Australia’s best known guitarist, Tommy Emmanuel, owns many Matons and almost exclusively uses the BG808 acoustic model on his latest albums. Maton has even constructed a Tommy Emmanuel “TE series” according to Tommy’s specifications. His understudy Kieran Murphy also uses Matons. Joe Robinsonplays Maton guitars and was the company’s featured performer at the Frankfurt Musikmesse in 2009.[3]
Unassigned maker badge names are AGS, Alex, Andre, Aquila, Asco, Avon, Axiom, Bradley, CG Winner, Clear Sound, CMI, Columbia, Commodore, Cortley, Crestline, Crown, D. Lewis (?), Danelectro, Dynelectron (some), Diplomat, Dixon, Dorado, Eagle, El Degas, Exceltro, Exper, Encore, Fandel, Garzia, Goya, Grant, Grenn, Laguna, LTD, Magnum (?), Maier, Monroe, Marchis, Mark II, Masaaki (?), Matador, Norwood, Palmer, Prairie, President, Rodeo, Sanox, S.G.C., Splender, Stella, Targa, Taro, Voxton by Vox, and Yoshi. Some of these badges are attributed to the importer as the 'maker', which is untrue. It's possible that some of these badges were made by smaller Japanese manufacturers that have faded into history.
I consider Squier and Epiphone to be the two top brands beginners should be looking at for their first guitar. However, there are some key differences when it comes to their flagship instrumets. Where the Epiphones listed above have a pair of humbucking pickups, the Squier Stratocaster has a trio of single coils, and the Telecaster a pair of single coils.

Ovations reached the height of their popularity in the 1980s, where they were often seen during live performances by touring artists. Ovation guitars’ synthetic bowl-shaped back and early use (1971) of pre-amplifiers, onboard equalization and piezo pickups were particularly attractive to live acoustic musicians who constantly battled feedback problems from the high volumes needed in live venues.[citation needed]


Hum cancelling: hum cancellation is caused by reverse polarity, reverse winding keeps a revrse polarity pickup in phase with a non reverse polarity pickup. To reverse the direction of the winding, simply swap wires, using hot as the ground and ground as the hot. Polarity can be changed on many pickups. If the pickup has bar magnets, simply flip them over. If the pickup uses alnico polepiece AND has the new plastic bobbins such as is common on Fenders, the polepieces can be pushed out with a screwdriver and reinserted "upside down". If the bobbin is fiber DO NOT attempt to flip the polepieces; the wire is wrapped directly around the polepieces and will almost certainly be damaged.
Her dad was Broadway star John Raitt, but Bonnie's artistic parents were blues giants like Howlin' Wolf and Mississippi Fred McDowell, whom she met and performed with early in her career. She learned fast: Starting with her acoustic slide workout on 1971's "Walking Blues," Raitt rolled out a fearsome repertoire of blues licks, fingerpicking with the best and wielding a slide like an old master. Most of all, she set a crucial precedent: When guitar was still considered a man's game by many, Raitt busted down that barrier through sheer verve and skill.
Shortly thereafter, the American instrumental rock band The Ventures asked their friend, session musician and electronics enthusiast Orville "Red" Rhodes for help recreating the Grady Martin "fuzz" sound.[18] Rhodes offered The Ventures a fuzzbox he had made, which they used to record "2000 Pound Bee" in 1962.[19] The best-known early commercial distortion circuit was the Maestro FZ-1 Fuzz-Tone, manufactured by Gibson, released in 1962.[20]
AJL: It’s a brand that specialises in making Gypsy acoustic guitars and archtop jazz box guitars. Each guitar is handmade by master luthier Ari-Jukka Luomaranta from Finland, and when I say he makes it, I literally mean he makes it all alone without any employees. I’m not exactly a classical guitar or jazz box fan but I understand why people love his guitars. He puts extreme attention to even the most minute details while making each of his guitar. Each AJL guitar is like a testimony of his art and dedication. He chooses the best quality woods to work with and by his undying passion for making guitars he creates masterpieces.
I am not satisfied with the sound I am getting from my guitar so I have decided to invest in a new set of strings. I bought an Electric guitar about 1 year ago and have not changed the strings as yet. Since it was not new when I bought it so I do not know how long they have been on it. I am not sure what the gauge of the strings are. I am trying to play lead. Should I go for a .,08 or .09 or a bit higher? I want to do bends as well.
What Fender might lack in heavy, modernized features, it makes up for in affordability, novelty and being some of the best all-around guitars in existence. They would also have to be considered some of the most stylistically versatile guitars, covering all kinds of musical genres and songs. We’ll focus primarily on the Standard (non-American) models, since they’re priced below our $700 cut off. If you want to go with something nicer, target the American series Strats and Teles.

Some solid-bodied guitars, such as the Gibson Les Paul Supreme, the PRS Singlecut or the Fender Telecaster Thinline, among others, are built with hollows in the body. These hollows are designed specifically not to interfere with the critical bridge and string anchor point on the solid body. The motivation for this can be to reduce weight, to achieve a semi-hollow tone, or both.
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Cadsoft Eagle is a very popular tool with pedal builders. A basic version can be had for free. There are limitations on board size and number of layers in the free version, but these won’t come in to play for the majority of basic analog effects pedals.  Element14  includes a host of documents and tutorials.  If you get into complex designs or full professional use later,  full versions of Eagle, at time of writing cost $575, and $1640.
My first electric was a Decca, and a friend had one too. Mine was the one pickup style and his had two pickups. This was back in 1972. These were cheap but played very well and I wish I still had mine. There's one on Ebay right now that's just like the one I had, only ten bucks so far. I remember the great sustain and feedback I could get through it playing Hendrix songs!

