as a signature model by Gibson. The modification shown in this diagram is an evolution of the original concept combining coil splitting, phase cancellation and parallel/series switching for a total of 22 different pickup combinations.

Looping – These pedals are miniature recorders that capture a passage, which you can then play back as much as you like. Many looper pedals also allow you to layer multiple recordings, and advanced models support extra features like built-in rhythms, mic and other instrument inputs, MIDI, USB and more. It’s worth noting that all the power of a looper pedal does come with a steep learning curve, so be sure that you’re experienced enough to handle one of these bad boys before you bring home one of your own.

It can get a bit difficult trying to properly depict certain aspects of effects pedals to our newer musicians out there since much of music tends to be described in an intangible sort of manner which relies heavily the assumption of prior knowledge and personal tastes which is why we try our best to not get the pros out there the meat of the information they are looking for, but describe it in a way that players of even entry levels can comprehend. So with that in mind, one of the more complex aspects of effects pedals for newer musicians is their implementation of a signal chain.
When you first start out playing electric guitar, it goes without saying that it all begins with a guitar and an amplifier. Those are the two most basic parts of your setup, and they’re all you need for learning the fundamentals. Once you have a grasp of your foundation, though, you’re probably wondering how professional guitarists manage to get so many different sounds out of their instruments. Effects pedals are the answer to that question.
After your design has been properly plotted out on the poster board you can cut it out with an exacto knife. Make sure you stay as true to your lines as possible so you have a nice clean line to trace once your ready to. Then lay out the template on body blank and trace away. I like to cut the piece of poster board the same size as the body blank I am using. It makes it a lot easier to line everything up that way. Now you're ready to move on to the next step.

The M5 is extremely portable and pedalboard-friendly, measuring about 6 inches wide and tall. The construction is absolutely first rate with a heavy-duty all-metal chassis and footswitches. Line 6 absolutely does not skimp on build quality with this one. It’s also found on lots of pedalboards of pro players that we’ll talk about shortly, which speaks to it’s durability and quality. In terms of interface, it’s actually quite a simple pedal, as you can see in closeup photos of it. The inputs and outputs are rather simple. ¼” stereo in, ¼” stereo out, an expression pedal input, and an input for a 9V power supply (which comes included with it). On top of the unit you have 2 main footswitches (which not only turn an effect on and off, they are also used to scroll up and down), a small screen in the upper left corner, and 6 knobs to control different parameters of whatever effect you have selected. It does not have USB capability, balanced XLR outputs, or any of the other fancy I/O from larger multi-effects units. But then again, for its purpose it doesn’t really need all that. The M5 is intuitive, nice, and simple.


By 1941, much of the pre-war Supro line had disappeared, to be replaced with what would eventually turn out to be a good portion – and look – of the post-war Supro line. Gone were the Supro Avalon Spanish, the acoustic resonators and the nifty amp-in-cases. The Supro Avalon Hawaiian was gone, in name, though its spirit was directly inherited by another lap, the Clipper. Also gone were the mated pickups in favor of a more traditional design with exposed polepieces. These with some variations, would prevail for the next decade or more.


Woodwinds, brass, and similar instruments can only play one note at a time. To make a chord, they have to have a minimum of 3 players playing a single note in the chord at the same time. As you can imagine, this requires excellent timing and coordination between the players to make a clean chord. This is why orchestras have to have a Conductor to direct the music. With a guitar, you are the Conductor, and can make any kind of music you want, all by yourself.
The Thunderhead guitars would be offered until June of ’72, with several model designation changes along the way. In ’70, the K-1360 became the K-1213, and in May of the following year changed again to the K-1233. At the same time, the vibrato-equipped models also changed, the K-1460 becoming the K-1214 and then the K-1234. The Tornado lasted until the end in January, ’73, but also went through the model number changes along with the Thunderheads, the K-1160 becoming the K-1211 and then the K-1231. The vibrato Tornados went from K-1260 to K-1212 and then K-1232.
In addition to modern versions of tricones and single cone resonators, National Resophonic also produce Dobro-style guitars. This company made the Model D during the latter part of the 2000s. Production of the Model D guitar has now ceased, but a few dealers in the UK and USA have stock available. National Resophonic are now producing their Smith & Young `Spider Cone’ models and the Model 11 is built on traditional Dobro lines. Also, Goldtone, Paul Beard and a number of custom builders are producing good guitars.
Once you start getting into reverb, it won’t be long before you start noticing different nuances of this effect. A good portion of digital reverbs sound too sterile, while some analog can be too narrow in range. Finding that perfect type of reverberation matters if you are serious about building your guitar tone properly. Built in reverbs you usually see in lower quality amps are good for home practice and not much more. That isn’t to say that the added value of them being available in the first place is a bad thing. No, but you can’t really rely on those reverbs to get you anywhere serious. On top of that, a good analog reverb pedal is a one time purchase.
Guitar cables (or jack leads as they are sometimes called) are a relatively inexpensive part of any setup compared to the instruments themselves, but as the link between your guitar and amp or recording interface, they are a crucial component. A frayed, broken or otherwise imperfect cable will introduce crackle, buzz and other nasties into your signal chain. Even a bunch of distortion pedals may not disguise it. Before recording, make sure your cables are in good order. If not - replace them!
Photo: Pick up an acoustic guitar and what you have in your hands is mostly empty space! Inside, the large wooden body (which is called the sound box) is filled with nothing more than air. As you pluck the strings, the wooden body of the guitar vibrates, the air inside the body vibrates too, and it's the vibrations of the wooden body and the air that amplify the string sound so you can hear it. Acoustic guitars have those big holes in the middle of the case, under the strings, so the amplified sound can get out and travel to your ears. In other words, the hole works the same way as the hole in the end of a trumpet, flute, or any other instrument. Photo by Greg Pierot courtesy of US Navy.

