I play a Breedlove and it compares very favorably with Martin, Taylor, and Gibson while I prefer it to Fender acoustic guitars (I think Fender electrics are much better). Beautiful tone, and in one place where I play I'm not allowed to plug in. At that place, my Breedlove is the only one of my guitars I can get sufficient volume from. My other guitars are a Martin, an Ibanez, and a Schechter. Breedlove should be in the top ten.
Serial #59640 New York label Epiphone Triumph circa 1949. Blonde finish. Spruce top, tiger flame maple sides and back. Cherry neck with diamond mother of pearl inlay. Small nick less than an inch wide on left front. Original Frequensator tailpiece with nickel finish, partly worn. Grover tuners fastened with screws and glue. Edging on back body has .25” gap at connection.Blonde natural lacquer finish in good condition. Glossy and brilliant color. Shipping quote inside US only. Ask for quote outside the US. 

The custom pickup for the AZ was developed in collaboration with Seymour Duncan. The pickups feature a moderate output through Alnico-5 magnets to keep the clarity of the fundamental tone when using a distortion sound, and to deliver a clear pick attack. From treble to bass, and from high-E string to low-E string, the overall tonal balance is evenly adjusted, and works well with various effect pedals.


Kay was founded in 1931 by Henry “Kay” Kuhrmeyer. They supplied guitars to Montgomery Wards and others. During the 1950s their electric guitars were competitors for the Silvertone and Danelectro guitars. The company dissolved in 1968. Kay guitars are not currently in production. However, Kay also produced cellos and basses. Engelhardt-Link purchased the acoustic line of instruments from Kay. These are still being produced in Elk Grove Village, IL.
How to Adjust Amp Settings for the Best Blues Electric Guitar Tone. The tone settings on an amp are as important as the settings on the guitar for producing the blues sound. The amp settings are a personal style preference. Blues guitar has a distinctive sound and tone which can be enhanced by the amp settings. Focus on the drive and reverberation settings for a good full-bodied blues sound.
This workshop includes: lecture, demonstration and hands on experience in advanced guitar electronics.  Students will study alternate guitar wiring schemes demonstrated by instructor Scott Walker, and stereo wiring and Onboard Effects loop options will also be covered.  This class will focus on signal paths, diagrams, and component selection, in passive and active circuits.  Students will learn about basic preamp design.
Like many others, Reinhold Bogner (born in Ulm, Germany, like the EL84 tube!) started his career with Fender mods. He founded his company in 1989 in Los Angeles and succeeded in earning a reputation among guitar amp manufacturers. His brand became famous with models like the Ecstasy 100A and 100B, where "A" stands for American (with 6L6 tubes) and "B" for British (with EL34 tubes). Among its famous users, you'll find Steve Stevens and Steve Vai (apparently your name must be Steve to be Bogner's friend).
An electric guitar can last many lifetimes; however, they have a variety of electrical parts and connections that, over time, can wear out. When that happens, you need to know how to fix or replace those electronics. The following are the parts that are most likely to wear out or break and need replacing. You can perform any of these fixes yourself without doing damage to the electric guitar — even if you screw up.
The use of two or more mics is likely to result in other phase issues when these mics are combined in the mix, since they will almost certainly be capturing sound waves that reach the mic capsules at slightly different times. Whether such issues are bad enough to cause a problem (or even be heard) depends on the situation. First, if your two mics sound odd and hollow and/or lacking in low-end from the outset, flip the phase of one (usually via a switch on the preamp or afterward in your DAW) to ensure you aren’t trying to blend two mics that are reverse-phase in the first place. If your two-mic sound goes from hollow and thin sounding to fat and full, you had a reverse-phase issue. If it doesn’t improve – or gets worse – you need to consider other remedies. Once you know that both mics are at least in phase with each other, you can improve their phase relationship even further by moving the position of one around until any other sonic oddities are less obtrusive, which is simply determined by finding a pair of positions that are really smoking tone-wise.
So what are acousticelectric guitars? Quite simply, it’s an acoustic guitar with slight modifications that means it can be plugged into a power amp. This means that the sound from the guitar can be made much louder for use live or with a band. It also means that, as the signal becomes electric, it can be altered with effects pedals and other equipment. Sometimes, because of this, electric acoustics are used when recording in a studio, though a microphone is often used too.
Check out a set of Elixir strings for yourself to hear and feel the difference.  The coating actually reduces string squeaks as well, providing a consistent sound for close miking and recording acoustic players.  The squeak of the finger over the round wound strings of an acoustic has always been an intrinsic part of the instrument, but hearing the guitar performed without such extra squeaking may change your mind.
Controls were volume and tone. A little elevated pickguard sat on the upper treble bout. The earliest examples of these had the little plastic logo on the head. By ’71, these had changed to an outlined block letter decal logo. A fretless version was also available by ’71. The U1970 with frets, and fretless U1970F, were both $220 with case. How long these were available is uncertain, but they were probably gone by ’73 or ’74.
Need an affordable luthier who is easily approachable with a cool little shop that rivals Pinocchio's gepetto? Then Steve Morrill in Boston is the place to take your beloved stringed contraption. I took my stratocaster here a few months back for a basic setup( innotation, neck/pots cleaning, truss rod adjustment, etc.) He did it all in less than a week's time and at a very good price--just $65 for everything including new string setup. I was able to play a few notes on his fender amp when I picked it up and was immediately pleased. The aura and smell in the little shop is enough to guarantee Mr. Morrill will do your guitar right. Also doesn't hurt to help out a small business as opposed to going to guitar center, there's much more thought and time out into the work here.

But the guitar store? They always remember me and treat me like a guest even if I'm not there to buy shit. Everyone there is a genuinely good dude. They're all honest too, which can be hard to find in this industry. I took my guitar in for a check up and they told me doing anything to it would be unnecessary. They could have easily charged me $80 for a set up and taken my guitar. 

