So where do you start in a section as massive as this one? From acoustic to electric, nylon to steel stringed, hollow body to solid body, all styles are represented here, so having a good idea of what you're looking for will definitely help. The best place to start is usually with the brand, as each one has a reputation for something different, allowing you to narrow things down from there. For example, you'll instantly recognize names like Fender, Gibson and Ibanez as trailblazers of the electric guitar, while others like Martin, Taylor, and Breedlove are more famous for the unparalleled quality of their acoustic instruments. After that, you'll want to look at things like body type, tonewood, strings, size, orientation and performance level. Once you have a general idea about each of these, your decision gets that much easier. Just remember, it all comes down to personal preference, so as long as you're happy with the guitar you choose you can't go wrong. The guitar is a special instrument, with a different meaning to every player. Whether you're taking your first steps into the world of music or you're a professional rocking out in front of sold out stadiums all over the planet, strumming, plucking and picking on a guitar is a way to express yourself that can't be duplicated with anything else. So pick up a guitar here and start playing... you'll be glad you did.

I just noticed that no-one has mentioned Robben Ford – another master of both technique and taste and a certain contender for my top ten list, fighting for a place in the same space as Larry Carlton and John Scofield. (John Mayer can certainly play, but for me, any of those three offers at least as much technique, and a wider range of accomplishments, than JM – check out their various versions of “I don’t need no doctor”).
The same bracing system and pickups in chrome covers are also included within the Vintage Reissue Series, with individual volume and tone controls, and a 3-way bat-style selector switch. Hardware includes individual chromed saddle-style mounted bridge with height adjustments, and a chrome trapeze tailpiece. The one-piece, Canadian maple set neck features a 20 fret, bound rosewood fingerboard, with pearloid block position markers.

We consider the finest tonewoods to be those with superior projection and sustain, and without weak or bright spots within the tonal range. Many of the wood species from the US Pacific NW meet this criteria, and more. Some were well known by luthiers, but others, like Myrtlewood, Claro, Franquette & Bastogne Walnut, Port Orford Cedar, Redwood, Pistachio, Olive, Osage Orange and Douglas Fir are just now gaining notoriety.


The DI approach most likely to capture the spirit of the original sound is to take a DI feed from the speaker output of a conventional guitar amplifier and feed this into the type of speaker simulator that also includes a dummy load to keep the amplifier happy (valve amplifiers can be damaged by running them into an open circuit). Emulators with a built-in load are generally very much larger than the regular DI box-size emulator-only products. Some of the emulator-only devices can be run from a speaker output, but you still need to plug in either a separate dummy load (usually an 8Ω resistor rated at over 100 Watts on a heat sink) or the original speaker to protect the amplifier from possible damage. Apart from the dummy load, which is passive, the circuitry may either be passive or active.

The EM-18 came with either a pair of Mighty Mite humbuckers or a pair of DiMarzios. It was otherwise the same as the E-18 with the addition of a three-way mini-toggle coil selector switch which allowed a choice of both or either coil on the lead pickup. This arrangement allowed for a rather remarkable variety of tones, by the way. EM-18 production began in 1979 and some 1,375 were made until the guitar ended in February 1982.


Description: Body: Alder - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 6 - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Fulcrum Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Duncan Designed - Pickup Configuration: S-S-S - String Instrument Finish: Transparent Colors


"Like any music technology, it's just a tool to help someone express their creativity. The gear never makes the player, but there's a purpose to it in certain playing situations and that's all good. As long as some guys are not hiding the truth of their playing behind it. A good player's a good player, and they usually sound good on an acoustic guitar simply because because they can actually play the damn thing.