You can set an octave to play the higher or lower notes or both at the same time. This is ideal for those who want to really thicken up their sound and are often used by heavy metal guitarists to make solos and riffs sound really cool! The Valeton OC-10 Octave pedal is a budget friendly choice and the Electro Harmonix Nano Pog is an industry standard option.
Bottom Line: The Line 6 HD500X is incredibly in-depth in the amount of options and editability it gives you. Doing all of it from the small screen on the actual unit is headache-inducing, but if you have a computer you can hook it up via USB and edit your sounds from there much more easily. There’s more of a learning curve with the HD500X than there is with the Zoom G3X, but the presets are decent enough and allow you to audition it if you’re the impatient type. Where the HD500X lacks is that it’s less of an immediate-gratification pedal, and it’s hard to tweak on-the-fly and come up with potentially inspirational sounds. Because of how the interface is, this is definitely more of a “sit down with headphones and tinker with it to get your perfect sound” type unit. If the effects quality of the Zoom G3X is a 7/10, the Line 6 HD500X is an 8.5/10. This is the one to get if you’re the type that likes to dig in and have control over every little thing. The price tag is a little on the high side, but considering what a powerhouse this unit is, it’s definitely not unreasonable.
Guitar amplifiers vary widely in price and quality. Many music equipment companies import small, low-powered practice amplifiers for students and beginners that sell for less than $50 USD. Other companies produce expensive custom-made amplifiers for professional musicians, which can cost hundreds or even thousands of dollars (USD). Most combo amplifiers have a carrying handle, and many combo amplifiers and cabinets have metal or plastic-reinforced corners to protect the amp during transportation.
Hey Frank i removed the pick guard and discovered why they were so tall.I just bought the guitar the day i asked you about it and it was late very late after midnight and i found out someone used pick guard screws to just secure them to the PG…lol And i have it back together correctly installed now.No pictures yet here is a better detailed description.The body is solid wood stained factory dark cherry.Rosewood fretboard semi-enclosed tuners…SSS P/U arrangement in a 3 ply black PG and 5 way switch and probably weighs 8 lbs.Thanks ….Larry
You can trace all things loud and riff-y right back to the Kinks' Dave Davies, starting with the fantastically simple power chords of "You Really Got Me," which he recorded at age 17 – setting off a run of proto-metal singles from "All Day and All of the Night" to "Till the End of the Day." Davies, who created the distortion on "You Really Got Me" by slicing an amp speaker with a razor, has laughed off claims that it was actually played by an uncredited Jimmy Page: "Who'd want to play a solo that crazy, anyway? Only Dave Davies could do that."
While the Line 6 PODHD500X is no longer the flagship guitar processor, it is still very much in demand in the market, as evidenced by the overwhelmingly positive response that it continues to get from users and expert alike. It follows after its predecessor, albeit with a more powerful CPU and improved interface via colorful LED rings around the footswitches.
But if you never play with a tone as dark as the fully-rolled off sound, you might consider a lower-value cap. The next example is an .033μ (also know as 33n and 333), another popular choice, followed by the smaller .022μ (also know as 22n and 223), and the even smaller .01μ (also know as 10n and 103). As the cap gets smaller, the minimum tone knob settings gets less dark. As the overall range of the tone pot decreases, it may be easier to locate any desired “nooks and crannies” between the highest and lowest settings.
Lawsuit Takamine F375s Hand built in Japan and still in excellent vintage condition! Build type is Rare Exotic Tone woods series Jacaranda Brazilian Rosewood back-sides-fingerboard & headstock overlay JUST Gorgeous. Its workmanship is really top shelf by any standards, We installed and set up with Martin Marquis 80/20 strings 12's, as well as setting this guitar up with a New bone nut & saddle, Condition is very good with a few minor hard to see scratches on its back you have to look closely sometimes at an angel ( clear coat only not threw to wood ) general play here and there as any 37 year old guitar that has been played would get... dinks and such but nothing major to detract from its obvious outward beauty, This example has an excellent neck its 1-11/16th's at the bone nut, fingerboard is very good as are the frets at 90%, its straight and has a nice meaty feel, has the Martin design detail of the Diamond Volute on back, original tuners are excellent as well, a warm vintage vibe to this 37 year old vintage Gem. Tone is rich with good volume she Sings well!!! JVG Rated 9/10 higher if it wasn't for the few minor clear coat scratches in its clear coat not to the wood that I can see more like swirls and such may be possible to fine grade 3000 wet sand and polish out its possible if it doesn't sell soon when I get the chance I'll do it, its a commitment because it may not sand out alone it may require a few thin clear lacquer applied and buffed out to cure it forever if so a guitar of this caliber deserves the attention.. ( the price will go up after I do that work ) and that really doesn't have to be done to make this guitar just very good -excellent vintage it would bring it very close to mint!.... aside from the few minor scuffs this guitar still qualifies as vintage excellent right now, just thought I would point those out. So to be clear about this listing the way you see it now is the way it is offered.Its a F375s and not the EF375s yet This guitar has a factory installed transducer type pickup installed and it sounds wonderful, Its said to have been installed by original owner in Tokyo by Takamine shop its a very clean job I call it CLEAN where they do not make extra unnecessary holes for output jack instead they use the END PIN hole and its a combination strap pin and or output jack, So this guitar is either Acoustic or Electric really nice in deed in SUPER Condition well above average. This beautiful instrument comes with its original hard shell case it to is in very good vintage condition its heavy duty molded type with plush black interior all functional fully. This is the total package. Contact Joe to buy: jvguitars@gmail.com .
Extra Features: This is where we’ll bucket a bunch of extras that could be important to you, depending where you are in your guitar playing journey, and what gear you might already have. Some multi-effects pedals include handy tools like a tuner, a looper pedal, a built-in expression or wah pedal, an input for an external expression pedal, the ability to double as a USB interface, the ability to be powered by batteries, and so on and so forth. It comes down to personal preference, but we generally like to see the inclusion of a tuner, and looper pedal, since both are extremely useful tools for most guitar players no matter their skill level.

That’s not all modeling processors can do. In addition to offering guitar and amp models, most guitar modeling processors have libraries of the kinds of effects you would get from individual pedals—reverb, echo, chorus, overdrive, distortion, fuzz, etc., as well as integrated drum machines with scores of preset rhythm patterns to help your practice. You can run several effects simultaneously, combining them to create your own unique tonal palette. Most modeling processors now have USB connectivity, some even with two-way audio streaming, for use as interfaces in direct computer recording.


Pickups and body styles are just scratching the surface when it comes to guitar features. No matter how overwhelming things may seem, though, if you’re only a novice or hobbyist there’s no need in fretting (get it?) over every single feature. Instead, look to the features we mentioned and go from there based on what type of music you want to play. If you’re a big blues and classic rock guy, powerful, full sound is necessary: you’ll likely want a semi-hollow or solid body guitar with humbuckers or P90s. Want to play old school country or folk? Check out hollow bodies. Are you a fan of alternative and punk? Consider a thin solid body with single coil pickups.
Franklin Guitar And Repair was started in this space to sell on Ebay By David Wood and Josh Pewitt! before They knew it...there were enough guitars to open a store! David had been a road musician for nearly 20 years, and along the way he learned to set up instruments and do repairs himself. Franklin Guitar and Repair has grown in many ways, purchased by Pat Stockdale in 2016 and still maintaining quality work, and a mom & pop homey kind of atmosphere.

ZPS (ZERO POINT SYSTEM) OF ZR TREMOLO Muelle principal Tope Bloque del trémolo Varilla de tope Con la guitarra afinada correctamente, ajuste el muelle principal y verifique que la varilla de tope toque el bloque del trémolo y el tope. Si la varilla de tope no toca el bloque del tremolo y el tope, gire el tornillo de ajuste del muelle principal hasta que lo haga.


If your interests are on the jazz side of things, the Ibanez Artcore series is worth a close look. These economical hollow-body guitars are perfect for players at any level who want a well-crafted instrument that won't break the bank. They come with a well-deserved reputation for solid stone and sustain and they hold tuning reliably, making the Artcore guitars a good choice to get the most bang for your buck.