• How to check frets: The easiest and quickest way to make sure a guitar’s frets are in good shape is to look straight down the neck of a guitar, from body to headstock. If the frets are at different heights (improper installation is the culprit here with new guitars) or askew, there are problems. They should look uniform and exhibit as little denting or wear as tolerable. 

Another important factor to consider is speaker size, which impacts overall loudness and tonality. Bigger speakers can push more air and have more low end, while smaller speakers have limited pushing power, while emphasizing the mids. In addition to size, different speaker models and cabinet types also introduce subtle differences to the overall sound.
While some effects can create a drastic change in a signal’s sound, other effects act more like a coating that add subtle variations of texture rather than a huge makeover. Texture-adding pedals like time-based or ambient effects – such as reverb, delay/echo, vibrato, flanger, and chorus – work best when added to something much more pronounced instead of the other way around (which in a signal chain means they go towards the end).
The National aluminum Hawaiian lap steel was a slightly fancier version of the Dobro, with a National logo shield shape employed as the bridge assembly/pickup cover. This had gold-colored paint on the relief sections and a tapered, rounded head with a single cutout in the center. This now had a volume control on the top of the lower bout, with the 1/4″ jack also on the top. The Dobro, National and soon-to-appear Supro aluminum lap steels were reportedly all designed by Rudy Dopyera.
Much like ESP, Schecter started out as a parts company which decided to start building their own guitars. Right from day one it was apparent that their mission was to deliver ultimate metal guitars. Everything from their design, to the choice of electronics pointed in this direction. It didn’t take long for Schecter to become one of the go to brands that has reached the elite level.
Basic Guitar chords and signatures. Find and save list of chords. Basic guitar chords A sheet of the most used rock chords. Suitable for beginners. Empty chord sheet All about how to play guitar chords and guitar chord charts. Once you finished the free online guitar lessons you know all there is to know about guitar. Music guitar tabs archive with over guitar chords for guitar, keyboard, banjo and viola, tabs for guitar, bass, drums, guitar note
Audiffex Guitar Pedals was one of the first professional guitar software packages, with its original version released more than a decade ago. It has since been upgraded but continues its legacy of providing stompbox effects in software form. The latest version is an all in one guitar effects software package - which includes 36 plug-ins that also works for bass, vocals and other instruments. Features include consistent interface with all effects having similar controls, modular plug-in configuration for easier and flexible routing and intuitive preset management. Current retail price: $49

The best advice any guitar player can give when it comes to figuring out which guitar to get is to buy the best model your money can afford. In most cases, this advice is rock solid. Even if you are a beginner who isn't sure whether or not you want to commit to playing guitar long term, you can always sell the guitar with a minimal loss, like a decent car versus a junker.  Think of it as an investment as long as you maintain and take care of it.
You’ll find a full slate of dedicated bass stompbox effects as well as many multi-effects pedals and processors. Like their guitar-friendly cousins, bass effects offer most of the same tone shaping capabilities, including chorus, reverbs, delays, phasers, and tremolos. Because of the bass’s unique sound dynamics that reach deep into the lower frequencies, many bass effects are focused around compression and limiters that help keep a lid on destructive subsonic sound waves that can damage gear. Typically, many guitar effects are not optimal when used with a bass.
The LGXT comes with 2 Seymour Duncan custom humbucker pickups that give it a classic electric guitar sound. The piezo pickup with custom preamp EQ makes it sound very much like an acoustic guitar. With the built-in synth pickup you can get just about any sound you want via a Roland GR series synth. It has a silver leaf maple solid body with a figured maple top and a mahogany neck with a richlite fingerboard on top which Godin says makes the action even better when using a synth. It has a full 25.5" scale length and 1.6875" nut width.
Electric guitars are full of options, with various pickups, bridges, fret sizes, neck radii, tone woods, tuners and so on all having an impact on how an instrument plays and sounds. But stripping things down to the absolute basics, there are three types of electric guitars: solid bodies, hollow bodies and semi-hollow bodies. And they’re ideally suited for different playing approaches.