A volume pedal is ideal for those guitarists out there who like to use volume swells or fade-ins, and those who don’t want to have to use the volume pot on their guitar to do so! All you do is apply pressure on the front or back of the pedal to get the desired effect and you’re good to go! They’re super simple to use and only change the signal rather than the tone of your guitar or bass.
Little-known manufacturer from Osaka, Japan, this company is responsible for the oddly named John Bennet badge. Nakai has been mentioned as a possible Matusmoto Musical Instruments Association member in the past. The company still exists and is producing musical instruments, quite a feat in light of so many manufacturers who faded after the golden electric guitar age.
What we're looking at here is a standard Les Paul body made of mahogany and finished with an attractive vintage sunburst pattern. There's also a gorgeous heritage cherry sunburst and a straight ebony finish option as well. It features a pair of 700T humbuckers, one at the bridge and one at the neck position. These are pretty basic in nature, but their performance is more than good enough even for more experienced players and important recordings.


We’re bookending this article with two Epiphone guitars. Why? Because Les Paul was the man. And G-400 Pro was actually a successor Les Paul model from ’61 to ’68, making this guitar a true icon of rock, power, and endless sustain. With a mahogany neck and rosewood fretboard, this guitar has the looks and, with Alnico Classic Pro humbucking pickups, the tonal quality is excellent. 


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He revolutionized music by combining two different guitar styles who were begging to be played together, blues and country. It was through this courage and confidence that Berry was able to convey his slick attitude that made everyone stop and listen. Sadly, however, even though his lyrics and performances were positively received, the artist himself did not have as positive a reception. He was said to be quite hard to get along with… but that didn’t stop his band swinging along. A sign of complete trust in what they were achieving together.
Yamaha is considered as among largest music instruments selling company in India, which provides a wide variety of guitars. S series, Yamaha RGX, RGZ electronic series, SG series (SG 5,SG 7) etc are the best models of guitar. Now they become the world’s largest manufacturer of a full line of musical instruments. They earned good name by providing super quality guitar at an affordable price. Available price is Rs. 8,000/- onwards (approx).
Hum cancelling: hum cancellation is caused by reverse polarity, reverse winding keeps a revrse polarity pickup in phase with a non reverse polarity pickup. To reverse the direction of the winding, simply swap wires, using hot as the ground and ground as the hot. Polarity can be changed on many pickups. If the pickup has bar magnets, simply flip them over. If the pickup uses alnico polepiece AND has the new plastic bobbins such as is common on Fenders, the polepieces can be pushed out with a screwdriver and reinserted "upside down". If the bobbin is fiber DO NOT attempt to flip the polepieces; the wire is wrapped directly around the polepieces and will almost certainly be damaged.
InstantDrummer provides tempo-sycronized drum loop sessions that can be accessed easily from within RiffWorks guitar recording software. Most RiffWorks InstantDrummer Sessions are loop recordings of professional drummers brought into the InstantDrummer format for easy manipulation by RiffWorks users. Play along with InstantDrummer sessions by famous drummers like Alan White (Yes, Lennon), Jason McGerr (Death Cab for Cutie), John Tempesta (Rob Zombie, Exodus, Testament, Tony Iommi, The Cult), Lonnie Wilson (Brooks and Dunn, Faith Hill, Tim McGraw), and Matt Sorum (Guns N Roses, Velvet Revolver). Use them in your recordings royalty free!
Like a door that's repeatedly opened and closed, you'll sometimes need some basic maintenance. Ensure everything is tight, and get some electronic contact cleaner (available at any electronics store), various screwdrivers and wrenches and you can often solve your own problems. It's easier on a Gibson Les Paul (with backplate access to the controls) than on a Gibson ES-335, but it can be done.
© Frank Meyers and Drowning in Guitars, 2012-2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Frank Meyers and Drowning in Guitars with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
The Yamaha APXT2 is a 3/4 size version of the world's best-selling acoustic-electric guitar, the APX500III. This well-constructed, compact guitar makes a great companion when you're on the road. The APXT2 features an ART-based pickup system and Yamaha's proprietary tuner, offering great sensitivity and accuracy for quick tuning. The APX T2 also includes a gig bag.
here is an example of why an acoustic reigns supreme for practical reasons. Last week, I had to get new tires on the truck. Knew I had a couple hours to kill while there. the Discount Tire was on the way to my guitar teacher… in a big way (an hour drive up to Denver for guitar lessons, the Discount was half way there). So, I brought my acoustic in to Discount and played for a couple hours in the waiting room. People loved it, and were shouting out requests and stuff.