In 2010, Gibson USA released the Slash “Appetite” Les Paul Standard as a tribute to Guns N’ Roses‘ debut album, Appetite for Destruction. It resembles the original Les Paul Standards of the late 1950s, including the 1959 Les Paul replica Slash used for the recording of the album. It has a maple top with a nitrocellulose Sunburst finish, rosewood fingerboard with acrylic inlay, and a Slash headstock graphic. It also features Slash’s signature Seymour Duncan pickups.[40] The Gibson Custom Shop introduced the Slash “Appetite” Les Paul Standard. Production was limited to 400, with 100 guitars hand-aged and signed by Slash himself, and another 300 finished with the Custom Shop’s VOS process.[41] Epiphone issued a more affordable version of the “Appetite” Les Paul, production of which was limited to 3,000.[42][43]
In a band and got your slot to wail? Think about it. Shredding scales is all well and good but the best songs and solos have structure, tempo changes and memorable licks. It may be a cliché, but listen to Jimmy Page’s solo in Led Zeppelin’s “Stairway to Heaven” – now that’s how you build-up to a solo. It may be your time to shine, but don’t just gush everywhere – think about structure and let your solos build and breathe.
: : Does anyone know for sure where these originated. I have been told Vox (the England years) made this flat bodied plank guitar in the skiffle days of early 60's/late 50's. Mine is painted white(by hand) with a large black pick guard that curves to envelope the two chrome "toaster" pickups ,bottom of neck, and three control knobs.The strings have a moveable maple bridge(not secured) and a small chrome hardtail heel.The neck has a zero fret at top and 19 more playing frets.There are dot inlays at the 3rd,5th,seventh,ninth,12th,and 17th frets.The headstock is of natural finish light maple with a top edge cut at a sloping angle like Hofner.It has brass tuning pegs,gears and gear plates and the keys are white plastic.The beautiful short neck is true ,natural maple.Along one of the tuning gear plates is the numbers: 35515 which are etched into the wood. Four bolts without any plate hold the neck base to the plain body and a green decal above the pegs at top face of headstock reads: Shadow. The fret board is rosewoodand is laid on neck without bindings.It has six strings and sounds like a short scale Baritone guitar. It also only has one strap peg at bottom since they used to put the other end of strap on a tuning key. No other holes are seen for any former peg at other end of body(where normally found). Please send any info on this small,early,simple but awesome sounding electric skiffle guitar from England(Vox?).Thanks!!!!! Hello, The Vox "plank" guitar I had was EXACTLY like yours! I don't have it now (January,2005). I sold it on eBay this last Spring on Ebay to a collector that works at Warner Bros. studio. He bought it for $460.00 !! There were a few bidders, so I would hang on to that 1950 skiffle guitar if I were you. They are very RARE! Peace! Rory
I have the Epi SG400. It is very playable, and I think the stock PUP's are fine. It is a very versatile guitar. The only thing about the SG is it has a heavy neck. I mean strap one on, and that long neck just tugs down on my left shoulder. I actually tried to sell mine a while back just because of the heavy neck. I added a strap bolt to the top of the horn thing, or whatever you call it, and that helped. Some like the SG310 which is cheaper, but it has a bolt neck, and I think that will translate into an even heavier neck. Rhonda makes some SG clones as well. My only advice would be try straping one around your neck before you buy if you can.
The Omen-6 is a stripped down take on the Hellraiser, with the same sleek double cutaway design and HH (dual humbucker) configuration, but at a more affordable price point. But what's good about it is how Schecter is able to maintain the premium look and attention to detail at this lower price point, including the carved top design. While the name again implies something evil, this guitar is quite good for the price.

Why is Mesa Boogie so low?! Have Mesa Boogie ever made a bad amp? Look how many guys endorse their gear. Have you ever tried a Dual Rectifier or Mark V? It will tear you to shreds. They are AMAZING amps. Best part, they're all tube. Line 6, why the hell are they fifth. Why are they in the top 15? They are nothing but crap digital rubbish. Play a real amp like a Mesa Boogie, line 6, pft. Mesa Boogie is the best amp brand by far.

FWIW: I have the same guitar, and it is around the same vintage as yours, with a 4 digit serial number and the headstock truss-rod adjustment. As you can see from the response from SLM, the headstock truss-rod adjustment was on the earliest Alvarez guitars. I have another Alvarez from 1981-2, that adjusts in the sound-hole. You'll see a lot of people claiming that they have, or are selling, 70's vintage Alvarez guitars, but have sound-hole truss-rod setup. To me, that's the first indicator that a guitar might be post 1980'ish. And actually, due to the neck attachment issues, I gravitate towards the 80's vintage, as they have had less time to have their neck angle change from string tension.
Chicago’s vintage guitar shop is located in Ravenswood just west of Lincoln Square. Rock N Roll Vintage is your one stop shop in Chicago for new guitars, vintage guitars, Chicago guitar lessons, guitar pedals, and we are currently the largest synth dealer in the Midwest. Looking for a specific guitar? Rock N Roll Vintage Guitar Shop carries Fender, Gibson, Martin, Gretsch, Rickenbacker and other popular guitars and basses including boutique amps. We have one of the largest selections of effects pedals in Chicago with many hard to find boutique pedal brands.
Fuzz Box World – We are dedicated to bringing the highest quality components to builders of guitar and bass effects. We want to be the number one source of parts for electronics diyers. Whether you are a professional boutique pedal builder or a weekend hobbyist, your business is very important to us. We will do everything we can to make sure you are happy with your experience at Fuzz Box World.

The Fender T Bucket is a great choice for beginner guitarists looking for a great sounding entry level acoustic. It is frequently the top choice for new guitarists looking for a an affordable acoustic guitar. Many owners site it’s ease of playability as one of its greatest attributes. It is available in 3 different color combinations: 3-Color Sunburst, Moonlight Burst, and Trans Cherry Burst. It is made of maple wood. It has a preamp installed, making it an acoustic electric. It is our top pick for the best acoustic electric under $500. It is a great choice for beginners.


The ultimate in superb workmanship, total versatility. This deluxe 4 pickup electric will be played with pride by the most experienced performer.  Four simulated split pickups make possible virtually unlimited sound combinations. Powerful magnetic pickups are height adjustable. Ultra fast steel reinforced neck. Head and Rosewood fingerboard bound in White. .22 Nickel Silver frets (plus zero fret), 8 “N” shaped pearl position markers, 4 volume controls, 3 position rotary tone control (high-medium-low), Rhythm-Solo-Switch, 4 slide pickup switches.  Advanced type tremolo arm.  Chrome adjustable roller-type bridge.  Highly polished yellow-to-red-to-black sunburst finish.  Size 41″x14″.
When Jimi Hendrix came on the scene in the late 1960s, he was like nothing anyone had ever seen before. His ability to use volume, feedback, wah pedals, and other sonic devices to their maximum effect was awe-inspiring. Eric ‘God’ Clapton saw Hendrix for the first time and thought he would be the end to his career. There may be more technically impressive guitar players, but it’s hard to find anyone who played with more adventure or spirit than James Marshall Hendrix.
The most underutilized sonic tool that electric guitarists have is built right into their instruments: the volume and tone dials. Most players tend to leave their guitar’s volume up full and set the tone knobs in one place and work from there, but with a little practice it’s easy to get used to using these potentiometers or pots — which are contacts that control voltage — to sculpt interesting sounds.
I'm going to break the electric guitar setup guide into five parts, which are all in the links below. It's important to note that the five parts be done in the order in which they're presented. If you have a truss rod that's out of whack, it makes no sense to move on and adjust the bridge. I realize this may be painfully obvious, but for the one person who may not get it, I'm talking to you. Good luck

While jazz can be played on any type of guitar, from an acoustic instrument to a solid-bodied electric guitar such as a Fender Stratocaster, the full-depth archtop guitar has become known as the prototypical "jazz guitar." Archtop guitars are steel-string acoustic guitars with a big soundbox, arched top, violin-style f-holes, a "floating bridge" and magnetic or piezoelectric pickups. Early makers of jazz guitars included Gibson, Epiphone, D'Angelico and Stromberg. The electric guitar is plugged into a guitar amplifier to make it sound loud enough for performance. Guitar amplifiers have equalizer controls that allow the guitarist to change the tone of the instrument, by emphasizing or de-emphasizing certain frequency bands. The use of reverb effects, which are often included in guitar amplifiers, has long been part of the jazz guitar sound. Particularly since the 1970s jazz fusion era, some jazz guitarists have also used effects pedals such as overdrive pedals, chorus pedals and wah pedals.

