Tokai was founded in 1947 and is based in Hamamatsu, Japan. Tokai began production of acoustic guitars in 1965 and by 1968 was producing electric guitars for the American market. Tokai still exists as guitar manufacturer. Tokai made guitars for Fernandes, Mosrite and Fender Japan. Tokai badged guitars included the house brand Tokai as well as Cat's Eyes, Conrad, Drifter, Hondo, Love Rock, Mosrite, Sigma and Silver Star. Possible badges include Artist Ltd., Gaban, Gallan, Gession and Robin. It's suggested that Tokai made Hummingbird acoustics as well, but if these were related to those made by Humming Bird I haven't quite sorted out yet.
The guitar features what is called a Super Strat shape. In other words, it is an evolution of the Stratocaster body style. Ibanez used mahogany as the main tonewood and maple for the neck. This guitar comes with two finish options. You can have the blackberry sunburst or the light violin sunburst. In terms of pickups, we have a set of two Ibanez-made passive humbuckers which pack a decent amount of heat. They handle distortion great but also sound very decent on a clean channel too.
The electric guitar was essentially born in 1929—long before the advent of rock and roll music. The first commercially advertised electric guitar was offered that year by the Stromberg-Voisinet company of Chicago, though it was not a smash hit. The first commercially successful electric, Rickenbacker’s “Frying Pan” guitar, didn’t kick off rock ’n’ roll yet either, but it did inspire competitors to jump into the electric guitar market. Invented in 1931, the Frying Pan had an electromagnetic pickup made out of a pair of horseshoe magnets placed end-to-end to create an oval around the guitar’s strings, with a coil placed underneath the strings. The pickup, a device that converts the strings’ vibrations into electrical signals that can be amplified, was bulky and unattractive, but it worked. The commercial version of the Frying Pan was a hollow cast-aluminum lap-steel guitar, and wasn’t an immediate hit beyond some Hawaiian, country, and blues musicians. It differs from the traditional Spanish-style guitar in that it is played horizontally, on a stand or in the player’s lap, and has a sliding steel bar that can be moved along the frets for a gliding effect.
Let’s get it straight. Froo – Shawn – Tey. If you don’t know him, he’s the lead guitarist of the Red Hot Chili Peppers. Frusciante is the author of the brilliant chord progression on Under the Bridge, the haunting intro to Californication and the simplistic solo and riff on Otherside. If you’re the casual listener of the Chili Peppers, then you may wonder why John has made it so far up this list. But a tad of a closer look will reveal that his simple catchy riffs are the tip of the ice berg. One can catch a glimpse at his technical skill in the Dani California solo. A bit deeper and you’ll run into Lyon 06.06.06 in one of the B Sides. John takes his influences (Page, Hendrix) and mixes his own nuances into a sound that’s pleasantly different, but melodically having the same effects on you. A track to look out for on his solo work – Ramparts – showcasing four or so guitars layered upon each other in an introspective orchestra.
• What they’re made of: Frets are typically made of nickel-silver or nickel-steel alloys, or – less often – brass, copper alloy or stainless steel. The harder and more dense the material, with stainless at the top of the scale and soft nickel at the bottom, the brighter and more cutting the notes played on a guitar should sound. Most manufacturers use nickel alloys because the metal is soft and easy to work with. At this point, most guitarists’ ears have been developed to the sound of nickel as well, and most guitar buyers have a tendency to balk at the unfamiliar when shopping for instruments.
Ovation’s Electric Storm series couldn’t have hit the market at a worse time. In ’67 electric guitars sales began to slump and the market took a dive in ’68. A bunch of Japanese companies went out of business, as did one of America’s largest mass manufacturers, the newly merged Valco/Kay. The Storms were so unsuccessful it appears Ovation actually stopped importing parts in ’69, although it had enough components in stock to keep the line active until early ’73.
Lastly, but not leastly, Univox offered a super amp head, the C Group, or UX Series, available with either a guitar or bass cabinet. These were promoted with a flyer that sported a muscular black model with naked torso looking for all the world like Isaac Hayes, the man behind the popular movie Shaft. The UX actually consisted of a UX-1501 Amplifier head and either a UX-1516 speaker cabinet for guitar use or a UX-1512 cabinet for bass. The amp was a mean two-channel S.O.B. with blue vinyl and handles. It was set up for lead guitar, bass or PA use, with two guitar inputs, two bass inputs and two mixer inputs. Its 140 watts were obtained with eight tubes – four 6550s, two 12AU7s and two 12AX7s. It had two volume and a master gain controls plus bass, middle, treble and presence controls. Power on and separate standby switches. Four speaker output jacks. The coolest feature was a “tunneling circuit” that allowed, near as we can tell, blending of channels, which meant you could pump up the bass on one and hyper the treble on the other, and combine them. For a little extra punch, you could throw a hi-boost switch, too. The UX-1516 guitar cabinet was a 150-watter. For bass, the UX-1512 was a 200-watt Reflex Speaker Cabinet. Cost for the guitar outfit was $1,400, for the bass outfit $1,450.
Combining Reverbs: You don't have to generate all of the reverb sound from a single plug-in, and using two different reverbs can also help you to save CPU power. For example, though a nice convolution reverb gives a good, believable sound, long impulse responses tend to eat up CPU. By using the convolution reverb for the early reflections, and then using something like Logic 's Platinumverb or Waves Trueverb to add the reverb tail — which is less critical to our perception of the sound — you should get a convincing but less processor-intensive result. Matt Houghton
We perform within include rings. Personal big assortment of pedals, a few I really like, a few foul odor. I quickly discovered how the just people who worry about the results tend to be additional music artists. The actual people( ladies dance mostly) might treatment much less. Therefore right now I acquired the tuner, as well as generate your pedal with regard to single sculpt.... that is this, as well as my personal sculpt rocks ! as well as straight forward. With regard to facilities felines it might be another tale.
your right brian i been a acdc freak since u all been out in the early n mid 70s the greast band of all time. and i seen acdc 37 times through out the united states. i love my memories with the band and still watch and listen to the cds and dvds of the band. brian johnson is the best thing that happen to acdc since bond scott death. keep rockin guys i love u with a passion. mark

There’s been a steady evolution in effects signal processing since the 1940s. Guitarist-innovator Les Paul was among the first and most avid effects developers, experimenting with echo and multi-track recording to add sonic excitement to his music. The first foot-switched effect showed up in the late ‘40s with Harry DeArmond’s Trem Tol tremolo processor that was later used by Bo Diddley. In the 1950s and early 1960s other effects were developed, but they tended to be expensive and some had operational issues. Meanwhile amplifier makers such as Fender and Gibson were building reverb and tremolo effects into their amps. These tube amps also produced tasty distortion and overdrive effects when gain and volume were cranked up to maximum settings. Today, many effects are designed to reproduce those sounds.
This is a musical problem rather than a technical one. Guitarists engage overdrive when they WANT to dominate. That's fine, but don't do it ALL the time! Not if there's an acoustic guitar in the band and you want to hear it! Everyone needs to listen, everyone has to be aware that another player may have something interesting to play, and therefore make space for it. Like turn down or - horror - even stop playing for a bit!