Effects and effects units—stompboxes in particular—have been celebrated by pop and rock musicians in album titles, songs and band names. The Big Muff, a fuzzbox manufactured by Electro-Harmonix,[49] is commemorated by the Depeche Mode song "Big Muff" and the Mudhoney EP Superfuzz Bigmuff. Nine Inch Nails, Pink Floyd, George Harrison, They Might Be Giants and Joy Division are among the many musicians who have referenced effects units in their music.[50]


I'm actually the designer of this devices and I myself had bought all the software in Apple. I'm really a big fan of JamUp, Bias, and Ampkit. Personally I like all the functions provided by JamUp such as JAM, LOOP, 8-track recording as well as the guitar effects and amps. But the Amps in Bias is a litte more juicy than in JamUp. A good way is using Bias amps in JamUp which just make a good combination of the two software. They can be used in that way :)


How are acoustic guitars and electric guitars different? Several ways. Most notably, acoustics don’t need to be plugged in to be heard. Acoustic guitars are generally larger and have a hollow sound chamber. This sound chamber "magnifies" the resonance of the guitar’s wooden top and body as you pluck or strum the strings. The bridge helps transmit the strings’ vibrations to the body.

This comprehensive set contains the most detailed version of the Yamaha C5 Grand plus a full compliment of performance sounds to cover all your needs from pads, strings, EPs, orchestra, synth, organs, guitars and many other instruments. At 971mb in size (with 592mb dedicated to one outstanding piano with five brightness levels to choose from)  it is designed for the fussy pianist who also wants a full bank of sounds at their fingertips.
In the ever-changing world of jazz music, you shouldn’t be surprised to hear of some big changes to the jazz guitar market either! To reflect this we’ve tweaked our chart, removing a couple of models such as the Ibanez AF95FB and the D’Angelico EXL101, and adding five new six-strings. These comprise the faithfully reproduced Epiphone Masterbilt Zenith Classic and the thinbody LH-302T from The Loar. In the semi-hollow section, we added the Ibanez AM93AYS Artcore Expressionist and the beautiful Hagstrom Tremar Viking Deluxe, while the solid-body section saw the arrival of Fender’s Classic Player Jazzmaster Special.



While there’s still 9 more guitars to talk about on this list, you really can’t go wrong with stopping here, at the Les Paul Standard. This guitar is one of the most sought-after electrics in its price range. If you’ve ever played a Les Paul Epiphone before, you know what we’re talking about. Besides being a legendary guitar invented by the artist, inventor, and guitarist, Les Paul, this guitar also has what it takes to be legit, such as ProBucker-2™ and ProBucker-3™ pickups with coil-tapping. You can find this guitar for literally one dollar under $500 at most stores. 



Fingerboards vary as much as necks. The fingerboard surface usually has a cross-sectional radius that is optimized to accommodate finger movement for different playing techniques. Fingerboard radius typically ranges from nearly flat (a very large radius) to radically arched (a small radius). The vintage Fender Telecaster, for example, has a typical small radius of approximately 7.25 inches (18.4 cm). Some manufacturers have experimented with fret profile and material, fret layout, number of frets, and modifications of the fingerboard surface for various reasons. Some innovations were intended to improve playability by ergonomic means, such as Warmoth Guitars' compound radius fingerboard. Scalloped fingerboards added enhanced microtonality during fast legato runs. Fanned frets intend to provide each string with an optimal playing tension and enhanced musicality. Some guitars have no frets—and others, like the Gittler guitar, have no neck in the traditional sense.

