If you have your heart set on a Stratocaster, but can’t justify shelling-out $600 or more for the USA-made Standard Strats, the Squier Standard Stratocaster is a great place to start. Unlike the even cheaper Strats that are included with Fender’s “starter packs,” this guitar is a definite step-up in quality and features a more modern take on their traditional bridge. I personally prefer this bridge style over Fender’s traditional/vintage 6-screw bridges.
Package arrived in a timely manner and in good shape. Guitar is alright, built to look like a high-end model but closer inspection proves otherwise. I was fine with that but then had to remove the rear cover of the amp to reconnect a power wire that had become disconnected during shipping just to get power to the amp. After that I still had no sound through the amplifier. I checked the amp and cable with another guitar and all worked fine. That lead me to replace the guitar battery that came with the unit with a brand new one and the problem still persisted. After destringing the instrument and checking the interior connections I am convinced that the issue is in the pickup under the bridge or in the onboard electronics. Hopefully the replacement will work better but buyers should be cautious when ordering this product. The guitar really is beautiful for the price but certain quality control issues leave me wondering, especially once the Amazon product support expires on it.

Telecaster is the original solid body guitar. Ever since this iconic model has only grown in popularity. This Tele we look it at here is a bit different. It comes packing an H/S/S pickup configuration, which you don’t see that often on these guitars. With that said, it feels and sounds awesome. I had it setup with a vintage Marshall Plexi and the sound was just impressive. There’s definitely more tonal range than you get in a standard Telecaster.
There is a weekly newsletter that features lessons from different genres and difficulty levels. Whenever I open that newsletter I feel compelled to try out that featured lesson. I believe that this is a big reason why my guitar playing is improving so quickly. I am continuously trying out different styles and techniques and I get better overall while doing this and having fun.
The more contact the bridge has with the body, the better the sound will be transferred into the body. On the other hand, we have non-vibrato bridges which provide an anchoring point but have no control over pitch or tension of strings. Both bridges have their own pros and cons but non-vibrato bridges provide better tuning stability and solid contact between the body and the strings.
Here I'm going to look at all of the different kinds of pedal available on the market. Hopefully this will help act as an effects pedal guide to beginners who are looking to buy their first pedal, and just don't know where to start. We'll look at the name of the effect, what it does, and an example of the pedal (mostly Boss and MXR pedals as they're probably the best known). Oh, and I won't be looking at any of the niche boutique pedals; that would take ages!

Most[citation needed] early blues harmonica players throughout the 20th century[when?] have been known for using Hohner Marine Band harmonicas[citation needed] because they were the most available at the time[citation needed]. However, as other harmonica companies[who?] began to expand and Hohner produced different types of harmonicas, harmonica players started to develop preferences[vague].
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In 1952, Alfred Dronge – co-owner of small New York City music shop Sagman & Dronge – registered the Guild Guitar Company. The following year, they began producing deep hollow body guitars, a reflection of Dronge’s love for jazz music. The brand grew steadily through to the 70s – when Alfred Dronge died unexpectedly in a plane crash – getting their instruments in the hands of musicians such as Buddy Guy, Muddy Waters, and Bonnie Raitt. In the 80s, Guild began producing signature guitars for musicians Hank Williams Jr. and Brian May of Queen. The brand moved around frequently and it wasn’t until 2014 that they settled in their present headquarters in Oxnard, California – where all of their line of USA made guitars are now produced. To this day, they still produce a wide variety of hollow, semi-hollow, and solid body guitars that look as beautiful as they sound.
As a rule, acoustic guitars with laminated spruce tops do not have the same resonance as those made from unlaminated tonewoods, but the Fender FA-100’s fuller dreadnought design provides a richer tone than some customers may expect. If price is a consideration, the Fender has been described as a “cheaply made guitar with a fantastic sound.” What’s more, When you buy a Fender product, you're investing in quality. The Fender Musical Instruments Corporation has been manufacturing instruments and equipment since the 1940s.

OCTAVACIÓN (FAT20) Cada una de las silletas está provista de un tornillo de bloqueo para impedir todo movimiento. Para ajustar la octavación, afloje el tornillo de bloqueo de la silleta con una llave Allen de 2 mm. (D) Para ajustar la octavación, introduzca una llave Allen de 2,5 mm en el tornillo de la silleta situado en la parte posterior del trémolo.


Although we encountered Japanese guitars from the early 1960s onward, the few Teisco brand and other Japanese instruments of that time did not capture nearly as large a market share in the USA as Harmony, Kay and Danelectro. Japanese guitars of the 1960s were generally very crudely made and did not at that time present any great threat to the market dominance of American-made student models.


Fender’s MIM (Made in Mexico) Stratocasters are offered as an affordable option, buyable at about half the rates of their American siblings. Moreover, you can also select your preferred one from among the maple and rosewood fingerboards, SSS or HSS pickup configuration, and color variations. You can also find several models available with Floyd Rose tremolo and pretty tops. For those requiring American Fenders, the American Original Series is available with all essential features.
A third product which does not fit into the "combo"/"head"/cabinet categorization are powered speaker cabinets designed for use with bass instruments. While these powered speakers share many features with a regular combo amp, a bassist cannot plug her bass directly into a powered speaker cab. The powered speaker system is designed to operate as a "slave" to another amplifier's unpowered signal (or another combo amp which has a pre-amp out jack). Some powered speaker cabs only accept a "link" XLR cable from the main amp. Some powered speaker cabinets are designed as part of a company's line of bass amps; as such, the colour of the cabinet and its grille match the combo amp which will be placed on top of the powered speaker. As well, the powered speaker may have interlocking corners to ensure that the main amp stays put on top of the powered speaker.

Having perfected the modelling amp concept, Line 6 have become experts at delivering a huge variety of great sounds in a convenient, affordable package. Experiment with 12 different amp models, from classic 1960s Fender tone to the “Insane Red”, inspired by the mental Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier, and sculpt your tone further with the seven built-in effects.
Doling out everything that an electric guitar newbie could possibly require for less than a hundred bucks, the Davison Guitars Beginner Starter Package with a full-size electric guitar (39”) is super-alluring from the very outset. While many so-called beginners packages reek of inferior quality, this full size black electric guitar plus accessories combo strives to deliver complete bang for your buck. And that’s exactly why this thrifty, but high value electric guitar package has garnered massive popularity, and has been featured in ‘Top 5 Electric Guitar Beginner Packs’ across most reputed websites.
I listen to a lot of internet radio, from soul to death metal. I think it's good to listen to a wide variety of music, even if you're not particularly into certain genres. Each genre has its own qualities when it comes to guitar, so spend time just... listening. Listen to how rhythms, chords and solos are used. You may not know how they're doing it just from listening, but you might like the sound of something which you'll then be inspired to go and investigate independently.
“Top shelf” simply refers to any product that is sufficiently uncommon and/or of significantly high enough quality to place it “above” the rest of the “regular” crowd of products. In a shopkeepers parlance, the top shelf was where you placed things that you wished to be visible, but were, in actuality, were rarely sold. The best stuff was kept up and just out of reach of the daily rabble and only brought down when someone who truly appreciates the quality (and is willing to pay the commensurate price) came into the shop.
Budget, feel and sound! Don't worry about who plays what or brand names. NONE of that matters if the guitar does not FEEL good to you and have the SOUND that you are looking for. Of course, most people have a budget and there is no need in trying $2000 guitars if you can't afford one, except for expanding your education about different types of guitar.
• Fast Fingers: If speed’s the goal, most shred-heads prefer light gauge strings. They’re easy to bend and promote fast playing by offering less resistance to the fretting and picking hands. Since guitar strings are measured in thousandths of an inch, the typical recommended gauge for players planning to burn in standard tuning are .009s, available in every guitar shop.
Here we have a VERY WELL MADE 1978 Vintage Japanese Quality Replica of G!b$@n Dove Acoustic guitar. This is a "SUPERB" top of the line model its Premium woods used in its construction along with very good workmanship see the bindings and the detail wow...and has now over the past 28 years has wonderfully aged into a very nice vintage guitar in its own right. The Vintage aged spruce top is of a high quality on often seen today with a woderful aged finish, also see the sides back & neck all made of premium grade mahogany WoW! The finish is SUNBURST and was done by a master no doubt I compair this very favorably with any G!b$@n for its fit & finish and sound! Believed to be from the same factory as the Aria and a few others exported to St. Lousi music in the 70's...this example is in very good - excellent original condition rated 8.5++/10 Quite a clean example. The frets are in good condition the neck is straight and tuners work well all and all a very enjoyable player with a wonderful rich tone. A Gig bag or case is optional and is available. Dont be fooled by the low price under $400 this guitar would cost over $1200 today out of Japan! Thie is a Bargain find get her before shes gone. .

Kamico guitars were lower-priced versions of Kay's original guitars. They were among the first guitars to use a humbucker type pickup, predating Gibson by some few years.[citation needed] Produced along with Kay brand name guitars from 1931–1951, according to most sources. The most recognizable model is the Jumbo Jazz. Kay also made banjo's under the kamico name.
This is the point where the neck meets the body. In the traditional Spanish neck joint the neck and block are one piece with the sides inserted into slots cut in the block. Other necks are built separately and joined to the body either with a dovetail joint, mortise or flush joint. These joints are usually glued and can be reinforced with mechanical fasteners. Recently many manufacturers use bolt on fasteners. Bolt on neck joints were once associated only with less expensive instruments but now some top manufacturers and hand builders are using variations of this method. Some people believed that the Spanish style one piece neck/block and glued dovetail necks have better sustain, but testing has failed to confirm this. While most traditional Spanish style builders use the one piece neck/heel block, Fleta, a prominent Spanish builder, used a dovetail joint due to the influence of his early training in violin making. One reason for the introduction of the mechanical joints was to make it easier to repair necks. This is more of a problem with steel string guitars than with nylon strings, which have about half the string tension. This is why nylon string guitars often don't include a truss rod either.
Whoa whoa wait, what? This pop artist? A guitar player? If all you’ve ever heard from Mayer is Your Body Is Wonderland, or Daughters, then you’ve got to give his album Continuum a listen to. He is no Shakespeare, but his guitar playing speaks to your soul. His songs will make most glorified tough guys miss their old girlfriend, and the rest just go to a corner and cry. If you think that his songs are all too depressing, then watch some videos of him playing. His guitar face is priceless.
Telecaster is considered to be the oldest solid body electric guitar in the world. Capturing that type of pedigree is not easy, but Squier managed to pull it off. Handling the Squier by Fender Vintage Modified Telecaster brought back some of the best memories of my youth, when Telecaster was the go to axe. This is definitely one guitar worth trying out.
What people may not know is that they have a very affordable line of entry-level guitars.  This line continues the legacy of craftsmanship and prestige that comes with owning a Taylor. Whether you look into their line of Baby Taylors – 3/4 sized guitars that play better than many full-sized budget guitars, or you look into their entry full-sized acoustics, Taylor will not disappoint you.
When technology changed from valve to solid-state, it was noticed that solid-state amplifiers lacked warmth and bass performance, and had to be twice as powerful as valve amplifiers, to sound as loud. Current Drive: Solid-state amplifiers behave in ‘Voltage Drive’. This acts as a short circuit (zero output impedance, or 100% damping factor) across the speakers, causing excessive damping, which reduces efficiency, limiting responsiveness. Valve amplifiers behave in ‘Current Drive’. This represents an open circuit across the speaker without over damping, allowing maximum response and efficiency.
There’s 2 very small and cheap amps that are widely used by guitarists and by guitar technicians across the globe and the Marshall MS-2 Micro Amp is one of them. The other is number 2 in our list, before you ask… This tiny 1-watt Marshall amplifier may fit in the palm of your hand, but it sure packs a punch and is a LOT louder than you’d expect. Styled just like the classic Marshall amplifier stacks now synonymous with rock n roll, this is one of the best cheap amps thanks to its convenient size, 9V battery powered operation for ultimate portability and the fact you can plug your guitar into it and rock out anywhere you like.
The color black is powerful, mysterious and evokes a sense of potential and possibility. It’s widely regarded as the single most popular color for Rock ‘n’ Roll thanks to rock pioneers such as KISS and AC/DC. Get back in black with these fine offerings from Dean with our vivid take on the classic black electric guitar with a few other shades thrown in for good measure. Plug in and play. Get your wings!
All of these soundfonts can be opened with most zip programs, but if you are not sure or you haven't got a zip program you can use 7zip in windows or xarchiver in linux. I chose the SF.tar.bz2 format as it compressed to almost half the size of the original. Let me know if you have any problems downloading or extracting the files. These samples have been tested in SFZ free player in windows (check this forum for download details) and Qsynth in linux.
Guitar amplifier modeling: Amplifier modeling is a digital effect that replicates the sound of various amplifiers, most often vintage analog "tube" amps and famous brands of speaker cabinets (e.g., the Ampeg SVT 8x10" bass cabinet). Sophisticated modeling effects can simulate different types of speaker cabinets (e.g., the sound of an 8x10" cabinet) and miking techniques. A rotary speaker simulator mimics the doppler and chorus effect sound of a vintage Leslie speaker system by replicating its volume and pitch modulations, overdrive capacity and phase shifts.[95]
We gave our electro-acoustic chart a big refresh to keep it relevant for early 2018, by replacing a few older guitars with some excellent upgraded models. Guitars such as the Epiphone PR-4E and Mitchell MX400 were removed, and in came the exquisite Yamaha A Series A3M, the new PRS SE A50E, the cool Fender Sonoran SCE, and two solid budget models, the Kona K2 and Yamaha’s APX500III.
Epiphone introduces the Les Paul Special VE (Vintage Edition) electric guitar featuring the classic Les Paul profile with a lightweight Poplar body. The Les Paul Special VE is powered by Epiphone Open Coil humbuckers and is available in beautiful “Vintage Worn” color finishes.For decades, the Les Paul Special has been one of Epiphone’s best se...  Click To Read More About This Product
You have all the control you need over your effects and you can use all three at the same time, too – ideal for those who like to create big walls of sound. The delay features a tap tempo control, whilst the FX loop connectivity allows you to hook up any other effects pedals you might have before the delay, which ensures the tonal qualities of those pedals are intact.
We’ve already shown you how you will sometimes want more than one mic on your amp to achieve ideal sound in your tracks. Many semi-distant and ambient techniques will be most useful, along with a close mic, but on a separate track, to retain the option of blending a more-direct tone to create your overall sonic picture. Any single-mic positions discussed thus far can be combined into multi-mic sounds in the mix when recorded to different tracks. There are also several other approaches to multi-miking that might come in handy now and then, and which are worth some exploration.