Unlike the other brands so far, Martin focuses more on the acoustic side of the world of guitars. They offer both acoustic and acoustic-electric guitars. The quality in the wood of a Martin strongly depends on the model you purchase. Their higher-priced guitars feature extremely high-quality wood, but even the lower end models are made of a decent material. Surprisingly, you can even find their lower-end models sporting Rosewood necks. Rosewood is known as one of the best materials to use for guitar necks. When it comes to resonators, on the other hand, Martin has that one in the bag. Most of the top-quality resonators in other high-end guitars are actually made by Martin. That, alone, should be proof enough of the quality of Martin’s resonators. Overall, Martins are excellent quality and are great for honing finger-picking skills. They are known for a warm, sustained tone and a very bright sound.
The key difference between an electric guitar and an acoustic is how they make a sound. Electrics use pickups and acoustics rely on a ‘soundboard’ a hollowed out body, and a sound hole to amplify the vibration of the strings. The most important difference though is what you want to sound like and what you prefer. A guitar that you want to pick up and play will always be one that makes you practice more – which is the only way to get better at guitar!
Perfect working condition Amp is an absolute beast, if you know anything about these AC30s you'll know that there tone is unbelievable. Make me an offer or trade These amps sell for close to 18k and well above that on oversees markets The amp does have some cosmetic ware but obviously does not affect the sound what so ever Gibson, fender, guitar Watssapp me 0737886874 Amp is based in Durban ...
Woods typically used in solid-body electric guitars include alder (brighter, but well rounded), swamp ash (similar to alder, but with more pronounced highs and lows), mahogany (dark, bassy, warm), poplar (similar to alder), and basswood (very neutral).[19] Maple, a very bright tonewood,[19] is also a popular body wood, but is very heavy. For this reason it is often placed as a "cap" on a guitar made primarily of another wood. Cheaper guitars are often made of cheaper woods, such as plywood, pine or agathis—not true hardwoods—which can affect durability and tone. Though most guitars are made of wood, any material may be used. Materials such as plastic, metal, and even cardboard have been used in some instruments.
Now, you said that most people you see just crank the tone knob to the maximum and leave it there. That’s fine, and some genres of music actually have no need for a tone control. Heavy metal and hard rock and their derivatives have almost no need for tone control. Guitarists either keep the tone knob wide open and never touch it, or they just buy a guitar that don’t have a tone knob (nor a neck pickup). Guitars made and designed for metal are built this way. I think a lot of country musicians also keep the treble wide open to get that biting shimmery single coil tone.
Ask anyone at all if they've heard of Ibanez, and you'll most likely get a 'yes'—even if it's not a guitarist or even a musician that you're asking. It takes a lot for an instrument maker to become as well-known outside the music community as it is inside, and Ibanez is one of the elite luthiers that has managed to do just that. How have they done it? Simple: by making instruments so sought-after that they can be found nearly everywhere. Originally founded in 1957, Ibanez is one of the "original" manufacturers from the formative decades of the electric guitar as we know it today. Ibanez was one of the first Japanese companies to break through to the international music industry as well as, even more impressively, the very first brand to mass-produce seven and eight-string guitars. That makes extended-range guitars an important part of the Ibanez legacy alongside their many classic 6-string models. Some of the most renowned Ibanez instruments include hollow body guitars like Pat Metheny's signature model, and distinctive solid body axes such as the Iceman and Fireman series. You'll also find a wide assortment of basses, including 5 and 6-string models that join the 7 and 8-string guitars in the extended-range Ibanez family. There are plenty of acoustic and acoustic-electric guitars and basses to choose from as well, not to mention mandolins, banjos and ukuleles. Ibanez has a prolific catalog that spans the whole guitar family, offering something for anybody who loves to work the strings. In addition to stringed instruments, Ibanez is also renowned for a broad range of effects pedals, amplifiers and accessories. The TS808 Tube Screamer, for example, is an effects pedal that's beyond legendary. The unmatched warmth and tone of its overdrive makes the TS808 a must-have item for countless guitarists. Connect it to an amplifier like the TSA30 Tube Screamer 1x12 Combo Amp, and you're rocking an amazing recipe for serious vintage sounds. Ibanez was an early player in the electric guitar game, and their instruments, pedals and amps are certain to be on stages the world over for decades to come. Make yourself one of the artists that takes Ibanez onstage at every gig and this gear will pay off in spades with the incredible sounds that made them an industry giant in the first place.
Schecter's Diamond Plus passive humbuckers are pretty hot for what is essentially an affordable set. Their range is wide and they handle distortion rather well. This is largely what makes this such a versatile option. Schecter went with a standard Tune-o-Matic bridge for this build, making it a simple but reliable configuration, especially for those more interested in playing than tinkering.
The EC-1000ET is an all-mahogany single-cut loaded with an set of EMG 81 and 60 active humbuckers, a comfortably modern neck and a high level of construction quality. Its key selling point, however, is a fitted EverTune bridge -  unlike other tuning systems, it doesn't tune your guitar for you or offer altered tunings. Instead, once set and tuned, it simply aims to stay there, thanks to a series of tension-calibrated springs and levers. We tried everything we could to knock it out of whack: huge, three-step bends, wildly exaggerated string stretching... we even put the guitar into a freezer. It came back perfectly in tune every single time.  What's more, a guitar that's perfectly tuned and intonated up and down the neck seems to play much more musically. We're not aware of any tone compromises, either. The EC sounds as full and aggressive as ever, with the more mellow tones of the neck EMG being pleasantly rounded, and all bereft of any metallic spring clank. If never going out of tune is important to you, this is one of the best electric guitars going.

* The Chinese examples I have seen tend to weigh more. One Indonesian model I saw weighed a full pound and half less than the Chinese model right next to it. There is not, unfortunately, any way to tell from the box or from the barcode or SKU number on the box what factory a given example inisde the box came from. The system will deal out whatever is in stock at the moment.
So I was all, "oh no...I want this one." So I did leave with it, and without even asking they sold it to me at less than the price on the thing because it was the demo and had a tiny belt buckle type scuff or two on the back. I think I actually wound up saving a few hundred dollars. I don't know if they figured a percentage of the total should be knocked off, or what.
The EM-18 came with either a pair of Mighty Mite humbuckers or a pair of DiMarzios. It was otherwise the same as the E-18 with the addition of a three-way mini-toggle coil selector switch which allowed a choice of both or either coil on the lead pickup. This arrangement allowed for a rather remarkable variety of tones, by the way. EM-18 production began in 1979 and some 1,375 were made until the guitar ended in February 1982.
One reason that some bass players choose to use a "bass stack" rather than a combo is that the separate component approach enables bassists to use different speaker cabinets for different shows or activities. For example, a bassist playing a stadium may use an 8x10" cab for this show, but then bring a 4x10" cab for a nightclub show the next day, or a 1x12" cab for a studio recording.

The 52-week part is an excellent way to motivate you to practice. The selection of licks is great too with several genres covered well. It provides info for setting your metronome to get the beat right too. They are challenging, especially when you play them at the recommended speed. The wide selection will give you plenty of choices even if you skip a genre.


The C7’s back, fretboard and bridge are all rosewood, which makes for a stunning color contrast with the spruce. The strings are Savarez Cristal Corum, in high tension (500CJ), but according to one professional guitarist, the action is very easy no matter the tension, so a beginner should have no problems starting out on this model. Even someone who’s played a good while but simply wants something they can “jam” on whilst out on a recreational road trip, or play on a small-gig basis, will love the Cordoba C7 spruce-top.
My favorite guitar effect is Tremolo with a touch of echo. This works well on songs with slower melodic guitar leads and slower rhythms. Tremolo is an effect that has a speed adjustment and amplitude adjustment. The speed needs to be adjusted to the song tempo. This was popular for many songs written in the 1950’s. If you are a guitar shredder you will not be happy with this effect. I have a Boss Guitar Pedal and Line 6 Pod XT and use this effect from the pedal. I am not crazy about software generated effects as there is not enough space on stage for all the equipment and adding a MacBook and keeping it from getting knocked around would be too difficult. After recording I have used Garage Band and this software is easy to use. I probably have four or five software packages and they are too overwhelming at times. I have given up trying to figure out how to use the software with my expensive Presonus 24 track digital AI Board. It is almost impossible to use these recording software packages without having expensive school training.
{"eVar4":"shop: shopbybrand","eVar5":"shop: shopbybrand: ibanez","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","pageName":"[gc] shop by brand: ibanez","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[gc] shop by brand: ibanez","prop18":"skucondition|0||historicalgrossprofit|1||hasimage|1||creationdate|1","prop1":"[gc] shop by brand: ibanez","events":"event1,event31","prop17":"sort by","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"brands","prop11":"ibanez","prop5":"[gc] shop by brand: ibanez","prop6":"[gc] shop by brand: ibanez","prop3":"[gc] shop by brand: ibanez","prop4":"[gc] shop by brand: ibanez","eVar1":"ibanez","prop9":"2875","channel":"[gc] shop by brand","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] site section","prop8":"ibanez"}
AMAZING. Awesome place. Will NEVER go anywhere else for guitar work again. I am sitting in the parking lot of this place writing this on my phone, THAT'S how good of an experience I had. I wanted the action lowered on two acoustics and a strap button put on. I called 6 different places around town, each one quoting me prices ranging from $50-$60 for the setup (action adjustment) and another $10 for the strap button. I called Franklin Guitar and Repair and was quoted at $25-$30 for the setup and $5 for the strap button. What a steal! So I took both guitars. He looked at one and said all it needed was minor adjustments, which he did right then and there for free. The other, he kept overnight to adjust and add the button. I picked it up today. $15 TOTAL. What a wonderful person, awesome shop, honest, quality people. And for a steal. Cannot recommend enough!
Meanwhile, in Sepulveda, Thomas Organ, after importing JMI's British-made amps for a short period in 1964–65, began to produce a line of mostly solid-state amplifiers in the United States that carried the Vox name and cosmetic stylings. With some assistance from Dick Denney, these amps effectively paralleled JMI's own transistorised amplifiers but were different from the British and Italian made Voxes in sound and reliability. To promote their equipment, Thomas Organ built the Voxmobile, a Ford roadster dressed up to look like a Phantom guitar, complete with a Continental organ and several "Beatle" amplifiers. Despite the huge marketing effort, Thomas Organ's Vox products did much to damage the reputation of Vox in the North American market for many years. By 1968, the company had also marketed a line of Vox drum sets (actually made by a German drum company, known as Trixon), which included a kit that featured a conical-shaped bass (kick) drum, that looked more like a wastepaper basket left on its side, and another with a bass (kick) drum, that looked like a flat tire. Such gimmicks did not help sales, and by the early 1970s Vox's American presence was virtually nonexistent.
This is another really nice 12" 16 ohm guitar speaker from 1973, and is a matched pair with the one listed earlier, it has its original Pulsonic H1777 cone, and is in excellent condition, there it also has a tiny repair on the edge of the cone but this doesn't affect the sound in any way.Cash on collection preferred but carriage can be arrange if required.
I know of two amp-and-effects modeling apps for the iPhone/iPod Touch/iPad, both of which are great and allow you to get realistic amp tones through your headphones. AmpKit and Amplitube both do a great job of simulating all the standard amp models and pedals, and they aren't very expensive. I use and prefer AmpKit myself, and between the app and the guitar-to-iPhone interface, I spent a total of $50.

