Without the rhythmic pummel of the Slits, there would be no riot grrl, no Rapture, no Yeah Yeah Yeahs; and without Viv Albertine — who played guitar for this groundbreaking U.K. punk band, and wrote the bulk of their early material — there would be no Slits. Albertine’s unrepentantly unpolished guitar stylings eschewed the high velocities and power-chord assaults of her male contemporaries in favor of trebly, dissonant stabs. It all meshed perfectly with the band’s cheeky, confrontational songs, ultimately turning jagged rhythms into something as provocative and primal as anything punk produced.
Same woods sounding different? OF COURSE!!! Look, I’ve been a carpenter for over 30 years and can absolutely inform you that there is a marked variation of characteristics of wood in the same species…density, tap tone, characteristics of how the individual piece reacts to being worked with tools…heck for all anybody knows internal stresses (for example as indicated by how a 12″ wide piece of wood reacts to being ripped down the center…many times both pieces end up being bowed and such) might play a big factor in how said piece of wood sounds musically…shrugs shoulders…
We all have heard that tone starts in the hands of the guitarist.  Different players can play thru the exact same amp and guitar rig and produce sounds on opposite ends of the spectrum.  I like to refer to this base sonic level as the DNA of a player.  Thanks to mad scientists tinkering in their evil laboratories of sound, we now have the ability to alter a guitarist’s tonal genetic code with effects pedals.
It does sound intimidating when you read platitudes like "There is no official rule on how to do it, and you should break the rules and experiment because that's what art is, and you'll invent something new." Some people even tell you to figure it out yourself, which is equally absurd. It developed over decades. No one person is going to just sort it out by themselves over night.
Mike Hedges also uses this idea a great deal, and explains how it really comes into its own at the mix. "You've got two or three tracks of guitar: one clean, one medium — say, half-driven — and then one really driven. As the song progresses, you might use the nice clean track during the verse, as you're coming to the bridge you fade in the heavier guitar sound, then back it off a bit, into the chorus with everything full on, then back to the next verse and drop it all out. It's all done on one guitar track, so it doesn't sound like you've done 10 guitar overdubs. It has a different quality, it sounds like a live performance, but you've got real dynamics in the sounds. It's a very effective technique."

Just SOLD #2 another fine example of the vintage 1960s era J200 copy by the great luthiers at Alvarez in the mid 1970s - the 80's WoW very well done impressive... Alvarez from over 40 years ago. This example is JVG rated at very good + 8.6/10 vintage condition with beautiful patina and character mojo as well so cool Gotta love this Beauty! This instrument has received our JVGuitars "set up" and several upgrades as well we have installed a new set of Martin 80/20 bronze Marquis strings for a crisp tone with great bass and volume as well as a Martin solid natural bone nut & a compensated saddle set custom fit into its original fully functional adjustable bridge with plenty of room for up or down adjustments to your personal taste further upgrades do include throwing out the old plastic tone robbing bridge pins for the superior resonation of solid ebony wood with brass ring and beautiful abalone inlay bridge pins and this was for tonal reasons and it looks much more high end as well, then we removed the old economy tuners of the era ( a weak point ) and installed a set of Grover tuners old holes were touched up in the process looks good and works excellent now to keep this guitar in tune and as a side benefit the added girth at headstock increases sustain as well. The medium slim profile C shaped neck is 1-11/16ths at the nut and also is pretty much the same as the 60's Gibby profile the frets are the originals as well and still playing well without buzz as per JVG set up. Truss rod is working fine and the headstock is looking cool with its Old School script Alvarez mother of pearl logo and crown design with its patina and cool old Alvarez Truss rod cove this guitar is striking as well. Great sounding like a Piano wow and she's playing with ease with excellent string action now. She retains her excellent vintage Sunburst and finish still shines nicely of course she is not new or mint it has some natural finish checking several that only adds to its Mojo along with several doinks here and there on the body and top a few that caught edge near binding on front and back not so big rather small and small paint had chipped off and so I addressed them with a fine tip matching color lacquer tip pen to touch up and to help preserve original finish integrity and looks much better as well. We also installed a replacement pickguard and it fits perfectly and looks great too. The 1960's VIBE and this instruments playability makes this an excellent choice for that SWEET Jumbo tone well crafted over 40 years ago Vintage Script Logo on headstock inlayed in mother of pearl on correct law suit era open book Gibby style headstock. Made in Japan well taken care of all these years and ready for you to enjoy another 40. Overall she is SWEET! Contact Joe to buy: jvguitars@gmail.com.
Me got a Dorado resonator guitar, very nice dark walnut finish with white binding on edges. I bought it in 1985 but assume the guitar is mid-70's. Incidentally the neck has a very "japanese" feel to it. I was told by a guitar dealer that these particular instruments may have been ( at least partially) manufactured in Japan, then possibly had their resonators fitted in USA. They were DISTRIBUTED by Gretsch, in Europe at any rate. Mine is a nice guitar but not nearly as loud as most resonators.
Because most electric guitars offer far more adjustability than acoustic guitars, the setup and adjustment of the guitar is more important than it is with acoustics, which don’t have much to adjust. We decided John and I would test the electrics first right out of the box, with their stock strings and factory setup, then get a professional to set them up with Ernie Ball Regular Slinky strings in gauges from .010 to .046—for decades, this has been one of the most popular string sets for electric guitars. Our setup technician was Avishay Shabat, who heads the Guitar Groomer repair shop in Woodland Hills, California, and who also manufactures his own line under the Shabat Guitars brand.
Even now i make people custom guitars and have made a few for people in MO/IL a total of 23 made and they all love them and say they are the best guitars theyve played cause i work side by side to shape the guitars necks and bodys to fit most comfortably with them but i charge $2500-3000 for a guitar which is still cheaper than the big name guitar places
The open strings of a guitar can be tuned to microtonal intervals, however microtonal scales cannot easily be played on a conventional guitar because the frets only allow for a chromatic scale of twelve equally spaced pitches, each a semitone apart. (Certain microtonal scales, particularly quarter tones, can be played on a standard guitar solely by adjusting tunings, but the distance between notes on the scale makes it somewhat impractical.) It is possible to play microtonal scales on a fretless guitar, to convert a fretted guitar into a fretless, or to make a custom neck with a specific microtonal fret spacing.

For those other performances, we run into limits of computer memory, computer processing power and computer programmers' time (and talent). With increasing processing power available in the consumer market, simulations are in some cases surpassing storage intensive sample libraries in terms of acoustic similarity and perceptive preferences. In guitar world, though, there seem to be no VST players of the simulation variety contending for top honors against leading sample libraries - of which amplesound.net seems to be the leading collection (unless you like something Vienna Symphonic Libraries has to offer)
The tone from a Bourgeois produced with master grade Cocobolo wood using hot hide glue is superior to any guitar I have played, I can get an incredible reverb sound by applying a light percussion on the body with my forearm, this guitar is expensive but worth it. I believe Bourgeois builds 400 guitars per year, the other major producers production is 400 guitars per week.

Fun !...so fun...I like the game it was worth waiting a couple years for it and I like the fact that even though I preordered it when I first got my xbox one to Best Buy they still gave me all the points for my xbox and the game so I recommend it to a friend and I'm glad that I finally got the Xbox one and the game came out to play it...IF YOU ARE A DIE HARD FAN OF HALO YOU WILL GIVE IT A 5, IF YOU ARE REALISTIC YOU WILL GO WITH A 4, NOT TOO MUCH HAS CHANGED A FEW NEW SUITS AND COLORS FOR YOUR SOLDIER, STORY IS GREAT LIKE ALWAYS, AND LIKE ALWAYS ALOT OF GRINDING ON EVERY LEVEL, IT DOES NOT BRING ANYTHING NEW ON THE 1 PLAYER SIDE,MULTIPLAYER HAS PLENTY NEW FEATURES,AS A FAN OF HALO, I MUST HAVE IT IN MY COLLECTION AND YOU MUST TOO!