The 75 Watt Fender Rumble 75 Bass Combo Amp and its 150 Watt and 300 Watt counterparts can produce an overdrive effect by using the gain and blend controls, giving overdrive sounds ranging from "mellow warmth [to] heavy distorted tones".[27] The Fender SuperBassman is a 300-watt tube head which has a built-in overdrive channel. The Fender Bronco 40 includes a range of effects including modern bass overdrive, vintage overdrive and fuzz.
Reverb is a sound effect used both in music and audio engineering, which adds a spatial dimension to the original track. To put it into more simple terms, a reverb gives you an impression that the sound is originating in a large room. You are hearing the source sound but also its numerous iterations as it bounces off different surfaces. Reverb guitar effects pedals offer a simulation of this phenomenon.
The auditorium style is a standard mid-sized acoustic guitar, with a lower bout that is generally the same width as a dreadnought, but with a smaller waist. Sometimes referred to as an "orchestra" body, these guitars balance volume, tone, and comfort, and have been regaining popular ground in recent decades. In 1992, Eric Clapton used an acoustic guitar of this body size, when he appeared on MTV Live to record his Unplugged album.
the les pauls are way out of my ballpark...but i played a few to kind of get the feel so I could compare the cheaper guitars. All the cheaper guitars (including epiphones) sucked when compared to a gibson les paul....with the exception of one... a samick copy of a les paul. It was solid, played as good as the les pauls i was trying, had nice fretboard and headstock inlays, has a set neck, keys held the tuning well, tone was better than any of the other cheap guitars i played (very close to the les paul tone), and had a drop dead georgous birdseye maple top.
This guitar also features Epiphone’s patented Locktone Tune-O-Matic Bridge and stop bar tailpiece for serving the easiest string changes and increased sustain. It comes with master volume and master tone controls along with the long-lasting 3-way pickup selector for a bold and controllable performance. The most exclusive feature added by Epiphone is that by pushing a button you can mute all the outputs to add more rock and roll to your performance.
I am sorry to hear this, Andrew. Rear shifted bracing should help protect against the kind of top bulges normally seen behind the bridge. Unfortunately, when it comes to guitars made by hand out of organic materials like thin, solid wood, some pieces of wood will misbehave. The old saying is a guitar takes about two years before the wood stops trying to turn back into a tree.
New, used, nylon or steel string — or electric — for your first guitar take your time, choose carefully and never be afraid to ask for advice. Best of all, search for a good music shop near you and actually pick up the guitar, pluck the strings, listen to the sound. The people behind the counter want to help you, so that you come back for another guitar — and another, not to mention strings, string cleaner, capos… Don’t forget, this isn’t just buying any old guitar. This is the beginning of your dream coming true.

As one user put it, this is one of “Amazon’s hidden little gems”, with a good set of tube electronics that gives out a natural sounding overdrive and some crystal-clear rhythmic sounds. If you want to make your guitar sound clear enough to accompany Porcupine Tree while also having the option for a natural grainy sound that might work well for jazz and blues, then this item is definitely something to look into.  
Nice-Keys-Extreme-2.0  Still a big SoundFont set at 1gb or 1000mb (645mb dedicated to 3 pianos with 6 velocity layers). Similar to the top set but the main piano is a little less detailed so it leaves room for an extra piano (Steinways).  PC users should not have any problems or if running on iOS this set runs perfectly well on iPhone 6s or iPad Air 2. It is still possible to load this set within the bs-16i app and run Sweet Midi Player app using GM set one at the same time for midi backing if required. This set has everything described below plus the addition of guitars.
Single coil pickups utilize a single magnet. They also typically have a lower output than humbucking pickups, which means they aren’t capable of producing as much distortion as a humbucker equipped guitar. However, because they’re not intended to be used with extreme levels of distortion they have a very rich and musical voice when played with lower amounts of gain.

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Note that the competition for our pick in this “simple beginner’s amp” category was much more hotly contested than our other picks in this guide. The Crush 12 just barely edged out two other amps that our panelists liked. One is the Stage Right 611800, a very loud, 40-watt amp with built-in reverb that’s a great choice for those who need a powerful amp on the cheap (although that person probably isn’t a beginner). The other is the Vox Pathfinder 10, an amp with a simple control setup that our panelists loved, but a rather bright and blaring sound that some liked and some didn’t. Both are mentioned in the competition section below.
Known for their distinctive jangle and chime, Rickenbacker guitars tended to be favoured by Jangle Pop, Power pop and British Invasion-style groups – bands such as The Who, The Byrds and The Beatles. The early Rickenbackers that made this sound famous were equipped with lower-output “Toaster” pickups. These pickups were phased out circa 1969-70 for newer “Hi-Gain” pickups, which had twice the output of their illustrious predecessors. This change was almost certainly due to the trend toward the louder “Rock” sounds of the 1970s, despite the earlier models being credited by Pete Townshend as being key to the development of “the Marshall sound” and his refinement of electric guitar feedback techniques[8]
In choosing an amp you have to first consider how much you have to spend, the style of music you like to play, and what kind of tone you like best. It is perhaps best to start with something small. You might feel that a Marshall stack is the way to go, especially if you have the money, but for home use, big amps are hard to work with because to drive them into distortion, you have to get really loud. They also take up a lot of space.
The Fender Stratocaster features cutaway horns that give musicians access to higher frets. The back of the body is designed for comfort for longer performances. These guitars have three single coil pickups which transfer the string vibrations to the amplifier. They can all be turned on at once to produce a wide range of sounds. It also features a tremolo bar which allows you to lower or raise the pitch, much like tremolo pedals themselves, by pulling up or down on the bar to produce different effects. Stratocasters are the best option if you like to dabble in different playing styles and music genres.
The D-120's all-mahogany body strays from conventional spruce top design, which results in a warmer and more articulate tone. This particular tone is ideal for guitarists who sing, and for those who accompany vocals, it also blends well with conventional spruce top acoustic guitars, easily cutting through the mix with its lower-mids emphasized voicing. And since the body is crafted from solid mahogany, you can be sure that the instrument grows with you, sounding better with age.
The Science of Electric Guitars and Guitar Electronics considers the electric guitar and related accessories from a scientific point of view. The majority of books about electric guitars try to avoid using mathematics when describing the scientific phenomena related to the electric guitar. However, mathematics is an invaluable tool in the design processes of all areas of technology, even when designing musical instruments and audio electronics. This book presents simple mathematical methods for modelling the electric guitar as a signal source for electric circuits such as effect pedals and amplifiers. In addition to modelling the electronics inside the electric guitar, the principles of operation of some vintage guitar effects and amplifier circuits are explained and analysed using systematic methods of circuit analysis. The book is intended for everyone who is interested in the design and analysis of basic analogue electronics used in the electric guitar and guitar-related accessories. The presented topics cover the whole signal chain from the guitar strings to the loudspeaker. Therefore, a solid foundation is established for creating own designs in guitar electronics using basic components of analogue electronics.
Paul Reed Smith is a relative newcomer having been born just 2 years after the Stratocaster was created, and founding PRS Guitars in 1985, but in that relatively short period of time PRS have made a huge impact on the guitar world, have been used by the likes of Carlos Santana, Ted Nugent, Dave Navarro. and Mark Tremonti, are now the 3rd biggest electric guitar manufacturer in the USA, and have earned their place among the best electric guitar brands.
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We would recommend that you, for your first guitar, spend between $500-$1000. This price range is good, because you know that you will be getting a guitar that is made for some serious music making (which the cheapest ones out there just aren’t). Of course you don’t want to spend this much money on something you’re not even sure you will be using a year from now, so if you aren’t that serious about learning to play the guitar it might be a good idea to go for an even cheaper option.

The greatest all time innovative guitarist to come out of the UK. Such a distinctive style and sound which is most important. Many guitarists have a similar sound and tone to others. This guy got me hooked on the sound of the guitar from a young age and I have tried to find others in a similar vein to no avail and I own over 2000 rock/metal CD's and have followed the scene since the mid 80's. A totally under estimated guitarist in my opinion. Long live The Cult.


When it comes to combo amps, the speakers included will usually give you a good idea of what to expect in terms of power and performance. While bass amps are in a category of their own, guitar combos tend to use speakers of anywhere between 3″ right up to 15″. Obviously, the bigger the speaker, the better suited it is for the stage, while having more than one is an instant upgrade to the power available.
Chorus is a great way to thicken up the sound of a bass (especially in a 3-piece band), rhythm guitar, or solo guitar. It is often used with distorted sounds but is a fantastic way to create full-sounding clean sounds as well. Stereo output (from two separate speakers) enhances chorus a great deal. Many acoustic guitar amps include a clean-sounding chorus effect adding depth and character to the amplified signal. Chorus pedals can be very helpful in fattening up the tone of acoustic-electric guitars whose piezo pickups tend to sound a little thin.

Hum cancelling: hum cancellation is caused by reverse polarity, reverse winding keeps a revrse polarity pickup in phase with a non reverse polarity pickup. To reverse the direction of the winding, simply swap wires, using hot as the ground and ground as the hot. Polarity can be changed on many pickups. If the pickup has bar magnets, simply flip them over. If the pickup uses alnico polepiece AND has the new plastic bobbins such as is common on Fenders, the polepieces can be pushed out with a screwdriver and reinserted "upside down". If the bobbin is fiber DO NOT attempt to flip the polepieces; the wire is wrapped directly around the polepieces and will almost certainly be damaged.
Picking out a guitar can be a bit daunting. And since there’s a lot of subjectivity involved, new players trying to pick out an instrument often find a lot of ambiguity and guesswork awaiting them. For someone buying their first guitar, the goals become fairly simple. Get a decent, budget guitar that you can afford and see if you stick with it. In so doing, avoid the worst guitars.
In 1971 Larrivee began adding inlay designs to their guitars and in 1977 inlays became a standard for their guitars. Beginning in 1978 their inlay designs took on a more romantic style. Since 1979 all engravings were designed by Wendy Larrivee except for a 1998 inlay called the “Joker.” In 2007 Larrivée began using laser engraving for their inlays.
You are bidding on a previously owned and in good working condition Blackstar Amplification HT Studio 20H guitar amp head. This auction is for the amp and power cable you see pictured. No footswitch is included. Nothing else is included. It comes as pictured. Please take a moment to look at the pictures and get a better idea of what you are bidding on. This unit has some scuffs and dings from being moved around. It has been tested and is in good working condition.

Another great thing about this guitar is the Min-ETune system that offers 16 tuning presets. This not only makes it super quick to tune your guitar for everyday use, it’s also great if you need to tune your guitar up or down. It saves you a lot of work and time! It’s also a feature that makes these electric guitars for beginners who don’t know how to tune their guitar, and even if they of course can use a tuner this is still a faster option.
The tip of a soldering iron is very hot, around 700F, and can damage the board, component packages, and wire insulation in a fraction of a second, not to mention your own skin, so be careful the tip does not touch anything as you move it in and out of the soldering area. Put the pencil back in its holder when not soldering. Don’t leave a hot iron laying on a bench or table.
I decided to release the book for public download, which was my initial plan anyways. In the future there will be no official 'second edition' of The Science of Electric Guitars and Guitar Electronics, as the material will live and float around here in the Internet. If time permits, I will add and edit the material on this pdf-version. This 'upgraded version' will be developed and published only here at this website. The revision date in the first page will updated accordingly on every 'new release' and the listing below will give more detailed information about the changes made to each chapter.
This is another best budget electric guitar from Epiphone. It is also a great choice for a beginner and it is quite lightweight to carry. For an inexpensive guitar, this one has a pretty good sound and tone. Despite being low priced, the manufacturer has not compromised in its quality. The cherry red color is really attractive and appealing and can help you to boost up your smart personality as a guitarist. This is closer in look to the iconic rock guitars.
The great Mark Knopfler has arguably the cleanest, smoothest electric guitar tone of all-time. Playing without a pick, his fingers blaze from note to note without any hint of misplacement. Even when he’s playing with blatant distortion, his notes ring out smooth and completely decipherable. While he has quite a few great guitar songs, a great sample of his playing can be found in the Dire Straits song, “Sultans of Swing.”
Dan Erlewine first saw this Tele back in the 1960s, before Mike Bloomfield recorded with it on Bob Dylan’s Highway 61 Revisited album. That was also before Bloomfield and Dylan were booed for going electric at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival. And before Bloomfield recorded the first Paul Butterfield Blues Band album with this guitar. There’s a lot of history in this Telecaster!
MXR’s Distortion+ preceded the Tube Screamer and is an even simpler design, and, despite its name, is more an overdrive than a distortion. That said, its sound is considered by many to be a little more opaque, or colored, than the Tube Screamer’s. The box uses a 741-type IC and a pair of germanium diodes to achieve its soft-clipping sound. These are different components than the famed germanium transistors, but are made of the same material. Germanium is generally attributed a “softness” of tone, and the same applies to the diodes used in the Distortion+ (and other units); change them for silicon diodes and you’ve got a hard-clipping distortion pedal.

Your signal chain starts at your guitar and passes through each cable and pedal until it reaches your amplifier, the speakers, and finally your ears. If you use a collection of dedicated effects stompboxes, you will be faced with a perennial question raised by guitarists: what is the best way to connect these units into a single signal chain that is easy to set up and won’t degrade your tone.
The M5 is extremely portable and pedalboard-friendly, measuring about 6 inches wide and tall. The construction is absolutely first rate with a heavy-duty all-metal chassis and footswitches. Line 6 absolutely does not skimp on build quality with this one. It’s also found on lots of pedalboards of pro players that we’ll talk about shortly, which speaks to it’s durability and quality. In terms of interface, it’s actually quite a simple pedal, as you can see in closeup photos of it. The inputs and outputs are rather simple. ¼” stereo in, ¼” stereo out, an expression pedal input, and an input for a 9V power supply (which comes included with it). On top of the unit you have 2 main footswitches (which not only turn an effect on and off, they are also used to scroll up and down), a small screen in the upper left corner, and 6 knobs to control different parameters of whatever effect you have selected. It does not have USB capability, balanced XLR outputs, or any of the other fancy I/O from larger multi-effects units. But then again, for its purpose it doesn’t really need all that. The M5 is intuitive, nice, and simple.
In mid-’29, John Dopyera left the National company to start the Dobro Manufacturing Company along with his brothers Rudy and Ed, and Vic Smith. National String Instrument Corp. continued operating under Beauchamp, Barth et al. In 1930, the Dobro company name was changed to the Dobro Corporation, Ltd., with additional capital provided by Louis and Robert Dopyera. Dobro was, during this period, a competitor of National’s, although in this somewhat incestuous world, both got their resonator cones, plate covers and other parts, like tailpieces, from Adolph Rickenbacker.
Predating many of the newer brands on this list is another Californian company – B.C. Rich, who has been producing heavy rock guitars since arriving on the scene in 1969. Since the seventies, B.C. Rich has been a name synonymous with high-quality electric guitars featuring weird and wonderful shapes, including the Warlock, the KKV and the Mockingbird.

It’s 1951, a dark, rainy night on the backstreets of Memphis, Tennessee. Ike Turner and His Kings Of Rhythm are packing the gear into the station wagon, getting ready to head off to the studio to record a track for producer Sam Phillips, a track that the Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame will one day honor as the first rock and roll song of all time, ‘Rocket 88.’ (Although, distinctly unfairly, the song will be credited to singer Jackie Brenston and the imaginary band ‘His Delta Cats.’) “The amp—a Fender Bassman—was in the trunk of the car and it fell out, right on the road,” Ike Turner told Guitar Magazine’s Rick Batey in 1998, “and it was raining, so the amp got wet. When we got to the studio and plugged it in one of the tubes went ‘pop.’ We didn’t have no more tubes—so that’s where the fuzz came from.’