One of the earliest studio effects created by taking advantage the distance between the record and playback heads on tape recorders, delay duplicates the original signal and repeats it after the original sound is played. This can be repeated over and over for an echo effect, or be a single repeat that produces the slap-back sound popular in rockabilly. The time between repetitions can be very short, measured in milliseconds. Or it can be longer and more dramatic. Delays can also add a rhythmic element to your playing. There are many different kinds of delay effects available, and most offer a number of different types in the same unit.
If you had to write a soundtrack for the 20th century, electric guitars would almost certainly be playing the tune. No other instrument defines the angry rebelliousness of the modern age quite like it. Who could forget Chuck Berry, Jimi Hendrix, the Rolling Stones, or Nirvana—some of the greatest exponents of guitar-driven rock? But if you think playing an electric guitar is all about attitude and dexterity, think again: it's actually about the science of electromagnetism. Let's take a closer look a how these amazing instruments turn electricity into sound.
In all my years I have never seen filter cct's like this but as tleco tech the filters have never been variable, When I put my guitar together I had a 0.022uF and a 0.047uF and for reasons that I have long forgotten I put in a switching matrix that allows me to get 0.047, 0.022 and 0.015uF. After many revisions to the cct (it had coil taping and variable taping) I almost put in a 0.033uF and taking out the switching, well I ended up getting some single ended 9 Watt amp and all of a sudden this flexibility made scene I have one tone control that I can control the cut frequency a coil control pot and a volume control. Now the funny thing If I put in a single cap 0.015uF (as close as you can get) It doesn’t sound like the two 0.022 and 0.047uF in parallel, Its in the harmonics that get let through from what I can hear. But when all said and done could be something to give it a go.
For a slightly more distant, but fuller sound, bring up the fader on the mid- distance mic. Slowly add that signal to the close sound described in the previous paragraph. You'll have the detail of the close mic, but with the fullness that comes with adding some "room" sound to it (just like sitting in the tenth row). This is a pretty standard approach that will give you a pretty standard rock guitar sound.

“The bottom line is you get a better dynamic response from the coil. Most people who play a hand-wound pickup say it sounds more ‘open’. It’s easy to make a pickup sound brighter but to have a truly open voice it’s got to be dynamically responsive – and that’s what scatter-winding [intentionally irregular hand-winding of a pickup coil] does. Also, compared to a machine-wound coil, the frequency response is slightly extended. So the sound is bigger and you hear more not just in the high frequencies but also in the depths of the frequency response.”


I started playing harmonica when I was a little boy. I used to get pushed out to entertain adults at two o'clock in the morning. I also had a kind of obsession about the guitar. The first actual toy that I had that I loved was a little wooden guitar that my folks brought me from a shop that sold brooms and buckets and stuff like that. I used to carry that guitar around like my friends would carry a football. I took this thing with me everywhere.
The E-28 guitar now sported a two-octave fingerboard and a Schaller adjustable bridge/tailpiece assembly, in chrome. Pickups were twin active humbuckers specially designed for Martin by Seymour Duncan. The straplocking system was also by Schaller, as were the tuners. Controls included two volumes for each pickup plus a master volume and master tone (all with black knobs sort of like those found on Rickenbackers), a three-way select, a phase switch and an active circuit bypass switch. The headstock had an ebony veneer. The cover on the control cavity was made of black Boltaron.

Thirdly, yamaha has been known for musical instruments for a long long time and is the biggest producer of musical instruments. On its logo, it has got two tuning pegs meaning unlike any other musical brand, it is the most diverse. The only reason that people say fenders and gibsons are better is because they were the original makers of contempory electric guitars and the fact that they're well known. So basically, all you're paying for is the badge.

You don't have to use plug-ins! Some synths such as the Virus TI have very flexible effects built in. You don't have to create audio effects in your sequencer. For example, I use the Access Virus synth, which features a simple delay effect, with the added bonus that all its parameters are available in the modulation matrix. One favourite trick involves routing velocity to the delay colour parameter. For parts that get brighter with increased velocity, it adds extra animation and bite if the echoes also get brighter. Unusually, the Virus also features four-way audio panning, so you can position an audio signal anywhere between the main stereo outputs and a second pair. If the second pair of outputs is routed to an external effects unit, you can play with the concept of moving a note around in a space, where its position also determines the treatment it gets. More fun can be had by modulating reverb time and colour via an LFO. The same LFO can then be used to control filter cutoff, EQ frequency and maybe wavetable position too (if your Virus is a TI). In this way, timbral changes happen at the same time as effect changes. Paul Nagle
The Effect: Compression rose to fame in the rock and roll era, many famous musicians used (and still do) compressor pedals in order to add distinctive sustain in their performances, attracting the listener’s attention and making them stand out from the diverse instruments playing along. Some of the most famous compression pedals are the “Ross Compression” and the classic “MXR Dyna”, which have been subject to imitations and remakes ever since their original releases. Compression pedals have remained popular to this day, and are considered a must-have in many guitarist’s arsenals.
Coming in as the fourth-most recommended multi-effects unit is the Boss ME-80, which is the upgrade to the older Boss ME-70. This is probably most comparable to the Line 6 POD HD500X in terms of having an all-in-one, full-featured multi-effects and amp-modeling unit. But the great thing about the Boss ME-80 is that it costs nearly half what the Line 6 does! Furthermore, the Boss is a very different animal in how you interact with it, which you can pretty much tell just by looking at the two pedals side by side.
Also new in ’39 was the Supro Collegian Guitar Family. This consisted of a number of metal-bodied resonators, the No. 25 Spanish, No. 26 Hawaiian, No. 27 Tenor, No. 28 Mandolin, and No. 29 Ukulele. These had metal bodies made of brass – no doubt leftover Style 97 and Style 0 National bodies – and painted a yellowish maple color, with a clear plastic pickguard. This latter guitar took over the bottom of the National resonator line, pushing out the Duolian, which was no longer offered. All but the uke cost $35, the uke $20.
Hold on now, this is my story, right? Anyways, realizing that I don’t use multiple amps live, and that I tend to stick with 1 basic amp sound, this was going to be easier than I thought. The amp sound I use is more of a Fender Twin sound with a little more mids, but not as much as say, a Deluxe. The gain is something I get from my pedals (like an 805 Overdrive and a Vapor Trail Analog Delay).  I didn’t need a device for live playing that replicated dozens of amps, cabs, and microphones. My setup is simple: Good pedals plugged into a simple modeler like the Tech 21 Fly Rig 5.  It is a simple amp modeler with reverb that I can even use as a full pedalboard if mine goes down. Getting use to IEMs with a well-mixed band took a little bit of doing, but after a few gigs, I had adjusted just fine. You can change your own balance of the band in your own ears, but it is sort of like listening to a CD and playing along with it. It is not much different than what I do at home, anyway, so once I got over the ‘hangup’ of not carrying my amp (my back thanks me), and not seeing my amp behind me, it made a lot of sense. We take 50% less gear now to gigs, and the recordings (and reviews) are much, much better. My ears don’t ring for 2 days after. I can still get glorious feedback (from my pickups hearing the PA sound), and all of the little tricks I do on guitar remain in tact. The pickups on my guitar still deliver the same sound. To my ears, it is easier to mix out front, and much, much easier to balance all of the instruments without all of the stage volume. We also have a lot more room onstage to move around. 
Introducing the next stage in the evolution of the music game. Rocksmith, the first and only game where you can plug into any real guitar. Featuring gameplay that automatically adjusts to your personal ability and innovative game design that makes playing music visually intuitive, Rocksmith will engage experienced musicians as well as those who have never picked up a guitar in their life. You'll unlock mini games to hone specific skills. You'll be able to choose from a large catalog of songs in different styles including:Every copy of Rocksmith will include a revolutionary 1/4 inch USB cable that turns the guitar's signal from analog to digital, allowing it to be played through video game consoles. By plugging into your console, you'll develop real skills and real styles while playing absolutely real music.