Early forms of the talk box, such as the Heil Talk Box, first appeared in Country Music circles in Nashville in the 1940',s 1950's, and 1960's, by artist like swing band pedal steel player Alvino Rey, Link Wray ("Rumble"), Bill West, a Country Music steel guitar player and husband of Dottie West, and Pete Drake, a Nashville mainstay on the pedal steel guitar and friend of Bill West. Drake used it on his 1964 album Forever, in what came to be called his "talking steel guitar." The device used the guitar amplifier's output to drive a speaker horn that pushed air into a tube held in the player's mouth, which filters and thereby shapes the sound leading to a unique effect. The singer and guitarist Peter Frampton made this effect famous with hit songs such as "Do You Feel Like We Do" and "Show Me the Way," as did Joe Walsh on "Rocky Mountain Way." On Van Halen's cover of "You Really Got Me" Eddie Van Halen uses a talk box after the guitar solo to make a sound similar to a person having sex. Newer devices, such as Danelectro's Free Speech pedal, use a microphone and vocoder-like circuit to modulate the frequency response of the guitar signal. Some Talk Boxes include: The Dunlop Heil Talk Box, Rocktron Banshee, and Peter Frampton's own company,Framptone.
The final pillar in the temple of electric guitar production is the semi-hollow guitar. Just as the name suggests, these guitars do have some chambering in the body, but they aren’t completely hollow. In an ideal world, a semi-hollow guitar will have the biting, singing tone of a solid body guitar, but can also achieve the same smooth fullness of a solid body. However, that simply isn’t the reality for many semi-hollow bodies.
Preamp, or gain, controls (sometimes called “volume” on master volume–equipped amps) let you dial in impressive-sounding distortion at low volumes, but excessive preamp distortion can sound too compressed and sizzling at high volumes. Turn down the gain and crank up the master volume until the amp is set at the output level you’d normally play at. Now, slowly increase the gain until the sound becomes as distorted as you want it to be. If the tone is buzzy and lacks dynamics, the amp will have all the onstage presence of an American Idol reject.
From loopers to distortion, effects pedals are a major part of guitar playing these days – and there are two ways to feed these pedals to the amp. You can run them from the front through the instrument input, or you can use an FX loop. The benefit of the latter is that it allows you to insert effects between the preamp and power stage. It’s a complicated topic that relies on a lot of trial and error – not to mention personal taste – but plugging boosters (overdrive, distortion, wah) into the front and then using an FX loop for modulators (chorus, flanger, delay) tends to deliver the best results.
The body of an acoustic guitar is composed of the top, also called the soundboard. The soundboard is supported by internal bracing; the sides, and the back that together form a hollow chamber. The upper body curves are referred to as the upper bout, while the usually larger lower body curves are called the lower bout. The area between them is referred to as the waist.

Most reviewers are simply floored by how good the Roland Blues Cube Artist sounds right off the bat, with many commending its organic tube-like tone for being so life-like. It's vintage aesthetics and familiar controls also gets a lot of thumbs up, especially from experienced players who are in it for the sound, and not for the bells and whistles. It should also be mentioned that there are many reports of it working well with different types of guitars and pickup configurations.


What about Trey Anatasio? I cannot stand the hippie commune nonsense that follows Phish but that guy is amazing. That man can play anything; literally anything. He has been playing stuff like Peaches En Regalia to perfection live for literally decades. Go out to Grooveshark and find this song and list to it. He is playing sax and xylophone solos to perfection on the guitar. And that is just one example. There are literally hundreds of examples that you can find if you willing to look. Listen to the solo on Chalk Dust Torture off of A Live One. There is no better example of building tension in a solo then that right there.
Description: Body: Laminated Maple - Flamed - Top Wood: Laminated Maple - Flamed - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: U-Shape - Nut Width: 43mm - Fingerboard: Ebony - Binding: White - Frets: 22, Jumbo, Medium - Inlay: Pearloid Thumbnail - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Rocking Bar - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: 2x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Schaller Tuners - Pickups: FilterTron - Pickup Configuration: Dual - String Instrument Finish: Orange Stain
Oh, did you say you like lots of switches and pickups and knobbies?  Hell, welcome to our club!  Yes, the Norma 421-4 was the proverbial “king” of the catalog from 1968 to around 1970.  Similar guitars were sold in Japan at this same time, mostly carrying the brand name Liberty.This model was sold alongside a 12 string (EG412-2T) with a tremolo(!!!!!), a bass (EG467-2B), and a two pickup version (EG450-2).  Reading the catalog from 1968 is a real trip!  Here’s the description of the 412-4:
While musicians intentionally create or add distortion to electric instrument signals or vocals to create a musical effect, there are some musical styles and musical applications where as little distortion as possible is sought. When DJs are playing recorded music in a nightclub, they typically seek to reproduce the recordings with little or no distortion. In many musical styles, including pop music, country music and even genres where the electric guitars are almost always distorted, such as metal and hard rock, sound engineers usually take a number of steps to ensure that the vocals sounding through the sound reinforcement system are undistorted (the exception is the rare cases where distortion is purposely added to vocals in a song as a special effect).
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You can use similar two-mic techniques, minus the effects, on a single amp to capture a variety of larger-than-life guitar sounds. One trick that I stumbled upon involves miking a twin-speaker amp with two mics that are close in response, but not matched (see Fig. 1). The first time I tried this, on a session with guitarist Paris Slim, I used an Electro-Voice RE20 and a Sennheiser 441.
Gibson Les Paul specifications during 1958–60 varied from year to year and also from guitar to guitar. Typical 1958 Les Paul Standard necks had a thicker “club-shaped” neck, thinner frets and lower fret height, which changed during the course of 1959 to develop into typical 1960 necks with a thinner cross-section and wider, higher frets. Les Paul Customs from the same period had totally different frets and were referred to as “The Fretless Wonder”, which were designed for jazz guitarists with thick flat-wound strings.[note 7][note 6]
To preserve the clarity of the tone, it is most common to put compression, wah and overdrive pedals at the start of the chain, modulation (chorus, flanger, phase shifter) in the middle, and time-based units (delay, echo, reverb) at the end. When using many effects, unwanted noise and hum can be introduced into the guitar’s sound. Some performers use a noise gate or noise suppression pedal at the beginning or end of a chain to reduce unwanted noise and hum.
The U130 Bass Amplifier pumped out 130 watts with five inputs covering two channels (high and low each) and one input that bridged both channels. Channel 1 had volume with push/pull high boost, bass, middle and treble contour controls. Channel 2 had volume, bass and treble controls. Both channels had master volumes, plus two, four or eight-ohm output. Cabinet options included the UFO215 with two Univox Pro Mag speakers in a front-loaded horn cabinet, or the U215 with two 15″ Pro Mags in a “tuned duct” reflex cab.
Vox Amplification Ltd. has been owned by Korg since 1992. Korg revived the tube rectifier and alnico speakers for their version of the AC30 in what is considered the most faithful version of the amp produced for many years. Korg have also used the Vox name for a new range of digital modelling amps. In 2005 manufacturing was moved to Vietnam, including a yet-newer redesign of the venerable AC30, designated the AC30CC, which has now been superseded by the AC30C2. A hand-wired, heritage version, the AC30H2 (and the wooden cased AC30H2L) were also produced. The AC30CC and AC15CC were later replaced with the AC30C2 and AC15C1 which had solid state rectification and a revised chassis. In 2010 Vox released a Hand-Wired version of the AC30 and AC15 with turret board construction, valve rectification and a choice of Celestion Greenback or Alnico Blue speakers. In 2011 a Hand Wired version of the AC4 was also released. Less expensive consumer versions of the retro AC4 have been marketed in recent years as well: various sizes of AC4TV.