Not to mention the difference tones created when two pure tones (sine waves) are produced at the same time (which, important to mention - pure tones only exist in theory, every sound we hear is comprised of overtones...) - then the additional difference tones created by the interaction BETWEEN difference tones - it's basically a fractal relationship. Anybody who has spent a significant amount of time studying the physics of sound knows that the interactions that occur between sounds are so complex and immense that it's almost silly to assume that just because "wood isn't magnetic" that the natural resonance of the wood wouldn't in turn accentuate certain overtones over the fundamental tone coming off the string. You can't say that the note "has already left the string," when the note takes place over time - even a staccato note has an attack, sustain, decay, and release envelope much in the way that a synthesizer does (this is where the idea for artificial dynamics envelopes came from anyway).
Ibanez are one of the best known of the more contemporary style guitars with artists such as Satriani and Vai on their books. This particular model, the RG 450 Deluxe, boasts a layout which traditional Fender players will be familiar with, but it's a very different guitar. It is a more compact instrument than the Stratocaster and with two humbuckers separated by a single coil, the pick-up system allows you to create some thick tones. In fact if you play around with the five way selector you can get just about any tone you could want. The body shape is very sharp and clinical and with jagged bolt inlays and the traditional Ibanez pointed headstock the guitar is very recognisably Ibanez. It also features a quality tremolo unit and two full octaves on the fingerboard with wide cutaways for access. This is an excellent alternative to the Gibson or Fender style dichotomy that dominates the market. If you're searching for your own sound, somewhere between the two, it's worth checking out the Ibanez range.
I work out of my home shop in Idaho Falls, Idaho.  I do repairs for clients and guitar shops all over the United States.  I’d love to help you repair or restore your guitar.  Repair prices are based on a rate of $60 per hour.  These prices apply to guitars in otherwise good working order.  Your repair may vary depending on the condition of your guitar and the specifics of the work needed. Please contact me using the contact page if you have a repair that you would like to discuss.  Consultations are always free.
Another cool place I just found was Madison Guitar Repair out of Fridley. I went there a couple weeks ago. It's a little hole in the wall place where they just work on guitars and have tons of parts. Really nice guys that seem like they know their stuff pretty dang well. Never used them but considering that all they do is luthier work I'd give them a shot.
I had a 1984 Jackson Randy Rhoads Custom with a serial # in the low 400′s…that thing would sing on a note with high gain and boost with a TS-808 Tube screamer like a Sustainiac guitar…problem was the bridge was mislocated and it wouldn’t intonate correctly…sent it back…made them replace it with a new guitar (didn’t want plugs in it)…the new one had (ermmm…still has as I still own it) the EXACT same pickups, hardware down to the tuning machines, etc…EVERY single piece of hardware was moved over to the replacement (and in the case of the bridge pickup it is a proven fact as that was/is a retail version of an SH-6 wired for series/single coil/parallel…along with the pickguard with the additional hole for switch)…same types of wood used (3 piece maple neck through construction with poplar wings) yet the replacement has NEVER sung on a note. So what does that say? I have to say that the replacement does sound “better” overall in some intangible way…glassier I guess…longer sustain…yet it REFUSES to go into a sustained feedback loop.
Gibson sells guitars under a variety of brand names[5] and builds one of the world's most iconic guitars, the Gibson Les Paul. Many Gibson instruments are highly collectible. Gibson was at the forefront of innovation in acoustic guitars, especially in the big band era of the 1930s; the Gibson Super 400 was widely imitated. In 1952, Gibson introduced its first solid-body electric guitar, the Les Paul, which became its most popular guitar to date— designed by Ted McCarty and Les Paul.
The 700-series guitars had all controls and pickups mounted on a faux-tortise shell pickguard. That makes it very easy to do any required work on the electronics. By contrast, On the 800-series, with a couple of exceptions, the tone and volume control pots and the jack socket are mounted to the body, a three-way pickup switch, and a lead/rhythm slide switch are mounted to the pickguard; and the pickups are mounted to individual little mounting plates made of the faux-tortise shell material.
Now you see why these Spectrum 5s are so desirable! It is not clear, by the way, how many (if any) were ever made with ebony necks. The few I’ve personally seen had maple necks. Certainly the expense of the ebony would have been enormous and hard to justify on the Teisco brand name. Also, with the density of ebony, the guitars probably would have been hard to balance. In any case, these are the Holy Grails of Teisco!
Thanks to the built-in pickup system, you can amplify your acoustic guitar by simply plugging it in, without having to perform any installation or tweaking beforehand. This bundle gives you a reliable 10-watt amplifier for electric performances, a digital clip-on tuner to keep your guitar in tune, a gig bag for safe transportation, a truss rod, extra picks and strings, and a strap.
Small guitar amps, contrary to popular belief, have the ability to produce a very powerful sound. You don’t need a whole lot of surface area to have an impressive sound, as so many chihuahuas have proven by keeping up their owners nights on end with their barking. The small amplifiers, the best of them, have sound comparable to the sounds of the larger amplifiers. This has been proven many a time, especially by the band called Annihilator. The guitar player for the band has a very specific set up for himself, with a relatively small amp being one of the main parts of the set up. While his is not as small as some of the ones here, it just goes to show that a live performance does not need a large amp for good quality sound.
One of my favourite hardware effect units is the Electrix Mo-FX (sadly no longer in production). It is superbly constructed for hands-on performance and it offers full MIDI control over the panel's knobs and buttons. I use this in conjunction with the Sequentix P3 (a hardware step sequencer). Not only can the P3 generate patterns of controllers suitable for varying multiple Mo-FX parameters, but it can generate evolving or shifting patterns, courtesy of its 'accumulators'. In a nutshell, accumulators are designed to prevent your sequences becoming annoyingly repetitive: controller values (actually values directed at any internal sequencer parameter) can be added or subtracted on each pass of the pattern, with rules and limits directing the behaviour as the accumulation progresses. Digging through the Mo-FX manual quickly reveals all the MIDI Continuous Controllers you need. Usefully, you can also trigger the tap-tempo function via MIDI, and this offers a rather wonderful way of generating clock intervals. As you can decide exactly where to place your tap-tempo trigger events, and the P3 sequencer can shift or vary these events according to rules you devise, you can find clock sync intervals unseen on any other device. Paul Nagle
Guitar effects pedals offer a huge range of possibilities for guitar-sound manipulation―there are literally hundreds of pedals from scores of manufacturers. If you or someone you know is not completely satisfied with the clean, unprocessed sound coming from their guitar and they want to experiment with and modify or color that sound, a great way to tweak it is with effects pedals, also called “stompboxes.” An effects pedal, depending upon its configuration, modifies the sound of a guitar through electrical circuitry or digital modeling via computer chips, either giving it subtle color or dramatic shift. All pedals include knobs on the enclosures that allow the player to adjust the intensity, speed, depth, and shape of the effect in increments, from nuanced color to ear-splitting crunch.
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You have to admire a YouTube channel and accompanying website that’s taken one guy on his own over fifteen years to build and offers hundreds of different lessons at all the various levels. The great thing about Justin is he gives off a cool, enthusiastic vibe all the time whether he’s teaching a basic chord for beginners or taking seasoned players through a complex solo.
Almost all big guitar makers have their affordable entry level guitar models and product lines. Guitar for beginners is a market that none want to ignore. The famous acoustic guitar makers in Northern America like Martin, Taylor  and Seagull provide high quality acoustic guitars for professionals and experienced guitarists. They build their brand image among the guitarists by making great sounding and great craftsmanship guitar.
Inspiring, light, and upbeat corporate background music with motivational and optimistic energy. Positive and sunny tune for technology and business presentations, travel inspirational Youtube videos, success stories, unforgettable journey, slideshow, TV, radio. Featuring muted electric guitar, piano, synth pads, acoustic guitar, drums, bass guitar, piano.
The pickups are made with mismatched coils and Alnico magnets and are wax potted to eliminate the ear-splitting squeal during high-gain playing.  The pickups are independently routed through volume and tone controls and the 3-system toggle switch.  You can activate single coil pickups with the push-pull method found on each of the volume controls for coil splitting.
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BC Rich is a fashionable brand of guitar that has been available since the year 1969. This is an American brand of acoustic & electric guitars & bass guitars. The brand produces 6-string electric guitars mahogany or basswood bodies. This brand is not as popular as other brands of electric guitars as it specializes in guitars for heavy metal & hard rock crowd. It is the choice of only those guitarists who are looking for an instrument that looks sound as edgy as possible. It offers trendy appearance and classic style of playing an electric guitar. The starting price of this brand of guitars is 29,000 INR approximately.

By the late 1960s, as electric guitarists in rock bands began using powerful, loud guitar stacks to play large venues, bassists needed a large, powerful bass stack to keep up in these performance settings.[3] The Acoustic 360 was a "200-watt, solid state head designed to drive the 361 cabinet, a rear-firing 18” speaker enclosure".[3] The engineers who designed the amp and cabinet in 1967, Harvey Gerst and Russ Allee, mounted the 18" speaker in a folded horn enclosure; the 360 amp had a built-in fuzz bass effects unit.[4] The Acoustic 360 and its 361 cabinet "...got the bass world ready for the Woodstocks, Altamonts and giant festival concerts" and it was used by notable players such as funk bassist Larry Graham, Led Zeppelin's bassist John Paul Jones and jazz fusion player Jaco Pastorius.[3] John Paul Jones used two of the amp/cabs in Led Zeppelin; Dave Brown used them with Santana; John McVie played with the amp/cab in the beginning years of Fleetwood Mac.[4] In December 1967, the loud sound of the Acoustic 360 led to The Doors getting "...arrested for noise violations".
Only two or three frets are needed for the guitar chords—major, minor, and dominant sevenths—which are emphasized in introductions to guitar-playing and to the fundamentals of music.[87][88] Each major and minor chord can be played on exactly two successive frets on exactly three successive strings, and therefore each needs only two fingers. Other chords—seconds, fourths, sevenths, and ninths—are played on only three successive frets.[89]

The Ibanez pickup sound is great and solidly diverse throughout the 5-options, providing lots of versatility for a variety of different music styles.The tuning is nice and extremely stable, and you can even dive-bomb on the whammy without throwing it out of whack. The frets are perfect, and the action is almost perfect, with that quality feel to it.

The Thunderhead had two humbuckers, gold hardware, a master volume with two tone controls, a pickup blender knob, and a phase reversal switch. Some had DeArmond pickups with metal covers, a large black insert with nonadjustable poles, plus six tiny adjustable pole screws along one edge. The ebony fingerboard was bound with diamond inlays and had the characteristic “mustache” on the end of the fingerboard. The tops and backs featured figured maple laminates. Colors options included a wine red, sunburst natural, and green (on Thunderhead only). The Thunderhead K-1360 had a trapeze tail, the K-1460 a vibrato. The Tornado (K-1160 with trapeze, K-1260 with vibrato) was a downscale version with plain top, chrome hardware, two volume and two tone controls (no phase), and the Schaller pickups.
Valco manufactured Spanish acoustic guitars, metal-bodied resonator guitars, electric lap steel guitars, and vacuum tube amplifiers under a variety of brand names including Supro, Airline, Oahu, and National. They also made amplifiers under contract for several other companies such as Gretsch, Harmony, and Kay. In the 1950s they began producing solid body electric guitars.
You probably won’t have to do this, but if you do, here’s how to go about it: First, slacken the affected strings and move them to the sides of the saddles. Then take some needle-nose pliers and remove one end of the retaining spring (different styles of bridge will use different types of retaining spring – sometimes there is an individual one for each saddle, in which case you might even need to remove the whole bridge to do this).

According to Mr. Noguchi, Teisco instruments debuted in 1946 and were made by a company founded principally by the late Mr. Atswo Kaneko, a renowned Hawaiian and Spanish guitarist, and Mr. Doryu Matsuda, an electrical engineer. Mr. Doryu Matsuda was born in 1921 and was still alive at the time of this writing. As mentioned, Mr. Kaneko gave the guitars the Teisco brand name, however, the original name of the company was Aoi Onpa Kenkyujo (roughly translated: Hollyhock Soundwave or Electricity Laboratories). This was a small workshop formed in war-ravaged Tokyo.
While Gretsch is known for semi-hollow and full hollow body guitars, and it is only fitting that one of their semi-hollow chambered body models make this list, specifically the Gretsch Electromatic Pro Jet Bigsby. Being part of their Electromatic line, brings with it all the Gretsch goodness minus the premium appointments, at a very accessible price point. It is a true archtop thinline guitar, that passed the same attention to quality and detail that more expensive Gretsch guitars also go through.
Joan Armatrading, Roy Clark, Jim Croce, Kevin Cronin, Neil Diamond, Al Di Meola, Robert Fripp, Mick Jagger, Greg Lake, Adrian Legg, Paul McCartney, Brian May, Freddie Mercury, Jim Messina, Steve Morse, Eddie Rabbitt, Kenny Rogers, Richie Sambora, Tom Scholz, Seal, Bob Seger, Paul Simon, Rick Springfield, Eddie Van Halen, Josh White, and Nancy Wilson;[32]

Of course, any item is only worth what a willing buyer will pay to a willing seller. iGuide?is "just a guide." Please be aware that PRICES VARY WIDELY from region to region. Current estimated values are the result of much research. And we invite anyone to help add and update data. Read the "What's A Wiki" section below for more info on how to help.
Rickenbacker: From making world’s first electric guitar to making the most iconic guitars of Rock’n Roll, Rickenbacker has a history of innovations in guitar industry. Their guitars are still made in the old way. Owning a Rickenbacker is pretty much like owning a classic muscle car, yes there may be more modern guitars out there but no one’s got the mojo of a Rickenbacker.

Now, these are known as Shaggs models because they’re what the Shaggs played, not because of some big corporate endorsement deal! No one knows who sold the Avalon brand. Mailorder? An area music store? An auto supply store? All possible. Nor who made them. Nothing like them shows up in the reference books. I’m not even sure when they were made, but 1967 or ’68 is a good guess. Japanese guitarmakers were competing with the Europeans early on in the 1960s and some of the earliest ‘copying’ was of European models.

Upgrading the components in your guitar’s control cavity should give you significant improvements in tone and component life. If your guitar has single-coil pickups, buy 250K pots. If it’s packing ’buckers, go for the 500K jobs. If your ax has humbuckers and single-coils, I recommend 500K pots. This could make your single-coils sound a bit brighter than normal, but it will unlock your humbuckers’ full potential. For this job you’ll also need a soldering iron, solder, safety goggles, wire cutters, and a camera, to help you keep track of your original wiring connections (your cellphone will work just fine for this).
Some of the earliest electric guitars, amps-in-cases, pickups under the bridge, fiberglass guitars, built-in electronic vibratos. Sound curious enough for you? The subject of Supro guitars and amplifiers represents a profitable avenue for exploration by collectors and enthusiasts interested in the many curious and significant byways off the guitar superhighway, which can be enjoyed without having an oil sheik’s bankroll. While National resonator guitars have received superb attention by Bob Brozman, little has been written about this mysterious corner of the Valco universe. Well, with a little help from our friends (in particular, catalogs and invaluable information supplied by Mike Newton, Jim Dulfer, and Michael Lee Allen), let’s set the record straight.