One of the more common questions beginners have is why even bother with reverb pedals when most modern amps have a built-in version of this effect? To be honest, if you have a vintage tube amp with an actual spring reverb inside, there really isn’t a good reason to go with a pedal. However, most don’t. The thing that makes reverb pedals a much better solution in most cases is that you get a level of quality that can be used on stage.


Schecter Guitar Research is a company that has really established themselves as one of the best guitar brands out there in recent years. Many of their guitars are focused on the heavy metal market, but players of any genre can find a Schecter that meets their needs. With superb craftsmanship and high-end appointments you’d expect to find on much more expensive guitars, they are also among the best values in the guitar world.
String sage Ernie Ball reckons it’s made some of the world’s strongest strings with the Paradigm set, which promises longer string life while retaining the company’s iconic Slinky tone and feel. Ultra-high strength steel can be found in the wound and plain strings, plus reinforcement at the ball end, enabling them to lock in tune fast and hold up to aggressive styles. There’s even plasma-enhanced wrap wire for increased corrosion resistance, too.
To start off our list (albeit rather difficult to choose a specific guitar first), let’s take a look at the Fender Telecaster, a high-quality electric guitar for the musician out there who is looking to improve their amateur status to accomplished guitarist. With the clear tone and quality range that the Fender brand is known to famously provide, the Telecaster is equipped with shielded body cavities meant to limit reverberation and focus in on the individual notes. The dual single-coil pickups allow the musician to vary between sharp tones and strong treble, providing a unique sound to fit various genres of interest. The flat surface of the of the fingerboard makes it easy to switch between notes and chords, while the alder wood used for the body of the guitar provides and even and bright sound. With a ‘C’ shaped design meant for comfort for long wear use, the Fender Telecaster is one of the best electric guitars for the money. The sound? Very classic, biting, and clear. You’ll have to hear for yourself in this Telecaster video, since we can’t really find adjectives to truly portray this beauty.
Another relatively drastic but easy and cheap way to hot-rod your guitar’s sound with its current components is to alter how and where its volume and tone pots are connected to each other. The difference can be subtle—and it’s more a matter of preference than what’s “correct”—but it can make the difference between a guitar that is just OK and one that really is a joy to play.
Original plate reverbs were mechanical in nature. There was a literal plate inside the amplifier, which would transform input signal into vibration. Then you would have a pickup located somewhere near the plate, that recorded those vibrations. Today, such a contraption comes across as relatively crude, but many still love the unique mechanical sound it produces. Spring reverb uses a pretty much exact same principle, only this time you have a spring in there instead of a plate. The biggest improvement a spring reverb offers is reduction in both weight and size of the device.
In January 2017, Vox introduced the MV50 amp head and amp sets. Described by Vox as a hybrid amp, the amp heads are called the MV50 AC, the MV50 Clean, and the MV50 Rock. When paired with the BC108 cabinet, each is then described as the MV50 AC set, the MV50 Clean set, and the MV50 Rock set respectively. Vox states the MV50 AC is designed to provide the sound of a VOX AC30, and that the MV50 Clean is designed to provide clean tones with a lot of headroom as inspired by the sound of American amplifiers. Vox states the MV50 Rock is designed to provide the more aggressive high gain sound of vintage British amps. In January 2018, Vox announced two new MV50 amp heads: the MV50 Boutique and the MV50 High Gain.
More theory: tone knobs are basically adjustable resistors with certain values. The higher the value of your potentionmeter (hence “pots”), the more treble you allow to pass. This is why Fender guitars with their bright single coil pickups have 250K pots, while Gibsons with humbuckers have 300K to 500K pots. Some guitarists emply 1000K pots for maximum treble, and some make pots that when maxed out, make it seem to the circuit that it is not present, allowing all frequencies to pass through.
I have made over a hundred solid body electric guitars by hand. I can use the same pickup in a plexiglas, or a wood body, utilizing a wood neck, plugged directly into a tube amp, and they do sound different. There is no way anyone can deny me my personal experience on this. I think whats going on here is the new 3D printer body's that are being pushed for their capability of unusual designs. Nothing wrong there, as i have some of my own designs i am going to try as well. I have a contact that makes aluminum guitars, and they also produce a different sound.