Though you can certainly buy any guitar of your choice by looking at the specs, this is not something a true music lover would do. If you get attracted towards guitars after being inspired by your favorite artist, then what you expect is to have your guitar produce that particular tone which your idol does. Of course, you cannot produce that typical signature tones from any guitar model. But how about if you get that guitar which your artist have?
Use songs as vehicles, certainly, and have fun playing them, by yourself, with friends, but get to realise that knowing what one chord sounds like after another will help you to play a new song almost spontaneously - a great trick to impress. Just learning songs will not give you much of a clue how music actually works, so you're better off using them to help learn music. obviously, you'll learn some songs to play along to, or with mates, but that's not the be-all and end-all. And it's not only the chords: learn pentatonics and you'll realise how many great guitarists use them in solos. Gilmour, Clapton, etc. Sunshine of your Love is pure blues scale notes!
While it won’t necessarily get you to Hendrix levels, it is a useful approach for beginners who want the focus to be on keeping enough fun and practically in practicing guitar. And while you still absolutely have to practice, this method shows tips and tricks up front to keep learning theory fun. It will also include enough information around traditional arpeggios, tunings, and scales to make sure you will learn music theory.
This page is a work in progress and as new information is revealed it will be added to the list. But I can't do this alone, folks. See a guitar not listed? Tell me! Listed below are the major manufacturers, known badges and suspected badges to the best of my knowledge in written and list form to make it easy to find out WHO MADE YOUR GUITAR! In some cases I won't know because the badge you have may be extremely rare and virtually unknown to even seasoned collectors.
As the title suggests, solid body electric guitars don't have a chamber or hole the way that an acoustic guitar does; instead, they're made of solid wood. These are the most common type of guitars that you’ll find in shops or online stores. They're perfect for a wide range of musical situations. These guitars rely on the wood quality and their components to output sound. Below we’ll highlight four famous types of solid body guitars.

This product was not working and parts were defect. I don't know how some people made it works. The instruction was terrible and seller's wires description photos are more worse. I did not expect much for this little toy. Just piece of the junk. I was tried to return, but the seller said that I had to pay return shipping and he gave me a fake return shipping address.

Following on from the previous article, we look at the grand-daddy of all pickup selectors: the 4-pole super-switch. The possibilities with this switch are endless, and we scratch the surface by coming up with a wiring scheme for an HSH guitar that auto-splits the humbuckers in the 2 and 4 positions, and combines both humbuckers in the middle position.
It worked like all amps: the guitar in my hands translated the vibrations from its strings through magnetic pickups into a voltage that traveled through the guitar's wiring and out the main 1/4" cable, then the amp picked up the signal and sent it through a coil of wire around a much larger magnet than those in the pickups, and the vibrations of that magnet shook the cone of the speaker, producing sound. The specific vibrations corresponding to those voltages created specific frequencies of vibration through the air, and my 10-year-old ears were hooked.
Originally equipped with P-90s, it wasn’t until 1957 that the most significant change was introduced: humbuckers. Humbucking pickups—two-out-of-phase coils wired together to cancel or “buck” the hum produced by single-coils—weren’t a new concept. But Gibson technician Seth Lover’s refined PAF (patent applied for) humbuckers produced a higher output with a clearer, fuller tone that solidified the Les Paul as the classic we know it as today. From Goldtops to Black Beauties and the ever-iconic sunbursts, Les Paul guitars come in almost limitless varieties, making them a staple of blues, jazz, rock, soul and country.
By placing two (or more) mics at different distances and angles from your speaker cab you will get two different sounds - and more variation will of course depend on whether these are the same model of mic, or different models. Mics placed further away will capture more room tone, and close mics are more upfront. Angled mics offer a less direct sound. Capture both feeds and blend or select from the two after recording.
This is another invariable question that you should be asking yourself if you are going to buy an acoustic guitar. This is because you also have to consider your comfort level with the guitar body so that you do not have any problem playing it. Be it the one with a shallow body or a full body or be it an Ovation guitar, you will have to make the right kind of choice.
Epiphone returns with yet another Solid and high-quality Les Paul Standard electric guitar, this time, an ebony styled-version of the Les Paul series. The body of this ebony version is made of solid and durable mahogany wood construction, including a maple top design. The fretboard of this Epiphone Ebony version electric guitar is made of rosewood, containing 24.75 scales.
An excerpt: “Scorned, laughed at, jeered, chided, and derided. The concept of the solidbody electric guitar was subject to such utter disdain in some corners that it’s almost hard to believe it ever came to be at all. The ridicule and mockery would have been enough to send a less self-confident inventor running for the hills. Given our more than 55 years of perspective, though, we know it just had to be; a world without the solidbody guitar? Moreover, without the Gibson Les Paul? Unthinkable ...”

I started to learn how to play guitar about 1.5- 2 years ago. My instruments are on the cheap/ lower cost side. I am disabled with a long life expectancy. I wanted a hobby that I can/ learn to do for the long run. I have five different guitars now ( all on the lower cost side ), They all sound good to my ear. One of them a Squire strat sounded horrible when I purchased it. I pretty much over a little time change just about everything but the wood. The Squire is a very light electric guitar as compared to my Epiphone Les Paul ( which actually strains my disabled spine ). So, It has to sound good to your own ear, and as equally important you have to be able to hold it for a period of time while playing to get the full enjoyment of the skill known as a "guitar player". Enjoy and be Proud. God Bless.


The company’s craftsmanship and innovation remain unmatched. Aside from their traditional ranges, Gibson also offers seriously high-tech instruments. This Mashable review of one of the brand's most revered models lauded not only its full-bodied tone but also Gibson’s penchant for taking risks. Its modern-take-on-an-old-icon kind of thinking allows it to constantly raise the bar—and the prices too, unfortunately.