The significance of Les Paul’s contributions to his Gibson guitar design remains controversial. The book “50 Years of the Gibson Les Paul” limits Paul’s contributions to two: advice on the trapeze tailpiece, and a preference for color (stating that Paul preferred gold as “it looks expensive”, and a second choice of black because “it makes your fingers appear to move faster on the box”, and “looks classy―like a tuxedo”).[11]


No tricks here, the volume control allows you to adjust the output level of your signal. But, unlike your amp's gain setting, the best signal-to-noise ratio will be achieved with the pot all the way up. If you have more than one volume knob, it means each controls a pickup. Middle positions can be useful with amps that don't have too much power and distort very easily or to get a crunch sound with a fat saturation. We can also use it as an effect by turning the knob progressively and playing a chord to make it appear (or disappear).

In the 21st century, European avant garde composers like Richard Barrett, Fausto Romitelli, Peter Ablinger, Bernhard Lang, Claude Ledoux and Karlheinz Essl have used the electric guitar (together with extended playing techniques) in solo pieces or ensemble works. Probably the most ambitious and perhaps significant work to date is Ingwe (2003–2009) by Georges Lentz (written for Australian guitarist Zane Banks), a 60-minute work for solo electric guitar, exploring that composer's existential struggles and taking the instrument into realms previously unknown in a concert music setting.
As a musician, learning songs for whichever instrument you are playing is one of the best exercises. Not only do you get to practice your chops but you also get to learn exactly how a particular song is played. As a beginner/intermediate guitar player, learning songs is all about knowing where to put your fingers on the fretboard, listening to the strumming patterns used, and taking note of any special techniques or chord combinations. Being aware of these things as you learn songs will help you become a better guitar player and composer. However, as a new/intermediate guitar player, you
The modern "tone block" is a design-based marketing approach from EBMM starting in their guitars a few years back. It originally involved routing out an alder body, fitting a block of mahogany from just behind the bridge to the neck join and applying a top to the guitar. It is an alteration of the design and some purists believe they hear a difference in the tone of the guitar versus plain alder bodied or mahogany instruments.
Acoustic necks are usually listed as 12- or 14-fret necks. This number refers to the number of frets above the guitar body, not the total number of frets. On a 12-fret neck, the 13th and 14th frets will be on the body, and, thus, harder to reach than on a 14-fret neck, where they are extended beyond the guitar body. If you have small hands, look for an acoustic guitar with a smaller diameter neck.
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Chris Broderick (b. 1970) is the lead guitarist for Megadeth, formerly of Jag Panzer and Nevermore. His main guitar was a 7-string RG model. During the recording of Endgame, he started using 6-string Ibanez S series guitars, which are painted with artwork from various Megadeth albums. This is because Dave Mustaine didn't want Broderick to use his 7-strings in the studio. He has since switched to Jackson Guitars.
The body of the PRS SE Standard 24 is made of mahogany and features a tobacco sunburst finish, vintage cherry, or translucent blue finish. Compared to most other body styles, this one is a lot more comfortable to play even though mahogany isn't the lightest tonewood out there.  The balance offsets any weight issues. The neck is a maple piece that comes with a standard rosewood fretboard and PRS classic bird inlays. The pickups PRS chose for this build are their S2 HFS Treble and S2 HFS Vintage Bass units. Their performance and color are pretty unique when compared to other designs out there. Looking at the hardware, we see a PRS S2 tremolo bridge on one end, while the headstock houses a set of PRS S2 locking tuners. Combined, these two components give you the ability to achieve great tremolo effects without losing intonation or tuning.
To produce Music and create the melody man has invented some musical instruments. In this process he has created the Guitar. Guitar is the instrument in which by the vibrations of the strings we can amplify the music. It’s an instrument having “a long, fretted neck, flat wooden soundboard, ribs, and a flat back, most often with incurved sides”. The melody produced by Guitar is also depends on the better finishing of its parts and strong pickups. That’s why it’s a vital task to select the best quality of guitar.

Since this guitar is from Taylor it benefits from the company's quality consistency, which applies to all their instruments regardless of price points. While aesthetics and materials are more affordable, it gets the same level of attention to detail and quality as the more premium models. This gives budget limited players the chance to have a true Taylor acoustic that plays like a "dream", and not a watered down version that plays and feels different.
In order to achieve supreme neck grip comfort, the fretboard edge is finished with a smooth curve that extends from the border between the fretboard and the neck, and then to the surface of the fretboard. The detailed neck shape is precisely carved using a ball mill for ultimate consistency. The width measurements of the fretboard are at 42mm at the nut and 56.4mm at the last fret. These dimensions allow for an easy grip in the lower register, and a more modern feel in the higher register.

Fuzz Box World – We are dedicated to bringing the highest quality components to builders of guitar and bass effects. We want to be the number one source of parts for electronics diyers. Whether you are a professional boutique pedal builder or a weekend hobbyist, your business is very important to us. We will do everything we can to make sure you are happy with your experience at Fuzz Box World.


If you have your heart set on a Stratocaster, but can’t justify shelling-out $600 or more for the USA-made Standard Strats, the Squier Standard Stratocaster is a great place to start. Unlike the even cheaper Strats that are included with Fender’s “starter packs,” this guitar is a definite step-up in quality and features a more modern take on their traditional bridge. I personally prefer this bridge style over Fender’s traditional/vintage 6-screw bridges.
The Ibanez TSA15H gets most of its high ratings from users who love the sound of a cranked tube amp, because this is where it excels. This is especially true of guitarists who use single coil guitars, but there are some humbucker users who are just as impressed. Even experts commend the amp's dynamic response, Premiere Guitar's Kenny Rardin comments: "It feels and responds like a good tube amp, and varying the controls dials in the response even further". Value for money and reliability are also commended, as expected from Ibanez.
If that were true, you'd have to take into consideration everything that vibrates after the string is stuck (the strap, the plastic of the knobs). You vibrate as well. So in essence, what you're saying is...the contents of your stomach affects the signal going to the amp. Hell, what wood your floors are made of affects the tonal quality. Maybe if you hit it hard enough you can get the ceiling involved.

One important thing about caring for a guitar is keeping the wood supple and moist, and quite often, you have to purchase a separate humidifier block with any guitar. Not this guitar, though. The Cordoba C12 comes with its own humidifier block right in the case. You just have to make sure you keep it moist every week. It is now ranked first on the best classical guitar list.
In the Popular Mechanics lab, we played the Xbox 360 version of Rocksmith 2014 with a pair of Epiphone guitars: The Les Paul Junior that comes with the game bundle, and a $1000 Les Paul Custom that the company sent us for testing, and which, sadly, we have to send back. The thing that sets Rocksmith apart from other rhythm games is the "Hercules" adapter. It's a cable that plugs into the output jack of any guitar or bass and connects it to your console via the USB port. You use the ordinary console controller to navigate menus.
Gibson Les Paul and Fender electric guitars can retail for several thousands of pounds, but electric guitars for beginners are available for less than £100. One example of a cheap electric guitar is the LA Electric Guitar + Amp Pack, which features everything a beginner needs to start playing the guitar right away for under £90.00. It includes a 15 watt guitar amp with 6.5" speaker for practising, a guitar lead, a strap, a padded gig bag, a set of spare strings, a pick and a 2-year warranty. The electric guitar itself has a neck made from maple - the most common type of wood used in necks - which helps to expand on the treble sounds of a guitar due to its hardness. The guitar is capable of producing a wide variety sounds, thanks in part to its 3x single coil pickups with a reverse wound middle pickup, which enables users to experiment with playing different styles of music.

A Flanger simulates the sound effect originally created by momentarily slowing the tape during recording by holding something against the flange, or edge of the tape reel, and then allowing it to speed up again. This effect was used to simulate passing into "warp speed," in sci-fi films, and also in psychedelic rock music of the 1960s. Flanging has a sound similar to a phase-shifter, but different, yet is closely related to the production of chorus.
Played by people such as Paul Simon and Richie Havens, Guild has been a top-of-the-line Acoustic guitar manufacturer since 1952. While they originally stuck to archtops, they branched off into more complicated builds. They also make solidbody electric guitars and even some semi-hollowbodies. Guild is known for their commitment to quality and tone. They were bought by Cordoba recently, but the general consensus is that the buyout is a good thing. When owned by Fender, their electric lineup was neglected and now they’re making a comeback. An additional aspect of Guild guitars is their durability. They have a very solid build and can easily shrug off some wear and tear while still sounding like it was when it was brand new.

Onboard effects had already appeared on various guitars, especially Höfner and Vox models, but these were not truly “active” in the modern sense. Alembic, with support from the Grateful Dead, was exploring active pickup systems, but these were still basically custom-made instruments. Both had a master volume and tone control with three-way select and a “band rejection filter tone switch,” also called a midrange bypass filter. Ovation was among the first to offer linear potentiometers to correlate movement with effect. Controls inside were mounted on a circuitboard with individual trim pots that can be adjusted to control the volume of each pickup.
An octave generator is a simplified form of pitch shifting. This effect will allow you to add an octave—usually below—the fundamental note. Units that add a lower octave exclusively are referred to as sub-octave generators. They can add a lot of depth to the guitarist’s sound. Many bass players also use sub-octave generators to significantly fatten up their sound.
If you do want to use single pedals then BOSS compact pedals come with a buffer circuit that converts your high impedance input into a low impedance output. For a more detailed discussion on the topic of single pedal buffers check out Steve Henderson’s excellent article here: https://www.rolandcorp.com.au/blog/buffered-effects-true-bypass-and-boss-pedals-by-steve-henderson
The Tube Screamer pedal has a long list of iconic users including Stevie Ray Vaughn, Gary Moore, John Mayer, Joe Bonamassa, The Edge and many more. As such, it is only expected for a company like Ibanez to take advantage of its popularity to extend their reach in the amplifier market - resulting in the creation of the Tube Screamer Amp (TSA) series. The Ibanez TSA15H leads the series in terms of ratings, with its compact yet versatile head profile while having the same combination of tube amplification and built-in tube screamer circuitry. At its core are two 12AX7 preamp tubes and two 6V6 power amp tubes, a standard configuration that sounds good on its own. Its standout feature is the implementation of a Tube Screamer circuit, which comes complete with the same controls as the iconic green pedal it is based on.
Marshall's current best rated amplifier is the humble 1-Watt DSL1HR, an all-tube, dual channel amplifier head that gives you genuine Marshall tone and appeal in a more compact and practice friendly format. It is based on the JCM2000 Dual Super Lead (DSL) series that the company released in the late '90s, but with some modern enhancements to make it more user friendly. What's cool about this amp is that it can go lower than 1W via its built-in attenuator, which lets you switch to low power mode that has a 0.1W power rating. This means that you can crank the amp's dual ECC83 preamp tubes and ECC82 power tube at very low volume levels, great for quiet practice and for recording. Speaking of recording, Marshall equipped the DSL1HR with a speaker emulated Line out, using Softube's cabinet simulator technology. Other features include having two channels: classic gain and ultra gain, built-in reverb and pedalboard friendly effects loop in and out. More importantly, this tube amp is affordably priced and comes bundled with a footswitch.
: This vintage YAMAHA is one of the greats folks and here for your serious consideration today at Joe's Vintage Guitars.... This is the Classic Vintage Yamaha FG-200 - Nippon Gakki body seems the same specs as the famous FG180...hummm? interesting She's been lovingly played for nearly 40 years,its beautifully aged now with a great feel & patina only found on real vintage guitars of this age and caliber. This guitar really has nicely opened up over the past 40 years and you just don't get booming bassy tone like this one with a new guitar thats for sure. This example is not mint but is beautiful in its own right, it does have a few nicks, dings and wear but nothing really bad at all really she just looks the part of the 40 year old Martin D28 vintage guitsr. A lot of guitar for not a lot of cash... Vintage aint goin down..get her at a great price today! Let me know...thanks for your interest, Joe email me: gr8bids@comcast.net This is an early one from the Nippon Gakki plant and has a surprising boom even for or a 200 same as our great old red lable FG180 for that matter with no real decernable diference. I cannot find a serial number but is believed to be late 60's - early 70's This old girl has Excellent low end sound!!! and tone on this guitar is wonderful - it really booms! Condition: Average vintage wear wich includes minor pick wear, scratches dents & dings for an old vintageguitar. but no cracks to be found, straight neck, trussrod is functioning properly, very good frets still playing well all the way up & down the fingerboard with no funny buzzes or dead spots... Frets 1 - 5 ( cowboy cord area )have medium play wear but still plenty of life remaining no problemo. action is very good at 3/32 1st E string @ 12th fret. Tuners are the original and in excellent working order. Bridge plate is securely fastened to top. We have just as a precationary installed A PlateMate brass plate has now been installed to any prevent further wear to bridge plate which is common among these vintage guitars. This brass plate has also contributed to its big booming tone now is even a more rich sounding competitor to a vintage Martin D-28... FRESH SET UP...with Martin Bone & Saddle... this guitar is a wonderfull fun guitar to play lots of bang for the buck factor here.. This guitar is overall a very solid well built guitar that is standing the test of time it also is a great sounding vintage guitar that plays very nicely. Ya can't go wrong with this wonderful vintage Yamaha FG Nippon Gakki guitar Has a new bone saddle and Martin Silk Steel strings. No case included but will protect and properly package for shipping. PlateMate product works very well and is easily removed if desired. To my ear it enhanced this boom-box's sound quality and is described by the manufacturer as follows: If you want to protect and enhance the sound and tones and balance out string volume of your acoustic guitar, Mitchels Plate Mate is the way to go. Mitchels Plate Mate is a small piece of brass that is applied without using or altering of tools, and is installed as fast as you can change a set of strings. This was invented and patend mainly to prevent damage caused by ball-end strings on the acoustic guitars bridge plate, it is also proven to enhance volume, tones, and balances out string volume by one of the best acoustic guitar makers in the world. Mitchels Plate Mate will protect your guitar from ball-end strings pulling up threw the bridge plate and possibly cracking the bridge or pulling the bridge off the top of your guitar which would be a very expensive repair bill. It also protects your bridge pins, and saddle by making the string windings stay down in the string holes where they belong. I have used Mitchels Plate Mate in guitars priced from $100 to $50,000 it doesnt matter the price just protect your prized posetion or investment. .
In the Beatles' early days, George Harrison briefly billed himself as Carl Harrison in honor of his quick-picking hero. Perkins' bright, trebly style – which the rockabilly king picked up from blues players in Tennessee – defined the singles he put out on Sun Records ("Blue Suede Shoes," "Glad All Over") and influenced scores of players from Eric Clapton to John Fogerty. "He took country picking into the rock world," Tom Petty has said. "If you want to play Fifties rock & roll, you can either play like Chuck Berry, or you can play like Carl Perkins."
Cadsoft Eagle is a very popular tool with pedal builders. A basic version can be had for free. There are limitations on board size and number of layers in the free version, but these won’t come in to play for the majority of basic analog effects pedals.  Element14  includes a host of documents and tutorials.  If you get into complex designs or full professional use later,  full versions of Eagle, at time of writing cost $575, and $1640.
Rickenbacker has produced a number of uniquely designed and distinctively trimmed acoustic guitars. Although a small number of Rickenbacker acoustics were sold in the 1950s and were seen in the hands of stars like Ricky Nelson[9]and Sam Cooke,[10] the company concentrated on their electric guitar and western steel guitar business from the early 1960s onward. From about 1959 through 1994, very few Rickenbacker acoustic guitars were made.
Slightly out-of-tune strings on a bass may not jump out as much as on guitar (especially in chords), but when that bass line is sitting under other parts in the mix, even slightly off-pitch notes will make their presence known, and sometimes be harder to track down (why does this song sound a little “off”?). I’d use a tuner (h/w or s/w), but I’d also always verify by ear, before hitting record, and I’d check tuning periodically as the session progresses—just as with drums, hard players can easily put the instrument out after a few energetic takes.
Speaking of, you’ll probably look to upgrade either the bridge or the tuners at some point, because heavy whammy use will pretty quickly throw this out of tune. If you don’t use a whammy often, this makes a very fine choice, indeed. The neck is satin finished for better feel. All in all, a very worthwhile guitar that comes in at less than half the price of most of the other options on this list.
1. Intonation: I have a brand-new Epiphone LP that will not completely intonate on the G, A, and Low E. Fretted notes remain sharp. I have replaced the factory strings with new Ernie Balls and tried every trick in the book to move the saddles as far away from the neck as possible. Many LP owners have this problem. Other than returning the guitar to Guitar World, my only other option is swap out the factory bridge with a wider one. You mention the latter option in one of your early comments, and I've decided to try it. I just bought a Gotoh one online. Hopefully, that will solve the problem.
From a fledgling studio that sold second hand music equipment back in the late 60s, Orange grabs the top spot in this list with their highly rated guitar amplifiers. Orange amps are easy to spot with their picturesque design, but what's interesting is how successful they continue to be, while veering away from amp modeling technology. By limiting the features of their amps, they made it easier for users to appreciate their brand of quality and tone, which translates to high ratings. Obviously, the influence of popular artists helps their cause, this includes Jimmy Page, Noel and Liam Gallagher, Billy Gibbons, Chino Moreno and many more. In addition to their distinct combo amplifiers, Orange amps is well known for their lunchbox size tube amps.