It depends on what you call important. Does an electric guitar's tonewood affect the tone? No. Sorry. When the thing capturing the sound is directly under the thing generating the sound and, it makes no sense for the wood, which vibrates in a secondary fashion, to have any effect on a tone that has already left the guitar. Think of it in layers, like this:

Ovation guitars have a history of innovative design, reflecting its founder’s engineering training and development of Kaman helicopters. Ovation guitars have composite synthetic bowls; earlier acoustic guitars have had wooden sides abutting a flat back since the 1700s. Kaman diagnosed structural weaknesses in the orthogonal joining of the sides, and felt that a composite material could be used for a smooth designed body. Ovation’s parabolic bowls dramatically reduced feed-back, allowing greater amplification of acoustic guitars. Improved synthetics used techniques from helicopter engineering to control vibrations in the bowl. Ovation has developed a thin neck, with the feel of an electric-guitar’s neck, but with additional strength from layers of mahogany and maple reinforced by a steel rod in an aluminum channel.[1] The composite materials and thin necks reduced the weight of Ovations.


I've been an on/off guitar player for at least 15 years now. Never really good, but steadily improving. My hardest thing is consistent motivation. I go through spurts where I study theory and practice like crazy and then, suddenly I just stop. I got this both because I was exceited about it's teaching potential (lessions were $20/30 min when I was a kid, got this for $25) and it has got me playing again and is a lot of fun.
Except for the Epiphone Les Paul Express’s total domination of the mini guitar category, there was no clear leader among the guitars, and our picks are the guitars that got the best average ratings. Our testers found lots to like in many of the guitars we tried, and you may find an axe you like better in our competition section below, where we include comments on all the guitars we tested.
There are lot of great amp out there, but there are overpriced. Peavey prove they can do almost as great as other for a really more decent price. Moreover, they have great features and technical improvement that the "classic" manufactureres avoid to be focus on vintage sound and their reputation... The bandit 112 is a bargain. The valveking series was great budget valve amp for metal. Classic 30 and 6505 are interesting too. Vypr series was also great but it seems their recent series have issues... Anyway they build great amp and doesn't scam people as others do... check it out!
This is the point where the neck meets the body. In the traditional Spanish neck joint the neck and block are one piece with the sides inserted into slots cut in the block. Other necks are built separately and joined to the body either with a dovetail joint, mortise or flush joint. These joints are usually glued and can be reinforced with mechanical fasteners. Recently many manufacturers use bolt on fasteners. Bolt on neck joints were once associated only with less expensive instruments but now some top manufacturers and hand builders are using variations of this method. Some people believed that the Spanish style one piece neck/block and glued dovetail necks have better sustain, but testing has failed to confirm this. While most traditional Spanish style builders use the one piece neck/heel block, Fleta, a prominent Spanish builder, used a dovetail joint due to the influence of his early training in violin making. One reason for the introduction of the mechanical joints was to make it easier to repair necks. This is more of a problem with steel string guitars than with nylon strings, which have about half the string tension. This is why nylon string guitars often don't include a truss rod either.
Also remember pedals change in sound character with different guitars/pickups/amps so it’s worth experimenting before buying. If you’re not sure where to start try a few ‘classics’ as a reference point. Ibanez’ Tube Screamer or one of it’s imitators of which there are many, are mild overdrives that also usefully liven up cheaper amps, particularly when volumes need to be kept low.
From 1986-1989, “Made in China” Squier Stratocasters carry the “Affinity” decal on the smaller ball of the headstock and have serial numbers as NCXXXX with the first number the year of manufacture, e.g. NC6XXX (Made in China 1986). NCXXXX is also used for Squier Strat Bullets of the same vintage. The Affinities are practically the same as the Japanese-made Squier Bullets of the mid-’80s; the same alder bodies, same rosewood-type fretboard and maple necks. Tuners and electronics are also very similar – not the best but distinctive in sound. Common modifications are more stable tuners, larger potentiometers, better capacitors, and pickups. They had single-ply 8-hole pick guards like the ’50s Fender Strats giving them a classic look. Colors were typically black, white and red.
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Pedalboards are just plain fun. You can mix and match any number of little boxes and really personalize your tone. We are living in the golden age of guitar pedals right now with such a huge variety of effects out there. The majority of effects fit into one of the following categories: gain (overdrive, fuzz, distortion, compression, clean boosts), filter (wahs, auto-wahs, envelope followers), and time-based (delay, reverb, chorus, flange, phase). 