You wouldn’t guess that this is a low-end electric acoustic, even on close inspection, because the build quality is superb. This translates to some great tone. While it might not have quite the same ring and sustain as an expensive model, only real audiophiles are likely to notice. You get a solid spruce top, good quality hardware, and Fishman electronics.
Ultimately, his thesis is shared by every single person interviewed for this article. It simply does not appear that there’s any way to objectively measure what is “good” guitar tone. A major reason for that is the infinitely varied human element of the musician performing and the audience listening. The impossibility of proving anything doesn’t, however, change the fact that so many guitarists revere those early tones. Some argue that’s because the early days were just better. Others point out that we’re simply intransigent.
{"eVar4":"shop: shopbybrand","eVar5":"shop: shopbybrand: ibanez","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","pageName":"[gc] shop by brand: ibanez","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[gc] shop by brand: ibanez","prop18":"skucondition|0||historicalgrossprofit|1||hasimage|1||creationdate|1","prop1":"[gc] shop by brand: ibanez","events":"event1,event31","prop17":"sort by","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"brands","prop11":"ibanez","prop5":"[gc] shop by brand: ibanez","prop6":"[gc] shop by brand: ibanez","prop3":"[gc] shop by brand: ibanez","prop4":"[gc] shop by brand: ibanez","eVar1":"ibanez","prop9":"2875","channel":"[gc] shop by brand","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] site section","prop8":"ibanez"}
There are many similarities between the two designs, such as the exquisite detail of the visual appointments, from the bound necks and headstocks to their trapezoid and block inlays.  They both include separate volume and tone knobs for each of the two humbuckers, which can be switched between or used in conjunction with the 3-Way Toggle switch.  Once you get your hands on one, the differences become apparent quickly though.
Technically the knobs are just the parts you turn when adjusting your volume or sound. When you remove the knobs however you are left with the pots (potentiometers) which are used for both volume and tone control. They look identical and almost are but there are differences in the way a volume pot and a tone pot is wired, which will make more sense by the end of this article.
PICK GUARD - KRAMER 450 - LO GIBSON - GOLDTOP - GIBSON SG CUSTOM SHOP - THUNDER JET - TAKAMINE - GIBSON 1959 - 450 12 - 66 ES-330 - 1972 - HAGSTROM F-300 RED LEFTHANDED - GIANNINI - BALLADEER - WHITE LES PAUL - HAGSTROM BRIDGE - CONRAD - LES PAUL 1953 - PROJECT - WASHBURN EA27 - KALAMAZOO KG - FRAMUS BASS - BASS VI - 1967 - ES-330 - HOLLOW - 1981 LES - BALDWIN BABY BISON - STELLA ACUOSTIC - MARTIN N-20 - VAN EPS - LES PAUL RECORDING - PIG - MARLBORO - HAGSTROM F12-S - FENDER STRATOCASTER 63 - LS 6 - HARMONY - J-45 - UNIVOX BASS
Sounds great. Compact and good looking. Easy to use. Extremely versatile! Make sure you read the instructions because there are so many things you can do with this. Only drawback is that if you plan to use it live, try not to have too many effects applied because it slows down the transition timing. However, best for recording if youre trying to produce specific sounds from your instrument.
Scratch and Dent - Demo Model full size electric guitar from Davison is the perfect way to start playing at an affordable price with features you'd normally expect on a much more expensive instrument. With a built-in humbucker pickup for that "rock" sound, you can plug this guitar into any amplifier or software system. It has a high gloss finished body and a contoured body for ultimate play-ability. Perfect for the aspiring guitar player of any age, this Davison is also Teacher Approved.
Variable 1: Speaker size. In Clip 1 you hear similar phrases played through models of four common speaker types. First comes the sort of 10" speaker you’d find in a small Fender Champ-style combo. Next is the 12" speaker of a midsized Fender-style combo, then a 12" Celestion Greenback you might encounter in a vintage Marshall cabinet, and finally the Celestion Alnico Blue from a vintage Vox combo.
From what I've been able to find out (as a proud owner of a mint W-415 'Dove' model acoustic), Lyle guitars are actually Gibson seconds, that for whatever reason didn't pass muster to be sold as a Gibson (bad finish, scuff, imperfection in the wood, etc.). The Lyle company was out of Portland, OR (I believe) and was started by former Gibson employees who would fix the flawed Gibsons and resell them under the Lyle name. Made in Japan was because Gibsons were made in Japan at the time(?). A damn fine instrument; considered rare now, I guess. I don't ever want to get rid of mine!
@BLAKTORX - Charvel is a great brand for metal and shred that is really starting to regain some prominence in the music world. I really like the Pro Mod Series. Music Man, too, makes some good gear, but I tried to keep my list to 10. The Ibanez GIO series guitars are good for beginners. Seems like you're into metal. In that price range you might also check out the Jackson JS Series.
In 1971 Larrivee began adding inlay designs to their guitars and in 1977 inlays became a standard for their guitars. Beginning in 1978 their inlay designs took on a more romantic style. Since 1979 all engravings were designed by Wendy Larrivee except for a 1998 inlay called the “Joker.” In 2007 Larrivée began using laser engraving for their inlays.
A Vibe or Univibe pedal reproduces the sound of a rotating speaker by synchronizing volume oscillation, frequency-specific volume oscillation, vibrato (pitch wavering), phase shifting, and chorusing in relation to a non-rotating speaker. The modulation speed can be ramped up or down, with separate speeds for the bass and treble frequencies, to simulate the sound of a rotating bass speaker and a rotating horn. This effect is simultaneously a volume-oriented effect, an equalization-oriented effect, and a time-based effect. Furthermore, this effect is typically related to chorus. Some vibe pedals also include an overdrive effect, which allows the performer to add "tube"-style distortion. This effect is the most closely related to a rotary speaker. Some Vibe-only pedals include:
{ "thumbImageID": "Player-Stratocaster-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Left-Handed-Electric-Guitar-Black/L21520000001000", "defaultDisplayName": "Fender Player Stratocaster Pau Ferro Fingerboard Left-Handed Electric Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Black", "sku": "sku:site51500000219698", "price": "674.99", "regularPrice": "674.99", "msrpPrice": "675.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/Player-Stratocaster-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Left-Handed-Electric-Guitar-Black-1500000219698.gc", "skuImageId": "Player-Stratocaster-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Left-Handed-Electric-Guitar-Black/L21520000001000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Player-Stratocaster-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Left-Handed-Electric-Guitar-Black/L21520000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Sonic Red", "sku": "sku:site51500000219699", "price": "674.99", "regularPrice": "674.99", "msrpPrice": "675.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/Player-Stratocaster-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Left-Handed-Electric-Guitar-Sonic-Red-1500000219699.gc", "skuImageId": "Player-Stratocaster-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Left-Handed-Electric-Guitar-Sonic-Red/L21520000002000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Player-Stratocaster-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Left-Handed-Electric-Guitar-Sonic-Red/L21520000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
{ "thumbImageID": "RG6003FM-Electric-Guitar-Flat-Sapphire-Blue/J07945000003000", "defaultDisplayName": "Ibanez RG6003FM Electric Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Flat Sapphire Blue", "sku": "sku:site51409670719560", "price": "279.99", "regularPrice": "349.99", "msrpPrice": "466.65", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ibanez/RG6003FM-Electric-Guitar-Flat-Sapphire-Blue-1409670719560.gc", "skuImageId": "RG6003FM-Electric-Guitar-Flat-Sapphire-Blue/J07945000003000", "brandName": "Ibanez", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/RG6003FM-Electric-Guitar-Flat-Sapphire-Blue/J07945000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Flat Transparent Gray", "sku": "sku:site51393862854365", "price": "279.99", "regularPrice": "349.99", "msrpPrice": "466.65", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ibanez/RG6003FM-Electric-Guitar-Flat-Transparent-Gray-1393862854365.gc", "skuImageId": "RG6003FM-Electric-Guitar-Flat-Transparent-Gray/J07945000001000", "brandName": "Ibanez", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/RG6003FM-Electric-Guitar-Flat-Transparent-Gray/J07945000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
• How to check frets: The easiest and quickest way to make sure a guitar’s frets are in good shape is to look straight down the neck of a guitar, from body to headstock. If the frets are at different heights (improper installation is the culprit here with new guitars) or askew, there are problems. They should look uniform and exhibit as little denting or wear as tolerable. 
In the ideal scenario, once set, your saddles should neither be flush down on the bridge assembly of the guitar, nor extended so high they could go no further. This saddle height relative to the bridge assembly is a reflection of the neck angle. If the saddles sit flush, the neck angle is not set back very far and vice-versa. This is where you should decide if your neck angle is in need of adjustment ( if you have a bolt-on neck). Check the measurement at the 12th fret then progress up the neck, measuring every couple of frets. The string height should continue to gradually rise, if it doesn't the neck is set back too far and has to be tilted up just a little. This is a very sensitive adjustment and the thickness of a couple sheets of paper can make a big difference. Some Fenders have a neck tilt adjustment screw that is accessed with an Allen wrench through a hole in the neck screw plate. The strings must be loosened, then the neck screws, then the tilt adjustment screw is tightened or loosened. Never do this when the neck screws are tight! If you don't have a tilt adjustment, thin shims of wood veneer are fitted in the neck pocket to adjust neck angle. Uneven frets are also a possibility. If , after having followed all the above steps, you are still getting fret buzz, you must establish that the frets are all even. But this leads us to fret dressing, which is another story altogether.
There are two common types of 5-way selector switches in the guitar world – the Fender type and the “import” type. Both types are functionally identical but differ in physical layout. It’s easy to see which type you’re dealing with. The Fender-type switches viewed from below have two rows of 4 contacts, either side of the circular body of the switch. The import-type switches have a single row of 8 contacts in a line.