We supply different variants of Electric Bass Guitar, which is just an extension of the Electric Guitar. The only difference between the two is that the former comes with a longer neck and scale length. It also comes with an option of 4, 5 and 6 strings. The four string bass guitar is tuned in a way similar to tuning a double bass guitar. It is capable of

I use an EBTECH HUM X. I plug my Fender ’62 Re-Issue Deluxe Reverb into the HUM X and then I plug the HUM X into the wall socket. It works great for me. For my pedals, I use a Visual Sound One Spot to power my large board with no issues and I have a Boss BCB-3 pedal board/case with OD-3, CH-1, DD-3, and a TU-2 next to the OD-3 on the floor since my BCB-3 is really old it came with a 4 pin daisy chain. I power that with a Boss PSA-120S AC Adapter also with no issues. I read about keeping your signal as clean as possible and cable lengths no longer than is necessary. I would try everything mentioned above and make sure you have good quality and proper length cables. BTW, if you research cables, you may find that more expensive doesn’t always mean better. Check out Pro-Co. They are also made in the USA. Good luck!
{"id": "114572014", "categoryId":"site5AAG", "name":"Used S421 S Series Solid Body Electric Guitar", "pageUrl":"/Used/Ibanez/S421-S-Series-Solid-Body-Electric-Guitar-114572014.gc", "thumbnailUrl":"https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/S421-S-Series-Solid-Body-Electric-Guitar/000000114572014-00-180x180.jpg", "hasFeatures":"0", "isAccessory":"0", "message":"", "value":"239.99", "priceMin":"239.99", "priceMax":"239.99", "msrp":"", "productVisibilityMSRP":"1", "restockPrice":"", "openBoxPrice":"", "clearancePrice":"", "isPlatinum":"0", "priceSavingsMaxPrice":"0.00", "priceSavingsMaxPercent":"0", "inventory":"1", "brand":"Ibanez", "reviewStarImageUrl": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/brand/gc/cmn/Sprit-Sm-Stars.png", "reviewStarRating":"0.0", "reviewStarRatingInteger":"0", "reviewHowManyReviews":"0", "usedOrNew":"used", "discontinued":"0", "onOrder":"0", "clearance":"0", "canBeSold":"1", "accessoryCategories":"site5LFMIC,site5LAAA,site5HBA", "stickerText": "", "isVintage": "0", "outletonly": "", "checksum":"159269514523", "priceVisibility": "", "itemType": "Used"}
If a metallic object (such as an electric guitar string for example) is vibrated above a magnetic coil the magnetic field is disturbed and an electrical current is produced. This current then travels through the pickups connecting wires, eventually making it’s way to your output jack where it is transferred to your guitar lead and ultimately to your guitar amp where the small signal is amplified to produce the sound associated with an electric guitar.
These samples are released under the GNU GPL license. The source code being the sf2 files (of which contain the audio samples and settings). The samples and settings can be accessed within Viena and Translator Free on windows or Swami on linux. This license means that you can do what you like with them but if you create any samples from them or improve on them then you have to use the same license in your projects. This way it keeps it open source (and therefore free). This license is only concerned with the source code. Any music you create with them is nothing to do with me (i.e. you take all the royalties and use whatever license you like).

As I’ve mentioned before, the topic of guitar pedals can really be a rabbit-hole and some people get really, really into them. They are very often the key to the tone you keep chasing after. However, at the end of the day, a lot of your sound depends on your ability to play your instrument, so please don’t neglect practicing your instrument over trying out different effects.
There’s an old joke in the technology industry: If a product has a problem, simply sell it as a feature. The electric-guitar-effects industry is no different. Music has often thrived on transforming faults into influential sound effects. Before professional studio production enabled granular tweaks in sound, standalone guitar effects emerged from deliberately converting hardware faults—often caused by the limitations of amplifiers—into positive features. By the end of the 1970s, it had become impossible to imagine how R&B, blues, and rock could have existed without these fortuitous mistakes.
Overall, the reviews and comparison should not be the criteria on which you should decide the brand that you want. The best way to choose one is by listening to and feeling the sound that the guitar produces. The brands listed above are some of the best-known in the world. Of course, there are many other good brands out there too. If you feel we've missed out on some, please feel free to mention them in the comments section below.
While Laney brand might not sound as familiar to the “uninitiated”, this brand has been producing quality amps for very good prices. The  LG12 is a combo amp with 12-watts. While 12-watts isn’t much it seems to kick in a punch when needed (and plus, you want it for practice and more practice amps don’t have a lot of wattages). Apart from that this combo offers  LG12 12 single channel with switchable drive, CD input, headphone socket (a much for practice) as well as Bass, Middle and Treble control. The tone of this amp is pretty crisp and clean. That’s partly due to the 6.5″ custom-designed speaker. The speaker is not only functional but looks pretty nice. Looks wise this model has top mounted construction, rubber feet for sturdiness and leather handle for ease of transportation. Apart from being a great practice amp, it is also great if you travel around and want a model that can take a punch or two.
In 1958, Gibson made a radical design change to their Junior and TV models: with the design change came cosmetic changes to these guitars that would later take on enormous importance. To accommodate player requests for more access to the top frets than the previous designs allowed, Gibson revamped both these electric guitar models with a new double-cutaway body shape. In addition, the Junior’s fresh look was enhanced with a new cherry red finish, while the re-shaped TV adopted a new, rather yellow-tinged finish for its new design.

Gibson did not take Fender too seriously at first; Fender were just an amplifier company that made a few guitars. They didn't regard the solid-body Broadcaster launched in 1950 as a serious musical instrument, lacking the depth of tone of a Gibson electric-acoustic. But music was changing, guitarists wanted different sounds, and music was getting louder. Fenders instruments proved to be more appropriate for the emerging musical scenes. Over the next decade Fender created a number of solid-body guitars that defined genres. Guitars like the Stratocaster, Telecaster and Precision and Jazz basses proved to be exceptionally popular and have stayed in production ever since.
Jazz guitarists learn to perform these chords over the range of different chord progressions used in jazz, such as the ubiquitous ii-V-I progression, the jazz-style blues progression (which, in contrast to a blues-style 12 bar progression, may have two or more chord changes per bar) the minor jazz-style blues form, the I-vi-ii-V based "rhythm changes" progression, and the variety of modulation-rich chord progressions used in jazz ballads, and jazz standards. Guitarists may also learn to use the chord types, strumming styles, and effects pedals (e.g., chorus effect or fuzzbox) used in 1970s-era jazz-Latin, jazz-funk, and jazz-rock fusion music.
I’m starting at guitar too at sixty years old, my opinion is that it’s not the guitar, but the time put into practicing, you can dup any type of sound with the features from amps, and guitar processors. You can even make an electric guitar sound like an acoustic. I purchased a line 6 150 watt amp, and a processor from line six, and I can dup any type of guitar sound. I built my own guitar
{"pageName":"[gc] pdp: fender california redondo player acousticelectric guitar","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","prop2":"[gc] shop: guitars: acoustic guitars","prop1":"[gc] shop: guitars","events":"event34,event3,event45,prodView","evar51":"default: united states","list1":"36-month,60-month,24-month","prop5":"[gc] shop: guitars: acoustic guitars: 6 string acoustic guitars","prop6":"[gc] shop: guitars: acoustic guitars: 6 string acoustic guitars","prop3":"[gc] shop: guitars: acoustic guitars: 6 string acoustic guitars","prop4":"[gc] shop: guitars: acoustic guitars: 6 string acoustic guitars","products":";K47863;;;;evar65=New-Guitars-Fender","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] product detail page"}
Advanced multi-effects processors can involve significant learning curves. Their hundreds of sounds and functions may entail diving deep into multi-layered menus to get at what you want. The best units offer intuitive and ergonomic user interfaces that keep the most common functions easily accessible via dedicated knobs and switches. Reading user and pro reviews can help you identify which models offer the greatest ease of use.
If you are feeling lucky, you can purchase any one of these guitars online. I personally like to sit in a store and play the actual guitar I’ll be taking home. That way I can see if the action is set too high, how it feels, and most importantly how it sounds. You can without a doubt find a great acoustic guitar for under $500. Don’t rule out the option of buying used. You can find a guitar that retails for $900 for maybe $500 used on sites like craigslist.org or reverb.com.
A guitar tuner pedal is an absolute must have if you’re serious about guitar as it provides accurate tuning instantly and can even allow you to tune your guitar to alternative tunings such as Drop D, open tunings and more. Check out our top 12 Best Guitar Tuners blog for more info on guitar tuners. The absolute industry standard is the BOSS TU-3 tuner pedal - a must have.
The gray area between different types of phasers and chorus pedals—and phaser-style chorus pedals versus delay-based chorus pedals—arises probably because designers and manufacturers really have followed two distinct paths in this field. Some phasers have sought to approximate the Uni-Vibe’s approximation of a Leslie cab, and some so-called choruses have done much the same. Other phasers have been designed from the ground up more purely from the perspective of the principles of phase shifting in itself, rather than in an effort to sound like a whirling speaker or any other electromechanical device that has come before. The result means the field is broad and varied, and different phasers (or their related effects) can often have different voices with characteristics more distinct than, say, two delays from different makers.
Because in most cases it is desirable to isolate coil-wound pickups from the unintended sound of internal vibration of loose coil windings, a guitar's magnetic pickups are normally embedded or "potted" in wax, lacquer, or epoxy to prevent the pickup from producing a microphonic effect. Because of their natural inductive qualities, all magnetic pickups tend to pick up ambient, usually unwanted electromagnetic interference or EMI.[23] The resulting hum is particularly strong with single-coil pickups, and it is aggravated by the fact that many vintage guitars are insufficiently shielded against electromagnetic interference. The most common source is 50- or 60-Hz hum from power transmission systems (house wiring, etc.). Since nearly all amplifiers and audio equipment associated with electric guitars must be plugged in, it is a continuing technical challenge to reduce or eliminate unwanted hum.[24]