Having Robert Johnson at the top is a joke. All the kids now think it's cool to like him because he was so "influential" but it's a complete myth. He was virtually unknown until the mid sixties and even then the whole "Robert Johnson is cool" thing didn't get going until around 1970, by which time most of the real pioneers were already well on their way.
I've played a Telecaster for years exclusively However i have tried playing a Les Paul and i remember thinkin how much easier it was to play. What guitar would you say was the easiest to play? I know it can be subjective but it seems to me that metal guitars are designed to play fast so they are made easier to hit notes etc. I'm guessing something like what steve Vai plays would be so easy and nice to play regardless of tone etc.
Some of the energy is not translated to string movement because it is lost. Where? To the body. Dependant on hardware and body composition, certain amounts of frequencies are absorbed by the body and therefore lost to be seen by the pickups. Body resonance is the OPPOSITE of what most people think. Those prevalent frequencies you hear ringing out of the wood are now unavailable to be transferred to the pickups. Remember, we can't create energy, only move it around. If a guitar is prominent in specific frequencies, it is only because other frequencies have been "removed" to make them stand out.

In any given field there are a handful of companies that rise above the others. This is true whether you are talking about cars or golf clubs or chainsaws, and of course it is true if you are talking about electric guitars. Some brands have proven themselves as the best of the best. They’ve created the most legendary instruments in music history. If you are looking for a new guitar, one of these companies is a smart place to start.
The Truetone Rock Star has a classic 1960s Fender Jaguar - inspired body with a cherry & black sunburst finish and swank natural wood grain finish neck. The headstock has an odd, but killer-looking shape, an elaborately cut pick guard and what might be the world's coolest pickup; a chrome-cased body with a shimmery red marblized pickup cover. The guitar is 100% original with no replacement parts. We  rescued this one a while back and it was rusty and did not work when first tested. We meticulously detailed and cleaned it and removed the rust. We also re-soldered a few wires inside, and this fab Japanese guitar was ready to rock again. It sold and was shipped France, and the Rock Star is pretty rare, but there are lots of cool retro Truetone / Silvertone Japanese Guitars for sale below! Scroll Down for more from our collection!

It all began in California in 1946, when inventor Leo Fender decided he could improve on the hollow-bodied guitars that were popular at the time by introducing the world’s first production solid-bodied electric guitar. Arriving in 1951, the Telecaster soon became a commercial success, shortly followed by the release of the sleek Stratocaster in 1954.
Chorus is the sound at the beginning of the Guns ‘n’ Roses song Paradise City. It is a gentle, shimmering effect that is good for arpeggiated chords and adding that little extra to a lead tone (such as in the solo for Smells like Teen Spirit by Nirvana). However, we recommend using it sparingly as it can sound dated and old fashioned if over used (unless, of course, old-school is what you’re going for). Common controls include level (the volume of the effect), tone (affects the EQ of the chorus effect), rate (how quickly the note shimmers) and depth (how large and prominent the shimmering is).
Sie sind so viele tolle bild listen das auf kann werden Ihre motivation und informativ zweck vonJaguar Guitar Kit design-Ideen allein sammlungen. wir hoffen sie sind alle genießen und zuletzt kann finden der beste bau aus unserer sammlung veröffentlicht hier und auch für ideal bedürfnisse für den persönlichen gebrauch. team auch liefert die bild ein TOP QUALITÄT Auflösung (HD bildauflösung) das kann sein heruntergeladen durch einfach Weg.
The goal is to find the body shape and configuration that appeals the most to your eyes and ears. The most straightforward choice for beginners will be the solidbody for its durability. Players who are looking to expand their sonic palette are usually the ones who will take interest in semi-hollow and hollow body guitars. For more information on this topic read The Different Types of Electric Guitars Explained.
RARE Epiphone Vintage FT-150 Bard Lefty Conversion with bone saddle. Spruce top, rosewood back and sides. Medium to low action. Beautiful sounding and playing guitar. Superb projection. Rivals guitars costing thousands.In excellent cosmetic condition with normal fretwear for a guitar it's age, and tiny dings here and there but nothing that stands out and looks gorgeous. Includes original right-handed, adjustable bridge. Includes hard shell case and original right-hand adjustable bridge if you wanna convert it back to a righty!
This little-known company is responsible for the St. George badge. This particular badge was made from 1963-1967. It also produced the rare Shiro guitar. It is possible that the company may also be responsible for the Pleasant guitar badge after 1966. This company may have been a small offshoot of Aria Guitar Company, founded by Shiro Arai, but that has not been verified as of today.
The hollow body — the original electric guitar design — is completely hollow on the inside, like an acoustic guitar. Hollow-bodied guitars like the Gibson ES-150 saw use in jazz ensembles by players such as Eddie Durham and Charlie Christian, but were also adopted for country, folk and, eventually, rock and roll. If you’re looking for warm, mellow tones, the hollow body is your best bet. That isn’t to say it can’t give you some sweet, raunchy distortion. A proper hollow-body setup can pull off a great classic blues or rock sound, but they are more prone to feedback than solid body guitars.
The paper presents the results of the modal analysis of six types of structures made from plates. Firstly, was done geometrical modeling of structures, after which they were numerical modeled using shell and solid finite elements. The next step consisted in simulating the structures behavior to free vibration for different thicknesses and materials. The results were processed and compared in... [Show full abstract]
Despite what appears now to a somewhat dated design (all the quasi-organic shapes inspired by Alembic at the time are tough to love with the passage of time), Martin’s 18 Series electrics are actually quite comfortable and yield a versatile number of useful sounds. The neck profile is quite round, not unlike many acoustics, but very easy to play. The frets are small and squarish, which makes them a bit awkward for blues-style bending.
I love them both, have a Strat and Les Paul. they are such different animals. Each has it’s place in my music, each has a special sound. Used to own a Tele which I just didn’t enjoy playing so much, so traded in for the Les Paul. I later bought a modified Tele with humbuckers (I know it’s a sin) but damn it sounds so good, for heavy power chords, more like a PRS sound. I’ve been playing 27 years now and am a composer / songwriter. Played in lots of bands, and during my live work I have to say I prefer my Strat. It’s lighter than the Gibson, and contours nicely to my body. With a good valve amp and the right strings I can get some lovely fat sounds out of it. I use the Gibson mostly in the studio. When I moved countries, I needed a cheap electric to tide me over until my stuff got sent over. I picked up a $100 Mitchel (Made in China). The setup was awful, totally unplayable, so set it up properly, and to be honest it plays like a dream. The neck is amazing for a $100 guitar, and with some new pickups the sound is great too. The upshot here is that it doesn’t really matter what guitar you use to make music on, as long as you enjoy the instrument, a cheap guitar can go a long way. I find the discussions about which is better kind of like guys comparing their crown jewels, it’s purely academic and what matters is how you use the thing 😉
Samick is a South Korean based musical instrument manufacturer, which was founded in 1958 by Hyo Ick Lee, with the goal of "enriching human life through music, the universal language". By the mid-1990s, they were the single largest guitar manufacturer in the world! Because they build under contract for many famous brand names, more likely than not, you've already played one of their guitars.
It was Berry’s songs from the late Fifties with cut boogie patterns—like “Roll Over Beethoven,” “Johnny B. Goode” and “Carol”—that realized electrically the guitar ambitions first dreamt by Robert Johnson. Berry’s tone—courtesy of a hollow-body Gibson through a tweed Fender amp—was raw and loud. This, along with his duckwalk, ringing double-stops and songs about cars and girls, grabbed the youth market. Tall and handsome, he brought the guitar as the “cool” instruments to a ready audience via appearances on TV and in movies, in a way that the Beatles would repeat in the early Sixties.

Another application of a fuzz pedal is available when the user has control over the the amount of feedback signal routed back into the transistor loop while the pedal is engaged. By configuring the feedback to more sensitive levels, the pedal will feed back into itself causing oscillation*. As the pedal oscillates, certain frequencies will be produced, causing a singing sustained note without the guitarist playing anything at all. The player can consequently play over the note produced to cancel out the feedback loop, but once the player stops the pedal will feed back into itself producing the configured signal once again.
Carvin is a guitar company with a different business model than the rest. You won’t find them at your local music store because Carvin only makes custom guitars. Their instruments are based around a handful of templates and each feature components that are individually chosen by the buyer. For this reason, it’s very rare to find two Carvins that are completely identical.

The electric guitar setup routine is as important to your sound as any component on your instrument. In addition, if you learn how to setup your guitar correctly you can save some money by not running down to the local guitar shop, and paying them to do it. I want to preface that I am not an expert on the building of guitars. I did not go to the "Fender/Gibson school of Luthier excellence". I am however someone that's built a dozen electric guitars, and have setup everyone of them. Additionally I've setup probably fifty more guitars, including acoustics, for friends, and friends of friends, who found out I've got some practical experience in the matter.


The most musically satisfying types of distortion tend to be progressive, where the audio waveform becomes more 'squashed' as the level increases. Hard clipping, by contrast, tends to sound harsh. All these types of distortion introduce additional harmonics into the signal, but it is the level and proportion of the added harmonics that creates the character of the sound. Harmonically related distortion can be added at much higher levels than non-harmonically related distortion before the human hearing system recognises it as such, so there is no way to define a percentage of distortion below which audio is acceptable or above which it is unacceptable. The reason that digital distortion has its own character, which most people find less musically pleasant, is because it is not usually harmonically related to the input signal. For example, quantisation distortion, which results from sampling at too low a bit depth, sounds quite ugly, though many dance and industrial music producers have found a use for it, and some plug-ins deliberately introduce it.
In 1952, Alfred Dronge – co-owner of small New York City music shop Sagman & Dronge – registered the Guild Guitar Company. The following year, they began producing deep hollow body guitars, a reflection of Dronge’s love for jazz music. The brand grew steadily through to the 70s – when Alfred Dronge died unexpectedly in a plane crash – getting their instruments in the hands of musicians such as Buddy Guy, Muddy Waters, and Bonnie Raitt. In the 80s, Guild began producing signature guitars for musicians Hank Williams Jr. and Brian May of Queen. The brand moved around frequently and it wasn’t until 2014 that they settled in their present headquarters in Oxnard, California – where all of their line of USA made guitars are now produced. To this day, they still produce a wide variety of hollow, semi-hollow, and solid body guitars that look as beautiful as they sound.
A basic tone control consists of a capacitor and a potentiometer (the tone control itself).  The illustration below if the basic wiring for a tone control.  The view is as you would see it from the bottom of the potentiometer, wired for a right-handed guitar.  The oval "blobs" on the potentiometer casing are solder connections.  The ground wire should be soldered to the potentiometer casing for this tone control to work - and it helps shield out unwanted noise (really noticeable if not done this way and you use metal knobs).
The guitar builder for the giants of jazz, Ibanez now introduces the Artstar AS153 Semi-Hollow Electric Guitar, to answer the needs of the working professional player. Crafted from specially selected tone woods, this guitar features a bone nut, ebony fingerboard, hand-rolled frets and Ibanez's famous Super 58 pickups-capable of tone magic any place between "jazz-clean" all the way to "blues dirty." If you're aiming high, Ibanez has an ARTSTAR for you.

Although the book contains some good information, it is not well written. In particular the use of poor grammar makes reading annoying. There is also incorrect reference to measurement units. She makes reference to measuring 1/32 or 1/64 of a millimeter. A millimeter is metric, measuring 1/32 or 1/64 are fractions of an inch, not a millimeter. I'm glad it was a free book.
Slicer – A dynamic effect that sounds like your guitar tone is chopping in and out. This percussive effect is akin to sequencer-type effects used by synthesizers. The effect turns the volume of the signal on and off, and sounds like the signal is being “chopped up” or “sliced” in a specified pattern. The BOSS SL-20 Slicer features 50 patterns to turn your guitar into a groove machine!
The first guitar amplifiers were relatively low-fidelity, and would often produce distortion when their volume (gain) was increased beyond their design limit or if they sustained minor damage.[3] Around 1945, Western-swing guitarist Junior Barnard began experimenting with a rudimentary humbucker pick-up and a small amplifier to obtain his signature "low-down and dirty" bluesy sound. Many electric blues guitarists, including Chicago bluesmen such as Elmore James and Buddy Guy, experimented in order to get a guitar sound that paralleled the rawness of blues singers such as Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf,[4] replacing often their originals with the powerful Valco "Chicagoan" pick-ups, originally created for lap-steel, to obtain a louder and fatter tone. In early rock music, Goree Carter's "Rock Awhile" (1949) featured an over-driven electric guitar style similar to that of Chuck Berry several years later,[5] as well as Joe Hill Louis' "Boogie in the Park" (1950).[6][7]
Super info. thks. Just found your site as I too, had some questions about action. I have a Martin D-28, manufacture date late 2013 and I purchased new in Feb. of 2015. It has always been humidified and kept in the case. I only really noticed the ‘high’ action when I changed to drop D tuning and I noticed amplified ‘string whip’. I estimate the height to be 4mm. I re-tuned and looked again and the action is noticeably higher than my Epiphone EJ 200 and Simon & Patrick Woodland Folk. I think, as you have said, the guitar is just getting acclimatized to it’s ‘new’ home. Play ability is still good, (although the player needs work!) but I think I will take it back to Folkways Music to have the Tech take a look. Thks. Great site, I will bookmark it!
There are several factors to consider when establishing a good guitar tone. Here are some guitar tone tips.  Lets start with electric guitar tone. With electric there are three major factors to consider…the guitar, the amp, and the effects. There are all types of guitars with all types of pickups. Single Coil pickups and humbucking pickups are the two main pickup categories. I prefer humbuckers for the simple reason that they are less noisy. I like the tone of a good single coil pickup but I have never had much luck with keeping them from buzzing terribly. This is especially a factor when you are playing gigs in dive bars or clubs with bad electric wiring. You are much better off with a humbucking pickup. If you are gigging musician I would suggest having at least one in your arsenal. Generally speaking your Fender strats have single coils and your Les Pauls have humbuckers.