First off, in any discussions about any effect pedals, no one is asking for or cares the slightest about the opinion of people who categorically don’t like pedals. While the Internet is a wonderful medium that expedites the broadcasting of a personal opinion (as I am doing here), I’m always curious about what motivates the person who categorically dislikes something to show up uninvited to express their feelings. Imagine you start a chat thread or post a status update or tweet with something like “Those of you who’ve seen The Avengers – how did you like Mark Ruffalo as Bruce Banner/Hulk?”. Now imagine you get a reply such as “I didn’t see The Avengers because I think movies suck. People should get back to reading books” – excuse me, but what on earth is that person contributing towards the discussion, and who the hell asked them?
Imagine a rich, authentic acoustic guitar tone coming from your electric guitar - at the flick of the switch!  Replace your current saddles with Graph Tech's ghost modular pickups and one of our Acousti-Phonic preamp and you'll have instant access to true, acoustic tone from your electric guitar or bass, without altering your electric pickups.  With the ghost Acousti-Phonic system you can play one guitar!  It can be electric AND acoustic, separately, or blended together for an infinite range of new and exciting sounds.
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At Ibanez, there has always been a goal to be anything but traditional. For over half a century, Ibanez has been pushing the world of guitar manufacturing forward, consistently breaking new ground. It's this drive that led them to become one of the first Japanese musical instrument companies to make a name for themselves in Europe and North America. With unparalleled commitment to quality, Ibanez Guitars are considered among the upper echelon by musicians of all playing styles around the world. A quick look at some of the musicians who play Ibanez guitars is sure to leave you very impressed. Artists such as Head and Munky of KoRn, Noodles of the Offspring, Mick Thomson of Slipknot, Fletcher Dragge of Pennywise, Steve Vai, and Joe Satriani all trust their sound to Ibanez guitars. Now it's your turn to do the same. Ibanez makes an impressively wide selection of guitars, so you're sure to be able to find one that is perfect for you here. Say, for example, you're a beginner who's looking for a great acoustic guitar? If that's the case, you'll love the JamPack IJV50 Quickstart Dreadnought Acoustic Guitar Pack. This set features everything you need to get started, including a beautiful dreadnought, as well as an electric tuner, a gig bag, a guitar strap, and an accessory pouch. If you'd rather a versatile acoustic-electric, you'll love an option such as the V70CE Acoustic-Electric Guitar. This guitar is highlighted by its outstanding playability and fantastic tone. With an incredible response and dynamic range, this guitar is perfectly suited for small clubs and larger venues alike. Of course, if all you want to do is plug in and pump up the volume, you're going to want to check out the JS1200 Joe Satriani Signature Guitar. This candy apple dream is built with top-tier electronics and sleek overall construction. With a resonant tone an impressive sustain (thanks, in part, to its DiMarzio humbuckers), this guitar is a progressive player's dream. Regardless of your playing style, there's an Ibanez here with your name on it that is ready to be played. With expertise that is second to none, Ibanez is a name you can trust in the music world.

The interface does get the job done well, it’s just that I’ve seen better looking free VSTs. But for me, this is completely fine because while flashy interfaces are nice, problems like software issues and hard to see text occur.  None of that is here, and within a few hours, most users will feel fairly comfortable creating moderately difficult, but realistic sounding guitar parts.
Generic PC audio cards often don’t have ASIO drivers. However, there is a freeware thing called ASIO4ALL - Universal ASIO Driver that can turn some of the low-level game friendly Windows audio interfaces (WDM streaming) into an ASIO driver, which is better than nothing. So if you’re going to start with your guitar going direct to the PC sound card, get this next.

You can think of these as distortion pedals turned up to 11. Usually, a fuzz pedal comes in as an accent for solos and intros, since its effect is so strong that it could overpower the rest of the band otherwise. You can hear an example of fuzz in the classic recording of Jimi Hendrix playing The Star-Spangled Banner at Woodstock. This is a good type of pedal to try out as an introduction to more powerful effects.


Description: Body: Maple - Flamed - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Brown
The Squier Vintage Modified Jaguar Bass has major “cool” factor, and the sound holds out, too. With a P-bass style single in the neck position, and a J-bass style single in the bridge position, you’ll actually get the best of both worlds in terms of tonal options on the pickups. You have a choice between basswood (on the sunburst and crimson models) and agathis (on the black model), so there isn’t anything special about the woods they’re using in these basses. But the slim, fast-action, C contour of the maple neck will give you a nice, smooth J-bass feel that plays well above this guitar’s pay grade.

But alongside Davy Graham and Jim Hall, the other musician I really wanted to remind you about was Martin Taylor. Astonishing technique – enough to make the shredders weep with envy, coupled with an exquisite feel for melodic line. Martin is one of the few guys (or gals) whose playing brings tears to my eyes regularly. When one of his albums gets into my CD player it stays there for weeks. In many ways, a natural successor to Django Reinhardt, truly a master of music as well as the guitar art and DR’s principal competitor for a top ten place in my list.
Ovation backed off from its more exotic design directions and in ’77 introduced two more conservative models, the Preacher and the Viper, and its first solidbody basses, the Magnum I and II. The Preacher featured two equal cutaways, whereas the Viper sported more of a Les-Paul-style single cutaway, though neither would never be confused with a Gibson equivalent. Their shape was, in fact, essentially a downsized version of the Ovation acoustic outline. The Magnum shape was derived from the earlier Breadwinner and Deacon, with more contouring.

You've Changed.  Yep, you still LOVE your guitar, but man, you are now playing through a sweeet pedal board and amp that has way more gain than you could ever use.  The days of plugging straight into a Twin Reverb and trying to bully her into distortion is (thankfully) long gone.  Plus, you're older and wiser now, you no longer judge a pickup's value simply in it's output level ... you have now acquired a taste for true tone.  You want rich complex harmonics and touch sensitivity.  Face it, those EMG's did what needed to be done in 1991, but it's time to move on! 
I wanna weigh in, I’m just an average player but having one of the best luthiers around and talking to them really gives you an idea of what quality your getting from a guitar. I play a martin DC 16gte, my singer plays a Chinese knock off Taylor. No one can tell the difference when he switched to the real genuine 314 CE Taylor (basically made the same way as the Chinese one), and we get no complaints about either guitar. Save your money, (buy quality) or buy the Chinese knock off and find it’s made the same and it will make you the same money playing and feel just as good in your hand as the 1000 dollar plus Taylor. Conclusions for Taylor or martin fans is don’t go name brand cause they (known or unknown) swear by them, is all personal preference, try everything in every price range find what’s right for you. My $750 DC 16gte Martin was right for me. My singer the 914ce Taylor Chinese knock off (327 bucks new) suits him better than his 1200 dollar original Taylor 314ce.
Have you ever looked at a guitar and wondered, "How do they make that?" Or thought to yourself, "I bet that I could build my own guitar," but never actually tried it? I have built several electric guitars over the years and through trial and error have learned many helpful tips that anyone who might want to tackle this sort of project needs to know before starting out. This kind of thing does require some wood working skill and also requires some specific tools as well but not all the fancy stuff that a guitar manufacture has. Building an electric guitar is time consuming and requires the completion of several steps before your project gets finished but be patient and you'll be happy with the results. I tend to go into detail so as not skip any steps or tips you need along the way, and use pics from other projects that I did as well so you can get more that on reference. If you set out to make a guitar you'll find that it takes quite a bit of time so you'll have time enough to go back and read other info if you just want to skim through the first go round. So I hope this helps all the future guitar builders out there!
The Venue has an adjustable gain feature designed for acoustics, which is compatible with both passive and active electronic systems. This is, of course, in addition to the five-band EQ we mentioned earlier. For feedback control there's a Garret Null Notch filter and a clipping light that will tell you when you're feeding back or when you need to cut down your output. Other perks include a full chromatic tuner and a boost button that gives you a nine decibel jump, ideal for solos or instrumentals.
The SG guitar kit while not as simple to assemble as an ST or TE (thanks to the pickguards or control plates being preloaded with electronics) is still a relatively straight forward guitar to assemble. This makes SG guitar kits a good option if this is your first building project and want to simply dip your toe in the water, to begin with before taking on something more challenging.
Nitrocellulose lacquer is prized as a coating by some guitarists as it is thinner than some other coatings, which some claim leads to a better sound (though we’re not going to wade into that argument here). It’s also easy to blend with paints, and easier to repair. It does have its downsides, however. The solvents used in the lacquer can be potentially damaging to the respiratory systems of workers applying the coating during the guitar’s manufacture, and for this reason other options were sought.

