That is, if the tone caps in parallel filtered from within th 1k-2k and 3k-5k frequency band with the pot determining how much of those ranges are filtered off, then moving the 2nd cap parallel to the pot should shift the 2k window of the bigger cap so it would be filtering less of the 3-5k at one end of it’s sweep, and more of the 1k-3k filtered at the other end of it’s sweep. (my frequency selection and math here are conceptual only, and not to be taken as accurate measurements).
Wah-wah: A wah-wah pedal creates vowel-like sounds by altering the frequency spectrum produced by an instrument—i.e., how loud it is at each separate frequency—in what is known as a spectral glide or "sweep".[68] The device is operated by a foot treadle that opens and closes a potentiometer. Wah-wah pedals are often used by funk and rock guitarists.[69]
More often than not a customer chooses bone as a replacement for cheap plastic nuts supplied on new guitars. It's such a good material for instruments because it's really dense – meaning vibrations travel through it faster meaning that more vibration is transferred to the rest of your instrument - essential! It's also great because it contains natural lubricants which are essential for tuning stability.
The road toward becoming a better guitarist is paved in… books? It certainly can be, although there are plenty of routes that both beginners and professionals take to improve upon — and bone up on — their craft. The books on this list are about history and technique. They’re books that you’ll pull off the shelf for years to come to look up a vintage guitar you’re curious about or a chord progression or song you’ve been meaning to master. You may find additional inspiration reading the autobiographies of your favorite guitarists, but we decided to leave those off this particular list. If you’re in the market for a good guitar book, read on.
Hook, who covered the economics of running a nightclub in his 2009 book, “The Hacienda: How Not To Run a Club”, predicted: “The guitar companies are going to restructure and get smaller. The true artist in the company — the guy who builds a guitar by carving it out of a piece of wood hopefully will be the one that will be celebrated, not the middle management.”
Tremolo: A tremolo effect produces a slight, rapid variation in the volume of a note or chord. The "tremolo effect" should not be confused with the misleadingly-named "tremolo bar", a device on a guitar bridge that creates a vibrato or "pitch-bending" effect. In transistorized effects, a tremolo is produced by mixing an instrument's audio signal with a sub-audible carrier wave in such a way that generates amplitude variations in the sound wave.[80][81] Tremolo effects are built-in effects in some vintage guitar amplifiers. The guitar intro in the Rolling Stones' "Gimme Shelter" features a tremolo effect.[82]
Many musical instruments are works of art, so it’s little doubt that design is very important to a lot of people. Make sure that you really like the way a guitar looks before purchase, because you might be playing it for years. This is one of the reasons the more natural wood colored guitars are always popular - they don’t go out of style or look out of place.

Ovation backed off from its more exotic design directions and in ’77 introduced two more conservative models, the Preacher and the Viper, and its first solidbody basses, the Magnum I and II. The Preacher featured two equal cutaways, whereas the Viper sported more of a Les-Paul-style single cutaway, though neither would never be confused with a Gibson equivalent. Their shape was, in fact, essentially a downsized version of the Ovation acoustic outline. The Magnum shape was derived from the earlier Breadwinner and Deacon, with more contouring.


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An excerpt: “Quite a few of the artists I’ve worked with have told me that my own personal style might be described as flashy. In this book, we will definitely cover the hotter aspects of playing, not only regarding lead styles, but rhythm techniques, too. What I’ve found after years of experience in the studio and onstage with many different types of artists is that a guitarist can modify his playing and adapt it to the requirements of the particular situation while still revealing his own distinctive musical personality.”
So to conclude, you don’t have to spend much money on a beginner/practice amp to have a tremendous amount of fun with it. Be sure to check out MusicGoRound stores near you for amazing deals on used practice/beginner amps. The store employees can help pick out the amp that fits your budget and your needs. Odd are that your practice/beginner amp will wind up becoming an old and dear friend to you over the years. Enjoy every minute with it!

My mom just gave me a Norma FG12 acoustic guitar my father bought for her back in the day. It is in the original box and i honestly doubt it ever made it out of the box! It appears in pristine condition but I know absolutely nothing about guitars. I really don't care to learn how to play it. I would like to sell it but have absolutely no idea how much it is worth nor know the best place to try to sell (?ebay perhaps) Any suggestions/thoughts would be most appreciated. Thanks!

Petros Guitars are an elite customized acoustic guitar luthier, formed by the Petros brothers, Bruce and Matt Petros, based in Kaukauna, Wisconsin. They are noted for their exceptionally high quality craftsmanship and often make guitars similar in appearance to Spanish Baroque guitars with the design, making both steel and nylon string hand-made guitars. Bruce began making guitars in 1972, and in 2000 he was joined by his brother to form the Petros company.[


While the decision to choose between bridges can be an overwhelming one, to simplify things, it’s better to choose one that’s appropriate for your skill level and your personal taste in music.  One bridge for the heavy metal genre may be absolutely frustrating for a country player.  For those with numerous guitars, you might have a different bridge on each instrument to suit that situation or style of music.
Of course, the big news was the introduction of the Spectrum 5. This had a slim, highly contoured body with a pointed upper horn pointing up and a hooked lower horn. The body featured a German carve relief along the edge. The head was the new hooked kind from ’64-65, while inlays were triangular “picks,” sort of like Kays of the time. Pickguards were two-part plastic covering the entire area under the strings, with volume and tone controls and stereo and mono jacks. The “vegematic” push-buttons came in five groovy colors.
Phasers work in a way similar to flangers, but this time the copy of the signal is filtered to bring it slightly out of phase. This creates a sweeping, futuristic sound at cranked-up settings, but dialed down will get a chewy, textured tone that’s even suitable for rhythm playing. Eddie Van Halen is one guitarist well-known for his application of the phaser. Today he employs his own signature effects pedal, but his classic MXR Phase 90 is legendary among guitar tone nerds.
The Epiphone Joe Pass Emperor II is the signature guitar of one of jazz music’s great guitarists. Joe Pass played on records with Ella Fitzgerald, and his influence has cemented his name among the greats of the genre. The guitar which bears his name is a fine example of a guitar geared precisely towards one genre. It won’t win any awards for versatility, but it is a fantastic instrument for jazz fans of any skill level. Featuring the classic hollow body arch top design of old but with two high quality Burstbucker pickups for a range of silky tones.
Finally, we come to our time-based (and space-based) effects group. This includes reverb and delay. Both are forms of the same effect with reverb being a much faster version of delay. All they do is take the input and "smear it out" while reducing the volume over time. Not only does this create an extremely complicated signal that other effects won't react to well, but the variances in volumes these create would further confuse the previous pedals.
In the 1980s, digital rackmount units began replacing stompboxes as the effects format of choice. Often musicians would record "dry", unaltered tracks in the studio and effects would be added in post-production. The success of Nirvana's 1991 album Nevermind helped to re-ignite interest in stompboxes. Some grunge guitarists would chain several fuzz pedals together and plug them into a tube amplifier.[47] Throughout the 1990s, musicians committed to a "lo-fi" aesthetic such as J Mascis of Dinosaur Jr., Stephen Malkmus of Pavement and Robert Pollard of Guided by Voices continued to use analog effects pedals.[48]
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