PICKUP CAVITIES Same basic thing here. Be careful routing as you don't want to go outside you lines. The pickup rings tend to be thin along the outter edge, so if you go outside you lines it will look like there is a hole in the body of the guitar once you fit the rings on. Determine the depth that you will need for the pickups you are using. This is usually based on the length of the mounting screws. You will need enough room for them to fit. I use a 1/4" bit for this as well. You can use a template if you want but I do it free hand because any imperfections will be covered by the pickup rings.


Ihave a 12 string dorado. I found a guitar that was sold for $299. It's a 12 string acoustic, Gretsch, 1971. Seems like the right period. The problem is that it is called doraldo. One letter out. Rosewood fret board, dot inlays. Exactly the same as mine but different name. Maybe it could be the same? Go to http://www.rabbithillmusic.9cy.com/id2.htm
The Reaction Many manufacturers reacted by making warranties void if amps were driven at full power, some threatened to cut off retailers who sold their amps to bands that played ‘music of the devil’. The parody of this historical contradiction has been rewritten, to fit mythical beliefs that brilliant designers created these amps for what ‘rock musos’ wanted.
I have had some truly “nightmare” scenarios with repair people in my time, and you must beware of these folks who love to take your money, but who can totally botch a repair job on a nice guitar! It’s happened often enough to me to make me be very careful whenever I am “trying out” a new repair shop for guitar-related problems. Due to this, I often like to start with bringing them some relatively un-complicated guitar repair problems such as fret jobs and wiring problems, but even these have sometimes turned into nightmares. Today for example, I brought of all things, 3 Lap Steels and one semi-hollow guitar for repairs, but unfortunately the store’s repair guy was not there. We had a good communication though, and they made sure I wrote down the repairs I felt were needed, with a separate sheet for each instrument, and said that he’d be calling me with any questions regarding the guitars and their repairs before tearing into them!
For many engineers, a simple one-mic technique gives them all the recorded electric guitar sound they need. Dynamic types, such as the ubiquitous Shure SM57, are ideal for capturing loud sounds, as they can handle high SPLs. For a more accurate representation of the amplifier as the human ear hears it in the room, a condenser or ribbon mic can be employed, although care must be taken not to damage the mic with very loud signals. Pointing the mic at the centre of the speaker cone produces the brightest sound, with the sound becoming increasingly warm the further off-centre it’s placed. It’s common to position the mic quite close to the speaker grille, unless a degree of room sound is desired. A good starting point is to place the mic just off-centre, at a distance of between two and six inches.
The Whammy – If you’re familiar with the tremolo arm, or “Whammy bar,” then you already have an idea of what this pedal can do. Usually, the Whammy pedal is a rocker type, much like the wah, which shifts the pitch up and down as you rock it back and forth. Eddie Van Halen, Jimi Hendrix and Joe Satriani are a few of the artists you can listen to for a general feel of this pedal’s potential.
I have made over a hundred solid body electric guitars by hand. I can use the same pickup in a plexiglas, or a wood body, utilizing a wood neck, plugged directly into a tube amp, and they do sound different. There is no way anyone can deny me my personal experience on this. I think whats going on here is the new 3D printer body's that are being pushed for their capability of unusual designs. Nothing wrong there, as i have some of my own designs i am going to try as well. I have a contact that makes aluminum guitars, and they also produce a different sound.
Lastly, if what you're really asking is "Can I play my electric guitar without making any noise that would bother my neighbors/housemates?" Many amps and all direct in setups will allow you play with headphones. I plug headphones in a small tube amp. The sound is quite nice. I find this setup allows me to experiment even more than usual since I am not self conscious about anyone hearing what I am playing. I've seen little tube amps for as little as about $125 that have headphone jacks. At that price don't expect Fender, Dr Z, Vox, Marshall or Mesa Boogie quality sound, but they get the job done of basic tube drive and bypass the loudspeaker by driving the headphones.
Hi, I’m John Anthony, Playing and collecting Cool Guitars is my hobby, and all of my friends and relatives know it. For the reason, I receive many queries over the phone, email and social media about Best Guitar Recommendation. Which one they should buy now, which will fit them etc. And finally, I created this GuitarListy.com and started putting my suggestions and reviews here.
There was no “Kent Guitar” Factory. The Kent brand was established in 1960 by Buegeleisen & Jacobson, a musical instrument distributor in New York City. The 500-series models had a metal “K” badge (like the one at left) attached to the headstock of the guitar. The use of a glued-on logo is a good sign that the guitar could appear under another brand name if the manufacturer so desired. The 600-series Kents had the name in metal script letters attached (probably glued) to the headstock. The 500 and 600 series guitars were almost identical. The headstocks were somewhat shaped like those on Fender guitars. Most of those were low-end solid-body instruments.
The CD-60CE is a Factory Special Run acoustic-electric guitar made by Fender. This inexpensive model comes with a Honeyburst gloss finish and a solid construction that gives a warm and rich sound. This guitar is made of laminated mahogany all-around. The top features scalloped X-bracing patterns for a wider range of frequencies and a distinctive sound.
A common acoustic body style that makes use of a very large soundboard is the dreadnought. Dreadnoughts are distinctive for their square bouts, wide waists, and 14-fret necks. The first dreadnought was developed in 1916, and it has been gaining in popularity ever since. Dreadnoughts are very popular among bluegrass guitarists due to their powerful, driving sound.
Electro String also sold amplifiers to go with their electric guitars. A Los Angeles radio manufacturer named Van Nest designed the first Electro String production-model amplifier. Shortly thereafter, design engineer Ralph Robertson further developed the amplifiers, and by the 1940s at least four different Rickenbacker models were made available. James B. Lansing of the Lansing Manufacturing Company designed the speaker in the Rickenbacker professional model. During the early 1940s, Rickenbacker amps were sometimes repaired by Leo Fender, whose repair shop evolved into the Fender Electric Instrument Manufacturing Company.
If you see "PM," play using palm muting. For standard right-handed guitar playing, gently lay the edge of your right palm across the strings near the guitar's bridge. When you strike the notes (with the same hand as is providing the mute), you should hear the tone of the note, but with a subdued, dead quality. Move your hand slightly up the strings toward the neck to deaden the notes more.
Most of the time, you’ll almost always see a piezo pickup on an acoustic electric guitar with the addition of an on-board preamp. Typically, it will be installed underneath and in contact with the saddle on the bridge of the guitar where it can effectively pick up vibration energy. This specific type of device is called an active undersaddle transducer. This type of pickup is often paired with other pickups and microphones to provide versatility for sound options, and to produce a richer, more organic and natural sound. A piezo pickup and other types of electronic pickups are what we call active pickups.
The long chord progression can be very intimidating, especially if you’re a beginning musician. Technically, you’re only dealing with four different chords, which are, A – G – D – A – F – G – A. Looking at it, it looks really scary, but if you listen to the chord changes on a piano or someone else playing a cover of the song, it seems less intimidating.

My services include re-frets, fret dressing, fret end dressing, action adjustment, truss rod adjustment, intonation setting, nut replacement, bridge saddle replacement, acoustic pickup installation, electric pickup fitting/replacement, output jack replacement, pot replacement, re-wiring, sound post setting, tuner installation, brace re-gluing, broken headstock repairs, strap pin installation, re-strings, bridge setting, tremolo setting, Floyd Rose setting, custom scratch plate cutting, tuning problems, restoration, polishing, cleaning, wiring modifications...Get in touch I'm sure I can help!
For my tastes, position 1 on a clean tone can be a bit too boomy. Even if one backs the volume a bit to take the edge off, it doesn't quite suit acoustic-style strumming. Position 2 is perfect for these sorts of things, though. I'd always use it for the small high chords you often find in funk and reggae. Position 2 is also a nice way thinning a distorted tone without it cleaning up too much, like Position 1 with the volume dialled down does. If you have your rig set so Position 1 screams, Position 2 will sing.

The Science of Electric Guitars and Guitar Electronics considers the electric guitar and related accessories from a scientific point of view. The majority of books about electric guitars try to avoid using mathematics when describing the scientific phenomena related to the electric guitar. However, mathematics is an invaluable tool in the design processes of all areas of technology, even when designing musical instruments and audio electronics. This book presents simple mathematical methods for modelling the electric guitar as a signal source for electric circuits such as effect pedals and amplifiers. In addition to modelling the electronics inside the electric guitar, the principles of operation of some vintage guitar effects and amplifier circuits are explained and analysed using systematic methods of circuit analysis. The book is intended for everyone who is interested in the design and analysis of basic analogue electronics used in the electric guitar and guitar-related accessories. The presented topics cover the whole signal chain from the guitar strings to the loudspeaker. Therefore, a solid foundation is established for creating own designs in guitar electronics using basic components of analogue electronics.
Body:  Soundboard:  two-piece spruce: medium grain broadening toward the flanks. Back: two-piece spruce: fine grain on bass side broadening to medium at the flank, wide grain on treble side; slightly arched; two f-holes; recessed 11 mm from edge of ribs. Ribs: 7-ply plywood, the outer layer birch, the inner layers mahogany, the outer veneer layer grain running perpendicular to plane of top and back; panel on bass side with nickel-plated steel plug; slides out for access to pickup unit. Head: mahogany veneered with white celluloid on both faces. Neck: mahogany; integral with head; rosewood stripe.
BassLab: This company can be best described as someone who goes completely against believers of tone-wood theory. They basically employ monocoque carbon fiber construction for their guitars, yeah you heard that right, the entire guitar technically becomes a continuous piece of carbon fiber with not even a trace of wood in it. The construction process for these guitars is pretty much same as F1 racing cars and is quite pricey. Since the guitar uses a monocoque carbon-fiber construction they offer the option for extremely thin profile necks, because making the neck thin doesn’t impact the structural strength of a monocoque guitar. This enables them to make their guitar necks even faster to play than those Wizard necks found on Ibanez guitars. As for bridge, well almost all BassLab guitars are headless, the ones with trem use high quality headless trems made by J-Custom, the design of these trems are based on the much acclaimed (but now discontinued due to high production cost) Steinberger S-trem which are a piece of cake to tune and hold their tuning as good as hardtail bridges. Just like Strandberg they also offer the option for Cycfi XR pickups, but unlike Strandberg since the BassLab guitars are made of pure carbon-fiber there’s barely anything on it to color the sound of those pickups, this gives them an extremely precise and transparent clean tone unheard on any other guitar. They also make acoustic guitars, for acoustic guitars they have option for carbon-fiber and wood composite to replicate tone of woods, or you can go for usual monocoque pure carbon-fiber construction for completely unadulterated tone from the strings. They are one of the few guitar makers who have dared to rise above the confines of traditional guitar making and have created what can be best described as guitars of the future.
Flanging is the strongest of the standard modulation effects. The feedback control increases the depth of the 'comb filtering' produced when a delayed signal is added back to itself. Because it is such a distinctive effect, it is best used sparingly, though it can also be used to process a reverb send to add a more subtle complexity to the reverbed sound.

Great article and very enlightening comments too. One thing I’d like to add is that it seems to me that a considerably large expense is necessarily involved in going the ampless route i.e. Axe FX + midi controller at the least, in an Axe Fx setup. Granted, amp setups can be just as expensive or more expensive, but cheaper amp options are available.


Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic - Body Size: Grand Concert - Top Wood: Solid Sitka Spruce - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Nut Width: 44.5mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 26" (66cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Bracing: X-Type - Hardware: Chrome, Grover Tuners - String Instrument Finish: Light Violin High Gloss Sunburst, Dark Violin High Gloss Sunburst
I'm going to break this review into pros and cons. Pros: Top notch wood, electronics, wonderful bound neck and great machine heads. The action/fretboard are wonderful (after being setup). Sounds beautiful!, and more so if you take my advice. One last pro, all of the cons are easily remedied. Cons: The saddle, nut, and bridge pins are plastic (kind of like putting crap tires on a good sports car). I replaced the saddle and nut with tusk, and for the bridge pins I went with brass. It was like the volume went from a 4 to a 8, and the tone went from nice to beautiful and singing. It was about a 40$ upgrade, that made it sound like a thousand dollar guitar. This is the first time I bought a guitar before playing it. The gamble more than paid off. Been playing guitar for 25 years, and I
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In 2004, the Gibson Custom Shop introduced the Slash Signature Les Paul Standard, a guitar that Gibson has used ever since as the “standard” non limited edition Slash Les Paul (this guitar is in the Gibson range all year round).[33] This guitar features a plain maple top with a Dark Tobacco Sunburst finish, and has a piezo pickup with a switch located near the tone and volume knobs .[32] In 2008, Epiphone issued the Slash Signature Les Paul Standard Plus Top, which was modeled after the Gibson Custom Shop model.[32] It has a solid mahogany body, flame maple top, and a Dark Tobacco Burst finish.[34]


The downside is you do pay a considerable sum for the pleasure! Still, the playability, comfort and tone on offer from is exceptional – as we highlight in the complete Taylor A12e review. It sports a Grand Concert body made from solid Sitka spruce on the top, with laminate sapele back and sides, along with a mahogany armrest for optimal ergonomics.
Being a grand auditorium body shape guitar, it’s a little smaller than the typical dreadnought size that we’ve covered several times on our list. That’s no bad thing, and allows this guitar to be nice and flexible, especially when combined with the ‘Expression’ electronics system that allows for some good tonal customisation. Match up with an effective wireless instrument system.
Thanks for the post on ’66 Deccas and the video. I have a red sunburst DMI-203 with the chrome pick guard as in your picture. My first electric guitar in 1966 was the same instrument with no name on the headstock but with paperwork saying GHI/Heit. Bought it in a department store plus a Concordia amp for $50. Sold it in ’69 when I needed cash for a car (for $75!). I picked up the Decca about 10 years ago. Vintage Guitar magazine did an article of some work done on it in it’s Jan. 2014 issue.
This guitar could have rocked around the clock. Bill Haley and many other early rockers used guitars just like this baby. They have a sound of their own, and just breath taking, to say the least. This Harmony H38 dates to about 1957-59. She's completely original except for the button input jack that someone installed. This guitar puts a chill in cool. There's just something about playing a Vintage Harmony. $799.99
Reverb is a sound effect used both in music and audio engineering, which adds a spatial dimension to the original track. To put it into more simple terms, a reverb gives you an impression that the sound is originating in a large room. You are hearing the source sound but also its numerous iterations as it bounces off different surfaces. Reverb guitar effects pedals offer a simulation of this phenomenon.