One master's name that kept being repeated by the guitar experts was Roger Crisler of Crisler Guitar Repair in Carrollton. He's been in the business of repairing guitars for almost 40 years. Some of the best guitarists in the DFW area turn to him when their guitar is sick: Chris Watson, Bnois King, Zach Weeks, Drew Adkins, Smokin' Joe Kubek, the list just continues to grow. He's trusted, and his work is respected. "When you love what you do, it doesn't feel like a job," he says.
One last note concerning the use of compression: Be careful. Compression occurs naturally in overdriven tube amplifiers, and overly-compressed clean settings or direct guitar tracks can sound harsh, with an exaggerated picking sound. We hope that having read this article, you'll approach the process of recording the electric guitar with a new insight and fresh ears, and wish you the best in your quest for the ultimate tone.
George Beauchamp was a vaudeville performer, violinist, and steel guitarist who, like most of his fellow acoustic guitarists in the pre-electric-guitar days of the 1920s, was searching for a way to make his instrument cut through an orchestra. He first conceived of a guitar fitted with a phonograph-like amplifying horn, and approached inventor and violin-maker John Dopyera to create a prototype which proved to be, by all accounts, a failure. Their next collaboration involved experiments with mounting three conical-shaped aluminum resonators into the body of the guitar beneath the bridge. These efforts produced an instrument which so pleased Beauchamp that he told Dopyera that they should go into business to manufacture them. After further refinements, Dopyera applied for a patent on the so-called tri-cone guitar on April 9, 1927. Thereafter, Dopyera and his brothers began to make the tri-cone guitars in their Los Angeles shop, calling the new guitars “Nationals”. On January 26, 1928, the National String Instrument Corporation was certified and, with its new factory located near a metal-stamping shop owned by Adolph Rickenbacher and staffed by some of the most experienced and competent craftsmen available, began to produce Spanish and Hawaiian style tri-cone guitars as well as four-string tenor guitars,mandolins and ukuleles.[3]

The Archtone acoustics were some of the most popular guitars ever produced by Harmony. While production totals are unavailable, we can safely say that tens of thousands of these instruments were manufactured. The Archtone had a non-cutaway body and was advertised as being constructed from hardwoods. These “hardwoods” were actually birch (grained to resemble mahogany and spruce) and maple (grained to look like rosewood) for the fretboard. The binding was actually painted on!
Delay is essentially echo, but it can be so much more when used well. The two most important knobs are “time” and “repeats”. Time will increase the length between repeats, and repeats will adjust how many echoes are heard. While it is tempting to max the repeats and enter space rock land, less can be more. Used gently you can get reverb or slap-back rockabilly sounds. With careful knob setting you can even create harmonies and loops like The Edge.
But older guitars are not always better than new guitars; they can have unreliable parts, or be difficult to maintain. A lot of these are upgraded to make great players grade instruments. Keeping the essence of the original vintage guitar, but adding a little of today's reliability. A great example is the 1960s Gibson Melody Maker; an all-mahogany set neck guitar with Brazilian rosewood fingerboard and beautiful nitrocellulose finish. Well-built by Gibson, in their Kalamazoo factory, but with very basic pickups, tuning keys and electronics. Upgraded examples are everywhere, and are exceptional value as players grade instruments. Then again some guitars, especially early Japanese and European models aimed at the student guitarists of the early 1960s are completely unplayable. Even the cheapest modern day guitars put these to shame. Before buying any vintage guitar it is a good idea to know exactly what you are buying!

Original Stratocasters were shipped with five springs anchoring the bridge flat against the body. Some players removed the backplate covering the bridge to remove two of the springs and adjust the claw screws to allow the bridge to ‘float,’ with the pull of the strings in one direction countering the pull of the springs in the opposite direction. In this floating position, players could move the bridge-mounted tremolo arm up or down to modulate the pitch of the notes being played. Jeff Beck and Ike Turner used the Strat’s floating tremolo extensively in their playing. However, other players, such as Eric Clapton and Ronnie Wood, disliked the floating bridge’s propensity to detune guitars and inhibited the bridge’s movement with a chunk of wood wedged between the bridge block and the inside cutout of the tremolo cavity and by increasing the tension on the tremolo springs. These procedures lock the bridge in a fixed position. Some Strats have a fixed bridge in place of the tremolo assembly; these are colloquially called “hard-tails.” Luthier Galeazzo Frudua has said the floating tremolos can have stable tuning through techniques specific to a floating bridge.[8] The Stratocaster features three single coil pickups, with the output originally selected by a 3-way switch. Guitarists soon discovered that by jamming the switch in between the 1st and 2nd position, both the bridge and middle pickups could be selected, and similarly, the middle and neck pickups could be selected between the 2nd and 3rd position.[9] This trick became widespread and Fender responded with the 5-way pickup selector (a standard feature since 1977), which allowed these tonal combinations and provided better switching stability.
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Every electric guitar has a series of electronics that give the guitar its unique sound. Fender guitars signature sound comes from their five-way switches and single coil pickups where as Gibson Les Pauls comes from their three way selectors, multiple tone knobs, and humbucker pickups. Many other aspects of electric guitars affect the tonal qualities of the instrument, but the electronics cannot be overlooked. In this article, I will talk about different electronics in electric guitars as well as some common repairs. For more information about electric guitar pickups, see the electric guitar pickup page.
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Beginners, take note! We’ve changed a few things in this article of beginner-friendly electric guitars, which included removing a few older models such as Squier’s Vintage Modified ’51 and the ESP LTD M100FM. We then added some new and popular models, such as the stripped-down Squier Affinity Jazzmaster HH, the super-cool Dean Vendetta XM, and the compact Jackson JS1X Dinky Minion. Also expanded the guide part of this article.
Some effects, such as flanger, wah-wah, and delay, are obvious to the ear. But others, such as compression, reverb, and even distortion, are core elements of your tone, so you might not always notice these as “effects.” But used artfully, or sometimes even just correctly, they can take you to tonal utopia. Even if your personal style doesn’t call for mind-altering sound, you can still improve your sound by using effects.
Most overdrive/distortion pedals can be used in two ways: a pedal can be used as a "boost" with an already overdriven amplifier to drive it further into saturation and "color" the tone, or it can be used with a completely clean amplifier to generate the whole overdrive/distortion effect. With care - and with appropriately chosen pedals - it is possible to "stack" multiple overdrive/distortion pedals together, allowing one pedal to act as a 'boost' for another.[44]
Post on February 14, 2013 in the RRF Forum:[12] “When John Hall so graciously let me have the license to build Rickenbacker Acoustics back in ’06, I brought a truck to RIC headquarters and loaded it up with all of the remaining wood for Rickenbacker acoustics, in order to free up some shop and storage space in Santa Ana. There was enough undamaged wood for about 40 guitars, and I’ve reached the end of the line with my RIC acoustic builds. I’ve decided to let my license to build Rickenbacker acoustics expire, effective February 1, 2013. All current orders will be built as agreed.
This is another 6 stringed electric guitar form the Givson brand. It is a right handed model and is wooden in color. It has a solid body of basswood and kneck of rosewood. It is provided with high quality cover and the best part is that the guitar is budget friendly. Prices range from around INR 7,100 depending on the prevalent market factors such as whether there are offers or discounts available. You can find more details regarding this model by clicking on the link below:
In the ever-changing world of jazz music, you shouldn’t be surprised to hear of some big changes to the jazz guitar market either! To reflect this we’ve tweaked our chart, removing a couple of models such as the Ibanez AF95FB and the D’Angelico EXL101, and adding five new six-strings. These comprise the faithfully reproduced Epiphone Masterbilt Zenith Classic and the thinbody LH-302T from The Loar. In the semi-hollow section, we added the Ibanez AM93AYS Artcore Expressionist and the beautiful Hagstrom Tremar Viking Deluxe, while the solid-body section saw the arrival of Fender’s Classic Player Jazzmaster Special.
While Line 6 is probably the best known high-volume preset modeling amp brand, Peavey isn’t far behind – and truly rivals the offerings of Line 6, both in quality and quantity. What’s especially intriguing about this particular amp is that it allows you to choose not just the amp models and a wealth of applicable effects, but that it gives you the power to choose the type of instrument you’re plugging into it – thusly shaping the rest of the options accordingly. Whether you play guitar, acoustic guitar, or bass, this amp can change it sound to suit the instrument. And that’s a lot more than other competitors’ amps have to offer. It also features a tap tempo, USB connectivity, a headphone jack, and more.
The taper of a potentiometer indicates how the output to input voltage ratio will change with respect to the shaft rotation. The two taper curves below are examples of the two most common guitar pot tapers as they would be seen on a manufacturer data sheet. The rotational travel refers to turning the potentiometer shaft clockwise from 0° to 300° as in the previous visual representation drawing.