Practical - These sessions will involve exercising your fingers. For example, fingering chords would fall under this category, as the focus will be on getting physically comfortable with positioning and changing between chords, or experimenting with new strumming patterns. With lead guitar, the physical side covers techniques such as legato (you'll learn what that means soon enough!), string bends, speed drills and anything that involves the physical side of playing guitar.
Fretsizes can be confusing.  They are small measurements but have a big impact on feel and the size designations can vary.  Its best in my opinion to think and talk of frets in their actual crown widths and heights rather than the old Dunlop numbers (the originator of the 6xxx numbering system) as they can mean different things to different people; i.e. Warmoth lists 6105 as .095-.047" while USACG has is at .090-.055" - these are two very different feeling fretsizes. 

The Yamaha Pacifica has long proved a benchmark for quality and specification, and the 112V remains one of the best guitars for beginners. The 112 is far from fancy and simply concentrates on the bare necessities. Yet the construction is of excellent quality. Trust us, if looked after this will be a guitar for life. By design it's an altogether more modern, brighter and lighter take on a hot-rod Strat. But when we say brighter that doesn't mean overly shrill. In fact the bridge humbucker will surprise some, it's beefy without being too mid-range heavy and although the coil-split proves a little bland played clean, with a distortion boost it's a pretty useful gnarly and wiry rhythm voice. It's good to have the choice too when mixed with the middle pickup - switching between the full and split coil here is subtle but, especially with cleaner 'class A' amp voicings, there's enough character difference to be useable. The solo single-coils impress - plenty of percussion and with a little mid-range beef added from the amp these get you to the correct Texas toneland. Neck and middle combined produces a fine modern Strat-like mix - the added brightness will cut through a multi-FX patch nicely.
THe 3 way switches is normally placed on the guitar with 2 pick up. For easy reference the Gibson Lespaul, that has 2 humbucker or soapbar type pickups. 1 near the bridge and one near to the neck. As it has 3 way switches it has 3 types of selection. 1st toggle normally for the bridge pickup, 2nd toggle is for the neck and bridge pickup. the 3rd toggle is for the neck pickup
Ibanez is the pioneer to launch the first 7-stringed guitar. They are the creators of the 7-stringed instrument in 1990 with the collaboration universe. Most Ibanez guitars come with a full-size frigate shape having a top of laminated select dapper. Ibanez guitars have mahogany neck, back, and sides, along with 20 frets on a rosewood fretboard. The Ibanez-branded headstock came with attractive quality and closed chrome die-cast tuners. These all features make the Ibanez guitars suitable for every kind of style and genre of music. However, heavy music is mainly the field where metal crowd flock and let the Ibanez guitars unbeatable.
The strings on your electric guitar have a major impact on its sound and playability. If you’ve taken a look at the huge Musician’s Friend guitar string assortment, you’ve likely realized that there’s a lot to consider in figuring out which strings are right for you and your instrument. Keep reading to find the strings that best match your electric guitar, music, and playing style.
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With the new Shreddage 2X update released in July 2014, S2 is better than ever. Enjoy a brand-new user interface and totally rewritten engine, with intelligent string / fret selection, new features and options, even more customizable mapping, and new samples like powerchord slides and staccatos. You can also use new built-in effects pedals and save/load your own custom presets to use across multiple projects.
The SS-4L was almost identical in electronics and other appointments to the SD, with the main differences being in body shape, vibrato and pickups. The body was more like a Strat, except the entire lower horn was lopped off and slanted toward the lower bout. Very, very… well, this is one of those ideas that’s so ugly it becomes beautiful! This had a new, very nifty vibrato system, one of the coolest the Japanese ever produced. This consisted of a plate or platform resting on springs, sitting above the top of the guitar. This then had a metal block with several holes along the treble side, into which the arm was inserted and secured with a thumbwheel screw. The SS-4L had two-tone metal-covered pickups with six poles along the rear edge, two half-slots exposing a gold insert in the center and six holes showing the insert along the front edge. These “two-tones” would become a mainstay of many early ’60s Teiscos.
Beginners want to hear the changes in their sound and get the blues, funk, and rock genres on their guitar. The DigiTech Element XP comprises essential features that enable a beginner guitarist to get more out of their guitar while still maintaining quality. These units also have durable metal foot-switches and an inclusive power supply. Other features include:
Here you will find a list of beginner guitar chords. These chords are very commonly used through many popular songs and so learning them is a great foundation for your guitar future. With the chords below you will be able to play thousands of songs, including most of your favourites. And once you have learnt these chords and the changes between them you will find it very easy to learn new chords and add them to your repertoire.