One reason why the sound changes in different parts of a given room is that sound reflecting from room boundaries reaches your recording microphone later than the sound travelling directly from the amp, causing phase cancellation — in effect a series of peaks and dips in the recorded frequency response, the spacing of which is related to the delay between the direct and reflected sounds. Keith Olsen suggests lifting and/or tilting the amp to minimise the effects of phase cancellation. "Leo Fender put those legs on the sides of a Fender Twin, and he did it so the guy in the orchestra could actually hear it when he was playing soft. But the other reason is that when you put a mic up against an amp tilted that way... you don't get phase-cancellation problems off the floor and wall. Let's take it one step farther. Let's lift that speaker cabinet off the floor and put it up on something that is stable enough to be able to give the speakers a platform to work from, but where... the reflected sound is going to be so far down in volume to the direct, it's of no real consequence... All these things start adding together into mic technique, stuff that you learn over years."
The pickups on an electric guitar can only pick up the vibrations of the string and convert those vibrations into electricity, which is ultimately converted into sound waves that emanate from the speakers. Do the pickups shape the sound? Of course! Can pickups mask the characteristics and make two electric guitars with different tonewoods sound the same? Yes again. So, I guess the correct answer to the question if wood makes a difference in the sound of an electric guitar is “It depends”. A pickup that can’t pick up these subtle overtone differences, enough compression, or other kinds of dynamics-killing processing, will kill the dynamics of any guitar, regardless of tonewood. Does that make it a bad guitar? Not necessarily – it depends on what the musician is after.
If you really want ultimate tone and control, it’s hard to beat a w/d/w type rig. You have ultimate power and control over your tone in a rig like this. Of course, a rig like this probably isn’t going to fit in the trunk of your car! But the massive tones and ultimate control will have you running out to buy a bigger vehicle (or hiring roadies). Don’t say I didn’t warn you....
The movie is very hauntingly beautiful, and it's especially highlighted by an awesomely haunting score, and some breathtaking visuals. The story is interesting, but it's definitely slow-paced, and the climax is much more of an intellectual payoff than a spectacular action scene (which many viewers might be hoping for). So I can definitely see why some people would hate this film, but I loved it. It's one I definitely won't forget anytime soon too, and it's great to see Natalie Portman (my old favorite actress) back in top form! watch movies online pro
I love them both, have a Strat and Les Paul. they are such different animals. Each has it’s place in my music, each has a special sound. Used to own a Tele which I just didn’t enjoy playing so much, so traded in for the Les Paul. I later bought a modified Tele with humbuckers (I know it’s a sin) but damn it sounds so good, for heavy power chords, more like a PRS sound. I’ve been playing 27 years now and am a composer / songwriter. Played in lots of bands, and during my live work I have to say I prefer my Strat. It’s lighter than the Gibson, and contours nicely to my body. With a good valve amp and the right strings I can get some lovely fat sounds out of it. I use the Gibson mostly in the studio. When I moved countries, I needed a cheap electric to tide me over until my stuff got sent over. I picked up a $100 Mitchel (Made in China). The setup was awful, totally unplayable, so set it up properly, and to be honest it plays like a dream. The neck is amazing for a $100 guitar, and with some new pickups the sound is great too. The upshot here is that it doesn’t really matter what guitar you use to make music on, as long as you enjoy the instrument, a cheap guitar can go a long way. I find the discussions about which is better kind of like guys comparing their crown jewels, it’s purely academic and what matters is how you use the thing 😉