According to Wikipedia, a grimoire is a magical text that instructs the user “…how to perform magical spells, charms and divination, and how to invoke supernatural entities…” In order to summon your own supernatural creations, this guitar-focused text compiles a vast selection of exercises that will help you connect patterns across the entire guitar neck.
These Gibson Les Paul Reissue guitars simply perform better than those made the year after or the year before. Gibson is aware of this and has been for quite some time. That's why they've decided to push out a series of Les Pauls which aimed to match the ones from 1959. Are they equally as good? Probably not since the old ones are legendary, but they're as close as you'll get for a brand new guitar.
Standard tuning but with the 6th string dropped one full step. Utilized by bands and/or artists: Radiohead, Avenged Sevenfold, Arrowmont, Kvelertak, Led Zeppelin on "Moby Dick", Jack White on the song "High Ball Stepper", Rage Against the Machine, Prayer for Cleansing, Lamb of God, Underoath, Evanescence, Silverchair, Muse, Skillet, Helmet, Soundgarden, Metallica on songs "All Nightmare Long" and "Just a Bullet Away", Rammstein, Fugazi in some songs, Tool in all their albums (except Prison Sex which is Drop B in standard variation Tuning and Parabol/Parabola which has E dropped to B and A dropped to E), C3 Church on their song Breathe, as well as numerous songs on older albums Stone Temple Pilots in some songs, Audioslave, Filter, Foo Fighters, Porcupine Tree, Incubus in some songs, Guns N' Roses on the title track and "Better" from Chinese Democracy (most of the rest of the album was in E♭ tuning), Black Veil Brides (on the song "Knives and Pens"), The Devil Wears Prada, Nirvana in some songs, Zakk Wylde in some of his projects, Quicksand, Alesana, Eyes Set to Kill, and The Beatles on "Dear Prudence", Iron Maiden on "If Eternity Should Fail", Jorma Kaukonen of Jefferson Airplane on Embryonic Journey from the Surrealistic Pillow album, All Time Low on the biggest part of their discography.
Phasers, also called phase shifters, duplicate the original waveform of a guitar’s output, and shift one wave out of phase with the other. They blend both waves together usually applying an oscillating circuit, resulting in the waves moving in and out of phase with each other creating spacey, “whooshing” effects. “Itchycoo Park” by the Small Faces was an early example of phase shifting in a recording. Eddie Van Halen and Queen’s Brian May often used phase effects in the 1970s and ‘80s.
What I really want is a pelham blue or mostly-bluish-but-a-little-teal gibson sg with an ebony fretboard. the fretboard is absolutely a deal breaker. i'll probably change the pickups to WRC's so stock pickups are unimportant. Could get a used Elliot Easton, but I'd have to buy it used, sight unseen, and the trem isn't really ideal for how I tend to play, so I was hoping there was someone out there who does this. I am kinda surprised that no one does. It's one of the most iconic designs in history, why no interest in BTOs?
Hold on now, this is my story, right? Anyways, realizing that I don’t use multiple amps live, and that I tend to stick with 1 basic amp sound, this was going to be easier than I thought. The amp sound I use is more of a Fender Twin sound with a little more mids, but not as much as say, a Deluxe. The gain is something I get from my pedals (like an 805 Overdrive and a Vapor Trail Analog Delay).  I didn’t need a device for live playing that replicated dozens of amps, cabs, and microphones. My setup is simple: Good pedals plugged into a simple modeler like the Tech 21 Fly Rig 5.  It is a simple amp modeler with reverb that I can even use as a full pedalboard if mine goes down. Getting use to IEMs with a well-mixed band took a little bit of doing, but after a few gigs, I had adjusted just fine. You can change your own balance of the band in your own ears, but it is sort of like listening to a CD and playing along with it. It is not much different than what I do at home, anyway, so once I got over the ‘hangup’ of not carrying my amp (my back thanks me), and not seeing my amp behind me, it made a lot of sense. We take 50% less gear now to gigs, and the recordings (and reviews) are much, much better. My ears don’t ring for 2 days after. I can still get glorious feedback (from my pickups hearing the PA sound), and all of the little tricks I do on guitar remain in tact. The pickups on my guitar still deliver the same sound. To my ears, it is easier to mix out front, and much, much easier to balance all of the instruments without all of the stage volume. We also have a lot more room onstage to move around. 
He revolutionized music by combining two different guitar styles who were begging to be played together, blues and country. It was through this courage and confidence that Berry was able to convey his slick attitude that made everyone stop and listen. Sadly, however, even though his lyrics and performances were positively received, the artist himself did not have as positive a reception. He was said to be quite hard to get along with… but that didn’t stop his band swinging along. A sign of complete trust in what they were achieving together.
Guitars vary by type. Some are designed for beginners, while others are customized for professional guitar players. Most of the major guitar brands are available in a variety of different styles, each designed to best suit a customers' specific playing needs. Ease and sound are certainly big factors to consider when choosing a new guitar. In general, heavy wood makes the tone rich and full--the weight and quality of the wood makes a big difference when choosing which guitar you should purchase. The type of music that you will be playing will also have an impact. While Fenders may be the best for rock and metal, an Ibanez may be more well suited for blues and jazz.
The sound blew away guitarists when units first popped up in guitar stores. If the dizzying harmonic swirl didn’t just make you puke, it really sent you tripping. Interestingly, many tired of it a lot quicker than they did the phaser’s subtler, less imposing “swoosh”, and consequently it’s difficult today to name a fraction as many great guitar tracks with flangers slapped all over them as with phasers. For the latter, we’ve got the Stones’s “Shattered” (or just about anything from Some Girls), the Clash’s “Lost in the Supermarket” from London Calling and loads from Sandinista, and heavier rockers from early Van Halen to recent Foo Fighters. In the flanging corner, we’ve got The Pat Travers Band’s “Boom Boom, Out Go The Lights” and… well, I’m sure there’s another somewhere. Okay, maybe the intro lick to Heart’s “Barracuda” redeems it some.
If you’ve been playing for a while, chances are pretty good that you’ve probably already built up a collection of four, five or 10 stomp boxes, which now leaves you with the question of how to hook them all up and use them in your rig. Or perhaps you’ve hooked everything up and wondered why you get howling feedback, excess white noise, hum or silence whenever you engage two or more pedals at once.
Technically the knobs are just the parts you turn when adjusting your volume or sound. When you remove the knobs however you are left with the pots (potentiometers) which are used for both volume and tone control. They look identical and almost are but there are differences in the way a volume pot and a tone pot is wired, which will make more sense by the end of this article.
Freshly Realeased from the JVG Vintage Vault..... Just serviced with fresh set up & cosmetic clean up remove grime etc, lube & adjust tuning gears, rehydrate the woods and polish out to the Beauty you see now...detailing & set up here at the JVG shop she's 100% ready NOW and a real rare style beauty too. She's a very clean example of a real Vintage guitar its over 35 years old and is a Japanese Vintage Acoustic guitar. She Plays like butta now! .