Bill Collings dropped out of medical school in the early 1970s[3] and instead worked in a machine shop for five years.[4] At the same time he built his first guitar. In 1975 he moved to Houston, Texas, where he worked as an engineer with a pipeline and oil field equipment company by day and a guitar builder by night. Three years later he met renowned musician Lyle Lovett and built him a guitar.
I always recommend spending a little more money in the beginning. If you start with a complete bottom of the line starter guitar, you are going to want to upgrade within a few months. So I recommend getting a more midrange priced guitar between $350-$800. It will be cheaper in the long run and if you decide playing guitar isn't for you, you will find it much easier to sell the nicer guitar.
{savingPercent=0.00, isPreOrder=false, pimStatus=R1, visibilitySalePrice=9.99, typeCondition=New, statusText=In stock, isPriceDrop=false, displaySku=451058000001000, invMsgBackOrdered=false, skuPriceVisibility=1, stickerUrlLink=null, kitCarouselSkuIds=1500000222576,1363016749098,1368456537505,1300744185161,1377190992159,1500000250930,1368456537510,1363811587202,1500000222578,1500000154196, stickerURL=null, availableDate=Wed Feb 27 04:20:22 PST 2019, invMsgAvailability=, serialized=false, listPrice=9.99, isShipsInternational=true, name=Black, invMsgBuyToDemand=false, partNumber=SSG-303 BK-MG, MSRP=24.99, inventoryStatus=1000, newPrice=9.99, condition=New, status=instock, stickerClass=null, stickerText=Top Seller, invMsgOverSized=false, invMsgDetail=, YourSaving=0.0, MSRPRange=false, invMsgPreOrder=false, invMsgVendorDropShip=false, availableInStoreOnly=false, prop65=WARNING: This product can expose you to chemicals including Vinyl chloride, which is known to the State of California to cause cancer, and Bisphenol A (BPA), which is known to cause birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov., salePrice=9.99, warranty=false, displayId=1274228076940, stickerDesc=Top Seller, isOnSale=false} 9.99 USD

The first thing that you’ll notice is that the PR5-E is a florentine style guitar, which means that it has that fantastic looking cutaway with a really dramatic horn. This gives you nice access to the upper frets while retaining some resonance. The result is some really nice tone for such an affordable guitar. What’s more is that it’s a slimline design. It is an incredible sounding instrument.