Vintage guitar amps are older guitar amplifier "heads", speaker cabinets and combo amp/speaker cabinets, which guitarists, record producers and bandleaders seek out for their unique tone. Some[which?] recording studios have a selection of the most popular vintage guitar combo amps, amp heads and speaker stacks, so that performers can get a retro sound. During the 1980s, when most guitar amps being manufactured used "solid state" semiconductor technology, many musicians seeking an older style of sound (for blues, roots rock, etc.) favored older amps that used vacuum tubes (called "valves" in the UK).[23] Popular vintage models include the Fender Showman, Bassman and Vibroverb amps, and older models made by Ampeg, Gibson, Marshall, and Vox,[24] as well as other smaller companies such as Valco, Danelectro, and Premier.
Guitarists have their own special system of music notation called guitar tablature, or "guitar tabs" for short. Using guitar tabs, a guitarist can play a wide variety of music without ever having to learn how to read standard sheet music. Though guitar tabs aren't a perfect way of describing music, they've allowed newer generations of guitarists to quickly and easily share information about how to play songs across the globe via the internet. Every guitarist should have at least a basic understanding of how to read tablature - it's the de facto shorthand for much of the guitar music you'll find written out online.
Solid state amps have many advantages: they are cheaper, lighter, and require less care than a valve amps (which eventually will need new valves, for instance!). Vox, Line 6 and Hiwatt make really good solid state amps that you can gig with without worries. They are not necessarily "worse" amps. The Rolling Stones, Status Quo and many other big acts have used solid-state amps at some point. They're also quite popular with jazz guitarists.
The Police incorporate a ton of reggae influences into the verse before the chorus turns into standard pop rock affair. The entire riff uses only down strums, and starts with the G minor chord while also lifting your fretting hand just enough so that the chord doesn’t ring after each strum. The majority of the chord progression goes from Gm, to Dm, to EbMaj7 chord. 
I'm going to assume that if you're reading this, you've probably been to two dozen guitar sites, all with varying, if not conflicting information on the correct way to do a setup. I've been there too, I've watched guys on youtube filing down frets with a dremel tool. Now it didn't look right to me, but maybe it works for him. The reality is there is more than one way to do something, and that's OK. If the end result is a great sounding instrument, it doesn't matter how you got there. So I'm going to show you my way of how to get to a great sounding electric guitar. And if you should choose to do something differently, and it works, great!!. Part of having some fun in life is experimenting, I encourage it.
Artists all over the world are enjoying the classic looks and premium features of Vintage Guitars. Professional players and producers working with world renown Artists like Gregg Allman, Amy Grant, Josh Turner, and many  more, rely on the great sound and playability of Vintage Guitars. See what they’re saying about the guitars they’re rocking out on every night!

More and more are finding themselves downsizing their pedalboards, if not totally swapping all their stompboxes for a multi-effects unit. There are also many who are looking to upgrade their existing guitar processor. Whatever your case may be, it is our intention to help you find one that fits your needs, or at least point you to the right direction.
As Jay Verkuilen, has already noted here (no pun intended!), be careful not to hammer too hard on the unplugged guitar as you can be fooled into thinking you have to play much harder that you really do. Fretboard exercises & scales, practicing chord forms, and the like while unplugged is beneficial to your playing, "muscle memory," and aids your relationship with your housemates and neighbors.
Actually, company founder Leo Fender's first business was repairing tube circuitry equipment including radios, phonograph players, and home music amplifiers. He noticed the growing popularity of amplifiers for home music systems and branched out into selling music records and renting out PA systems he had designed from his repair shop. Then he got even more involved in music by making and selling Hawaiian lap steel guitars containing a proprietary pickup system which he bundled with his own newly designed amplifiers in 1945. The following year he changed the company name from Fender’s Repair Service to Fender Electric Instruments Company.
For many guitarists, the only thing better than a Gibson Les Paul is a vintage Gibson Les Paul. From stunning museum-quality pieces from the '50s to road warrior axes from the Norlin era of Gibson production in the '70s, there are fresh Les Pauls added to this page every day including Les Paul Standards, Customs, Juniors, and more. Whether you're a veteran Gibson collector or a new inductee to the ranks of Les Paul fandom, you can find your next vintage LP here.

In 2008 Squier released its Classic Vibe series, a series of electric guitars and basses mirroring classic Fender designs of the 1950s and 1960s—each roughly reflecting the hardware, woods, color variations, finishes, body contours, and tonal characteristics of their respective era; Squier states that they didn’t intend the series as completely era correct, but wanted to impart the ‘vibe’ of a classic Fender design—the vintage-quality feel, look, and sound of their first series of guitars in 1982.
Fender’s MIM (Made in Mexico) Stratocasters are offered as an affordable option, buyable at about half the rates of their American siblings. Moreover, you can also select your preferred one from among the maple and rosewood fingerboards, SSS or HSS pickup configuration, and color variations. You can also find several models available with Floyd Rose tremolo and pretty tops. For those requiring American Fenders, the American Original Series is available with all essential features.
For the electronics, Martin went with a Fishman F1 system. This is a fairly straightforward platform that features a clear, transparent sound with plenty of authentic vibes, and a very simple control layout, which matters when you're in the middle of playing and need to tweak something. There's no EQs or anything extra like that. Instead, you get one volume control, one tone control, and a built-in tuner.
Paul Gray (b. 1972 d. 2010) swapped his longtime association with Warwick basses for a customized version of the ATK bass series, the PGB1. He was impressed with the ATK bass after he bought one from a pawn shop and told Ibanez that he would endorse them if they put the ATK series back into production. He switched to his signature model shortly before recording of the Slipknot album All Hope Is Gone and used them until his death in 2010.

A right handed 6 strings, electric guitar that mostly comes in black. The body is made from mahogany, while the fret board is made up of rosewood. The fret board is composed of up to 22 frets of 2.7 mm in size. It additionally has beautiful electric features such as a 3 way toggle and a push and pulls volume and tone. Price ranges from INR 21,400-21,541. Click below to get more product details.
What makes this one of the best electric guitar amp for beginners is Peavey’s TransTube preamp technology which provides a realistic tube amp tone and response, with the price and stability of a solid state amp – the best of both amp styles. Loud enough to rock, yet the headphone jack allows you to rock in isolation without disturbing others. The line in lets you plug in a CD player or mp3 player to jam with your favorite bands. It currently retails for $79.99.
After being branched into ESP-LTD designs, the company made its signature guitars accessible to the masses. This was done by launching these guitars with the affordable price range. The design of ESP-LTD guitars is quite similar to the typical ESP designs like the Eclipse. Its ESP-LTD EC-1000 is a fantastic guitar model for rock, with high-quality features. In fact, if you are looking for something that could substitute the Les Paul guitar, EC-1000 will be the right choice.
I do all my recording through my Axe FX, though there are many ways to USB record to computer. That being said, I plan to play live using my Ax and my other FRFR gear. I’m using a Matrix 1600-watt amp and a Matrix 2×12 (FRFR) cab and will run direct-out to PA when the time comes. I see no reason to lug around a half-stack or stack let alone the consistency and versatility of this setup. This is my first time using FRFR, and was tempted to go with a hi-end head and cabinet combo, but the up front investment will be worth it. I won’t ever have to buy effects pedals or change heads when I want a different sound. I did add a Mission SP-2 expression/volume pedal and also use my old Pod X3 Live for a midi controller. As for volume, I’m confident that my setup will hold its own vs. most other half-stack setups. I may add an Atomic CLR or another Matrix 2×12 (like the one I have) for a monitor later on. Another important factor is my band does cover songs and the Axe setup allows me to tailor my tone to match the bands we cover at the click of a switch. As a guitarist and computer tech/nerd, it doesn’t get any better than this for me. The configuration possibilities are endless.
The 600 series pairs maple back and sides with a spruce top that has gone through Taylor’s torrefaction process, which accelerates the wood’s aging process through heat. We couldn’t find a single fault with this guitar’s build quality and the 612ce is an unbelievably comfortable guitar to play. The tone is still that of a maple guitar, but a more refined one than we’re used to. Likewise with the torrefied spruce: it’s immediately familiar, but with enough difference to cause a cocked ear. Strumming out chords and standard singer-songwriter fare was pleasing, and it put in a good shift with some country-style flat-picking, but it is fingerstyle playing that this guitar lives and breathes. By any token these models from the 600 series are stunning guitars. They have a laudable ecological footprint, they look superb and they have rich, unexpected tonal qualities. 