switches between each pickup, weather its 2 or more you've got one to switch between each of them. pointed up = neck pickup (suggested for solos and high pitched stuff) middle = both pointed down = bridge (suggested for metal or lead guitar) the fenders with a 5 way blade switch its all the way up = same way , solos up a bit = neck and middle pickup middle = all the pickups (this can vary between guitars) down a bit = middle and bridge down = the bridge by itself some guitars with two pickups have a 5 way blade which you hear 5 clicks , this isn't a broken guitar if its the case you got an awesome slightly new thing called a coiltap which makes say a les pauls neck pickup split the sound inside the pickup and giving you a more fender sounding pickup sound... very cool.
Amps. When I first plug into an unfamiliar amp, I’ll start by setting all the tone controls to noon, and slowly raise the volume to a comfortable level. If the amp has a master volume, I set it for a good listening level and sweep the gain knob to explore the amp’s overdrive capabilities. I then make small tone tweaks by sweeping each pot up and down and listen to the range they work in, and how they affect the sound from different points in front of the amp.
Now that you’ve learned how to purchase a guitar, how to play guitar chords, and the basics of playing a guitar, you’ll just need to maintain practice! Use the ChordBuddy device as long as you need to, removing tabs as you progress. You’ll be ready to perform for your family and friends in no time at all. When you see how easy it is to finally practice and play the guitar, you’re not going to want to give up! See how ChordBuddy works, and discover how beginners, teachers, senior citizens, people with arthritis, and those with disabilities can play the guitar. To contact us, click here or call 877-947-2641.
I don’t have a list of 10 top acoustic guitar brands, but I certainly think Martin would have a place on it, with a focus on their steel string instruments). Wechter may be the foremost manufacturer of resonator guitars. I’ve mentioned Gibson, and would like to add Breedlove as well. I’m quite certain that there are others equally worthy of an acoustic guitar list and I rather hope somebody more knowledgeable than I am will compile one.
Pre-delay on the reverb can help separate it out from the source sound. If your reverb has no controls for pre-delay, you can simulate this using a simple delay on an aux track before the reverb. Decay Settings: Choosing the most appropriate reverb treatment for a song can be surprisingly difficult, especially if you have hundreds of presets to choose from. So, instead of regarding reverb like the glue that holds the mix together, try adjusting its parameters (and in particular the decay time) while listening to the reverb return by itself. If the decay time is too long you'll hear a continuous mush of sound; if it's too short you'll scarcely hear it unless its level is turned right up. Somewhere in the middle you should find a setting that adds rhythmic interest to your song, without overpowering it, making the reverb work for its keep. This is also a useful technique when using several reverbs in a song, to make sure they complement each other. Martin Walker
The Mahogany body and neck with rosewood fretboard makes it a highly resonant and great sounding guitar whilst the dual Alnico Classic pickups with push pull coil tapping provide a world of tonality. A SlimTaper D Shape neck profile makes it comfortable for beginners to learn on, whilst pro players will enjoy the ergonomic design 2 hours into their set or rehearsal! Available in more finishes here.
Ibanez is a Japanese guitar company that started out making outstanding copies of classic guitars, and has gone on to be one of the most revered guitar builders in the world. This is one of the top brands of heavy rock, and Ibanez instruments are known for the thin, fast necks and outstanding build quality. They’ve also led the way when it comes to 7-string guitars.
G&L, owned by Leo Fender, is yet another brand producing quality guitars. (Of course, when it is owned by the same owner as that of Fender, one can expect the extent of quality of these guitars.) Many of the G&L guitars seem to relive the Fender classic designs with some improvisations in style. Thus, this brand can indeed be considered an excellent alternative to Fender. Instead, in many instances, you will find G&L outnumbering Fender.
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Look at the action. Action is the distance between the fingerboard and the string at any given time. Make sure you hear no buzzing from the guitar when playing a note at a normal weight. Try it at the 5, 10, 12, fret, etc. and listen for the 'buzz' of strings banging on the frets below it. If any guitar is like this, ask the music store (any good one will do this for you) to adjust the neck if you can try it out in playable condition. If they can adjust it for you, then there is no problem, it just needed adjustment.
Two easily overdriven cathode-bias 6V6 output tubes deliver a sweet, harmonically rich tone, and the 5Y3 tube rectifier has the sag required for dynamics and touch sensitivity. This holy grail of vintage combos has been used by Neil Young, Mike Campbell, Rich Robinson, Mark Knopfler, Billy Gibbons, and countless others. If you can’t afford the original, more-affordable reproductions are available from Victoria, Kendrick and Clark Amplification, to name a few.
Unlike many of the other pedals, which are designed to create dramatic or exciting effects, these units take care of the less glamorous (but still very important) jobs in creating your tone. Sound-conditioning effects are the ones that will give the finishing touches to your sound, making the difference between “amateur garage band” and “international touring guitarist.”
Lastly, there's Session mode. When you need to take a break from structured lessons or just want to shred for a while, enter this mode and play to your heart's content. Rocksmith 2014 will even provide you with a backup band: tell the game what instruments you want in your power trio or quartet and the AI will follow your lead on the drums, bass, keys or anything else in its arsenal. We highly recommend the kazoo.