1939: The #1 brace inside near the neck block changes from 5/16" wide to 1/2" wide, making it roughly twice as wide. This happened at the same time as the popscicle brace addition. The neck block thickness was also reduced by 1/4". About the same time neck width reduced from 1 3/4" to 1 11/16" at the nut, and the bridge spacing reduced from 2 5/16" to 2 1/8".
You know you’re getting great guitar from the outset, because it’s based on Gibson’s legendary Dove model, which has been sued for decades now by distinguished guitarists in numerous genres, including the likes of Elvis himself. It really does look the part, with the dove design on the fretboard and pickguard, and numerous other nice little touches.
Considering that the setup on a factory-fresh guitar might be good or bad (and few music stores bother to do setup on inexpensive guitars), we strongly recommend that you have a new guitar professionally set up, which will likely cost about $50. You can also learn to do it yourself; there are plenty of online tutorials, and even at age 15 I managed to figure out how to set up my first electric guitar with a little guidance from my guitar teacher. It’s a good idea for every electric guitarist to at least learn how to set action (string) height because you will want to adjust this to suit your style and skills as they evolve.
But no all are created equal, and I don’t really do this — I have live performance gear for anything I do, actually, way more than I need at this point. But a good friend of mine does the whole live-thing-throug-PC and has completely sold his soul to Ableton Live (Music production with Live and Push). You can find Ableton Live Intro online for about $99. It’s not just a live performance tool but also a DAW, you can use it for recording, composing, etc. Again, not one I use, but probably what you want if you’re going for live playing.
Under the ’38 Avalon Hawaiian was a Supro Electric Hawaiian Guitar. This had a similar shape but was covered in “radiant crystal silver.” This was not pearloid, as is often assumed, but rather a silver paint (possibly a Duco leftover from the aluminum steels) with a crystalline additive similar to that used on Duolian finishes. The head was slightly rounded. The fingerboard was black. A handrest covered the pickup/tailpiece assembly. One volume control sat on a square plate on the treble side, reminiscent of the previously mentioned Supro Hawaiian Model in the ’38 Sorkin and ’39 Grossman books. This cost $30.
Here we have a very nice example of the Yamaha Red Label fg230-12... This example is in very good - excellent original condition. The woods used on this guitar are of a very high grade ... spruce top, Honduran Mahogany back, sides and neck please see pics for the details but very nicely grained woods!... workmanship is impeccable... the guitar plays like a real with very good action and the intonation is set dead on... The neck is solid Mahogany and is slightly beefy..I love the feel of this guitar and when you hear is you will be in 12 string heaven... no cracks or repairs ... the condition is vintage used its about 40+ years old you know ...with several minimal scratches but still overall a very beautiful vintage guitar. The wood has aged and mellowed with time to yield a wonderful rich tone only a 30+ year old quality instrument can offer. This one has that quaity rich sound along with the playability with the right aging now and with its beauty ...its a no brainier... Also available is a cool $100 vintage hard shell case see pics Thanks for your interest!.
There are a huge number of different style tone controls in musical equipment; this hardly scratches the surface. If you’re interested in what your tone controls do to your sound, agood place to look is at Duncan’s Amp Pages, where there is a tone stack calculator that shows frequency graphs of several different types of tone controls. Check out http://www.duncanamps.com/tsc/ for more info.
Learning guitar with no source material to work with will require many different resources, overlapped to fill the blindspots of each. Most people take lessons, but you’ll be at the mercy and pace of your teacher, with little room for your own interpretation. These days, there are apps and online lessons which have their advantages, certainly. They also come with monthly fees, though these will likely be cheaper than a live local instructor.
Frets & Necks did an AMAZING job on my RG7421. They installed my BKP Black Hawk p/u's and new tone/volume pots. Frets & Necks service was above and beyond, fast and super knowledgeable. I am very pick...y about who works on my guitars, I am beyond pleased that I chose Frets& Necks to work on my RG. I will be bringing my RG7421 back to Frets & Necks for future upgrades very soon. Be good to yourself and treat your guitar, give Frets & Necks a try. You won't be disappointed. Thank you F&N. See More
Chorus pedals actually make your guitar sound like there are a variety of different guitarists playing the same thing that you are playing, but with a different guitar and slightly out of time with you. This effect makes everything you play sound a little bit ‘warbly’ and thickens up your guitar or bass lines. We recommend experimenting with these as you can use them subtly to add weight to your sound or as a full-blown effect that completely takes over your signal.
I would like to start off the list of the best small guitar amps by talking about one of the best small guitar amps out there, which unfortunately dedicated the entirety of its existence to being used for the purposes of laying acoustic guitars. Unfortunately, because I would love to have one of these to work with my electric guitars. On the other hand, the fact that the amp works with acoustic guitars best, means that those of you looking for a mini amp for your acoustic guitar are in luck. The amp does a great job of amplifying the sound of an acoustic guitar, keeping it clean and clear of any kind of electric distortion, so that if there was no increase in volume, nobody would understand the point of the pick up. While small, the pick up is still on the larger side as compared to the rest on the list. The design is vintage and cool, so that the guitar is enjoyable to look at for everyone.
WET SANDING You can wet sand with 600 or 800 grit wet sanding papers that you can get from the hardware or auto body shop before you apply the clear coats. You can get precission paper from Stewart Mac Donald that are suppose to cut better, last longer and yeild a better result, but I have never tried them so that's up to you. When wet sanding there are a few things to keep in mind. First you will need to soak the paper overnight in water. You can add a little Murphy's Oil soap to it. It will act as a lubricant and help it cut better. You could even soak the paper in a solvent if you use a laquer finish but I use water because it cleans up easier and dosen't smell. Next be sure not to overly soak the areas that you have drilled holes in. If the water get in the wood it can cause a lift in the lacquer that could lead to cracks in the finish. This is why some people choose a solvent to sand with because it is more forgiving in that area. Start wet sanding with a 600 to 800 grit paper and gradually work your way up to a 2000 plus grit. If you use water you may experience a condition in you finger tips that comes with a prolonged exposure to it called "raisoning". Just let them dry out for a while and get back to work!
Near the beginning of Epiphone's thinline semi-acoustic range is 'The Dot', based on the timeless and legendary Gibson ES-335. The Dot feels comfortable to hold and play, and the neck, while by no means clubby, feels substantial in your palm, probably due to the 43mm width at the nut. Its slightly flattened C-profile increases marginally in depth further up the neck, making for a suitably vintage feel. An acoustic strum issues forth a pleasing, resonant ring. We'd wager that the Dot's all-maple construction has got something to do with that, but more obviously, the hollow bouts bolster the acoustic tone, inducing wry smiles to those listening. Before plugging in, listen to Ronny Jordan, then Noel Gallagher, then BB King, then George Harrison and John Lennon. It becomes immediately apparent that this style of guitar is hugely versatile. This Dot is no exception: the pickups, while not packing the punch of USA PAFs, offer everything form smooth and moody, front-position mellowness to screeching, bridge position rawk. It's one of the best electric guitars for jazz at this price point, too. The Dot looks fine, sounds great and plays great. To our minds, that's value for money indeed.
The one-piece maple neck was discontinued in 1959. From 1959 until summer 1962 the fingerboard was a piece of rosewood milled flat on the underside and glued to the maple. This has become known as a “slab fingerboard”. The slab fingerboard was approx 4.8 mm at its thickest point in the center of the neck under strings 3 and 4. From mid 1964–1979 the rosewood and maple were pre radiused and the fingerboard became known as curved, round laminate or “veneer”, having an even thickness across the neck unlike the previous slab type. This design change was made because Fender encountered problems with some of the necks twisting with the slab design and this new method of construction reduced this problem significantly. Maple fingerboards were available as a special order only. The following year the pickguard design changed to a 3-ply (4-ply on some colors) “multi-layer” with 11 screw holes. After purchasing Fender in 1965, CBS began to offer both a maple neck with a separate glued-on laminated maple fretboard in 1967 (known as a “maple cap” neck) and the rosewood fretboard over maple neck remaining the other neck option. Three years later, the CBS-owned Fender companies re-introduced the 1-piece maple neck after a 10-year absence. The primary reason for the switch to rosewood in 1959 was that Gibson guitars had rosewood fingerboards and customers wanted this. Also, the maple fingerboards discolored very quickly because the old nitro cellulose lacquer was not very durable and wore through on the fretboard very quickly.

This Fender Modern Electric guitar features an apine body and mini-toggle-coil-split-switch with modern humbucker pickups. It comes with a C-shaped maple neck, a maple fretboard with 9.5-inch radius consisting of 22 jumbo frets. It has a Stratocaster middle pickup, a three-ply pickup guide and a five-way pickup switching for maximum sound control and sustains.
This is another best budget electric guitar from Epiphone. It is also a great choice for a beginner and it is quite lightweight to carry. For an inexpensive guitar, this one has a pretty good sound and tone. Despite being low priced, the manufacturer has not compromised in its quality. The cherry red color is really attractive and appealing and can help you to boost up your smart personality as a guitarist. This is closer in look to the iconic rock guitars.
The relationship between power output in watts and perceived volume is not immediately obvious. The human ear perceives a 5-watt amplifier as half as loud as a 50-watt amplifier (a tenfold increase in power), and a half-watt amplifier is a quarter as loud as a 50-watt amp. Doubling the output power of an amplifier results in a "just noticeable" increase in volume, so a 100-watt amplifier is only just noticeably louder than a 50-watt amplifier. Such generalizations are also subject to the human ear's tendency to behave as a natural compressor at high volumes.

The Effie U1935 thinline hollowbody ($220) was a bolt-neck ES-335 copy with a bound rosewood fingerboard, blocks, open book head with outlined logo decal, two 12-pole/slit humbuckers, finetune bridge, fancy harp tailpiece, three-way on the treble cutaway horn, elevated pickguard and two volumes and tones. The Effie was available in orange sunburst, cherry red or jet black. It is entirely probable an earlier version of this existed, since thinline versions of the ES Gibsons were already mainstays in Japanese lines by ’68. If you find one with the old plastic logo, don’t be surprised.
I have many Behringer pedals.Used them gigging.Have had many people ( lots of musicians ) asking me what I am using to get my tone and effects .They are all surprised when I tell them Behringer pedals.And almost all say the same thing."aren't they made of plastic"? Yes they are made of plastic.But being someone who has worked in the plastics industr.for 25 + years I know Plastic can be very strong .I have done hundreds of gigs with these pedals and never had a problem.You would really have to jump ontop of these hard to damage them.And if you did that with the non plastic pedals I am sure you would also have a problem .That said.I have 5 fx600 pedals because I found a site selling them for $14.A super bargin for so much effect.As far as battery power nowadays batteries cost more than pedals so anyone ... full review
The very first thing to remember about pickups is that the active option is not necessarily better than the passive choice, and vice versa. Each type brings its own set of drawbacks and benefits. Passive pickups might be limited in terms of signal strength and tone shaping, but they are much more expressive in comparison to the active pickups in terms of picking and strumming intensities.
For a more neutral experience, we bring you ESP E-II Horizon FR. This is one of ESP’s top tier models which packs a set of high output Seymour Duncans. Build quality is top notch, and so is the performance. We tested this guitar some time ago, with a number of us having the chance to play it for several days. Anyone who picked it up was in love it at the end of the day. It’s just that good.