Fender, or the Fender Electric Instrument Manufacturing Company, as it was properly known, was started in 1946, in Fullerton, California, by Leo Fender. The early designs effectively wrote the book on the solid body guitar manufacture; his approach of simple guitars using quality parts, easily assembled (most specifically the replaceable neck) proved an immediate sucess. Guitars like the Fender Stratocaster, Telecaster, Jaguar and Precision bass have barely changed since their very first inception; Fender simply got it right first time round.
Bridge craft USA musical instruments presents the exceptionally designed Glen Burton GA204BCO Acoustic Electric Cutaway Guitar in Black by Glen Burton. Perfect for the beginner or the expert, the full package comes with Strings, Picks, Gig Bag, Strap, Digital Clip-On Tuner, Truss Rod and a 10 Watt Amplifier . This excellent Acoustic Guitar also includes: Flame top; Basswood back and sides Catalpa Neck and Bridge; Rosewood Fingerboard Steel String; Sealed Gear Tuners EQ: Active 4 Band 7545 .
The Boss Katana KTN-HEAD Amp Head has become one of the most talked about amplifiers as it features the coveted Waza technology found in the beautiful BOSS Waza Craft Pedals. The same care and attention that goes into these pedals has gone into the BOSS Katana head to produce a versatile and highly  aerticulate amplifier. Packed with Five unique amp characters: Clean, Crunch, Lead, Brown (derived from the Waza amp), and Acoustic (for acoustic-electric guitars), the Katana head ensures you have enough sonic diversity for all genres. You can choose from 55 BOSS effects and load 15 on to the amp via BOSS Tone Studio editor software and you can actually use it without a cab thanks to the monitor speaker - making it a great practice amp that you can use to get your sound and hook up to a cab later on at your gigs.
{"eVar4":"vintage: guitars","pageName":"[gc] vintage: guitars: harmony","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"vintage","prop18":"skucondition|0||creationdate|1","prop2":"[gc] vintage: guitars","prop1":"[gc] vintage: guitars","prop17":"sort by","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"category","prop11":"guitars","prop5":"[gc] vintage: guitars","prop6":"[gc] vintage: guitars","prop3":"[gc] vintage: guitars","prop4":"[gc] vintage: guitars","channel":"[gc] vintage","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] vintage"}
Now that said, the orientation of the individual saddles does have some significance. In an ideal world, you would have all of the saddles sitting with the flat side facing the pickups. This is so that there is an immediate fall-off as soon as the strings clear the saddles so that they vibrate as cleanly as possible. At the same time, the fall-off towards the stop bar tailpiece is a little more relaxed and possibly a little more forgiving on your strings. In the real world, however, you may have to swap one or more around in order to intonate the guitar properly, and this is more important.
Having perfected the modelling amp concept, Line 6 have become experts at delivering a huge variety of great sounds in a convenient, affordable package. Experiment with 12 different amp models, from classic 1960s Fender tone to the “Insane Red”, inspired by the mental Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier, and sculpt your tone further with the seven built-in effects.

Once you start getting into reverb, it won’t be long before you start noticing different nuances of this effect. A good portion of digital reverbs sound too sterile, while some analog can be too narrow in range. Finding that perfect type of reverberation matters if you are serious about building your guitar tone properly. Built in reverbs you usually see in lower quality amps are good for home practice and not much more. That isn’t to say that the added value of them being available in the first place is a bad thing. No, but you can’t really rely on those reverbs to get you anywhere serious. On top of that, a good analog reverb pedal is a one time purchase.


As a result of requests by audio engineers to reduce onstage volume, in the 2010s, in many large venues. much of the on-stage sound reaching the musicians now comes from the monitor speakers or in-ear monitors, not from the instrument amplifiers. Stacks of huge speaker cabinets and amplifiers are still used in concerts in some genres of music, especially heavy metal, but they tend to be used more for the visual effect than for sound reproduction.
{"eVar4":"shop: guitars","eVar5":"shop: guitars: electric guitars","pageName":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars: first act","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop1":"[gc] shop: guitars","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"brands","prop11":"gretsch guitars","prop5":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop6":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop3":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop4":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] sub category"}
Electric guitars and guitar equipment - want something new? Shop online and in-store for your new guitar setup. Pick from solid body, semi-acoustic, and hollow body styles to get your ideal electric guitar. We stock all the major guitar brands like Fender, Gibson, and Ibanez. Alongside electric guitars, you'll find amps and pedals from Marshall, Vox, and Orange.

click on the red highlighted portion of instrument that you want to download then click win 32 for 32 bit operating system..then copy the dll file and paste it into c:/program files 86 :/imageline /flstudio/plugins/vst and paste here refresh the fl studio by going add then channel and then more plugins and start scanning ..find that instrument by name and enjoy
Hello, Our rhythm guitarist had a 12- string Mark X11 guitar by Vox back in 1967. It had a protective back pad ( 8 sided) on the back that snapped on. It was only made from 1964 - 1967. In mint shape, the Italian made one is worth at least $1,000.00 and the Engish made one is worth at least $1,500.00. Remember that is for a Mint shape guitar.(Info from Blue Book of Electric guitars -7th Edition 1999) You can see our guitarists sunburst Vox Mark X11 at Myfirstband.com ,click on Indiana -(SOS) Society of Sound page. There is a group shot and a close up in color of him with it. Peace........Rockin Rory in Indiana