Years ago companies used to manufacture rotating speaker cabinets (the most famous being the Leslie Rotary Speaker) – as they rotated the sound would change and develop, creating interesting modulation effects. Nowadays such things are considered too large and inconvenient to transport and use, so we have stomp boxes to help us emulate the sound. The most famous of these is the Dunlop Uni-Vibe, and although it doesn’t sound as close as other pedals to the real thing, it has become a famous sound in its own right. Rotary speaker effects often have controls for the speed of the effect, and can sometimes (such as in the case of the Uni-Vibe) be connected to expression pedals to control the speed on the fly. If you’re into 60’s psychedelic rock like Jimi Hendrix, this one’s a must.
Since we’re talking about acoustic-electric guitars that look as good as they sound, I’d be remiss to not add the Fender Tim Armstrong Hellcat to this list of top acoustic-electric guitars. Based on the infamous 1960’s acoustic played by the punk rock legend Tim Armstrong of Rancid, I could devote an entire article to the artful styling on this guitar, which is why it consistently ranks at the top of acoustic-electric guitar reviews by players of all levels.
Korg SDD3000 Preamp Clone Great project! Since I finished it, it become one of my always on pedal! With a extremely subtle compression... Eclipse Device-2 DOPAMINE OVERDRIVE based on the Klon Centaur circuit. Materials: 01. Xicon 1% metal film resistors. 02. Kemet 5% MLCC (C0G) 03. WIMA Box Film... Refractor Black Octopus Pedalworx More build reports
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I just thought you'd like to know that Takamine produced for other names. I've just bought a 1973 Wayne which has a Takamine label inside stating it was made for Wayne. Its a Takamine 375 thats a Martin D35 copy. Wayne were guitar makers in Melbourne Australia in the 1950s and 60s and began importing under their name briefly in the 70s. It sounds amazing.
For most players, the ideal location to place modulation effects—which include phase shifters, flangers, chorus, rotary, tremolo, vibrato and so on—is directly after a compressor and/or overdrive/distortion pedal. When these effects are distorted after the fact, the sound tends to smear and lose definition (particularly with chorus), although there are a few exceptions where distorting a flanger or phase shifter can sound really cool. The best example is Eddie Van Halen, who doesn’t use distortion pedals and instead generates all of his distortion from the amp. When a flanger or phase shifter is placed in front of a distorted amp or overdrive pedal, it can create dramatic thick, jet-like phasing and flanging effects (See Example 2, below).
For you, the 15W should be fine for a long time to come. It runs about $215.00 retail but I suspect, like me, you can make an offer on one for less than $200. Many dealers put these up on Reverb or Ebay as “open box” or make an offer. Mine was marked open box but was clearly brand new when I got it. I think I paid $189 for my 15W. By far this series was the best value I have ever seen in an amp. I’ve owned several Fender, Vox, Sundown (smaller 5W) and no name amps. This AV series is super nice.
From what I've been able to find out (as a proud owner of a mint W-415 'Dove' model acoustic), Lyle guitars are actually Gibson seconds, that for whatever reason didn't pass muster to be sold as a Gibson (bad finish, scuff, imperfection in the wood, etc.). The Lyle company was out of Portland, OR (I believe) and was started by former Gibson employees who would fix the flawed Gibsons and resell them under the Lyle name. Made in Japan was because Gibsons were made in Japan at the time(?). A damn fine instrument; considered rare now, I guess. I don't ever want to get rid of mine!
In the first part of this two-part article, we look at the original five-way switch and find it lacking for some uses. The 2-pole super-switch steps in to help, and we look at how we would go about wiring a Strat in the standard way using that switch. Once we’ve understood that, we go on to create an interesting alternate wiring scheme for a Strat that wouldn’t be possible with the standard 5-way.
Another reason that some bassists prefer the "bass stack" approach is that it is much easier to customize a separate preamp/amp/speaker cabinet setup with a bass stack than it is to customize a combo amp. With a bass stack setup, a professional bassist can handpick the brands of preamplifier, graphic equalizer, power amplifier and speaker cabinet(s) they wish to use. It is also much easier to replace defective components with a bass stack than with a combo amp. If the power amp on a combo amp fails, only an electronics technician can repair or replace the power amp. With a bass stack, in which the power amp may be a separate component in a rackmount road case, the defective power amp can be removed with only a screwdriver and a new power amp can be mounted in the rack and connected to the other components. This facilitates replacement of components while on tour. Touring bassists may travel with one or more backup amplifier heads, to use in case the main amplifier head develops a technical problem.

The Blues Junior's compact dimensions, light weight and pedal-friendly credentials have made it one of the most popular gigging combos in the world, but for 2018, Fender has updated it to the new Mark IV specification, which features various tweaks, including Celestion’s excellent A-Type loudspeaker. Controls include gain, bass treble and middle, reverb level and master volume, with a small push-button ‘Fat’ switch. In use, the Junior unleashes a stunning range of Fender tones, from spanky, sparkling cleans, to fat and smooth midrange crunch that’s spot on for blues and classic rock. The Fat switch adds a generous midrange boost and can be remote-controlled from a footswitch for greater versatility, while the improved reverb circuit is very impressive, with no noise and a smooth, warm delay that feels more integral to the overall amp tone, harking back to the best blackface reverbs of the 1960s. No matter what guitar you use, the Blues Junior flatters single coils and humbuckers alike, not to mention drive pedals with plenty of volume. The sounds are top-drawer, comparing well against many so-called boutique amps costing four times the price. Factor in the compact dimensions and light weight, and it’s easy to see why the Blues Junior remains a firm favourite.
TRUE. Tommy can be good but I find he has a lot of filler and some overly fluffy tunes sometimes. It makes it sound like he’s trying too hard to play it with as many different chords as possible before finally landing the first note. (which is usually late). and for clapton below me I could agree but I think Jimmy Page’s playing is just as good but he’s more reckless. he’s reckless for good reason though, it’s like he’s transfering his feeling to it like Jimi Hendrix would but Page’s guitar sounds like your heart wanting to rip out of your chest to claim your biggest desire once and for all. The kind of vibe when you finally realize your in love after a LONG time of dullness. Jimi is groovy, and Clapton likes to serenade seeming like an old gentle man from any age.
Understandably, the Blackstar ID:Core Stereo 20 V2's main selling point is its versatility, and this is reflected in the reviews. Sound quality also got a lot of thumbs up, with many describing the amp as full sounding, thanks to its stereo speaker configuration. For something this versatile, the amp's ease of use also gets commended quite often, with some finding it easy to dial in different sounds. Finally, a good number of users find the amp's overall build quality to be solid and reliable.
In late 1960, the amp was redesigned with three, rather than two, channels, each with two inputs, and offered with an optional Top Boost, or Brilliance, circuit, which introduced an extra gain stage and separate bass and treble controls. The Top Boost feature proved popular enough that it became standard on the AC30/6 (so named for its six inputs). Its chimey high end was a signature of the Beatles’ early recordings and was later favored by guitarists like Brian May, Tom Petty, Peter Buck and The Edge, whose 1964 AC30/6 has been featured on every U2 album.

Very good working condition, this guitar is completely playable and in great condition. All electronics function properly without any issue. This guitar contains very minor cosmetic scuffs throughout, typical wear from a used guitar, nothing at all significant, please see pictures. The body, neck and headstock are all straight and contain zero cracks, bends, or bows. This guitar will come exactly as shown with soft gig bag.

Flat tops from 1970 to present are considered to be excellent utility instruments, but are not collectible. Staring in 1976, Martin has been undergoing many changes with numerous reissues, new models, limited editions, etc. Workmanship has improved greatly from the early 1970's, and Martin is now producing some of its best guitars in over 20 years. While not currently collector's items, these intruments have excellent workmanship, sound, and playability.
Are you running it through a cab simulator? That or proper eqing. Turn up the mids and drop a high pass filter on that sucker. If you're finding it still lacking check out the KeFir cab simulator and then just use the preamp you have now. I've had wonderful results with that. If you're not liking your preamp try out The Anvil by Ignite amps. Best clean tone I've had out of freeware.
We are your Vintage Pickup specialists.   We have cornered the market of manufacturing the most accurate vintage pickup reproductions to which can not be equaled.  Our process is to chemically analyze an original pickup magnets and wire, then we reproduce them with the exact same magnets and wire.  We don't use stock magnets or wire.   We don't degauss magnets and say they are vintage.  Our magnets are only as strong as the elemental composition will hold.  Our wire is specially manufactured for us, we have many batches of wire with all different types of resistances and O.D.'s.  Our wire also is processed differently than modern conventional wire, these little details are what makes the Klein Pickups Reproductions the most accurate in the world.   We have a full array of models that we reproduce.  Check out our site for the full list of all of our offerings.   As a small business we always appreciate your business & support.  -Thanks
We selected this guitar as our Top Pick because it’s an instrument that could suit anybody. It has everything you need from your electric guitar and it’s easy to play. A good classic that will stay with you for many years to come. It suits both beginners and guitarists who have been playing for a while. True, a professional guitarist would buy something pricier, but if you’re not super picky this guitar will do perfectly well!
I’ve been keeping track of completed Ebay sales since I started looking at Kents, and have come up with a few average sale prices. The way I figure an average is by first tossing out the highest and lowest sales. If I am left with fewer than three sales I don’t bother. That’s too small a sampling to be worthwhile, otherwise I take the average of the rest. The table below will only be updated when there is a sale that results in a change, so if the table looks like it might be dated, it’s probably because there haven’t been any sales that affected the numbers. Availability of Kent guitars on Ebay seems to ebb and flow.