An electric guitar is an expensive toy, so deciding who to buy it for is very important. Depending on the electric guitar’s purpose, its size and sound have to align with the player’s taste and goals. Profciency is also another deciding factor. If you are a beginner electric guitar player, the most important things to keep in mind is how easily you can play the electric guitar. What type of body style is suitable? What types of tones suits your tastes? These are the types of questions anyone should ask themselves when deciding who to buy an electric guitar for.

You can always rely on Epiphone to provide an acoustic guitar with eye-catching looks and a quality sound at an excellent price, and the EJ-200CE is certainly a testament to this. Based on one of the world’s most famous guitars, the J-200 (introduced in 1937), this revamped model offers an excellent mix of vintage style and modern components, perfect for any level of skill.
Our site has a wealth of information about what goes into making a Taylor guitar and how to make this very important decision. We have guides for how to find the right fit for you. Learn about the subtle differences in shapes and styles. Delve into different types of woods and construction, which are vital to the flavor and tone of an acoustic. Explore the Taylor line by series to find the look and style you want for your instrument.
I have a Norma single pickup electric guitar with 1 volume and the 3 position tone switch. Someone tried to repair the wiring (w/o soldering) so it didn’t work when I found it. I did some simple wiring/soldering and got it working and the pickup sounds great but I cant figure how to wire it so the tone selector works. Any help or a diagram would be great.
Get it tuned up and play it in the store. Some people may find this uncomfortable, being a newbie and all. If you don't want to play it, just start bending strings, up and down, using the whammy bar; think of it as 'guitar stretching'. Then see how well it stays in tune. If this guitar has no locking nuts on the head, and it still stays in tune, it's a winner. But if you have to re-tune more than a little, and almost all the strings, pass on it. You will grow frustrated by it very quickly.

Unassigned maker badge names are AGS, Alex, Andre, Aquila, Asco, Avon, Axiom, Bradley, CG Winner, Clear Sound, CMI, Columbia, Commodore, Cortley, Crestline, Crown, D. Lewis (?), Danelectro, Dynelectron (some), Diplomat, Dixon, Dorado, Eagle, El Degas, Exceltro, Exper, Encore, Fandel, Garzia, Goya, Grant, Grenn, Laguna, LTD, Magnum (?), Maier, Monroe, Marchis, Mark II, Masaaki (?), Matador, Norwood, Palmer, Prairie, President, Rodeo, Sanox, S.G.C., Splender, Stella, Targa, Taro, Voxton by Vox, and Yoshi. Some of these badges are attributed to the importer as the 'maker', which is untrue. It's possible that some of these badges were made by smaller Japanese manufacturers that have faded into history.


Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Sunburst, Amber
Another factor that may need to be considered is the length of the speaker cable. Very long speaker cable runs may affect the performance of the system, either by causing line loss of power or by affecting the impedance. For best performance and highest wattage output with bass stacks or combos with extension speakers, bassists typically use the shortest possible speaker cable.
Interestingly, it’s the back of this guitar that’s the most visually attractive, with a drop dead gorgeous rosewood fretboard and quilt maple three-piece design. You’ll stare at it for some time before you can bring yourself to flip it over and start playing. That’s not to say the front doesn’t look good - the whole thing feels more upscale than the price.
{ "thumbImageID": "Mockingbird-Set-Neck-Electric-Guitar-Amber-Burst/J47208000001000", "defaultDisplayName": "B.C. Rich Mockingbird Set Neck Electric Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Amber Burst", "sku": "sku:site51500000031711", "price": "499.99", "regularPrice": "499.99", "msrpPrice": "714.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/BC-Rich/Mockingbird-Set-Neck-Electric-Guitar-Amber-Burst-1500000031711.gc", "skuImageId": "Mockingbird-Set-Neck-Electric-Guitar-Amber-Burst/J47208000001000", "brandName": "B.C. Rich", "stickerDisplayText": "", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Mockingbird-Set-Neck-Electric-Guitar-Amber-Burst/J47208000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Gloss Natural", "sku": "sku:site51500000031710", "price": "497.54", "regularPrice": "497.54", "msrpPrice": "714.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/BC-Rich/Mockingbird-Set-Neck-Electric-Guitar-Gloss-Natural-1500000031710.gc", "skuImageId": "Mockingbird-Set-Neck-Electric-Guitar-Gloss-Natural/J47208000002000", "brandName": "B.C. Rich", "stickerDisplayText": "", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Mockingbird-Set-Neck-Electric-Guitar-Gloss-Natural/J47208000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
In 1947, Jerry Wexler, a writer for Billboard Magazine described African American music as ‘Rhythm and Blues’ and its appeal was spreading fast and wide helped by the popularity of the radio DJ. People across the states would tune in to their favourite stations to hear the music they loved. Whether or not the song was performed by black or white musicians became irrelevant.
Guitar pickups are a vital component of your tone and replacing them is something that most guitarists can learn to do themselves. Using high quality pickups can go a long way to bringing new life and excitement to your playing experience. There are hundreds of pickup manufacturers and thousands of pickups to choose from. Whether you’re looking for a hotter pickup, trying to capture a beloved vintage tone or seeking single-coil sound in a noiseless package, brands like DiMarzio®, Seymour Duncan®, Lace®, Porter®, Fender®, Gibson® and many others offer a solution.

No matter what style of music you are into, you won’t have to look far to find a like-minded guitar builder. The electric guitar can trace its roots back to the big-band days, and there are several companies that excel at creating excellent guitars for jazz. Likewise, there are those companies that have grabbed on to the heavy metal genre and make guitars built for extreme mayhem.
When it comes to guitar amps, American Musical Supply carries iconic cornerstone brands such as Fender, Marshall, Vox, and Orange. These are the names that have formed the foundation of guitar rigs worldwide for decades. We also stock the most innovative new models from such brands as Blackstar, Fuchs, Line 6, Paul Reed Smith, Supro, and a host of other incredible companies anchored by passionate engineers, technicians, and designers. With the myriad of choices available from AMS, how does one decide? All it takes are a few questions to get started.
Back in the good ol’ days, guitarists had to crank their amplifiers to eleven in order to obtain a nice and creamy distortion. Today, this is no longer the case. Thanks to overdrive pedals, you can basically drive every clean amp into overdrive – at any volume – and choose the amount of gain and shape the tone precisely as desired. The overdriven or crunch sounds are commonly used for rock, to slightly get that “breakup” clean tone or to play blues licks and solos. During the last two decades, guitarists found out that overdrive pedals are also perfect for boosting the crunch channel of their amps into total distortion – a technique often used during guitar solos, to give the sound that extra weight and girth – or, as with the famous Tubescreamer, to tighten up the bass response of the amplifier gain channel. The Boss SD-1 is a very popular choice for overdrive pedals, capable of great sounds. The legendary TS9 by Ibanez is also worth a mention – even considering that it’s available in Mini and Deluxe formats. And while we’re at it, why not give the Harley Benton Ultimate Drive a try? This little screamer can boost your amp into full overdrive at a very competitive price.
Dude I totally agree with you,Eddie Hazel was awsome.And Add Ernie Isley (he learned from Jimi Hendrix when he played with the Isley Brothers),And Carlos Santana(his oloder stuff,check out the Borboletta album from 1975),and if you like Hendrix and stevie Ray why isn't Robin Trower (Robin Trower Live) on this list ?Also the guitarist from the band Slave(he was17 when they cut the album with "Slide"on it).Most of these are Metal guitarists,I prefer a guitarist that can make the hair on the back of my neck stand up when they play.Someone that makes you feel different emotions when they play.Just because you can play super fast doesn't make you great.