We think this entry-level multi effects pedal is a perfect fit for beginner guitarists due to the simple layout and the fact you have three extremely useful effects at your disposal. You have individual overdrive, distortion and delay effects circuits as well as a built-in, footswitch activated tuner within this budget friendly multi effects pedal – basically all your bread-and-butter effects that will allow you to sculpt some seriously great sounds.
I remember the first time I saw Eddie Van Halen on MTV, the way he played two hands on the fingerboard during his short “Jump” guitar solo. I loved his cool “Frankenstein” guitar, so named because he cobbled together a variety of guitar parts and decorated his creation with colored tape and paint. Even as a 13-year-old who grew up primarily listening to, and playing, classical music, I felt compelled to run out and buy his band’s “1984” LP at my local Tower Records store.
The brand continued to release new models through the sixties, seventies and eighties (namely, the RGX Series). Then, in 1990, Yamaha launched the incredibly successful Pacifica range, which combined versatility, reliability and great tone in an affordable package. It was pounced on by beginners who didn’t feel the need to splash out on a Fender. Needless to say, the Pacifica Series is still going strong in 2018.
The aim of Audio Issues is to help interested newcomers get started in the world of audio production with easy to use practical audio production tips for beginners and advanced. If you are just starting out doing some home recording or have been engineering for a while, these quick and easy audio tips are guaranteed to be of interest and use to you.
And finally, it is always a good idea to have your amp set on with clean settings in order to get a clear image of the sound of your effects chain. Hitting the distortion on the amp, for example, will distort EVERYTHING in your chain, so it’s best to leave the distorting to your pedal where it can be better contained. But in the end, experiment! While these are merely a few suggestions of the general way a signal chain works, you are only limited by your creative implementation.