The Effect:These pedals keep the original clarity of your sound intact, depending on how you tune it, you can use a little bit of overdrive, that adds some grit to the signal, with higher tuning you can get relatively more aggressive overdrive sound that’s still tame and if you push your overdrive pedal to the limits you might get a similar sound to that of a distortion pedal’s lower settings. A good overdrive (like the Ibanez TS9 Tube Screamer) is an essential solution for those of you wanting sound enhancement with lower interference, while having the option to add some aggression in your sound, but without taking it to extreme degrees.
Great sounding pedal reasonably easy to assemble. First, if you havent much experience, take the time to study up on PCB's, it's not step by step. If you have trouble reading the resistors there are apps that tell you the values by scrolling through the band colors. My only problem was wiring the jack outlets because the print isn't that great in that area. 2 or 3 components didn't match the PCB's labeling but I looked at the product's pic and figured it out. It took about 3 1/2 hrs with eating dinner in there somewhere. Now some friends want me to make them one also! 4 stars because of the jack outlet picture and no green wire
So don't hesitate; your next multi effects pedals, rack-mounted units and accessories are probably waiting just a few clicks away. The only thing better than a board full of great pedals is one box that combines all those great pedals into a single convenient package - and once you've got that multi effects unit onstage with you, the possibilities are virtually endless for the personalized tones and unique sounds you'll be able to bring to every performance.

You will definitely want to start slow, with an almost completely dry signal, and start adding some reverb bit by bit. Depending on the type of music you are making, that subtle hint of reverb may be all it takes to get the point across and make that track sound more organic. If you want to take things a bit further, recording a completely dry track and then mixing it with the very same section with added reverb can yield some pretty interesting results. As you have probably noticed by now, experimentation is the key here. The most important thing is to start slow.


Alonso de Mudarra's book Tres Libros de Música, published in Spain in 1546, contains the earliest known written pieces for a four-course guitarra. This four-course "guitar" was popular in France, Spain, and Italy. In France this instrument gained popularity among aristocrats. A considerable volume of music was published in Paris from the 1550s to the 1570s: Simon Gorlier's Le Troysième Livre... mis en tablature de Guiterne was published in 1551. In 1551 Adrian Le Roy also published his Premier Livre de Tablature de Guiterne, and in the same year he also published Briefve et facile instruction pour apprendre la tablature a bien accorder, conduire, et disposer la main sur la Guiterne. Robert Ballard, Grégoire Brayssing from Augsburg, and Guillaume Morlaye (c. 1510 – c. 1558) significantly contributed to its repertoire. Morlaye's Le Premier Livre de Chansons, Gaillardes, Pavannes, Bransles, Almandes, Fantasies – which has a four-course instrument illustrated on its title page – was published in partnership with Michel Fedenzat, and among other music, they published six books of tablature by lutenist Albert de Rippe (who was very likely Guillaume's teacher).
The guitar is one of the most beloved musical instruments of all time. Guitarists tend to wear that title with pride, and their instrument becomes an extension of the player’s distinct personality. Because of this, players tend to develop a strict loyalty to the guitar brand of their choosing. Luckily, there are many great options out there today, with niches that cater to virtually all genres and styles. This guide will weigh the pros and cons of the five best guitar brands on the market, to help you make as informed a decision as possible on which brand will best suit your needs.
On round hole martin guitars, the serial and model numbers are stamped on the neck block inside the instrument. The number can be seen by looking inside the sound hole. Look at an angle towards the neck. All f-hole Martin archtops have their serial and model numbers stamped on the inside center of the backstripe, roughly under the shadow of the bridge (and best seen from the bass side "f" hole).
Today's use of Torres and post-Torres type guitars for repertoire of all periods is sometimes critically viewed: Torres and post-Torres style modern guitars (with their fan-bracing and design) have a thick and strong tone, very suitable for modern-era repertoire. However, they are considered to emphasize the fundamental too heavily (at the expense of overtone partials) for earlier repertoire (Classical/Romantic: Carulli, Sor, Giuliani, Mertz, ...; Baroque: de Visee, ...; etc.). "Andrés Segovia presented the Spanish guitar as a versatile model for all playing styles"[5] to the extent, that still today, "many guitarists have tunnel-vision of the world of the guitar, coming from the modern Segovia tradition".[6]

Visually, what sets this guitar apart is its distinct headstock shape, but there's more to this guitar than meets the eye. Firstly, the guitar's top is crafted from solid cedar, an interesting wood choice because this type of wood is more commonly used on nylon string guitars. The warm tone of cedar matches nicely with the bright sound of wild cherry, a staple tonewood used on the back and sides of most Godin guitars. This combination gives the instrument a more distinct appearance and sound. Other features that don't follow the usual convention include the use of maple for the neck, and its B-Band M-450 T preamp system.


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Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic/Electric - Body Size: AEG - Top Wood: Cedar - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Nut Width: 43mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Binding: Ivoroid - Frets: 21 - # of Strings: 6 - String Type: Bronze - Scale Length: 25.4" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Rosette: Abalone - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast Tuners - Pickups: Fishman Sonicore - EQ/Preamp: Ibanez AEQ-SP1 - String Instrument Finish: Low Gloss natural


You can hear one all over Led Zeppelin’s debut record and all over Jeff Beck’s trademark “Heart Full of Soul” intro riff from the Yardbirds. He also used it extensively on the Jeff Beck Group sessions. Of course the most famous fuzz pedal is the Dallas Arbiter Fuzz Face. This pedal was favored by Jimi Hendrix and set the benchmark for fuzz tones that we are still chasing to this day.
Ibanez is the pioneer to launch the first 7-stringed guitar. They are the creators of the 7-stringed instrument in 1990 with the collaboration universe. Most Ibanez guitars come with a full-size frigate shape having a top of laminated select dapper. Ibanez guitars have mahogany neck, back, and sides, along with 20 frets on a rosewood fretboard. The Ibanez-branded headstock came with attractive quality and closed chrome die-cast tuners. These all features make the Ibanez guitars suitable for every kind of style and genre of music. However, heavy music is mainly the field where metal crowd flock and let the Ibanez guitars unbeatable.
Note: as of November 2004, the serial number represents not necessarily the year the instrument was produced but rather the model year to which the instrument belongs. It has long been Ibanez's practice to begin production for the subsequent model year in November (or even late October), but the serial numbering change that was implemented in November 2004 acknowledged and formalized this practice.
Dave Murray: select alder body with a nitrocellulose lacquer finish, flat soft V-shaped maple neck with satin back, 21 medium-jumbo frets, American Vintage hardware and ahumbucker/single-coil/humbucker configuration – DiMarzio Super Distortion DP100 (bridge), American Vintage ’57/’62 (middle), DiMarzio PAF DP103 (neck) – with 3-way switching. Other features include chrome pickup bezels, synthetic bone nut and aged white plastic parts with black switch tip. Available in Black only and as a Japanese “Tribute” version with an original Floyd Rose locking vibrato system, dual DiMarzio Super Distortion DP100 humbucking pickups (Neck/Bridge) with a Fender Texas Special single-coil pickup (Middle), 3-way switching and an oval neck profile.
Then, in the late ‘60s, two things happened. First, Unicord was purchased by conglomerate Gulf+Western around 1967. Then, Unicord was merged with a company called Merson, which housed brands like Tempo, Giannini and Hagstrom. It’s not certain what the exact timeline of these events were, but once the merger occurred, Univox up and moved its production from New York City to Westbury, NY. However, that didn’t stay static for long.
In the earlier days of My Chemical Romance, Iero mainly used Gibson SG's & Epiphone Les Paul guitars (most notably his white Les Paul nicknamed 'Pansy' which proved popular amongst his fans but has since been broken while onstage) and Marshall amps. He has since switched to using Gibson Les Pauls (with the Neck Pick-up removed) and occasionally uses a Gibson SG. He also used a Fender Stratocaster in the Desolation Row video. He has recently collaborated with Epiphone to design the Wilshire Phant-O-Matic guitar which he used onstage for the My Chemical Romance 'World Contamination' Tour, the Honda Civic Tour and for the Reading and Leeds festivals.
As a rule, open-backed cabinets tend to have a different low-frequency characteristic to closed ones, partly because no air is trapped inside the box to act as a pneumatic spring. One characteristic is that low-frequency sounds, such as damped lower strings, cause the speaker cone to move a considerable distance, producing what is affectionately known as cabinet thump. In addition, there is interaction between the sound coming from the front and the back of the cabinet, which may cause some frequencies to cancel and others to be reinforced.
• How to check frets: The easiest and quickest way to make sure a guitar’s frets are in good shape is to look straight down the neck of a guitar, from body to headstock. If the frets are at different heights (improper installation is the culprit here with new guitars) or askew, there are problems. They should look uniform and exhibit as little denting or wear as tolerable. 
Lest anyone think left-handed guitarists are at a disadvantage compared to their right-handed contemporaries, consider this list of some of the best known lefties: Paul McCartney, Dick Dale, Jimi Hendrix, and Albert King are just a few of the world’s most esteemed left-handed guitar players. In the 1950s and ’60s, though, left-handed guitars were often difficult to come by, especially for guitarists on a budget. This makes left-handed...Continue Reading