All this is to say that you don't need to worry about getting your hands on a large amp. Small amps perform better for the overall sound of your band in most venues, and any venue big enough for you to need more volume is going to mic your amp anyway, giving you all the juice you'd need. So, as you look at the amps on our list, you can evaluate them based on their EQ options, their effects, and, frankly, their look.
Description: Body: Koa - Flamed - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: U-Shape - Nut Width: 43mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Binding: White Sparkle - Frets: 22, Jumbo, Medium - Inlay: Thumbnail - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.6" (62.5cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Rocking Bar - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Grover Romantics Tuners, 3x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: FilterTron - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Flamed Koa

Guild is an American guitar company that makes some amazing semi-hollow electric guitars such as the Starfire and the Aristocrat. These are guitars that nail the retro-rock sound and have the looks to match. Many classic Guild models have been revived through the Newark Street collection. While these guitars are cool beyond words, where Guild really shines is in the acoustic arena.
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24" (61cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Goldburst
NEW ARRIVAL SORRY SOLD OUT QUICKLY ...She's super clean Genuine Ibanez Hoshino Factory release this is a cool collector piece of Japanese Law-suit modle guitar history WoW is this well made guitar Beautiful in person just impressive . This vintage J200 is now over 39 years old that plays with ease and has a HUGE SOUND... really sweet beautiful tone that rings out pretty loudly and its playability makes this guitar fun to play and an excellent choice in your next cool Japanese Vintage guitar... she's in better than average cond too well taken care of Adult owned right here in California she's in top form folks. With its Nice medium slim taper flamey maple neck 1-11/16ths at the nut. Classic beautiful original pick guard looks exactly like the old age Gibson, the detailed workmanship fit & finish you will be sure to notice and love. Ready to tour or record tonight! every time you pick it up to play. TO SEE THE PICTURE GALLERY OF THIS GUITAR CUT & PASTE THIS LINK THEN CLICK OR RETURN: https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/73ElDegasJ200BlondFlamed?authkey=Gv1sRgCKTqjqGy09roBw#slideshow/5573434646760239042.

Kay was founded in 1931 by Henry “Kay” Kuhrmeyer. They supplied guitars to Montgomery Wards and others. During the 1950s their electric guitars were competitors for the Silvertone and Danelectro guitars. The company dissolved in 1968. Kay guitars are not currently in production. However, Kay also produced cellos and basses. Engelhardt-Link purchased the acoustic line of instruments from Kay. These are still being produced in Elk Grove Village, IL.

Guitar chords and signatures. Find and save list of chords. Basic guitar chords A sheet of the most used rock chords. Suitable for beginners. Empty chord sheet An empty sheet of chords templates to print out and use. Basic guitar chords Em, C, G, D, Am, E, and A Free lesson on the basic guitar chords Em, C, G, D, Am, E, and A. The following chords are 7 of the most basic open position chords. An open position chord is one that contains at least o
Hendrix, Van Halen and, uh, Mozart are the musicians to thank for most heavily influencing death-metal shredder Azagthoth, not that they really come through in the jagged riffs and cheetah-fast solos of Morbid Angel classics like “World of S—t” and “Where the Slime Live.” But that’s because he has blazed a tension-filled style all his own (when he solos, he enters a mystical mind state he calls the “Temple of Ostx”) that is finally getting more praise than early antics like cutting himself with a razor before hitting the stage and extolling Satanism.
Because IRs can be recorded in virtually any space, convolution reverbs generally come with a library of IRs ranging from small live rooms to famous venues, top studio rooms, forests, canyons, railway stations and just about anything else you can think of. They sound very convincing, and there's plenty of variety to be had, but once the IR is loaded, there's only a limited amount of editing you can do without spoiling the natural sound. Usually you can apply EQ and also change the envelope of the reverb decay to make it shorter, and adding pre-delay is not a problem, but after that you pretty much have to take what you get. Some companies, such as Waves, have managed to create additional controls but, as a rule, the further you move from the original IR, the less natural the end result.
While continuing to keep the E string depressed at the first fret, move up the neck from the 12th fret to the end of the fretboard, continuing to depress the string at each of the successive frets. As you move up the fretboard, watch if and how much the distance between the bottom of the string and the top of the frets in the 6-7th fret range changes, if at all. The less the gap rises, the flatter, overall, the neck is. Using this method you may discern that there is more curve in one area than another, and not necessarily centering on the 6-7th fret area. In some cases this curve will be resolved by changing the tension on the truss rod. In other cases, adjusting the truss rod tension will not resolve them, and fret leveling, refretting, or heat bending the neck(rarely) may be necessary.
Digital reverbs, like their sibling delays, offer more power and a greater variety of settings. And in addition to doing some approximations of spring reverb sounds, digital units usually offer more “lifelike” reverberation as heard in anything from an empty room to a large concert hall, if you want to add a synthesized “natural” room sound to your signal rather than merely replicate the classic sproing of springs. A few pedals do this very well, but most such devices are rack units that are best used in an amp’s FX loop, and are beyond the scope of this article. For all the power of digital reverbs, however, there are plenty of guitarists who just don’t warm to them, and the tube-driven, analog, spring reverb effect remains hands-down the favorite for guitar.
It's Mal - i posted the comment ref the muted G string on my Epi Les Paul 1960 Tribute - thanks for your response it was very good of you. I'm going to be playing (when i say playing i really mean faffing with) my guitar later so i'll have a look at the saddle, though i have rubbed my finger over it to see if there were any obvious issues which there wasn't. I have also rubbed the graphite from my clutch pencil over it when changing strings - no improvement; i'll get magnifier out and take a closer look and let you know, i may take you up on your kind offer if i'm still stumped.
If you plan to be the more lead-orientated guitarist, good for you. You’ll get more chicks and a higher place in the band pecking order. You shouldn’t however, neglect your chordal playing. A song can exist without lead lines, but not without rhythm. Don’t be fooled, every one of your guitar heroes is invariably a demon on rhythm guitar too. It’s a prerequisite: you have to understand the chords, rhythm, and harmony of a song before you can play any meaningful melody on top of it.
Flanger – a time-based effect likened to the sound of an aeroplane taking off and landing. The “whooshing”effect is created by feeding the output of the guitar tone back in on itself with a very short delay (usually less than 20 milliseconds) causing comb filtering (boosts and cuts along the frequency range). The delay time is then varied which causes the comb filter to move up and down the frequency range.

Acoustic guitars are generally larger than electric guitars. They also tend to use heavier-gauge strings. Heavier-gauge strings will require a bit more finger strength than the lighter-gauge strings found on electric guitars. Getting comfortable holding the guitar and fretting notes is important on both acoustics and electrics, but may be slightly more physically challenging with acoustics versus electrics.
PICKUP CAVITIES Same basic thing here. Be careful routing as you don't want to go outside you lines. The pickup rings tend to be thin along the outter edge, so if you go outside you lines it will look like there is a hole in the body of the guitar once you fit the rings on. Determine the depth that you will need for the pickups you are using. This is usually based on the length of the mounting screws. You will need enough room for them to fit. I use a 1/4" bit for this as well. You can use a template if you want but I do it free hand because any imperfections will be covered by the pickup rings.
FWIW: I have the same guitar, and it is around the same vintage as yours, with a 4 digit serial number and the headstock truss-rod adjustment. As you can see from the response from SLM, the headstock truss-rod adjustment was on the earliest Alvarez guitars. I have another Alvarez from 1981-2, that adjusts in the sound-hole. You'll see a lot of people claiming that they have, or are selling, 70's vintage Alvarez guitars, but have sound-hole truss-rod setup. To me, that's the first indicator that a guitar might be post 1980'ish. And actually, due to the neck attachment issues, I gravitate towards the 80's vintage, as they have had less time to have their neck angle change from string tension.
A common misconception of the Lyle brand, among others, was that Norlin sued Matsumoku for copying their designs and shut them down. The actual lawsuit was indeed filed by Norlin, only not against Matsumoku but Elger/Hoshino--the American division of Ibanez--over elements of the Les Paul and SG guitar designs that Norlin/Gibson had since claimed as a trademark. The case was eventually settled out of court. Japanese companies preemptively altered the designs of their guitars in such a way that they would not be "exact" copies of Gibson guitars. The true story of the demise of the Lyle brand is largely unknown to this day.
I have a beautiful 2003 Ltd and my friend who has played for many years has the Taylor and he ended up borrowing my tak for five months he didn't want to give it back you know the guy has played with some well known folk's so I trust his judgment played with Keith Green and America and I have played over thirty years so I haven't let to many go by without some trial and ownership this tak is as good or better than the best Martin can offer. Ovation can't touch it and of course Gibson is too soft for me I own a fender and a Yamaha 6 and 12 for the money you can't beat a yam and I have played hummingbird to dove guild gretch Washburn breedlove which is a favorite not many I haven't played so with all this my top ten is Takemine Martin Gibson Breedlove Hagstrom Taylor Guild Gretch Washburn and Yamaha. If you can find a Hag it will blow your bag I have a 1971 Hagstrom acoustic I believe it was a demo for Golden Earing it was a gift from an old friend from Deutschland any way I will say ...more
Leo Fender’s simple and modular design was geared to mass production, and made servicing broken guitars easier. Guitars were not constructed individually, as in traditional luthiery. Rather, components were produced quickly and inexpensively in quantity and assembled into a guitar on an assembly line. The bodies were bandsawn and routed from slabs, rather than hand-carved individually, as with other guitars made at the time, such as Gibsons. Fender did not use the traditional glued-in neck, but rather a bolt-on. This not only made production easier, but allowed the neck to be quickly removed and serviced, or replaced entirely. In addition, the classic Telecaster neck was fashioned from a single piece of maple without a separate fingerboard, and the frets were slid directly into the side of the maple surface—a highly unorthodox approach in its day (guitars traditionally featured rosewood or ebonyfingerboards glued onto mahogany necks). The electronics were easily accessed for repair or replacement through a removable control plate, a great advantage over typical construction, in which the electronics could only be accessed through the soundholes in the case of hollow-body instruments, or by taking off the pickguard after removing the strings (in a design popularized by Fender’s own later guitar model, the Stratocaster).
I'm pleased more and more people are realising this. It really is blindingly obvious when you think about it. Anyone who talks about "resonance" when talking about a solid electric guitar body is completely missing the point, and the point is to remove, as far as is possible (and that's pretty far), any influence the body has on the amplified sound. So the primary quality you're looking for in a solid electric guitar body is not resonance, but density.