The key difference between an electric guitar and an acoustic is how they make a sound. Electrics use pickups and acoustics rely on a ‘soundboard’ a hollowed out body, and a sound hole to amplify the vibration of the strings. The most important difference though is what you want to sound like and what you prefer. A guitar that you want to pick up and play will always be one that makes you practice more – which is the only way to get better at guitar!
First of all build quality. CTS's sturdy casings, brass shafts and contact patch, solid connections are second to none, and importantly are precision made by a company who have been doing so for a long long time. Fitting a well made pot will mean you'll likely only need to do it once in that guitar, that's important I feel! There are however a lot of different variations of CTS pot, and that is why I now only swear by the 450 Series, and 'TVT' Series, both are constructed with the same components, I like consistency here! Which is why you'll only find these models of pot in my harnesses. I've seen some lower quality series' of CTS pots that have been wildly inconsistent, which I'll get to next..
Aside from the superstrat ESP M-10 shown earlier. The ESP LTD EC-10 is also an affordable guitar but with a different body design derived from the Les Paul. The features of this LP inspired guitar that makes it different is the bevels on the body and belly cut at the back for comfort. Its major resemblance to a Les Paul is the humbuckers pick-ups equip on the guitar. Together with the bridge design for having a stopbar and tom bridge without a whammy bar.
{"id": "113668304", "categoryId":"site5AAG", "name":"Vintage 1984 1984 Ibanez Destroyer I Red Solid Body Electric Guitar", "pageUrl":"/Used/Ibanez/Vintage-1984-1984-Ibanez-Destroyer-I-Red-Solid-Body-Electric-Guitar.gc", "thumbnailUrl":"https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/NonExistingImage-00-180x180.jpg", "hasFeatures":"0", "isAccessory":"0", "message":"", "value":"", "priceMin":"", "priceMax":"", "msrp":"", "productVisibilityMSRP":"1", "restockPrice":"", "openBoxPrice":"", "clearancePrice":"", "isPlatinum":"0", "priceSavingsMaxPrice":"0.00", "priceSavingsMaxPercent":"0", "inventory":"0", "brand":"Ibanez", "reviewStarImageUrl": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/brand/gc/cmn/Sprit-Sm-Stars.png", "reviewStarRating":"0.0", "reviewStarRatingInteger":"0", "reviewHowManyReviews":"0", "usedOrNew":"new", "discontinued":"1", "onOrder":"0", "clearance":"0", "canBeSold":"0", "accessoryCategories":"site5LFMIC,site5LAAA,site5HBA", "stickerText": "", "isVintage": "1", "outletonly": "", "checksum":"", "priceVisibility": "", "itemType": "Vintage"}
Nickel finish Frequensator style split trapeze tailpiece. This split fork design originated on archtop models from the 40's. The difference in fork length alters string tension behind the bridge to add depth to the bottom strings and brilliance to the top strings. Width of plate with mounting screws = 2 17/32 in. (64.3mm). Length of mounting bracket side with mounting holes = 1 39/64 in. (41mm) from end to bend Length of mounting bracket from bend to trapeze hook tops = 1 13/64 in. 30.5mm.) Length of short trapeze to top of string retainer bar (not including nut heights) = 2 1/2 in. (63.35mm). Short bracket width = 1 3/64 in. (26.65mm). String Bracket width = 1 3/16 in. (30.35mm). Length of long Trapeze section including string bracket = 6 in. (152mm). Widths of each trapeze and string bracket are equal.

A seasoned guitarist, however, makes use of restraint at the high end of the spectrum. What to an amateur sounds muffled and buried by the drums is actually the guitar sitting in its proper place in the mix, assuming the role of a rhythm instrument. When it is time for the guitar to jump forward, in a lead part for example, power and contrast can be now gained by unleashing a bit more treble. Here you can use your pickup selector, tone knob, volume knob (which also functions as a mild treble cut as it is rolled back), or a pedal such as an equalizer or overdrive.
Ovation guitars have a history of innovative design, reflecting its founder’s engineering training and development of Kaman helicopters. Ovation guitars have composite synthetic bowls; earlier acoustic guitars have had wooden sides abutting a flat back since the 1700s. Kaman diagnosed structural weaknesses in the orthogonal joining of the sides, and felt that a composite material could be used for a smooth designed body. Ovation’s parabolic bowls dramatically reduced feed-back, allowing greater amplification of acoustic guitars. Improved synthetics used techniques from helicopter engineering to control vibrations in the bowl. Ovation has developed a thin neck, with the feel of an electric-guitar’s neck, but with additional strength from layers of mahogany and maple reinforced by a steel rod in an aluminum channel.[1] The composite materials and thin necks reduced the weight of Ovations.