Every ZZ Top tour is a treat for guitar geeks, as Gibbons uses the occasions to unveil a six-string surprise. (Last year it was an elusive Gibson Moderne.) But what really makes Gibbons cool is a certain undefinable quality called “vibe.” Anyone who has ever met Billy and gotten to know him—however briefly—has an outrageous story to tell about the encounter.
Hybrid amps are a strange beast. As the name suggests, they combine multiple technologies to produce a unique hybrid amp experience. They may use the digital front end of a modeling amp with a tube-based power stage, or a tube preamp with a solid-state power amp. The benefits of this style of lesser-seen amp is that you can sometimes get the best of both worlds, with the awesome tone of a tube amp, but with the processing power of a solid-state amp. These amps tend to be cheaper than tube amps and generally easier to maintain.

The second issue of the Les Paul guitar was introduced to the public in 1954. Called the Gibson Les Paul Custom, this entirely black guitar was dubbed the Black Beauty. The Les Paul Custom featured a mahogany top to differentiate the instrument from its Goldtop predecessor’s maple top. It also featured the new Tune-o-Matic bridge design and a pickup with an alnico-5 magnet, P-480, in the neck position. In addition, since 1957, the Custom was fitted with Gibson’s new humbucker pickups, PAF,[16] and later became available with three pickups instead of the more usual two. The three pickup model retained the standard Gibson 3-way switch so not all pickup combinations were possible. The neck and bridge-only settings were retained, but the middle switch position was set to enable the middle and bridge pickups. A common modification was to restore the standard neck/both/bridge switching combination and add a switch to enable the middle pickup on its own.[citation needed] The guitar is wired as a “normal”2 pick up Les Paul except there is a master volume , master tone, (for front and back pu) while the middle pick up has its own volume / tone. this allows the middle pu to turned out of the circuit or mixed with the other two. allowing many different tones.


The new HT Club 40 looks familiar, but practically every detail has been worked on and sweated over. The control panel has separate channels for clean and overdrive, with two footswitchable voices on each channel. There’s also a new, low-power option, which reduces output from around 40 watts down to just four watts. Global controls include a master volume and level control for the Club’s built-in digital reverb. On the rear panel, you’ll find extension speaker outlets and an effects loop, with new features including a USB recording output together with speaker-emulated line outs on jack and XLR. The MkII’s clean channel has a completely reworked architecture with two tightly defined voices, best described as classic American and classic British, which can be pre-set on the control panel or footswitched. Although only one button is pressed, lots of changes happen inside, including preamp voicing, EQ and valve gain structure, as well as the power amplifier damping.  A similar thing happens on the overdrive channel, with a choice of two voices called ‘classic crunch’ and ‘super- saturated lead’, which can be infinitely tweaked between Brit and USA response using Blackstar’s patented ISF control. Like the clean channel, these voices have been reworked to be richer and more responsive. In use, the HT Club 40 MkII is jaw-droppingly good - while the MkI version was efficient if a little bland sometimes, the MkII is full of character and attitude, with astonishing tonal depth and response that will have many top-dollar boutique amps struggling to keep up.
as cool as it sounds to say that robert johnson has influenced everyone since him, directly or indirectly, is just nonsense. sure he was a legend in his own right; but a lot of that has to do with his life being shrouded in mystery. yes, he has influenced some players, way back when, but there were so many more players influenced by electric blues; chicago and texas blues, not delta blues. i understand he was somewhat of an innovator, and that is very important, but i think so called ‘music critics’ have over-blown it a bit in the reverence department for fear of being labeled un-hip. dave marsh, the ‘rolling stone’ critic is a perfect example. he claims johnson as one of the most gifted players of all time. but he dislikes david lee roth, singer in ‘van halen’, so right away edward van halen, guitarist in that group is marginalized with: “the basic 12 bar-blues on the louie-louie thump theme” to describe his playing. lol. to sum it up, whenever a critic uses the phrase ’12 bar blues’, you can pretty much assume he has no clue about what he talking about….best wishes.

In our so-called modern configuration, the tone cap is attached to the pickup before the volume pot. This presents the volume control with a totally different signal, resulting in a more colored sound as you reduce the volume. This can be useful if you like to turn up the guitar to cut through more. For me, the downside is the way it makes the tone control a bit of a hair-trigger affair. If you’re the type who avoids the tone control, this won’t be a factor for you.


But for all its light weight, this classical guitar shows off a stunning cedar top and rosewood fretboard. The inlay is just as elegant, and to keep the guitar’s profile looking good, the neck has a 3-ply construction style to prevent warping. The guitar has a matte finish, which gives it an “old-school” appearance, and the matte finish is great for photo sessions: no glare.
One possible way of dealing with the g string tuning issue (my experience has involved the low e more than anything) is to wind the string on the peg so that the winding goes up from the bottom of the peg, not v.v as it is done at factory. This reduces the angle at which the string sits relative to the nut and neck, potentially reducing the problem caused by the friction this angle creates when it contacts the nut. It will likely have a significant impact on the string staying in tune over time and you don't have to worry about filing the nut. A little nut lube might help too.
This effect gives a guitar that ska/reggae sound. It works by varying the cutoff frequency of a low-pass or bandpass filter (the same filter that's in a Wah-Wah effect, hence the Envelope Filter is also called an Auto-Wah) using an envelope follower which watches the signal for amplitude changes. So it wahs your attack, and then gives less and less wah as the signal attenuates. So the sound has a crunchier attack and the tone is very sensitive to varying dynamics.
SWEET just in a famous Vintage Classic BOOMER Folks from Nippon Gakki RED LABEL 000 OM type Yamaha FG We have just done our JVGuitars set her up with our Martin Bone Nut & Compensated Saddle se as well as upgraded bridge Pins to solid Ebony with Abalone dot with brass ring and of course a new set of Martin Strings 80/20 Bronze 12's.. and this guitar Sounds like a true vintage classic This guitar is AWESOME and is in BEAUTIFUL Condition! Classic Martin 000 OM style copy from Yamaha this guitar rings like a bell with excellent intonation. No Cracks no problemo like so many of these I see and just pass unlike the majority this guitar has excellent play action and is super fun to play! If your looking for a well aged ( almost 50 years ) just try to buy a 50 year old Martin $$$$$$$$$$$ WoW... This guitar is a Boomer surprisingly so but I have carried these FG110 Nippon Gakki's for decades now myself and was always impressed by the good one's... This one will impress you too.... at this price point its hard to beat this old Nippon Gakki Red Label 000. True Japanese Vintage guitar it top vintage condition as seen... Ready to purchase contact Joe at: jvguitars@gmail.com Thank you for your interest in our quality Vintage Guitars, Joe Pics soon to come no worries its excellent!!!.
Another technology that is used in Delay units is a feedback circuit, consisting of a tracking oscillator circuit to hold a note of the last interval, and after amplifying the signal, send it back to the input side of the delay. While it was first associated with Boss DF-2 Super Feedbacker & Distortion, currently, the signal feedback circuit is employed by Delay pedals, and if used under "hold" mode (As in Boss DD-3) it will provide a sustain effect instead of a simply delay effect.
The prototype was introduced at the 2011 NAMM exhibition. Bolan is seen holding the instrument on the outer gatefold jacket of T. Rex, his first album after shortening the band name from “Tyrannosaurus Rex”. The guitar was stolen from Bolan in London, and for the last months of his career he was using a wine-red 1970s Les Paul Standard. Gibson announced the availability of the Marc Bolan signature Les Paul in February 2011.