10% of our readers voted for brands that were not listed in the survey. So, besides G&L, Jackson, Yamaha, Danelectro, Charvel, Cort, Washburn, Framus, Parker, Dean, B.C Rich, and Aria, you might also want to check Duesenberg, Wild Customs, Mayones, Caparison, Reverend, Blackat, Hagstrom, Peerless, Carvin, Guild, Cole Clark, Seagull, Meloduende, Suhr, Nik Huber, Feline, Ozark, Burns, Ruokangas, and Eko.
A diagram showing a wiring modification for a Les Paul or a similar electric guitar with two humbuckers. Wiring schemes using four push-pull pots for additional pickup combinations were made popular by Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page and later produced as a signature model by Gibson. The modification shown in this diagram is an evolution of the original concept combining coil splitting, phase cancellation and parallel/series switching for a total of 22 different pickup combinations.
The main thing to keep in mind regarding vintage guitars: A guitar is worth what somebody will pay for it. There aren’t necessarily rational reasons behind the value of a particular model. Rarity is only really relevant if the guitar in question is part of a group of guitars that are lusted after by many collectors, and many of those collectors are also considering investment potential, so those guitars will never be played and may end up in museums in Europe or Asia. In other words, Rarity means nothing without demand. A rare crappy guitar is still a crappy guitar and if nobody wants it, it’s just firewood. Condition counts for more.
Wiring: If you chose the optional snap together wiring, then all of our instruments come pre-wired and pre-soldered, so that you can assemble the instrument without needing to do any soldering. You simply snap a few connectors together to complete the electrical connections before you screw down the pickguard, control panel, and output jack plate. This is detailed on the guitar kit wiring and hole drilling description page. If you would prefer to not have your kit pre-wired and pre-soldered, please let us know.
The Gruhn Guitars repair shop has been world renowned for decades for its unrivaled expertise, skill, and respectful repair practices. Though our full-time staff of luthiers primarily focuses on repairing and restoring the instruments we make available for sale, beginning in 2016 we are also pleased to offer our repair services to loyal customers as an extended benefit of buying an instrument from Gruhn Guitars. Instruments purchased from Gruhn Guitars will be moved to the front of our repair queue and will be repaired at a discounted labor rate. As a sign of our appreciation for your business, Gruhn Guitars is here to help you for years to come to keep your instrument in the same prime working order as when it was listed for sale at the shop.
Theoretically, there is an unlimited number of possible chords. In actual play, you can get along just fine for quite a while with only around 30 chords in your repertoire, and maybe even less depending on what type of music you want to play. There are bluegrass guitar players that have gone through entire careers never playing more than a dozen or so chords.

Marshall's current best rated amplifier is the humble 1-Watt DSL1HR, an all-tube, dual channel amplifier head that gives you genuine Marshall tone and appeal in a more compact and practice friendly format. It is based on the JCM2000 Dual Super Lead (DSL) series that the company released in the late '90s, but with some modern enhancements to make it more user friendly. What's cool about this amp is that it can go lower than 1W via its built-in attenuator, which lets you switch to low power mode that has a 0.1W power rating. This means that you can crank the amp's dual ECC83 preamp tubes and ECC82 power tube at very low volume levels, great for quiet practice and for recording. Speaking of recording, Marshall equipped the DSL1HR with a speaker emulated Line out, using Softube's cabinet simulator technology. Other features include having two channels: classic gain and ultra gain, built-in reverb and pedalboard friendly effects loop in and out. More importantly, this tube amp is affordably priced and comes bundled with a footswitch.


The humbuckers were smaller than typical, with metal covers and two rows of exposed adjustable polepieces. The pickups and three-way were mounted on a small black/white pickguard, with knobs on the body. Two jacks for mono or stereo output were mounted on the side of the lower bout. The two-octave unbound rosewood fingerboard had dot inlays. Early Preachers had “Preacher” engraved on the lower pickguard and a bridge/tailpiece assembly was similar to that on the Breadwinner/Deacon, with more metal and less plastic. Other versions are seen without the engraving and all-metal bridge/tailpieces, indicating the model evolved. Though no information is currently available on when the transition occurred, based on evidence from later UKs, it happened late, possibly around 1980.

Description: Body: Maple - Flamed - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Brown
I love them both, have a Strat and Les Paul. they are such different animals. Each has it’s place in my music, each has a special sound. Used to own a Tele which I just didn’t enjoy playing so much, so traded in for the Les Paul. I later bought a modified Tele with humbuckers (I know it’s a sin) but damn it sounds so good, for heavy power chords, more like a PRS sound. I’ve been playing 27 years now and am a composer / songwriter. Played in lots of bands, and during my live work I have to say I prefer my Strat. It’s lighter than the Gibson, and contours nicely to my body. With a good valve amp and the right strings I can get some lovely fat sounds out of it. I use the Gibson mostly in the studio. When I moved countries, I needed a cheap electric to tide me over until my stuff got sent over. I picked up a $100 Mitchel (Made in China). The setup was awful, totally unplayable, so set it up properly, and to be honest it plays like a dream. The neck is amazing for a $100 guitar, and with some new pickups the sound is great too. The upshot here is that it doesn’t really matter what guitar you use to make music on, as long as you enjoy the instrument, a cheap guitar can go a long way. I find the discussions about which is better kind of like guys comparing their crown jewels, it’s purely academic and what matters is how you use the thing 😉
First off I need to mention that there is a category of effects I will call “overdrive” effects where descriptive labels often overlap so it can be confusing. They are essentially effects that simulate amplifier tubes being overdriven to create distortion. These type of effects are can be called: distortion or overdrive or fuzz or metal. And the label is usually based on the amount of gain they produce. 

Here we have a well preserved vintage Hohner HW600n HW for Hohner Western Acoustic Dreadnought Martin D35 Style acoustic guitar. with a gorgeously grained THREE Piece Mahogany back and sides WoW its really a beauty. Workmanship Fit and finish quality is excellent this guitar is stunning, previously set up and is Great sounding in near mint like condition its from the late 80’s early 90’s D35 Look alike, Spruce top with Mahogany Neck and some of the absolutely highest grade Mahogany your going to see its flamed and figured and has fire and looks as if it could be Koa but listed as Mahogany at any rate this is one of the nicest models Hohner in this era truly a stunner,,, its in top structural shape as well its neck angle is excellent at 1-11/16ths at the nut its medium profile neck is very easily played and is a convertible c shape… We were impressed with her sound to with nice volume and a mature sounding tone. We think you’ll like this beautiful Vintage Hohner as well we believe this to be late 1980’s to early 90’s made in Korea and would fool any made in Japan fan for its fit and finish workmanship this is a good vintage guitar in its own right… no cracks no repairs no issues no excuses someone is going to have a smile on their face. any questions or to buy this guitar contact Joe at: JVGuitars@gmail.com .
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Eventually, silicon transistors replaced germanium ones, helping to combat the inconsistent sounds of the germanium version (each circuit varies, and they were often affected by hot temperatures). Silicon completely changed the distortion, making it brighter, edgier, and more aggressive, as exemplified by the famous Electro-Harmonix Big Muff. The later introduction of the integrated circuit provided even more stability. Digital emulators can now universalize effects in a standalone unit. Materials don’t lie, however; when compared to their analog ancestors, the digital units lack the unique wildness of the germanium effect.
In 2007, Gibson announced the idea to create a computerized Les Paul, dubbed the “Robot Guitar” which was released on December 7, 2007. The guitar has a computer integrated into the body with a “master control” knob next to the volume knobs, which can be pulled out, turned, or pressed to issue different commands to the guitar. One of the more notable features is the ability to tune the guitar to standard tuning simply by pulling out on the master control knob and strumming the guitar, while the tuning pegs adjust themselves to standard tuning. Another use of the master control knob is to be able to tune the guitar to alternative tunings, such as drop D, by pressing on the control knob to fit the setting. The new Les Paul has a new custom silverburst blue finish.[30] While the product was advertised in the American popular press as a “world’s first”, similar systems, some external, have been in use for decades.

Not nearly as popular as single-coils and humbuckers, piezo pickups can be found on electric guitars as well. These crystalline sensors are usually embedded in the saddle of an electric guitar. Piezo sensors operate on mechanical vibration as opposed to magnets to convert sound from vibrating strings into an electric current. Piezo pickups can be used to trigger synthesizer or digital sounds much like an electronic keyboard. Most often, piezo pickups on an electric guitar are used to simulate an acoustic guitar tone. Piezo-equipped guitars often also include magnetic pickups to expand their tonal versatility.
The guitar builder for the giants of jazz, Ibanez now introduces the Artstar AS153 Semi-Hollow Electric Guitar, to answer the needs of the working professional player. Crafted from specially selected tone woods, this guitar features a bone nut, ebony fingerboard, hand-rolled frets and Ibanez's famous Super 58 pickups-capable of tone magic any place between "jazz-clean" all the way to "blues dirty." If you're aiming high, Ibanez has an ARTSTAR for you.
Engineers invented the first loud, powerful amplifier and speaker systems for public address systems and movie theaters. These large PA systems and movie theatre sound systems were very large and very expensive, and so they could not be used by most touring musicians. After 1927, smaller, portable AC mains-powered PA systems that could be plugged into a regular wall socket "quickly became popular with musicians"; indeed, "...Leon McAuliffe (with Bob Wills) still used a carbon mic and a portable PA as late as 1935." During the late 1920s to mid-1930s, small portable PA systems and guitar combo amplifiers were fairly similar. These early amps had a "single volume control and one or two input jacks, field coil speakers" and thin wooden cabinets; remarkably, these early amps did not have tone controls or even an on-off switch.[1]

The same bracing system and pickups in chrome covers are also included within the Vintage Reissue Series, with individual volume and tone controls, and a 3-way bat-style selector switch. Hardware includes individual chromed saddle-style mounted bridge with height adjustments, and a chrome trapeze tailpiece. The one-piece, Canadian maple set neck features a 20 fret, bound rosewood fingerboard, with pearloid block position markers.
Okay, getting down to brass tax - how do the effects and amp models sound? In a word, great! It’s not secret that Boss makes some fantastic pedals, many that have reached legendary status over the years. It’s nice knowing that you’re getting a multi-effects pedal from a brand that has really dominated the guitar and bass effects field. Boss uses some technology terms like COSM modeling and MDP (Multi-Dimensional Processing) which sound fancy but might not mean much to many guitarists. Truth is, given that this is a digital unit, some things sound really great, and some sound not so great. The overdrives are hit and miss. This user review hits the nail on the head:
Fender’s open-back combo tube amps have been used on countless hit records in practically every genre of music in the past half-century. They can deliver both warm bell-like clean tones and gritty overdriven snarls. The Blue Junior III is a relatively inexpensive way to get into Fender tube amps, and it’s the perfect size for studio and small venues.

Jump up ^ The Guitar (From The Renaissance To The Present Day) by Harvey Turnbull (Third Impression 1978) - Publisher: Batsford (ISBN 0-7134-3251-9) - p113 (Chapter 3 - The Twentieth Century) - "Segovia's visits to South America also inspired new music. The Mexican composer Manuel Ponce (1882–1948) responded by producing a greater number of extended works than Turina and Torroba had achieved."
The Afterneath gets a place on our favorites list, largely because of the "Drag" feature that allows you to sort of delay the decay of your reverb effect, giving off an ambiance that trails off behind each original note as it bleeds into new notes. It's a very unique reverb effect, which blends particularly nicely with a fretless bass in the example video below. 
An excerpt: “Scorned, laughed at, jeered, chided, and derided. The concept of the solidbody electric guitar was subject to such utter disdain in some corners that it’s almost hard to believe it ever came to be at all. The ridicule and mockery would have been enough to send a less self-confident inventor running for the hills. Given our more than 55 years of perspective, though, we know it just had to be; a world without the solidbody guitar? Moreover, without the Gibson Les Paul? Unthinkable ...”
Epiphone, coolest brand ever. More songs have been written on Epiphone guitars than any other. Sure! Gibson bought & attempted to hijack the Epiphone kudos, but failed, as all that happened was Epiphone became the affordable brand of the people. Gibson & Taylor are by far…so far…the least cool brands ever. I’m telling you, more songs (filled with passion & desperation & anger) have been written on Epiphone guitars than any other, by folk who can’t afford or don’t have a mummy to buy them a Fender strat or Gibson.
Now that said, the orientation of the individual saddles does have some significance. In an ideal world, you would have all of the saddles sitting with the flat side facing the pickups. This is so that there is an immediate fall-off as soon as the strings clear the saddles so that they vibrate as cleanly as possible. At the same time, the fall-off towards the stop bar tailpiece is a little more relaxed and possibly a little more forgiving on your strings. In the real world, however, you may have to swap one or more around in order to intonate the guitar properly, and this is more important.
Tempo guitars and amps offered in 1971 included three nylon-stringed guitars, three steel-stringed guitars, and two solidstate amplifiers. These were pretty low-end beginner guitars probably imported from Japan, though the heads have a Harmony look to them. The N-5 Folk Guitar ($31.90) was standard-sized with spruce top and mahogany body (presumably laminates), slothead, tie bridge, no markers. The GM-62 Steel String Guitar ($29) was also standard size, “light” top and “dark” back with dots, moveable bridge with saddle and stamped metal tailpiece. The GM-300 Convertible Guitar Outfit ($33.90) was a spruce and mahogany slothead with dots and a glued/bolted bridge which could be used for either nylon or steel strings. It came with nylons and an extra set of steel strings. Harmony made guitars like this for Sears in the early ’60s. The N-48 Nylon String Guitar Outfit ($82.50) was a grand concert classical with amber spruce top, maple body, marquetry strip on the slothead and gold hardware, hardshell case included. The N-40 Nylon String Guitar ($45) was grand concert-sized with amber spruce top and “dark brown” body. The F-34 Steel String Guitar was also grand concert-sized with spruce top, “dark brown” body, belly pin bridge, block inlays, and engraved hummingbird pickguard.
I ordered this item from their ebay store, roughly the same price with shipping, very easy to read point to point instructions, this was my first diy pedal, I've fooled around with a soldering iron but not enough to speak of. I bought it because I was not pleased with my Peavey Valveking 112's boost sound, it not only boosts the signal, it changes the tone, from the reviews I watched on youtube, it sounded like this pedal would do the trick, for the price, and the fun of a first time build, I love it, it boosts the signal with no change in tone, I'm not super impressed with the pedal's distortion tone, but I am spoiled with that saturated tube tone, there is some extra hum when I turn on the pedal, I don't know if this is my fault from the build, or what, but I would ... full review
Gibson Les Paul and Fender electric guitars can retail for several thousands of pounds, but electric guitars for beginners are available for less than £100. One example of a cheap electric guitar is the LA Electric Guitar + Amp Pack, which features everything a beginner needs to start playing the guitar right away for under £90.00. It includes a 15 watt guitar amp with 6.5" speaker for practising, a guitar lead, a strap, a padded gig bag, a set of spare strings, a pick and a 2-year warranty. The electric guitar itself has a neck made from maple - the most common type of wood used in necks - which helps to expand on the treble sounds of a guitar due to its hardness. The guitar is capable of producing a wide variety sounds, thanks in part to its 3x single coil pickups with a reverse wound middle pickup, which enables users to experiment with playing different styles of music.
If you just start playing into a Windows PC, you’re going through a software construct called an audio device driver, through another software construct called the Windows Mixer, and finally into your recording program. If you then loop that back to play out so you can hear your guitar plus all effects, you again go from that DAW program to the Windows Mixer and to the device driver. That can take a really, really long time in music terms.