So fun...I like...I liked it I liked it a lot but the only thing was it took me awhile to get the email that was supposed to get so that is a kind of backed me up on the game but I'm doing good now though so that is good good good good good good good...The fact that the studio is making Mortal Kombat asked on the next generation console is showing you how much they want to improve on disfranchise if they made it for last GEN consoles as well done they would have not done a justice that it deserves besides the DLC being 30 bucks which is a big downfall for me see nest Jayston predator are one of my all-time favorite colors of all time I just wanted them still good game

Of course, the big news was the introduction of the Spectrum 5. This had a slim, highly contoured body with a pointed upper horn pointing up and a hooked lower horn. The body featured a German carve relief along the edge. The head was the new hooked kind from ’64-65, while inlays were triangular “picks,” sort of like Kays of the time. Pickguards were two-part plastic covering the entire area under the strings, with volume and tone controls and stereo and mono jacks. The “vegematic” push-buttons came in five groovy colors.


The difference between laminate and solid wood is that laminate is several thin sheets of wood glued together, while solid wood is a solid piece of wood. The glue that binds the pieces of laminate together reduces the amount that your guitar vibrates, which in turn lessens your volume and frequency production (tone). Solid wood resonates more efficiently, so instruments that use it are louder and sound better. On the flipside, laminated woods are cost effective, reliable and resilient to weather changes.
That said, however, the volume knob can help you conjure a variety of tonal characteristics that can come in handy provided you play with dynamics. Using a volume knob in this context can allow such cool maneuvers as having different tones for verses and choruses, or for various styles of music. To get a handle on how your guitar’s volume dial or dials can affect tone, plug in and fire up your amp until it’s growling with overdrive. Start with your guitar’s volume pot at 10 and begin rolling the dial back in increments. As you go, you’ll hear not only a decrease in loudness, but your sound will clean up and experience variations in its harmonic characteristics.

What about Derek Trucks? Mark Knopfler? Trey Anastacio? Chuck Berry? Even Eddie Van Halen deserves some credit–more than John Mayer does for guitar playing. John Mayer's fame as a guitarist piggybacks on his commercial success, which is a result of targeting a demographic of 13 year old girls. He's no doubt a skilled guitar player, but over-rated as a guitarist relative to guys like Van Halen, Knopfler, etc.
This is the first, and quite possibly the best reason to invest in a good miniature guitar amp. It will allow you to play with a tone that’s enjoyable at a volume that won’t get you kicked out by your condo board. Even if you live out in the middle of nowhere, and can blast your Dual Rectifier full stack as loudly as you’d like, you still have to take the feelings of those you live with into account. Few marriages remain happy when a loud instrument is in the mix. That’s also why a mini amp is a great gift for a young student guitarist. You won’t have to hear them butcher the relatively simple line from a David Bowie tune for days on end.

Always use more than one mic, and when possible, double down on the amp as well. This will give you additional options in the mixing phase. You can split the signal to the amp by employing a stereo FX pedal or a DI. The second mic doesn’t necessarily have to be close to the cabinet and can be placed as far as 3 ft away to give you more tonal range.   
i am writing this now because i can't even look at this guitar without thinking about this experience, and still can't enjoy playing this very expensive and special vintage piece. i went to great lengths to get all the way to this shop, it was extremely difficult, several trains, a really long walk. then i waited a truly insane 3 months, and then went to the same lengths to pick it back up. he did say to me to bring it back, but that was impossible. never in my life, in NY or LA, or anywhere in between have had to wait more than 1-2 days for any service on any guitar. in my experience he takes on way more work than he can handle and apparently doens't do a thorough job. 3 months is obscene. 1 month is unacceptable. bad experience, 100% waste of time & money. if he refunded my money it would not come close to the amount of time i had invested in getting here & back. truly negative experience. waste of much time.
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Ivory, Sunburst
Consideration of this takes us back again to Kink Dave Davies: “The blues players were the first to crank it up, and the music had that spirit, that anguish. We used to listen to all those guys. Like John Lee Hooker—he had that buzz, that drive. I used to listen to him and think, ‘What’s he doing there? That’s amazing—how do you get that sound?’ I think all those elements led to me messing around with amplifiers, because all the amplifiers were clean, soulless.”
PRS started off in the 1990s. At that time, it seemed Les Pauls were being swapped in favor of a PRS guitar. PRS leveraged this opportunity to continue the trend, making PRS more accessible to all. Hence, they launched another line of product with affordable price tags – the SE guitars. Nonetheless, one cannot consider SE guitars as the beginner’s guitars, since they all flaunt with high-end specs like other instruments. Through these guitars, one gets an opportunity to enjoy playing a pro guitar without causing a blow to your budget.
If you are a first time builder or an experienced professional you know the value of building your instrument on a solid foundation. The Custom Shop Jag body is beautiful, high quality and made to spec. The Allparts neck is manufactured under license by Fender. The materials and quality level meet the standards set by Fender. Using these high quality materials will give you the sweet tone and sustain you are looking for.
Guitar pedals are perfect for this. Firstly, and perhaps most importantly, because you should never try to circuit bend anything mains-powered, they can run off 9V batteries. Secondly, their internal circuitry is usually very simple, and they already have audio I/O. Thirdly, you can get them for almost no money from eBay, and the other tools required — soldering iron, wire, switches, and so on — are also very cheap. There's an almost infinite number of sonic possibilities to be explored here, from finding new ways to process a signal (of course you don't just have to use them with guitars) to creating a machine that goes 'Eeeeeeooooowsquelch blipipipip' in a different way every time you turn it on — and who would say no to that for less than a tenner?
{ "thumbImageID": "Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Special-I-Electric-Guitar-Worn-Black/H71861000002000", "defaultDisplayName": "Epiphone Limited Edition Les Paul Special-I Electric Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Worn Black", "sku": "sku:site51296155735782", "price": "129.99", "regularPrice": "159.00", "msrpPrice": "265.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Epiphone/Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Special-I-Electric-Guitar-Worn-Black-1296155735782.gc", "skuImageId": "Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Special-I-Electric-Guitar-Worn-Black/H71861000002000", "brandName": "Epiphone", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Special-I-Electric-Guitar-Worn-Black/H71861000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Worn Cherry", "sku": "sku:site51296155735774", "price": "129.99", "regularPrice": "159.99", "msrpPrice": "265.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Epiphone/Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Special-I-Electric-Guitar-Worn-Cherry-1296155735774.gc", "skuImageId": "Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Special-I-Electric-Guitar-Worn-Cherry/H71861000001000", "brandName": "Epiphone", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Special-I-Electric-Guitar-Worn-Cherry/H71861000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Worn TV Yellow", "sku": "sku:site51296155735784", "price": "129.99", "regularPrice": "149.00", "msrpPrice": "265.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Epiphone/Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Special-I-Electric-Guitar-Worn-TV-Yellow-1296155735784.gc", "skuImageId": "Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Special-I-Electric-Guitar-Worn-TV-Yellow/H71861000003000", "brandName": "Epiphone", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Special-I-Electric-Guitar-Worn-TV-Yellow/H71861000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
×