"The Legacy’s vintage-spec CLF-100 Alnico V pickups have that unmistakable chime and quack reminiscent of the best examples from the late ‘50s, thanks to the work of Paul Gagon, G&L VP Engineering. Gagon found his inspiration reviewing original prints stored in Leo’s private laboratory at G&L, but that was just the start. About 30 years ago, Gagon was an R&D engineer at another company when he was tasked with finding out what was so special about the early bolt-on guitars many players raved about. Gagon tirelessly analyzed many examples of what were considered holy grail guitars, spending time out on the shop floor talking to builders still working in the pickup department since the ‘50s, all on a quest to discover where the real mojo was – and wasn’t. What he learned from the builders matched his own engineering analysis. You see, back in the day, the actual spec of pickups coming that down that old production line varied considerably. That meant coming up with the right specs for the Legacy pickups was more challenging than simply following the prints. Gagon’s persistence paid off as the Legacy garnered rave reviews from both players and magazines like Guitar Player and Guitar World."
The moral of this story is simple, if you have an old Terada, Yamaha, Ibanez, Suzuki, Yairi, Tokai, Takamine, Emperador, Morris, Pearl or Tama (yes! they made guitars to) just to name a few, you probably have a guitar that given the right bit of TLC will wipe the floor with most of its modern competitors, including those beautiful guitars that cost $2000.00 plus. Ok Then, enough of my yacking, enjoy the pictures.
Maple » Maple is usually used for sides and backs, because its low response rate and internal damping doesn't add coloration to the natural tone of the top wood. It produces a “dry” sound that emphasizes high-end tones. Its lower resonance makes it great for live settings, especially with a band, because it can still be heard through a mix of instruments with less feedback.
In 2003, The Blues, a PBS-TV series produced by famed director Martin Scorsese, traced the roots of the blues from Africa to modern day society, showing how it inspired other generations of musicians. While in production, Marshall Chess got an e-mail from Chuck D saying that he heard he was doing a film that connected the blues to hip hop and that he wanted to be part of it. Chess was happy to hear Chuck D say "Electric Mud was one of his favorite, most influential albums and that all the early hip hop guys were inspired by it," affirming a connection he thought had happened. In the episode titled Godfathers and Sons, the focus is on the Chicago blues, Chess records and the effect of Electric Mud on Public Enemy, with Chuck D coming to Chicago, led on a historic blues tour by Chess. There, Chuck D's feverant appreciation of EM got him to reassemble the musicians from the sessions to perform material from it for the upcoming 20th Anniversary Chicago Blues Festival. In keeping with the experimental vein of the record, Chuck D added a turntablist (Juice) and a rapper (Kyle Jason) to the band, re-naming the group the Electric Mudcats. Having the material played at a blues festival showed how the album had finally come full circle, from being hated to being respected and enjoyed.
I was just old enough to catch the tail end, but many folks remember the days of the record store.  Large vinyl albums, huge artwork, leafing through the stacks….it was a cool time that lasted longer than the days of cassettes, 8-tracks, and CDs.  Nowadays, most music buying is relegated to the online variety.  But there was a time during the 1960s where record stores were THE place to get your music, and musical instruments!That’s right, in window displays or hanging above the stacks of vinyl, guitars like these were waiting for teenagers.  Again, just a cool time!  This Decca guitar was sold through Decca Record stores.  In early 1966, Decca Records jumped into the electric guitar frenzy.  This was around the same time when CBS has bought Fender and only a few years away from MCA buying Danelectro. Curiously enough, Decca Records was a subsidiary of MCA.Anyway, Decca and many other companies saw the potential profits of electric guitar sales and quickly tried to capitalize.  There was a whole line of guitars, amps, and accessories, all imported from Japan.  The entire instrument line was handled through Decca’s 21 branches and distributors throughout the USA, but the company seemed to concentrate on the east and west coasts.  There was also a Decca subsidiary in Canada as well.This particular guitar was made by Kawai, and featured a design that was semi-exclusive to Decca.  Kawai was producing and exporting thousands of guitar to the USA at this time, and Kawai’s prices were very competitive, but Decca decided to go with an (as of this writing) smaller, unknown Japanese company to produce the guitars.  Many of the Decca electrics featured non-adjustable truss rods and just seemed to always be on the “cheap” end.  But some of the them did sound very good.  Sometimes you’ll see some really odd Decca electrics that literally copied the Teisco look from the same time period.  There were also some cool hollow bodies with set neck designs as well as the late 60s  line of guitars, like the DMI 231 pictured below.
Schecter Guitar Research is a company that has really established themselves as one of the best guitar brands out there in recent years. Many of their guitars are focused on the heavy metal market, but players of any genre can find a Schecter that meets their needs. With superb craftsmanship and high-end appointments you’d expect to find on much more expensive guitars, they are also among the best values in the guitar world.
ZPS (ZERO POINT SYSTEM) OF ZR TREMOLO Main Spring Stopper Tremolo Block Stop Rod With the guitar tuned correctly, adjust the Main Spring make sure that the Stop Rod makes contact with the Tremolo Block and Stopper. If the Stop Rod does not make contact with the Tremolo Block and Stopper, adjust the Main Spring adjustment screw until contact is made.
Just SOLD OUT sorry.... Another FRESH Release from the JVG Vintage Vault: Hey Mandolin lovers here we are proud to present a wonderful vintage 40 year old beautiful sounding and is absolutely gorgeous !!! She has chop too well preserved and well taken care of this is the more rare of the Japanese mando's you do see a lot more Aria's & Alvarez but less Ibanez lawsuit version of the famously popular Gibson F5 mando. Excellent workmanship and it's the solid spruce carved example she's in very good - excellent vintage condition with just a few blemishes and yet nothing to detract from its undeniable beauty. This beauty comes with its original hard shell case it's rectangular black tolex with brilliant plugs marigold lining, open its cas and wow she's really striking .... This Iis a rare one folks a must for the ibanez mando fan... Contact Joe: jvguitars@gmail.com.
In the vintage setup, the pickup is wired to the pot lug alone, with the tone control capacitor being attached to the output side. This tends to allow the volume to be rolled off without losing too much high end. This is great for those who play clean rhythm by just lowering their guitar volume as opposed to switching amp channels or turning off a boost pedal. It’s old-school, and it works. The downside is that the tone control sometimes has to be rotated a bit more before its effects are heard.
Have you ever looked at a guitar and wondered, "How do they make that?" Or thought to yourself, "I bet that I could build my own guitar," but never actually tried it? I have built several electric guitars over the years and through trial and error have learned many helpful tips that anyone who might want to tackle this sort of project needs to know before starting out. This kind of thing does require some wood working skill and also requires some specific tools as well but not all the fancy stuff that a guitar manufacture has. Building an electric guitar is time consuming and requires the completion of several steps before your project gets finished but be patient and you'll be happy with the results. I tend to go into detail so as not skip any steps or tips you need along the way, and use pics from other projects that I did as well so you can get more that on reference. If you set out to make a guitar you'll find that it takes quite a bit of time so you'll have time enough to go back and read other info if you just want to skim through the first go round. So I hope this helps all the future guitar builders out there!