The Roland Blues Cube Artist looks and sounds the part of a vintage tweed tube era amplifier, but the innards tell a different story, being a solid-state amp with Roland's Tube Logic technology. And for something with tube amp modeling and USB direct recording, the amp comes with a streamlined set of features, having just two channels, clean and crunch, both of which have boost switches. Interestingly, this more traditional setup helped the amp score high points from users who want a pedal friendly amp that has the feel of tube without its usual drawbacks. Giving it a bit of an edge over older amps, is its built-in power attenuator that lets you lower the power rating from 80W down to 0.5W. For a bit of tone experimentation, the amp comes with a "dual tone" switch for blending the two channels in a way that's musically pleasing. Roland also equipped this amp with tremolo and reverb that complements its simple setup. Finally, the Blues Cube Artist lets you expand your tonal palette via its swappable "tone capsule", which is an analog component that you actually switch out to give the amp a different sound. There are currently three available tone capsules, two of which are artist signatures from Eric Johnson and Robben Ford, and the third one being Roland's own rendition of the Blues sound.


As a general rule, I'll set up the 57 right against the amp's grill cloth, pointing it directly in to the speaker (sometimes at a slight angle from the outer rim of the speaker pointing toward the center). I'll usually place a condensor about two to three feet in front of the amp (at the same level as the amp) and point it at one of the speakers, and if I have another condensor available, I'll place it about five or six feet away, in front of the amp. I'll also raise the "far" mic to a height of approximately five or six feet off the ground.

Personally, I just don’t understand how you can justify calling guitars that go for 2-3x the price an “alternative”. In a list like this, you should be providing alternatives that provide superior quality, sound, and ergonomics for a SIMILAR pricetag, not a jump from $200 to $600. Also, the concept that a beginner musician will have absolutely any clue that these guitars will sound poor is almost laughable to me. A good amp will do a lot of the work, and another portion of your sound goes into technique and playing style. An actual guitar itself is less important than the amp and the player. Think of an amp as a GPU and the player as the CPU cooler: if the GPU runs fine and the CPU cooler can do its job efficiently then your CPU will manage just fine as long as it isn’t so horribly behind as to bottleneck the GPU. Also, tonewoods only affect tone in a very small way that unless you are doing a back to back comparison on a clean channel with a flat response cab is very, very difficult to notice, and once you add any crunch or dirt or even distortion it’s just out of the question altogether. If somebody has never picked up a guitar then they could hardly appreciate a Mexican Strat more than a Squire at all.
You’re probably not going to damage your laptop by plugging in a guitar. But take it easy. Instrument output is usually about 10dB louder than mic level and 10dB quieter than line level. But there’s a big variation between instruments, and of course, your guitar has a volume output. On an electric, it’s just an attenuator — there’s no active circuitry, the volume knob just knocks down the output of your pickups, some use it as creative control, some just to match a cheap amp better.
This page contains information, pictures, videos, user generated reviews, automatically generated review and videos about Washburn XM DLX2 but we do not warrant the quality, accuracy or completeness of any information on our web site. If you have more information about Washburn XM DLX2 please write a review. Some reviews are automatically generated generated by using verbal representation of publicly available numeric rating information musicians entered while writing review of Washburn XM DLX2. User generated reviews of Washburn XM DLX2 represent opinions of credited authors alone, and do not represent Chorder's opinion.

If you’re a beginner, you may still be in the process of exploring different playing styles or developing your own. In this case, it’s best to go for a versatile guitar that can accommodate a variety of acoustic playing styles. Fortunately, the guitars on this list are also versatile players. Some, however, may cater to a more specific style. For instance, the Taylor 214ce’s bright sound and the Seagull Maritime’s wider nut make these models great for those who do a lot of fingerstyle playing.


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The first thing is to adjust height. If you have the first type, you will need a flathead screwdriver. The two posts holding the bridge have flat slotted heads showing at either end. You can turn these clockwise to lower the strings or counter-clockwise to raise them. Find the string height that suits you. For an electric guitar, it will be about 1/4" off of the neck or lower. Get the strings as low as you can for comfort, but be careful that your frets don't start buzzing or that the strings are not coming into contact with pickups or any other parts. If this happens, your strings are too low. If the bridge is the second type, you will need a very narrow Allen wrench to adjust the saddles; you will find the Allen heads on either side of the saddle top.

First, Steel String sounds heavenly, and I always love it when my mouth drops the first time I hear a hyper-realistic sounding VST. Steel String has done this completely, in fact, the only time I was ever pulled out from its hyper-realism was on the fret noise that recreates the articulation of finger sliding across the strings when changing positions.


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Air Norton
DP193
The Air Norton started out simply to be the Airbucker version of the Norton. DiMarzio thought it would make a distinctive-sounding bridge pickup with high-gain amps, but they soon discovered that it's a radically neat neck pickup, too. The tone is deep and warm, but not muddy. It's hot, but not distorted. It's even got cool harmonics, which are really unusual for a neck humbucker. The patented Air Norton magnetic structure reduces string-pull, so sustain is improved; and pick attack and dynamics are tremendously controllable and expressive. Combine the Air Norton with The Tone Zone in the bridge position for a perfect blend of power and tone.

The Tone Zone
DP155
Have you ever heard a bridge pickup that made a guitar sound like a giant mosquito attack? If you've run into this problem, The Tone Zone is the solution. The Tone Zone is hot enough to qualify as a high-output pickup, but it has a wider dynamic range - hard picking will produce a lot of power, and softer picking will be much cleaner and quieter. It's got tremendous bass and low-mid response to reinforce the bottom end and make the overall sound bigger. The highest single notes have depth, and chords sound huge. Patented dual-resonance coils reproduce more overtones than you'd expect from such a fat-sounding pickup. It makes a great match with an Air Norton.

Case sold separately.
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Mod® Kits are designed to give both novice and experienced musicians the opportunity to build their own amps and effects pedals. All kits come with easy to follow instructions and use point to point wiring. Pre-drilled enclosure and all parts are included. All you need to provide are hand tools, a soldering iron and solder. All of our kits have a build difficulty rating to help you determine which kit is right for you.
Naturally, you must also consider the Gibson Les Paul starter pack as well. Available from the consumer friendly Epiphone range, this player package is a great introduction to one of the most popular electric guitar models in the entire world. With 22 frets, dual humbuckers, and a gorgeous aesthetic with ebony finish and silver hardware, this is a knockout in every regard. The set is rounded out with the standard fare such as an amp, picks, a cable, a strap, and a tuner.
as cool as it sounds to say that robert johnson has influenced everyone since him, directly or indirectly, is just nonsense. sure he was a legend in his own right; but a lot of that has to do with his life being shrouded in mystery. yes, he has influenced some players, way back when, but there were so many more players influenced by electric blues; chicago and texas blues, not delta blues. i understand he was somewhat of an innovator, and that is very important, but i think so called ‘music critics’ have over-blown it a bit in the reverence department for fear of being labeled un-hip. dave marsh, the ‘rolling stone’ critic is a perfect example. he claims johnson as one of the most gifted players of all time. but he dislikes david lee roth, singer in ‘van halen’, so right away edward van halen, guitarist in that group is marginalized with: “the basic 12 bar-blues on the louie-louie thump theme” to describe his playing. lol. to sum it up, whenever a critic uses the phrase ’12 bar blues’, you can pretty much assume he has no clue about what he talking about….best wishes.

The construction allows the soundwaves to resonate freely within the body’s hollow airspace as well as around the violin-style F-holes and throughout the solid glue joints. Everything – from the body wood and construction to the neck wood and pitch – contributes to the tone of the 2019 Gibson ES-335 Figured guitar. This model boasts impressive depth and sustain in addition to an exceptional resonance that you can feel through the guitar’s body.
When you’re talking Gibson, mahogany is frequently going to factor into the brew. And that’s a wonderful thing. This is the classic ingredient of the multi-wood body, and one of the most common neck woods also, but is very often used on its own in single-wood bodies. On its own in an SG, Les Paul Special, or Les Paul Junior, mahogany’s voice is characteristically warm and somewhat soft, but extremely well balanced, with good grind and bite. It has the potential for good depth, with full (though not super-tight) lows, velvety highs, and a slightly compressed response. Overall, think round, open, warm.
* Advertised Price Per Month: The advertised price per month is the estimated monthly payment required to be made on your WebBank/Fingerhut Advantage Credit Account for a single item order, or if at any time your account has multiple items on it, then please see the payment chart for payment terms. The advertised price per month will not apply. See Full Cost of Ownership.