Music man make the best regular production (i.E. non custom shop) guitars on the planet. Nobody else comes close. This is the quality that everybody else should be reaching for. The fit and finish and playing comfort are second to none. And the oil finish on the necks is to die for! These guys don't just churn out minor variations on the same 60-year old theme, they actually innovate, they challenge, they dare. Wonderful new designs, made for real players. The results are outstanding. Roasted maple and all-rosewood necks, new chambering and tonewood construction ideas. They are so far ahead of the game it makes you wonder why the rest of the industry stays so stagnant. Music Man are the only guitars I will buy now. I'm so proud to support them!

I have owned Fender amps and Line 6 amps and while they have been "ok" amps, none of them come close to my newly acquired Mesa Mark V 90watt and 4� - 12 rectifier cab. Amp is super versitile and the time is out of this world. I knew I'd hit the jackpot the first time I plugged up to one. Mark V pairs nicely with my variety of guitars including PRS Holcomb sig, Fender Tele and Strat, Schecter Hellraiser, and Epiphone Les Paul. There's a tone in there for everyone, every guitar and every style of music... you just have to be willing to sit down and get to know the amp. Mesa Boogie is definitely the brand for me so I cast my vote in with them. Great company with quality amps and super friendly/helpful custom service.
There are two common types of 5-way selector switches in the guitar world – the Fender type and the “import” type. Both types are functionally identical but differ in physical layout. It’s easy to see which type you’re dealing with. The Fender-type switches viewed from below have two rows of 4 contacts, either side of the circular body of the switch. The import-type switches have a single row of 8 contacts in a line.

Many bass players believe that tube amplifiers produce a "warmer" or more "natural" sound than solid state amplifiers when lightly or moderately driven, and more pleasing distortion characteristics when overdriven. Some performers also believe that tube amps have a greater level of perceived loudness for a given amount of amplifier power. Even though tube amplifiers produce more heat than solid state amplifiers, few manufacturers of tube amplifiers include cooling fans in the amplifiers' chassis. Usually adequate cooling is provided by passive convection. Adequate airflow is needed to prevent excessive heat from shortening the tubes' lifespan or producing tonal inconsistencies.[13] Tube amplifiers require more maintenance than solid state transistor amplifiers, such as replacing vacuum tubes or rectifying the tubes.
How a guitar feels is highly subjective – after all, even guitarists come in all shapes and sizes. While the acoustics in our list are all made in such a way that most guitarists will find them comfortable and easy to play, there’s still no beating being able to try several models out so you can choose which one feels like it’s a part of your body.
The Indiana Thin Body Acoustics give you all the sonic punch you need but in a more compact body size. Starting with a spruce top that's matched to mahogany back and sides, the I-TB2 Series were created for acoustic players that find that a traditional dreadnought body size is a bit too bulky. Having a tighter profile gives these guitars and almost electric guitar feel and they're perfect for the stage or studio. Great action and playability right out of the box! An on-board 3 band EQ gives you total control at the touch of a button and all players love the extended cutaway for upper fret access. Sealed diecast tuners, nickel silver frets, gold hardware, high gloss finish and 10 Year Warranty make the Indiana Thin Body Acoustic series a great alternative for any player.

High frequency tweeters, typically horn-loaded, are included in some bass instrument speaker cabinets. Vox's 1960s-era "Super Beatle" amplifier was an early enclosure that used horn tweeters. During the late 1960s Acoustic's 260 Series guitar amp used a treble horn in the dual 15" loudspeaker 261 guitar enclosure, and Kustom's nearly 5-foot-tall (1.5 m) 2J + 1H guitar enclosure used two 15" speakers and a 15" diameter treble horn. Horn-equipped cabinets were not available for bass players until much later.
The fact is, the qualities of different strings can have an effect on your guitar’s resonance and tone, on the quality and responsiveness of your attack as a plectrist or finger picker, and impact your speed and other important factors. And think about your budget. Some coated strings list at nearly $20, while a good basic set of electric guitar strings can be scored for $3 to $4 on sale.
The musical theory of chords is reviewed, to provide terminology for a discussion of guitar chords. Three kinds of chords, which are emphasized in introductions to guitar-playing,[10][11] are discussed. These basic chords arise in chord-triples that are conventional in Western music, triples that are called three-chord progressions. After each type of chord is introduced, its role in three-chord progressions is noted.
“Hi folks here’s a classic beauty 1974 ALVAREZ 5024 DOVE Japanese crafted Dreadnought acoustic guitar mid 1970’s which is prime time lawsuit era when Japan was out and out copying the great classic AMERICAN DESIGN GUITARS the classics if you will they sought out to make an affordable alternative to the more expensive American built guitars in this case they obviously copied Gibson right down to the details...Like the open book headstock, the overall size -shape- the bridge detail on this is just like one My friend had as a kid it was his dads but we played it too was a wonderful 1964 Gibson Dove it was 1968 we admired it greatly to say the least but with our pocket books at the time forget about it one of my band mates brought one to practice an Alvarez like this one and it to had the tunimatic bridge installed on it, it made the difference to get your acoustic set up to intonate not new or ding and doink free but vintage beautiful JVG rated 8+/10It shines up quite nicely too. Ok here is the story of this guitar just one elderly owner of this California guitar. I have collected no less than 12 of these classics and have had some put away in our warehouse for about 15 years it’s been out of circulation all these years strings loosened inside a caddalic old Gibson case which is not included with this purchase. kept out of circulation over 15 years and not played that much by its original owner she is in better than average for one of these it’s neck is 1-11/16ths width at nut - medium profile- very good frets and rosewood fingerboard and classic inlays and the dove motif pickguard. I noticed it looks as if the treble side tuners were replaced and he chose to use the opposite side simply reversed... they look fine work the same good so I’ll leave that to you to decide , we can do a Grover tuner upgrade for you installed for $125 additional if requested. Other than ,that the bridge has upgraded to high end fossil pins that resonate tone far superior to the original plastic ones. No cracks in the wood or even finish checking none seen... neck joint also is excellent as is neck angle - set for proper relief it’s Mahogany neck is nice and strateght . It’s beautifully grained Sitka Spruce Top is nice - pretty flat not buldging no such issues it’s bridge is also original and is nice and tight to its top.its body is all mahogany and is beautiful as well have a good look, the back of headstock has what Gibson use to call a black stinger painted on... Gibson did that so did Alvarez... I like this one’ds white Alvarez trussrod cover as well .. truss rod is working as it should... The open book headstock mirrors that of the Gibson with the old style script Alvarez logo looking quite cool in deed... love this era.. ok it’s hard to find these that are not rode hard and put away wet... not this baby She’s a one owner sweetie pie... NO CRACKS - NO NECK ISSUES PLAYING REAL NICE contact Joe to buy it: jvguitars@gmail.com Thanks for looking folks!.
Although most of us who participated in this article have years of experience with guitar amps, none of us was particularly familiar with all the latest beginner models. There are few reliable professional reviews of beginner amps, but I sorted through what we found, searched through music stores and websites, and sampled numerous models at the recent National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) show in Los Angeles. This experience gave me a good idea of what’s available now.