Hollowbody guitars feature full hollow bodies much like acoustic guitars do, and are used often in jazz and mellow style music as exemplified by Jazz greats that include Joe Pass, Pat Martino to name a few. It is however not limited to just that as exhibited by Brian Setzer and his Rockabilly style, along with Chet Atkins and his iconic country guitar playing.
Boss is well known for producing reliable and good sounding guitar effects, many of which continue to serve popular guitarists like Eric Johnson, Steve Vai, Marty Friedman and many more. Being a big player in one market doesn't always translate to success in another, but Boss' recent foray into the guitar amplifier market is proving to be quite successful, as evidenced by the consistently favorable ratings that most of their amplifiers are getting. To be specific, we are talking about the Boss Katana range of amplifiers, which combine Roland's (Boss' parent company) experience in amp building with Boss reputation for quality and reliability.
They have the same basic principles, but most people start on acoustics. This is because they are more difficult to play, but you build up your finger strength and calluses (tough lumps of skin on the end of your fingers; you'll need them!) much faster. But the acoustic guitar is limited. If you feel an electric guitar is the way you want to go, then by all means get one. Just because most beginners have acoustics doesn't mean you have to. The best thing to do would be to go to your local guitar shop, tell them your budget, and see what they have to offer. You can get starter packs which come with a guitar and an amplifier but you may be better off looking at some cheap electric guitar models at your local shop, as the starter packs can be really inconsistent. Good luck, my man
As you can see, this is simply a case where the Les Paul Custom is a feature-rich product, with more qualities that Epiphone can highlight as buying incentive. All the same contextual advice applies, as the LP Custom is every bit as versatile as the Standard (if not more) and can hang in just about any musical style. When deciding between them it's more a matter of price and aesthetics than any kind of style or playing scenario.
This is one of our favourite cheap electric guitars and it certainly doesn’t suck thanks to its Alder body, comfortable “C” shape neck, snappy maple fingerboard and two Vintage-Style Single-Coil Tele pickups to provide that awesome tele twang. If you’ve always wanted a Telecaster and are just starting out in the world of guitar, this is a dream beginner’s guitar that is budget friendly and still completely high quality.
The Kay Guitar Company has been the major producer of guitars since 1890. Most players do not realize that in 1928, Kay was the first company to start production of electric guitars in the USA. From 1952 through 1964, The Kay Guitar Company excelled at producing quality professional electric guitars with unique designs and features. The Kay Gold Line professional series became synonymous with that rich gutsy Blues/Jazz sound that eventually became known as Rock and Roll. This unique Blues sound was not available from any other guitar of that time. For the past decade, vintage Kay instruments have been fetching high prices and have had increasing interest from collectors and players because of the cool look and unique Blues/Jazz sound. Part of this special Blues sound came from the triple chamber design and the hand-wound blade pickups on the Kay K161V Thin Twin and the Kay K162V Electronic "Pro Bass" Guitar.
4-conductor humbuckers are fun to wire because they offer many combinations to play with. Some pickups have another bare wire which is there for shielding and should always be grounded. Manufacturers have their own color code, so make sure you find the right color code before connecting anything. Below is color code diagram for common pickup manufacturers.

It’s safe to say a wah-wah pedal will be your first stompbox if it’s not already. The wah is a sweepable fixed bandwidth filter that has a treadle you rock back and forth producing vowel-like inflections. The phrasing possibilities are only limited by the player. These days, you have an array of major as well as indie pedal builders who make incredible wah pedals such as Dunlop, Vox, Fulltone, Teese, Xotic, and Wilson Effects.
There’s a huge range of cheap electric guitars out there that would not look out of place on the stages of the world thanks to high quality manufacturing and the brands actually caring about their products – “cheap” does not always mean poor quality and plenty of guitars out there will give you a fantastic playing experience for many years without breaking the bank.
Eddie Kramer has a slightly different approach, working from a familiar setup of favourite close and ambient mics (including the Beyerdynamic M160 ribbon mic) and then mixing them together to taste. "I use a three-mic technique: an SM57, an MD421 and an M160, all in a very tight pattern. Then I can pick and choose the tone quality, because each mic is totally different. I combine these together, and then I put a U67 away from the amp to get the ambience."
This is another incredible right handed electric guitar from Cort guitars. It mostly comes in red color and has 6 strings. It has its body made of agathis and fret board from rosewood. The fret board is composed of up to 24 jumbo size frets. It is a sassy looking guitar that is quite affordable, with prices ranging from INR 9,999 to INR 10,050. Click below to get more information on the product.
Although I left it up to our panelists to decide what they think is most important in a beginner’s amp, we all agreed on a few parameters. First, the amp should have no glaring technical flaws—it shouldn’t produce excessive amounts of noise or hum, and it shouldn’t exhibit audible signs of distress, such as buzzes or rattles. Second, it should produce enough volume that the guitarist can jam with instruments such as piano, saxophone, and a small drum kit.
Let me tell you about the vintage look at why it is favored among so many musicians and aestheticians around the world. Well, I won’t be able to tell you much about the vintage look in this short text, but what I can tell you is the fact that some of the best looking items out there, and best sounding, are entirely vintage. Well the Vox MINI3G2CL Battery Powered Modeling Amp is one of the vintage looking but entirely modern technology employing amps that produce a great sound while looking positively scrumptious. This small amp avoids the problem of weak low tones that so many other amp have by incorporating a bass boost technology into its construction. As a result we get a small, portable amp with a handsome look and an incredibly well rounded sound, with expressive lows and expressive high both present. And the price point relative to some of the other options on this list makes it a required purchase, unless something else catches your eye that is.
The Hi Flyer guitar and bass would be offered pretty much until the end, in ’77. At some point after, probably around ’73 or ’74, the plastic logo was changed to an outline decal logo. Also, at some point the pickups were changed to the distinctive twin-coil humbuckers with metal sides and a see-through pink insert on top. These changes most certainly occurred by the ’76 catalog, when the Hi Flyers were available in four finishes – sunburst (U1815, U1815B), white (U1816, U1816B), black (U1817, U1817B) and a cool natural with maple fingerboard and black dots (U1818, U1818B).
A musician's pedalboard can be a cluttered place, with lots of stompboxes all competing for room, not to mention creating a virtual spaghetti of patch cables. Wouldn't it be nice to swap out some of those pedals in exchange for a single unit? Of course it would, and that's why multi effects pedals exist. With one of these babies at your feet, you'll have multiple pedals in one. That does more than just clean up the visual look of your effects loop - it also makes your pedals easier to manage and use, and if you're a beginner, you'll appreciate how much simpler it is to put together your board with the most common effects all gathered in one unit.
Oh but this guitar is beautiful. The PRS SE A50E Angelus is something you would really want to play in front of an audience because of its stunningly good looks and the quality sound it produces. This guitar has a solid Sitka spruce top, figured maple back and sides, mahogany neck, bone nut and saddle as well as ebony fretboard and bridge. It has a distinct and highly playable Angelus Cutaway body shape. The PRS abalone bird inlays on the fretboard are a really nice touch. Yes, it’s a gorgeous, well-built guitar, but that’s not all.
Everyone from Jazz guitarists to lovers of Queens of the Stone Age style heavy rock have fallen in love with the Artcore series since it was first introduced in 2002. Fusing expert workmanship with affordability, the Ibanez 2017 Artcore AS53 Semi-Acoustic Guitar, Transparent Black Flat is one of the best cheap electric guitars you’ll find on the market today. It’s budget friendly price tag makes it a fantastic choice for beginners whilst the high-quality pickups and superb tonewoods are the reason why so many pro level players will choose it for the stage and studio.

The Les Paul body style actually encompasses a few different designs: solid, solid-arched, and solid-chambered. Solid Les Pauls are made from a solid piece of wood, with some having a significantly arched top and a maple cap and some lacking a curved top and the maple cap. Chambered Les Pauls are arched, but the inside of the body is chambered, so there are a few cavities underneath the top.
Leaving aside guitarists whose relative fame is debatable (such as Steve Hillage or Terje Rypdal), how can you have a wannabe like John Mayer on your list, but not Dr. Brian May, Jerry Garcia or Jeff Beck? And I’d have also swapped out Tom Morello in favor of Adrian Belew. Belew was making his guitar sound like “everything but a guitar” more than a decade before anyone had heard of Morello. Adrian played with Talking Heads, Joan Armatrading, David Bowie (that’s him playing the crazy solos on DJ and Boys Keep Swinging), and King Crimson back in thee late 70’s and early 80’s. And his song Oooh Daddy at least grants him one hit wonder status, as far as “fame” goes.
I keep coming back to this point because it’s absolutely essential: learn how to solo over chords. I don’t mean simple chord arpeggiating, even though that has its place, too. If you can follow the chord changes with smooth, soulful playing, you will never be fenced in. You can drop into any style, any band, and any situation. Most of us get stuck playing a given scale pattern for years before something shakes us up. Make this the foundation of your learning with this book.

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There are many variations on the solid-body guitar theme. Companies such as Ibanez, Yamaha, PRS, Jackson and many others make solid-bodied guitars. Generally you get what you pay for, but provided you avoid the very cheapest models, and stick with reputable brands (such as those mentioned above) you can spend a relatively small amount of money and get a guitar that will last you long into your playing career.
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Since it was originally introduced in 1975, the Destroyer has become an icon of that era's chapter in rock n' roll history. Over the years it has undergone many incarnations and the perennial classic returns once again. The body and neck of both guitars are made of a tight Mahogany for maximum resonance. The bound rosewood fingerboard is adorned with Jumbo frets. The Destroyer also features Sure Grip III control knobs for no-slip control. It's not called the Destroyer for nothing.", "value":"447.99", "priceMin":"447.99", "priceMax":"699.99", "priceSavingsMaxPrice":"0.00", "priceSavingsMaxPercent":"0", "inventory":"0", "brand":"Ibanez", "reviewStarImageUrl": "https://static.musiciansfriend.com/img/brand/mf/cmn/Sprit-Sm-Stars.png", "reviewStarRating":"5.0", "reviewStarRatingInteger":"10", "reviewHowManyReviews":"3", "usedOrNew":"new", "discontinued":"1", "onOrder":"0", "clearance":"0", "canBeSold":"0", "accessoryCategories":"site1LFMIC,site1HBA,site1LAAA", "stickerText": "", "checksum":"", "priceVisibility": "1"}

Featuring a scalloped X, a Fishman Isys III System, a Rosewood bridge with compensated saddle and chrome die cast tuning keys, a body with laminated Mahogany back and sides and laminated Maple top, a cutaway design with dreadnought body shape with a wide choice of color and design, and to top it all off, a Fender FTE-3TN Preamp with Tuner, this guitar surely has it all and it’s not even that expensive!
We also decided to test a separate group of smaller guitars with scale lengths (the distance from the string nut at the top of the neck to the bridge that supports the strings on the body) in the range of 22 inches, as compared with 24.75 to 25.5 inches for most full-size electric guitars. These models may be more comfortable for kids because their smaller hands won’t have to stretch as far, and many adults also like them because their compact size makes them easier to travel with.
I haven't listened to all the amps on the list but found the Rivera Knucklehead blew away every Fender, Marshalla and Mesa in the shop when I was testing things out for the clean blues with a PRS. My daughter playfully plugged in a Gretsch baritone, cranked up the gain and Three Days Grace came screaming out with the finest quality. She agreed the Knucklehead was a win.
The Telecaster has also been a long-time favorite guitar for hot-rod customizing. Several variants of the guitar appeared throughout the years with a wide assortment of pickup configurations, such as a humbucker in the neck position, three single-coil pickups and even dual humbuckers with special wiring schemes. Fender offered hot-rodded Teles with such pickup configurations, the US Fat and Nashville B-Bender Telecasters around 1998. The Deluxe Blackout Tele was also equipped with 3 single-coil pickups, a “Strat-o-Tele” selector switch and a smaller headstock than a standard Telecaster. The most common variants of the standard two-pickup solid body Telecaster are the semi-hollow Thinline, the twin-humbuckerDeluxe—and the Custom, which replaced the neck single coil-pickup with a humbucking pickup. The Custom and Deluxe were introduced during the CBS period and reissues of both designs are currently offered.
ZPS (ZERO POINT SYSTEM) OF ZR TREMOLO Main Spring Stopper Tremolo Block Stop Rod With the guitar tuned correctly, adjust the Main Spring make sure that the Stop Rod makes contact with the Tremolo Block and Stopper. If the Stop Rod does not make contact with the Tremolo Block and Stopper, adjust the Main Spring adjustment screw until contact is made.
Bass players who do not have a combo amp who are playing live shows can connect their bass to a DI unit and from there to the PA system. In a well-equipped nightclub or music bar, the audio engineer can then route the bass signal to a stage monitor suitable for bass, so the bass player and band can hear the bass tone. Some standalone bass preamplifier pedals have a DI output, so this output can similarly be connected to a PA system. Bass players who are playing in small venues (coffeehouses, small pubs, etc.) will typically need to bring their own bass combo amp (or an alternative amp, such as a keyboard amp combo), because very small venues often have a very small, low-powered PA system which is used mainly for vocals. Some small venues do not have monitor speakers, or they have only one, in front of the lead vocalist. Bass players who do not have a combo amp who are laying down tracks in the recording studio can plug into a DI unit (any professional recording studio will have one), which is connected to the audio console; the audio engineer can provide the bassist with the sound of their instrument through headphones.
A functionally solid-body electric guitar was designed and built in 1940 by Les Paul from an Epiphone acoustic archtop. His "log guitar" (so called because it consisted of a simple 4x4 wood post with a neck attached to it and homemade pickups and hardware, with two detachable Epiphone hollow-body halves attached to the sides for appearance only) shares nothing in design or hardware with the solid-body Gibson Les Paul introduced in 1952. However, the feedback associated with hollow-bodied electric guitars was understood long before Paul's "log" was created in 1940; Gage Brewer's Ro-Pat-In of 1932 had a top so heavily reinforced that it essentially functioned as a solid-body instrument.[2] In 1945, Richard D. Bourgerie made an electric guitar pickup and amplifier for professional guitar player George Barnes. Bourgerie worked through World War II at Howard Radio Company, making electronic equipment for the American military. Barnes showed the result to Les Paul, who then arranged for Bourgerie to have one made for him.
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