Bell's journey to become a guitar master began with a car running over him as a child. He was an aspiring baseball player just shy of his 13 birthday and left with a fractured skull that ended his future career. So he picked up the guitar and fell in love. He's been building and repairing guitars since 1975. Today, he's running Bell's Custom Guitars on the side and repairing guitars at Murphy's Music in Irving.
The Ibanez Tube Screamer is the industry standard for overdrive pedals. Kicked into legendary status by the late great Stevie Ray Vaughan. The Tube Screamer TS808 was first released in the late 70’s and now catches a small fortune on the vintage market but fortunately there are reissues and many boutique clones out there. The Tube Screamer is not the only overdrive circuit of course, there are many excellent options, it is just clearly the most famous. What makes the TS so cool is the way it interacts with an already overdriven amplifier. It can add a nice amount of gain, sustain, and tonal shaping options. They do provide a bit of a boost in the mid frequencies that many people love as it helps to cut through a band. The list of TS users is extensive but Stevie Ray is the most notable.
Comes with hard case.This is the iconic Yamaha apx-6a. Made in the 1990s it has the iconic Yamaha AMF preamp/Eq system. This specimen is in overall faircondition for a guitar that is over 20 years old. It has normal scratches and other sings of wear. Shipping is free. Estimated arrival is 4-8 business days. A signature is usually required at the time of delivery.
For example, if the note E (the open sixth string) is played over the A minor chord, then the chord would be [0 0 2 2 1 0]. This has the note E as its lowest tone instead of A. It is often written as Am/E, where the letter following the slash indicates the new bass note. However, in popular music it is usual to play inverted chords on the guitar when they are not part of the harmony, since the bass guitar can play the root pitch.
You need to know what colour code your pickup wires are. If the 4-wire pickup is a Seymour Duncan then the link above should work for you, if it’s another brand of pickup then you’ll have to figure out how to correct for the appropriate colour wires e.g. DiMarzio pickups use a different colour code on their wires to Seymour Duncan and they’re all fairly easy to find on the web.
Lydia Lunch once beat her Teenage Jesus & the Jerks bandmates with coat hangers during practice; and her confrontational attitude was only matched by her completely unfettered guitar playing. Calling the instrument “a grand assaultive weapon,” she treated it as such, often attacking the strings with knives or even shards of glass, refusing to even bother learning chords, using it as a blunt force to express a total anti-pop, anti-punk, anti-everything rage.
“Hi folks here’s a classic beauty 1974 ALVAREZ 5024 DOVE Japanese crafted Dreadnought acoustic guitar mid 1970’s which is prime time lawsuit era when Japan was out and out copying the great classic AMERICAN DESIGN GUITARS the classics if you will they sought out to make an affordable alternative to the more expensive American built guitars in this case they obviously copied Gibson right down to the details...Like the open book headstock, the overall size -shape- the bridge detail on this is just like one My friend had as a kid it was his dads but we played it too was a wonderful 1964 Gibson Dove it was 1968 we admired it greatly to say the least but with our pocket books at the time forget about it one of my band mates brought one to practice an Alvarez like this one and it to had the tunimatic bridge installed on it, it made the difference to get your acoustic set up to intonate not new or ding and doink free but vintage beautiful JVG rated 8+/10It shines up quite nicely too. Ok here is the story of this guitar just one elderly owner of this California guitar. I have collected no less than 12 of these classics and have had some put away in our warehouse for about 15 years it’s been out of circulation all these years strings loosened inside a caddalic old Gibson case which is not included with this purchase. kept out of circulation over 15 years and not played that much by its original owner she is in better than average for one of these it’s neck is 1-11/16ths width at nut - medium profile- very good frets and rosewood fingerboard and classic inlays and the dove motif pickguard. I noticed it looks as if the treble side tuners were replaced and he chose to use the opposite side simply reversed... they look fine work the same good so I’ll leave that to you to decide , we can do a Grover tuner upgrade for you installed for $125 additional if requested. Other than ,that the bridge has upgraded to high end fossil pins that resonate tone far superior to the original plastic ones. No cracks in the wood or even finish checking none seen... neck joint also is excellent as is neck angle - set for proper relief it’s Mahogany neck is nice and strateght . It’s beautifully grained Sitka Spruce Top is nice - pretty flat not buldging no such issues it’s bridge is also original and is nice and tight to its top.its body is all mahogany and is beautiful as well have a good look, the back of headstock has what Gibson use to call a black stinger painted on... Gibson did that so did Alvarez... I like this one’ds white Alvarez trussrod cover as well .. truss rod is working as it should... The open book headstock mirrors that of the Gibson with the old style script Alvarez logo looking quite cool in deed... love this era.. ok it’s hard to find these that are not rode hard and put away wet... not this baby She’s a one owner sweetie pie... NO CRACKS - NO NECK ISSUES PLAYING REAL NICE contact Joe to buy it: jvguitars@gmail.com Thanks for looking folks!.
At the onset, we decided to stick to DIY electric guitar kits that can be bought from online retailers in the mainland US, to ensure that the ones we list are accessible. We then took note of popular and highly rated kits, which for this updated required us to gather around 700 relevant user and expert reviews and ratings. All these data are then fed into the Gearank algorithm, which gave us the scores that allowed us to narrow down the list to just the top 6 kits. For more information about this process see How Gearank Works.
While high action is a concern, I see more people on guitar forums who bought Authentics, including the 1941, who say the action and playability is “like butter” more than I see people mentioning high action being a problem. Also, a lot of players rarely go beyond the fifth fret without a capo, so they may not even notice if their 10th fret would seem high to some players.
Get a Luthier (or do it yourself if you have the knowledge) to change the tuners to the ones I specified, take the sharp edges off the neck, throw some extra light strings on, and do a set up and this guitar becomes a dream guitar for kids or adults for a lifetime. So while the Yamaha APXT2 may not be the best guitar for your purpose, in this price range you WILL NOT find the perfect guitar, period. At least Yamaha gave us a foundation off which to build (which you can't say for other brands) and with a little modification here and there, you will have the perfect little guitar. I bought this for my child and I find myself picking it up and playing it more than my more expensive full size guitars. It's just a pleasure having it around the house, but not so much so before I modified it. There's nothing worse than having a guitar that's just about not a toy as compared to a professional guitar. You want to make your guitar easy to tune and enjoyable to play so spend the extra bucks to make it perfect and you will have no regrets.

You wouldn’t guess that this is a low-end electric acoustic, even on close inspection, because the build quality is superb. This translates to some great tone. While it might not have quite the same ring and sustain as an expensive model, only real audiophiles are likely to notice. You get a solid spruce top, good quality hardware, and Fishman electronics.


If you're a Zakk Wylde fan, take a look at his signature Les Paul or the exclusive Graveyard Disciple with its authentic Floyd Rose tremolo bridge. For the metalheads among us, there's the Brendon Small Thunderhorse Explorer, a mahogany axe based on the one Brendon plays in concert with Dethklok. To satisfy Beatlemaniacs, Epiphone also has a Casino guitar inspired by John Lennon’s famous six string.
Play It Loud: An Epic History of the Style, Sound, & Revolution of the Electric Guitar is just that: a swooping, all-encompassing timeline of the instrument’s early days to its beyond-essential role in pop culture and music. Written by Brad Tolinski and Alan Di Perna, with a foreword by Carlos Santana, the book dives into the electric guitar’s place in our society, tracing its evolution in sound, style, look and purpose. Here are 10 things we learned from reading:
This is an interesting one - by fitting a MIDI pickup to your guitar you can record your performances as a MIDI track as well as live audio. This can then be assigned to any software or hardware MIDI-triggered instrument to double up or even replace the guitar part. Some DAWs now also allow the extraction of audio to MIDI data from a recorded audio part, but the MIDI pickup route is more accurate where electric guitar is concerned.