Now, let’s consider the tone knobs. Eric Clapton was one of the first guitarists to realize the power within those unassuming plastic spinners. His famed “woman tone” sound during Cream relied on rolling the pots on his Gibson Les Paul Standard, SG or ES-335 all the way off and turning the treble and midrange of his superbly overdriven Marshall amps high. Similarly, jazz guitar players who are looking for a classic tone roll their pots back until they get in the Wes-Benson-Burrell-Pass-etc. zone.

While tremolo is a change in volume, vibrato is a constant and repetitive change in pitch up and down. It can be used to make chord progressions shimmer and to add a wobbliness to single note lines. It is like adding vibrato with your finger, but it is constant and consistent. Controls are usually the same as tremolo pedals, with tap tempo also being common.

We think this is one of the best multi-effects pedals as it’s packed to the brim with a range of classic and modern Boss effects. In fact, there’s eight simultaneous effects categories that can work in unison, and each of those categories has multiple effects types within. This means you have access to a vast array of Boss effects as well as COSM amps derived from the Boss GT-100.


An acoustic guitar suited to bluesy rhythms. Has quite alot of fret rattle with the high velocities but also a certain amount of mid to high frequencies which helps to give it its own place in a mix. Presets include a standard mapped guitar, a fake twelve string (octave harmonies on each key) and split voices of muted fifths at one end and solo guitar at the other end of the keyboard (for quickly creating tunes and ideas). There are other banks of the same presets except with long releases (for sustained notes), chorus and/or reverb added to give the different variations. The amount of reverb can be altered with cc12 and the amount of chorus can be altered with cc13. Reverb and chorus has to be enabled on your soundfont player to use them.

Gibson sells guitars under a variety of brand names[5] and builds one of the world's most iconic guitars, the Gibson Les Paul. Many Gibson instruments are highly collectible. Gibson was at the forefront of innovation in acoustic guitars, especially in the big band era of the 1930s; the Gibson Super 400 was widely imitated. In 1952, Gibson introduced its first solid-body electric guitar, the Les Paul, which became its most popular guitar to date— designed by Ted McCarty and Les Paul.
Whilst we’re on the subject of practice amps, we have to talk about the amazing BOSS Katana-Mini Guitar Amplifier. This little powerhouse of tone makes our best cheap amps that don’t suck list due to its immense sound, portability and inspiring tones within. Coming straight out of the acclaimed BOSS Katana series, the Katana-Mini uses the authentic multi-stage analog gain circuitry which allows you to select from three classic sound settings - Brown, Crunch, and Clean and enjoy a selection of fantastic sonic options. On top of that you have a classic 3 band EQ to dial in your perfect sound as well as an onboard tape-style delay.

In the 1980s it seemed like Washburn guitars were everywhere, and they were leaders in the hard rock and metal guitar genre. Even though they aren’t quite as prominent as they once were, they still feature some nice guitars in their lineup. From metal to jazz and anywhere in between, Washburn has you covered. With signature models for Paul Stanley and Nuno Bettencourt, they still have strong name recognition in the rock world.
Guitar pedals, sometimes called effects pedals, provide an easy and effective way to modulate your electric guitar's tone. The order of your pedals well ensure the best tone, but what tone that is depends on your personal preference. While there are basic guidelines, there's really no right or wrong way to order your pedals. To set up guitar pedals, learn the basic guidelines and experiment to find the arrangement that best creates the style and tone you want in your music.[1]
Choosing the right strings for your instrument and your style of playing might not seem like the biggest deal. After all, the Delta bluesmen of the ’20s, ’30s and ’40s often bought used strings at dry good stores for a few pennies, or boiled old strings to brighten them up. And the proliferation of brands on the market can be overwhelming to the point of leading a player to assume strings are as generic as picks – which aren’t really generic at all, but that’s another story.
A lot of people begin with a nylon string acoustic, often called a classical guitar. They’re reasonably priced at beginners level (don’t go too cheap), the design has a wide fret board to accommodate your inexperienced fingers and the nylon strings are easier on your aching fingertips. You have to agree, they can sound kind of dull unless that dream of yours is of becoming a famous, classical guitarist like John Williams — certainly not a bad thing. So nylon string acoustics are great to learn with, but there’s a risk you’ll want something more pretty quickly.
Charlie Christian and Django Reinhardt are generally held to have initiated the use of the guitar to play melodies and improvisations over other instruments, the former using an early form of amplification, the latter playing forcefully on an acoustic guitar. Over the years, jazz guitarists have been able to solo in standard jazz idioms, such as bebop, cool jazz and so on, while in also absorbing influences from rock guitarists, such as the use of electronic effects.
This is one of the best guitars according to many guitarists and there are many reasons for that! It has a nice weight, not too heavy, not too light, and it’s comfortable to play. If you want to find a good guitar but don’t really know what to look for this is a safe choice, you will most likely love this guitar, especially if you like vintage-looking things! Go wireless on stage with this guitar, with one of these awesome wireless guitar systems.

Reverb works well for acoustic guitars because it's a less intrusive effect that doesn't overtake the clean signal. Echo and delay pedals can be more difficult to tame from a feedback perspective, especially when the echoing trail gets too long. With reverb, you can have a thick effected layer with a relatively short trail behind it, especially with the HOF's short/long switch. 
Guitars come in two basic flavors: acoustic and electric. From a hardware standpoint, electric guitars have more components and doohickeys than do acoustic guitars. Guitar makers generally agree, however, that making an acoustic guitar is harder than making an electric guitar. That’s why, pound for pound, acoustic guitars cost just as much or more than their electric counterparts. Both types follow the same basic approach to such principles as neck construction and string tension, and so they have very similar constructions, despite a sometimes radical difference in tone production.
Here is a list of the schematics that are exclusive to this site. We created several and we have redrawn some schematics that were already available on the internet  for readability or ease of use (these needed an easier-to-read format, corrections or part identifiers).  Many of these schematics include “modernization” that are included and explained in the “Project” for the given schematic.  You may freely post links to any of the pages or files on this site, but please do not put copies of these files on your site. We frequently update our files.  If you want to see photos of the original units of any of these guitar effects see our  “Originals” board on Pintrest  Note: All Trademarks mentioned here belong to their owners and not to General Guitar Gadgets
If you’re a guitarist, chances are you’ve either owned or at least played on a Zoom multi-effects pedal. It’s basically an unwritten law! They have always and continue to make some of the best multi effects pedals known to the musical world, so naturally we had to include the Zoom G3n Multi-Effects Processor (as well as a handful of other Zoom models) in this list.
The Continental and other Vox organs such as the Jaguar, the Continental II, Super Continental, and the Continental 300 share characteristic visual features including orange and black vinyl coverings, stands made of chromed steel tubing, and reversed black and white keys. The English wood key single manual Continental (V301J) is increasingly collectable, although the wood key American-built (V301H) and plastic key Italian-built models (V301E, V301E/2 and V302E) also command premium prices. Jennings sold production rights for the Vox Continental organ to an Italian subsidiary of Thomas Organ in 1967. Under the new production agreement, the Continental was gradually and subtly altered in quality and sound, and reliability became questionable. For example, Ray Manzarek of The Doors had been using a Vox since 1966, but could no longer trust it during performances because of the problems in quality after 1967, and thus was forced to look elsewhere for an organ. He settled on the Gibson Kalamazoo, because it had a flat top like the Vox Continental, so it could accommodate the physical requirements of the Fender Rhodes Piano Bass, which was the bass instrument for The Doors in concert.
thanks for your note. We are not drawing any conclusions whether one is better than the other, just that they are different, which I think is apparent from the samples. Also, we did use only one pickup that we moved between the samples, and mounted it in the exact same location in relationship to the bridge. I would claim that the only variable that could have been controlled to a greater extent is the picking attack.
Below you’ll find the 33 most prominent guitar manufacturers, listed alphabetically. Some specialize in one type of guitar (acoustic or electric), while others do well with both. Some focus on a specific genre, such as metal or jazz, and some do it all. I’ve tried to give a good overview of each brand, along with a few notes on any significant changes for 2018.
By far the best bang for the buck. These guitars are beautifully made with good attention to details such as fret ends, bridge fit and neck joints. They also have wonderful finishing and are made from quality materials. The 'snob' factor is the only thing against them, they are not Gibsons. Martin's or Fender's, BUT they do play just as well and quite frankly, only those with a good ear and perfect pitch could tell the difference in a rock environment. I have Fender, Gibson, Taylor, Columbus, Washburn, Squire and Maccaferri Guitars, as well as Richwood. Sadly like the great majority of guitarists, the guitars themselves are more capable than I am, and I am happy to admit it. Having an exceptional guitar will not make you an exceptional guitarist, just as a more professional camera won't make you a professional photographer. The Richwood Artist / Master series of guitars are good, believe me! For the average guitarist, pro or am, you can buy more expensise guitars but not better as far ...more