When it comes to buying an electric guitar there are a lot of options available, and choosing one can be confusing. This guide will help you understand the basic differences in electric guitars so you can make an informed decision. And remember, we’re here to help with friendly Gear Heads available at 1-800-449-9128 who can guide you to the electric guitar that best meets your needs.
Schecter Guitar Research is a company that has really established themselves as one of the best guitar brands out there in recent years. Many of their guitars are focused on the heavy metal market, but players of any genre can find a Schecter that meets their needs. With superb craftsmanship and high-end appointments you’d expect to find on much more expensive guitars, they are also among the best values in the guitar world.
Solid Body Guitars: For those looking for a more versatile array of tones blended with the deepest number of volume options and full-blooded sustain, the electric solid body is the right machine. The differences between various types of solid body models are vast — even between an SG, the most popular model Gibson makes, and a Les Paul, Gibson’s six-string flagship. A wide variety of tone woods, including mahogany, maple, alder, spruce, maple and, commonly for the fretboard, rosewood and baked maple, are employed. They are extremely versatile instruments and have been spotted in the hands of players as wide-ranging as Les Paul and Zakk Wylde.
Thanks for your note, Ed. I try and be terribly clear that there’s no notion of 1 being higher than another. They’re simply completely different, and it’s a matter of preference what you wish. Nothing I’ve ever denote has gotten additional attention than this, thus despite it in all probability being futile, i’m getting to build redo of this with video likewise.
WOW! This thing is incredible. One of the nicest instruments we have ever played and we've had, played and sold a few hundred over the past 20 years! Can't say enough about this bass. It's a pre-owned Zon Legacy Elite series 5-string model featuring a beautiful book-matched solid Bubinga wood top over a solid Mahogany wood body. A solid graphite neck / fingerboard utilizing a sculpted body neck joint finishes off the basic construction of the instrument. Huge tone is delivered via 2 active Bartolini pickups that feature controls for volume, bass, midrange, treble and balance. This bass has had the electronics modified by Zon to move the midrange control from the access hole in the back cover to a matching pot located in the control section on the front of the bass. While at Zon to get the custom electronics installed,  the original owner had new frets and a new finish coat added. Figured as long as it was there "what the heck". Tuning is accomplished via the 5 German made Schaller tuning machines in the same gold plate finish as the solid cast bridge. The solid graphite neck features a full 2 octave neck with 24 frets and a 34" long scale. This bass is a dream to play! Just about as good as it gets. There's not a mark on it anywhere. It looks brand new! Rock solid and stays in tune. Set up perfectly! Includes original Zon Soft exterior hard shell case on black Cordura.
2. Pickup Setup: I'd like to see you add a section on this. Pickups should be lowered out of the way before any setup. If they're too high, the strings could hit them and cause buzzing. After everything all other setup steps are completed, the pickups should be raised to the proper position. One online video claiming to post Gibson specs says that the Low E should be 6/64" above the pickups, and that the High E should be 4/64".
The way that manufacturers state the wattage output of an amplifier can be confusing. Amplifier manufacturers may state that a combo bass amp produces 600 watts at 4 ohms and 300 watts at 8 ohms. If the speaker mounted in the combo amp is an 8 ohm speaker, then the combo by itself will only produce 300 watts. This combo amplifier will only put out 600 watts if an "extension speaker cabinet" is plugged into the combo amp with a speaker cable. Plugging a second 8 ohm cabinet in parallel wiring with the combo amp's internal 8 ohm speaker will lower the amp's impedance (electrical resistance or "load") to 4 ohms; at this point the amp will put out 600 watts. Another factor that can make it difficult for bassists to select a bass amp is that different manufacturers may state their amps wattage in Root Mean Squared (or "RMS") and in "peak power". For example, a bass amp ad may state that it produces 500 watts RMS and 1000 watts "peak power". The RMS figure is much more important than the peak power wattage.
There are separate chord-forms for chords having their root note on the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth strings. For a six-string guitar in standard tuning, it may be necessary to drop or omit one or more tones from the chord; this is typically the root or fifth. The layout of notes on the fretboard in standard tuning often forces guitarists to permute the tonal order of notes in a chord.
Immediately you can see that this unit is on the larger side, measuring 25 inches (63.5 cm) across, and weighing about 11 lbs (5 kg). If you’re concerned about portability, we noticed one of the most purchased items together with the HD500X is this case, which comes highly recommended and will keep your multi-effects pedal safe during transit and storage. The Line 6 POD HD500X itself has superb build quality. It has a very nice metal chassis, and heavy duty construction. The build quality probably doesn't get much better than this in a multi-fx unit (we say it is a step above the Zoom G3X). We won’t spend a ton of time talking about the inputs/outputs and controls available on the Line 6 POD HD500X, since you can very easily discern that from photos of it. We will say that of all the multi-effects pedals on our top 5 list, this is the most robust. The inputs/outputs cover above and beyond what you probably need. You’ve got your basic inputs and outputs, USB 2.0 so you can use it as a USB interface and for DAW integration, MIDI in/out/thru, FX send and return, AUX input, balanced XLR outputs, integrated mic preamp, and more. In short, however you want to integrate the HD500X into your bedroom, music studio, or live setup, there’s a very good chance you’re covered.
Ibanez Mikro GIO Electric Guitar in Black w/ Bag. The guitar is in good working condition does have few marks and one nick. Does not include stand just used to take pictures. Includes guitar strap and Ibanez bag. Please contact me if you have any problems with your purchased item and I would be Happy work with you to help make your Transaction a Pleasant Experience.           Please check photos carefully and use the enlarging tool. Some photos are taken with a flash and may cause the image to appear darker in some areas. Photos are an important part of the description and the condition of each item.Thanks for Looking!!           Also please verify the correct shipping address before bidding. Payment is expected within 48 hours.    

Rickenbacker: From making world’s first electric guitar to making the most iconic guitars of Rock’n Roll, Rickenbacker has a history of innovations in guitar industry. Their guitars are still made in the old way. Owning a Rickenbacker is pretty much like owning a classic muscle car, yes there may be more modern guitars out there but no one’s got the mojo of a Rickenbacker.
Cool guitar! And you’re right— most Harmony guitars aren’t worth much, or in other words, they aren’t very collectible. That said, I wonder how many guitarists reading this column started out learning to play on a Harmony. There are hundreds of thousands of Harmony guitars out there, and though these are mostly entry-level instruments, they’re very much a part of guitar history.

So you decided to play electric guitar. Once you get a guitar and an amp, the next step is to explore effects. Effects pedals can be separated into groups based on their functions. Understanding the different pedal groups is the key to getting the best sound when chaining them together. The largest pedal group is probably overdrives and distortions, and BOSS currently makes 16 different pedals in this category. For our example pedal board, we’ll pick the ST-2 Power Stack. Another category with many choices is modulation.These are effects like flanger, phaser, chorus, tremolo, and others. Let’s use the most versatile of these—the BF-3 Flanger. Another group is ambience effects, such as delays and reverbs. We’ll use one of each: a DD-7 Digital Delay and the FRV-1 ’63 Fender Reverb. There are some pedal effects that can add notes or alter the pitch of what you’re playing. For want of a more esoteric name, we’ll call these “pitch-altering” pedals. From this category, let’s throw in a BOSS OC-3 Octave. BOSS also has a few pedals that make your instrument sound like some other instrument. The AC-3 Acoustic Simulator will do the job. Some effects change your sound with filtering. This effect type can be used in different places in the signal path, so we’ll use the GE-7 Graphic EQ. A few BOSS effects defy categorization, but are nevertheless very useful in any signal path. The most common of these is the CS-3 Compression/Sustainer. Loopers fall into this category also, so let’s add an RC-3 Loop Station to the mix. And you might want the NS-2 Noise Suppressor to kill the noise in your rig, so let’s add that in, too. What about a tuner? The TU-3 is the most popular pedal tuner in the world.
Replacing switch and jack covers. These are the plastic or metal covers that hold the jack and tells you witch switch is treble or rhythm. The switch cannot be repaired and will need to be replaced, however, a metal jack plate can never break and only will need to be cleaned. A plastic plate will need to be replaced or the screw holes need to be resized, do so properly and make sure every fastener is snug including screws and nuts.

A few guitars feature stereo output, such as Rickenbacker guitars equipped with Rick-O-Sound. There are a variety of ways the "stereo" effect may be implemented. Commonly, but not exclusively, stereo guitars route the neck and bridge pickups to separate output buses on the guitar. A stereo cable then routes each pickup to its own signal chain or amplifier. For these applications, the most popular connector is a high-impedance 1⁄4 inch (6.35 mm) plug with a tip, ring and sleeve configuration, also known as a TRS phone connector. Some studio instruments, notably certain Gibson Les Paul models, incorporate a low-impedance three-pin XLR connector for balanced audio. Many exotic arrangements and connectors exist that support features such as midi and hexaphonic pickups.
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