Position 2 (outside coils, parallel connection): this one is more exciting because all poles do something. Pole 1 connects bridge pickup coil tap to ground, effectively splitting the bridge pickup. Pole 2 connects bridge pickup hot lead to the output. Pole 3 connects neck pickup coil tap to pole 4 which connects it to the output. What we end up with is a coil from bridge pickup coil tap to hot lead and a coil from neck pickup ground to the coil tap. Because of the way poles 2 and 4 are connected, these two coils will be paralleled.
With the Orange Terror series, you can have premium high-gain tube tone without having to lug around heavy equipment. The Orange Micro is among the smallest in the Terror series of amps, following the same streamlined design of its siblings, but with a different "dark" tonality. This lunchbox amp combines a 12AX7 preamp tube with a solid-state power amp, all packed in a compact and lightweight profile.
This is why I’m nervous when I see a free guitar plugin that actually wants to replace a guitar, which Cute Emily Guitar attempts to do. Now, Cute Emily is the most guitar-sounding of the bunch, but it also has the least amount of controls. This gives you a relatively singular sound and while I commend Big Cat efforts, I stopped using this free electric guitar plugin faster than I did the others.
1991 saw the introduction of guitar designer Jol Dantzig's first truly workable acoustic-electric hybrid guitar design. The instrument, called the DuoTone, was conceived while Dantzig was at Hamer Guitars. (Dantzig was also the designer of the first 12 string bass.) Adapted by players like Ty Tabor, Stone Gossard, Elvis Costello and Jeff Tweedy, the DuoTone was a full "duplex" instrument that could switch between acoustic and electric tones. Recently there have been many entries in the hybrid category (capable of both acoustic and electric tones) including the T5 by Taylor, Michael Kelly's "Hybrid," the Parker Fly and the Anderson Crowdster.
You should visit a local guitar shop to purchase your first guitar. You will benefit immensely from their experience, and they will be able to support you after the sale. Avoid places like Walmart, Best Buy, etc., because all they can do is sell you a guitar, and a poor one at that. Most local guitar shops have gone to great lengths to select guitar lines that are serviceable, and play and sound good. As a beginner, you will appreciate their service and commitment to you, even though a local shops pricing may be a touch higher. Most local shops offer lessons, as well.
This list is called "best guitar techniques" not hardest guitar techniques, people are looking at some of more shreddy elements first, but many other things are far more important. I think alternate picking is one of the most important because it is the technique that truly gives you control over individual notes (not chords). It is commonly used in both rhythm and lead guitar unlike sweep picking which is only used by shreddicus maximus/l0rd 5hr3dd0rz. All these techniques are important but think of some more basic techniques first.
In the 1980s, when shred metal was at its peak, Ibanez took a big share of the market with models that were geared towards the fastest, loudest players – thin necks, floating double-locking tremolos and high-output pickups. These guitars were endorsed by modern day virtuosos such as Paul Gilbert, Steve Vai and Joe Satriani, with many artists designing their own custom Ibanez models.
To quote the super-helpful legendarytones.com, "The Hiwatt DR103 is notably louder and can also run much cleaner than 100-watt Marshalls when needed, and they also have tremendous headroom available. Playing a Hiwatt at a loud volume is, well, an experience." The site adds, "The Hiwatt DR103 design is based around the use of four EL-34 power tubes and four 12AX7 preamp tubes. The transformers are set up so that the amp can be used with various line voltages around the world and speaker impedance can also be set to 4, 8, or 16 ohms with two speaker outputs wired in parallel."

Side Note: The above is a visual example of how the wrong pedal order screws up your tone. When you compress before using delay, you get a perfectly shaped note ringing out and decaying uniformly over time. If you delay before compressing and even normalize with your make-up gain, you still lose volume and power due to the attack sneaking through first. Then your delayed notes are all also compressed, ruining your fine-tuned echo decay so that all echoes are relatively too loud and don't decay equally over time.
Schecter has built a strong reputation for itself as one of the best manufacturers of affordable guitars for musicians worldwide. Their commitment to quality and innovation has made them a leading brand name for high quality guitars that are affordable for every budget. The Schecter Hellraiser C-1 Electric Guitar is one of their flagship electric guitars that not only delivers performance, but also uncompromising quality.
The 1934-’35 Dobro amplifier was a square cabinet covered in imitation leather with a leather suitcase handle, the eight corners protected by metal bumper guards. The grill was curiously covered with a down-sized version of a Dobro resonator plate cover, probably made by Rickenbacker. It had back-mounted controls, five tubes (5Z3 rectifier, 56 and 79 preamps, and two 2A3 power outputs) and a 12″ Utah speaker. This amp was built for Dobro, with the cabinet coming from Bulwin of Los Angeles and the chassis coming from Webster of Racine, Wisconsin.
There’s 200 unique patch locations for you to assign your own sounds with and make use of the effects for guitar and bass, including world class BOSS delays, reverbs, mod/pitch effects, overdrives, distortions such as the DS-1 and Metal Zone and more. A built-in tuner is extremely handy as is the onboard USB interface which allows you to load presets onto the unit. This multi-effects unit allows you to access the free MS-3 Editor/Librarian software on a Mac or PC where you can make changes to your effects, assign parameters and sculpt your sound in complete detail for later recall when you’re playing live. You can mix whatever pedals and sounds you want and have that preset ready to go in seconds.
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For decades, the Les Paul Special has been one of Epiphone’s best selling electric guitars. And the new Les Paul Special VE—inspired by the Les Paul, the greatest electric guitar in rock—continues the tradition of giving new both players and pros a real Les Paul at a price anyone can afford.

Case sold separately.

Classic Les Paul profile
The Les Paul Special VE has a Poplar body with a sleek look thanks to the Vintage Worn finish and no binding on the neck or body. The Les Paul VE is cut to the same classic profile of all Les Pauls and has a comfortable and fast Mahogany bolt-on neck with a 1960's SlimTaper D profile. The Rosewood fingerboard has traditional Pearloid "Dot" inlays, a 24.75” scale, a 14” radius, 22 medium jumbo frets, and a standard 1-11/16” nut. Just below the headstock is the famed “bell” shaped truss rod cover found on every Les Paul since the early '50s with “Vintage Edition” in white. 

Epiphone Open Coil Humbuckers
The Les Paul Special VE features Epiphone’s world famous open-coil humbuckers with a warm 650R in the neck position and a slightly hotter 700T in the bridge or lead position.Controls include a 3-way pickup selector switch, a Master Volume, and a Master Tone control, each with traditional “Black Speed Knobs” pots with long lasting
500K Ω potentiometers.

All-Metal Hardware
Epiphone features all-metal rock solid hardware on all of its instruments. The Les Paul Special VE comes standard with the legendary Locktone Tune-o-matic bridge and Stopbar tailpiece for easy set up. Tuning is fast and reliable with Epiphone Premium Covered tuners with a 14:1 ratio.The higher the ratio, the more accurate your tuning. The tuners are mounted on an Epiphone Clipped Ear headstock with Les Paul Model in gold and the Epiphone log in silver. In addition, a "2016" Edition logo is on the back of the headstock. 