If you had to write a soundtrack for the 20th century, electric guitars would almost certainly be playing the tune. No other instrument defines the angry rebelliousness of the modern age quite like it. Who could forget Chuck Berry, Jimi Hendrix, the Rolling Stones, or Nirvana—some of the greatest exponents of guitar-driven rock? But if you think playing an electric guitar is all about attitude and dexterity, think again: it's actually about the science of electromagnetism. Let's take a closer look a how these amazing instruments turn electricity into sound.
You have a 2 band EQ as well as independent gain and master controls as well as a headphone/line out jack for either silent practice or recording directly to your audio interface. There’s 10 watts of solid state power flying out of the 6.5" speaker so you’re covered for smaller gigs and practice sessions whilst the classic VOX grille cloth and chicken head knobs provide that unmistakeable VOX look. A fantastic amplifier that will provide you with lush tone and typical VOX reliability – you can’t argue with that for under £70.
Gibson’s offerings also differ from Fender in that they largely employ scale lengths of 24.75, resulting in a warmer, more rounded out sound that has come to characterize the brand’s output (3). Playability is also affected by the shorter scale length size, with reduced tension making string bending a bit easier. Gibson’s generally utilize mahogany in their construction, which contributes to a darker tone with increased sustain and warmth.
Sound also factors into this, though I'd argue equipment is less critical than playing technique. But a muffled high-impedance humbucker makes it much harder to bring out the right notes than a twangy Tele singlecoil. And in particular, distortion can quickly make an utter mess out of an only slightly muddy clean signal. So, keep the gain down when playing more chordal stuff, and treble up especially when doing delicate arpeggios etc..
Next important control knob is usually labeled as time or rate. This defines the length of echoes in a reverb. You can have them short or you can have them last for a fairly long time. Which side you will lean more towards is going to depend on the nature and tempo of your music. Slower, more subtle riffs can easily deal with long reverb times while faster sections usually work best with short reverb. Again, experimentation is the key here.
Bill Collings dropped out of medical school in the early 1970s[3] and instead worked in a machine shop for five years.[4] At the same time he built his first guitar. In 1975 he moved to Houston, Texas, where he worked as an engineer with a pipeline and oil field equipment company by day and a guitar builder by night. Three years later he met renowned musician Lyle Lovett and built him a guitar.
You are sure to find a Gibson in any guitar brand comparison list that you come across. This guitar manufacturer is the oldest producer of solid-body electric guitars. The first guitar was manufactured by Les Paul himself, and the company's signature model is, in fact, also a Les Paul model. It was the first company to introduce the double coil pick ups or the legendary 'humbucker' for rock music. The guitars by Gibson made rock and roll possible. Like Fender, Gibson is also a universally popular guitar brand whose guitars are known for their high treble and melodious tones. The company also has a bass series. It has remained consistent as far as styles and designs are concerned. Other famous electric guitars from Gibson include the SG, Flying V, Explorer, ES-335, and Firebird, and classic acoustics include models like the Hummingbird.
Thanks. It sounds good without tone shaping ability but I wanted to hear the original sounds. It now has 2 capacitors tied together from the volume pot to 1 tone leg. I am guessing the original tone switch was wired with one cap. for the low & one cap. for middle and the 3rd tone leg was straight wired for treble high. I also wonder how the ground sweep worked on the tone selector?? I just need to know. I’m a DIY guy.

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Without going into technical details, the amp's power rating is directly correlated to its loudness. This means that the higher the power rating is, the louder the amp can go. But loud is not always better, especially when considering space and noise level restrictions, this is why even those with big wall of amps have a humble practice amp to play quietly with. Low power amps also let you crank the gain at lower volumes, so you can get to your amp's sweet spot without being a noise nuisance. Thankfully, some big amps now come with built-in power attenuators, which give you the option to lower the power rating when needed. Also note that many tube amps are louder than similarly rated solid-state amplifiers.
Hybrid bass amplifier heads typically pair a tube preamplifier with a solid-state power amplifier. This provides the player with the best elements of both amplifier technology. The tube preamp gives the player the ability to obtain tube amplifier tone, which tube enthusiasts state is "warmer" than a solid state (transistor) preamp. As well, tube users state that tube preamps have a more pleasing-sounding, natural tone when the preamp's volume is pushed up so high that the bass signal becomes overdriven; in contrast, a solid state preamp that is pushed to the point of signal "clipping" can be harsh-sounding. Some hybrid amp heads have a bypass switch, so that the tube preamp can be bypassed, if the tube breaks or develops a technical problem. The tube preamplified signal in a hybrid amplifier head is then sent to a solid state power amplifier. Compared with tube power amps, solid state power amplifiers are more reliable, require less maintenance, less fragile and lighter in weight. A hybrid tube preamp/solid state power amp thus provides a bass player with the benefits of both technologies' strengths: tube preamp tone and solid state reliability for the power amp.
This is one of several Squier models available that offer a pretty good product for a reasonably low price. The pickups and hardware are sometimes suspect, and the workmanship varies from instrument to instrument, but for the price, these are a very good beginner guitar choice. Squier Fat Strats are similar in appearance to the much more expensive Fender Stratocasters, so the look of the instrument is appealing. 

The final stages of on-board sound-shaping circuitry are the volume control (potentiometer) and tone control (a low-pass filter which "rolls off" the treble frequencies). Where there are individual volume controls for different pickups, and where pickup signals can be combined, they would affect the timbre of the final sound by adjusting the balance between pickups from a straight 50:50.
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