Traditionally, the vast majority of professional engineers prefer to record electric guitars through a mic’d up amplifier, rather than use a DI (direct injection) box, even though specialist guitar DI units are readily available. That said, there are many pracitcal reasons to split the signal from the guitar and use a DI box in conjunction with an amp. If you find out later that the recorded amp sound doesn’t work in the mix, or you wish you hadn’t committed a particular effect ‘to tape’, the pure guitar sound can be re-amped and subsequently reprocessed without the need to discard a great take. You can route the DI’d signal through a modelling plug-in and blend that with the mic’d amp sound, too.
You can use compression not only to keep levels under control but also to increase sustain. Sometimes a guitar part will work better in a track if the sustain is created using a little less overdrive augmented by compression rather than relying on overdrive alone. Even a heavily overdriven guitar sound can be made to appear more powerful if compressed, as its average energy level is increased further, though any noise will also be rendered more obvious. Clean guitar parts can also benefit enormously from compression, as it creates a more dense, even sound and can emphasise the picking attack of the notes when a longer attack time is set. Using a faster release time, so as to cause audible level pumping, can make for exciting rock guitar sounds, but some compressors pump more gracefully than others — Dbx models are quite popular in this respect.
Chabot Guitars - Paul Chabot used to offer quality hand made Classical guitars (Colorado, USA) "Paul first apprenticed und er guitar maker / repairman Robert Buchanan, where he became familiar with the aspects of guitar repair, and guitar refinishing. Furthering his ability and knowledge, Paul attended Roberto-Venn School of Luthiery where he learned the basics of wood, instrument design and guitar making. Not long after graduating from Roberto-Venn, Paul was fortunate enough to apprentice under world renowned Master guitar maker Augustino Lo Prinzi. Through Augustino Lo Prinzi, Paul was able to learn some of the most proven methods and advanced techni ques of fine guitar making."
A steel-string guitar tuned to concert pitch endures a tension of about 180 pounds (800 N) on the top of the guitar from the strings[citation needed]. The X-bracing system has been shown to be an efficient technique for preventing the top of the guitar from warping under this force. The braces are generally carved, scalloped and tuned to improve resonance and integrity of the guitar top, such capability being performed by skilled artisans and not readily reproducible by machine[citation needed]. This work is an important factor in determining the timbre of the guitar and a major determinant in the observation that rarely do two guitars ever sound alike, even though they are ostensibly identical in construction.

12 Month Financing: For a limited time, purchase $599 or more using the Amazon.com Store Card and pay no interest for 12 months on your entire order if paid in full in 12 months. Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date if the promotional balance is not paid in full within 12 months. Minimum monthly payments required. Subject to credit approval. Apply now.
You will see numerous inputs and outputs for sound, depending on your computer. You will want to enable the main one (in which all of the sub­devices are listed) and two others: one for input, and one for output. For input, look for something similar to “Line in”. If you only have a microphone jack, enable that instead. For output, look for “Stereo out” or something similar.
Finally, new by ’41 was the No. 130 Supro Rio Spanish Guitar. This was a slothead Regal roundhole flattop done up in a “radiant blonde hardwood body.” It had an 13″ body and logo plate on the head. In place of the typical acoustic bridge was the same square pickup/control panel found on the Clipper. The cord was permanently attached and sort of snuck out from under the control plate on the top. Cost was $33.
B.C. Rich manufactured a ten-string six-course electric guitar, the Bich, whose radical shape positioned the machine heads for the four secondary strings onto the body, avoiding the head-heaviness of many electric twelve-string guitars. However, many players bought it for the body shape or electrics and simply removed the extra strings. The company recognized this and released six-string models of the Bich, a shape now generally incorporated into their standard Warlock.
Fingerboards vary as much as necks. The fingerboard surface usually has a cross-sectional radius that is optimized to accommodate finger movement for different playing techniques. Fingerboard radius typically ranges from nearly flat (a very large radius) to radically arched (a small radius). The vintage Fender Telecaster, for example, has a typical small radius of approximately 7.25 inches (18.4 cm). Some manufacturers have experimented with fret profile and material, fret layout, number of frets, and modifications of the fingerboard surface for various reasons. Some innovations were intended to improve playability by ergonomic means, such as Warmoth Guitars' compound radius fingerboard. Scalloped fingerboards added enhanced microtonality during fast legato runs. Fanned frets intend to provide each string with an optimal playing tension and enhanced musicality. Some guitars have no frets—and others, like the Gittler guitar, have no neck in the traditional sense.
×