All Epiphones come with a Limited Lifetime Warranty and Gibson’s world famous 24/7/365 Customer Service.", "value":"131.12", "priceMin":"131.12", "priceMax":"149.00", "priceSavingsMaxPrice":"0.00", "priceSavingsMaxPercent":"40", "inventory":"57", "brand":"Epiphone", "reviewStarImageUrl": "https://static.musiciansfriend.com/img/brand/mf/cmn/Sprit-Sm-Stars.png", "reviewStarRating":"4.0", "reviewStarRatingInteger":"8", "reviewHowManyReviews":"17", "usedOrNew":"used", "discontinued":"0", "onOrder":"0", "clearance":"0", "canBeSold":"1", "accessoryCategories":"site1LFMIC,site1HBA,site1LAAA", "stickerText": "Best Seller", "checksum":"93895071200", "priceVisibility": "1"}

The steel guitar is unusual in that it is played horizontally across the player's lap. The steel guitar originates from Hawaii where local musicians, newly introduced to the European guitar, developed a style of playing involving alternative tunings and the use of a slide. The Hawaiian guitarists found that by laying the guitar flat across the lap they could better control the slide. In response to this new playing style some Hawaiian steel guitars were constructed with a small rectangular body which made them more suitable for laying across the lap.There are two types of steel guitar played with a steel, the solid metal bar from which the guitar takes its name, namely the lap steel guitar and the pedal steel guitar with its extra necks. The pedal steel guitar comes on its own stand with a mechanical approach similar to the harp. Pedals and knee-levers are used to alter the pitch of the strings whilst playing thereby extending the fluency of the glissandi technique.
Guitar chords are dramatically simplified by the class of alternative tunings called regular tunings. In each regular tuning, the musical intervals are the same for each pair of consecutive strings. Regular tunings include major-thirds (M3), all-fourths, augmented-fourths, and all-fifths tunings. For each regular tuning, chord patterns may be diagonally shifted down the fretboard, a property that simplifies beginners' learning of chords and that simplifies advanced players' improvisation.[70][71][72] The diagonal shifting of a C major chord in M3 tuning appears in a diagram.
Hugh Padgham adopted a similar tactic for recording Andy Summers' Roland JC120 when working with the Police: "The chorus [was] always switched on in order to produce the slightly out-of-tune guitar sound that was all the rage during the early '80s. The amp's two 12-inch speakers would each be close-miked with a Sennheiser MD421, panned left and right — one speaker would produce a straight signal while the other would be chorused, and these would sometimes be double-tracked the other way around in order to produce an especially wide stereo picture."
Ibanez are a Japanese guitar brand founded in Nagoya, Japan in 1957. They began by building copies of Fender and Gibson models, but – a couple of lawsuits later – they started creating their own models, which are now icons in their own right. Their line currently includes their famous Roadstar (RG), the thin-bodied S series, and several artist signature models, including guitars for Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, and Mick Thomson.
Obviously, what I've done is to give myself a choice of three different sounds--a close, ballsy sound, a mid-range room sound, and a more distant room sound. By setting all three mics up at the same time, putting them each in a different input, and assigning them all to the same track on tape, I've given myself the option of having any one of those sounds immediately available to me, or a combination of them.

000-15: Base model of the upper end Martin Guitar line. All mahogany orsapele construction. ‘A Frame’ “X” top bracing, 14 frets clear, Optional model 000-15S 12 frets clear. All -16 and -16 series 000 instruments have long scales (25.4″) and 1-11/16″ nut widths, in contrast to the -18, -28, and -45 series, which have the ‘traditional’ 24.9″ 000 scale, retaining the 1-11/16″ nut width.


12-string acoustic guitars have six string courses, each with two strings that are tuned to produce a chiming, chorus effect. Usually, the string pairs in the bass courses are tuned an octave apart while all treble strings are tuned in unison. Some guitarists prefer tuning the second string in the third course (G) in unison while others opt to tune it an octave higher for bell-like ringing tones.

The Firebird did have some other unique features such as its banjo style tuners and mini humbuckers that produced a different sound than the full humbucker pickups Gibson typically offered.  Many notable players preferred the Firebird: Mick Taylor from the Rolling Stones used it on the album Exile on Main St.  Allen Collins would also use this axe on stage with Skynyrd alongside his Explorers.  The great Texan blues guitarist Johnny Winter was known for playing slide on his 1963 Firebird to great effect.  Dave Grohl, of Nirvana and Foo Fighters fame, used his white Firebird to create a modern rock sound.
It comes in arctic white, fiesta red, black and vintage sunburst, so there’s a healthy level of customization available. Finally, there are three classic Strat single coils, two volume knobs and a tone knob. Accompanying that is a five-way selector switch, so you can dial in your tone and fine tune it with the knobs. It all comes in a really nice package that will feel really good right out of the box. You really can’t go wrong with a classic like this. 
Many amplifiers have effects built in, but even those that do are no substitute for a well-equipped pedalboard. There are literally thousands of effects to choose from, some of which (like the Boss TU-3 Chromatic Pedal Tuner) are more like accessories that don't directly impact your sound. Others will transform it completely. For example, two of the most popular effects are the Fulltone OCD Obsessive Compulsive Overdrive Guitar Effects Pedal and the Ibanez TS9 Tube Screamer Effects Pedal - these are both overdrive pedals, and together with a good amp, they'll take an electric guitar's sound from its default, vintage-like tone all the way to the high-powered distortion of a modern rock anthem.
Yeah there is no double about it the Epiphone Special 11 is unreal value for money and even though I have over the years filled my Den with guitars some worth a lot of money the Epiphone Special 11 is my go to guitar. I just cannot fault, great tuners, pickups and basically the only guitar I have that stays in tune 90% plus of the time. It is also the lightest of my guitar collection weighing in at about 5.5lbs. For $299 Australian they are an absolute steal. If I could only have one guitar I would go to this Epiphone Les Paul Special 11 ever time.
The SparkFun Proto Pedal is an easy-to-assemble kit that makes building guitar effect pedals easier. Let’s face it, most guitar pedals start with all-too-similar circuitry – you need the input and output jacks, the bypass switch, and a barrel jack for power input. In some pedals, there may be as much wiring involved in the jacks and switch as there is in the effect itself. The SparkFun Proto Pedal takes care of the hard part and provides you with a simple infrastructure; all you need to do is decide what simple circuit to make to gain your desired effect, and you’ll be ready to rock!
Lou Reed has been blowing traditional guitar styles to bits since his Velvet Underground days. A fan of Ike Turner's R&B and Ornette Coleman's free jazz, he created epic bad-trip psychedelia on songs like "Sister Ray." "He was rightfully quite proud of his own soloing," wrote fellow New York guitar luminary Robert Quine, "but resigned to the fact that most people weren't ready for it." As a solo artist, Reed kept on ripping up the rulebook: See 1975's Metal Machine Music, a noise opus that took feedback further than Hendrix could have imagined.

We took another detailed look at all acoustic-electric guitars priced under $500 available from major American online retailers, and for this update, we shortlisted 78 of them for closer analysis. We then collated over 7700 ratings and reviews from forums, videos, retailers, blogs and major music gear publications and processed those data with the Gearank Algorithm to produce a Gearank score of out 100 for each guitar. Finally we selected the highest rated guitars in two of the most popular price brackets, sub $300 and sub $500. For more information about this process see How Gearank Works.
We considered more than 40 guitars for this guide, and we tested the 13 most promising models. A couple of models aside, our testing panel thought, as Lynn Shipley Sokolow put it, “These are all of good quality and are all adequate.” In fact, certain models we didn’t pick may be a better choice for beginning guitarists who are into a specific style—most notably metal, which is clearly the primary market for brands such as Ibanez and Jackson.
On guitars with bound fingerboards, shrinking of the binding can produce a gap large enough to catch the treble E string when pulling it over the edge. If only a few our present I will fill the gap to eliminate the problem. If the binding shrinkage has introduced gaps at every fret, the board should be re-radiused to eliminate all gaps and re-fretted.

Because in most cases it is desirable to isolate coil-wound pickups from the unintended sound of internal vibration of loose coil windings, a guitar's magnetic pickups are normally embedded or "potted" in wax, lacquer, or epoxy to prevent the pickup from producing a microphonic effect. Because of their natural inductive qualities, all magnetic pickups tend to pick up ambient, usually unwanted electromagnetic interference or EMI.[23] The resulting hum is particularly strong with single-coil pickups, and it is aggravated by the fact that many vintage guitars are insufficiently shielded against electromagnetic interference. The most common source is 50- or 60-Hz hum from power transmission systems (house wiring, etc.). Since nearly all amplifiers and audio equipment associated with electric guitars must be plugged in, it is a continuing technical challenge to reduce or eliminate unwanted hum.[24]
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