This is an absolutely stunning OM acoustic in MINT/As New Condition. This has been in my personal collection for a few years. In the words of Bill Kraus, the builder: An OM model in my favorite combination of woods: Red spruce top, Honduran rosewood back and sides, curly Koa bindings. I first heard about Bill Kraus from my good friend, Scott Freilich of Top Shelf Music in Buffalo, NY. Scott has been a factory authorized Martin repair center since 1979 and has seen the finest 6 figure pre-war Martins. Scott was raving about Bill Kraus, his knowledge of tonewoods, and the insane quality of his guitars. I also learned that Stan Jay of Mandolin Bros. was equally impressed with Kraus Guitars and had started carrying Bill’s guitars in his store. Every Kraus guitar at Mandolin Bros. has sold!
The Ampeg Bassamp Company, founded in 1949 by Everett Hull, responded to the growing demand for electric bass equipment by producing a line of bass amplifiers. Ampeg bass amps were widely used by electric bass guitarists in the 1950s and 1960s. The first bass amplifier offered by Ampeg was an 18-watt model with a single 12" speaker and a rear ventilation port called the Super 800. In 1951, they introduced a 20-watt version with a 15-inch speaker. In 1960, they introduced the B-15 Portaflex, a flip-top 25-watt tube bass amplifier with a single 15" speaker. While the Ampeg Portaflex had a pleasing bass tone, and was used by studio bassists such as James Jamerson and Carol Kaye, it was not powerful enough to be used in a stadium or arena concert.[3]
Another exotic tonewood is making a name for itself in the guitar industry. It’s similar in appearance and sound performance as Mahogany. It has a distinctive punch for the mid-range tones, but it emphasizes the bright trebles that can be an asset in music when you achieve pitch-perfect intonation. The Martin Road Series DRS1 Guitar sports Sapele beauty perfectly!
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Until his death in August 2009, Les Paul himself played his personal Les Paul Guitar onstage, weekly, in New York City. Paul preferred his 1971 Gibson “Recording” model guitar, with different electronics and a one-piece mahogany body, and which, as an inveterate tinkerer and bona fide inventor, he had modified heavily to his liking over the years. A Bigsby-style vibrato was of late the most visible change although his guitars were formerly fitted with his “Les Paulverizer” effects.
Judging by the tag in the sound hole, headstock logo, and general construction of the guitar I would think it's definite made earler than '86. Mine has a tag identical to this one but the date 16 5 78 is stamped onto it and it also has the name of the person who inspected it stamed on it. Interestingly I did notice your guitar has a different truss rod construction than mine. looks like yours adjusts from the head stock under the cover and mine is an allen adjustment through the sound hole. Don't know if they switched over to your style at a later date... food for thought. I have heard of some poeple reffering to these as Yairi built guitars even though they don't carry the Yairi headstock logo.
Really loving this bit of kit. The thing that surprised me most wasn't the fourth position (which is great!) but the overall sound improvement I get from quality hardware. I have 2017 American Professional Tele and I'm amazed at the clarity that this upgrade has given me. TBH - I don't understand why Fender don't fit quality parts like this straight from the factory. Thanks guys!" - Max
It is rare for any brand, let alone an entire company, to stay in business this long and their longevity speaks volumes to the exceptional quality of their instruments. Although they did dabble in electric guitars and basses for a short time, today the company is dedicated to making the finest acoustic guitars possible just as they were over 180 years ago.
The Fender Squier Bullet Stratocaster is one of the most popular low budget electric guitars on the market. For what money can buy around this price, it’s good value. The quality of the hardware, tuners and pickups can’t go up against the original Fender Stratocaster, but it still sounds really nice and feels good for playing, practicing and some first gigs. A perfect entry-level guitar that is worth the investment.
Made famous by George Harrison in the ‘60s, the jangly Rickenbacker 360/12 12-string electric guitar has become perhaps one of the most iconic 12-string electrics. With a semi-hollow body and thru-body neck, the 360/12 is able to create a unique tone that is difficult to create with other 12-string guitars. Though this model has undergone many changes and seen many iterations through the years, the newer Rick 360/12 models have a slimmer neck and are still highly-sought instruments.
POWER – amps are created for amplifying the sound (duh) in the first place. Of course, nowadays amps are these versatile things that can do pretty much anything but cook you a scrambled egg (maybe SOON?). But power is expensive. This might sound like some deep statement I make as I look into the sunset but what I mean is wattage is not a cheap thing to come by. That is why most inexpensive models or practice models (which are often the same) do not have a lot of wattages. While this might be disheartening, trust me, as a beginner you won’t need a lot of watts. I mean unless you are a prodigy you will be spending a lot of time practicing on your own whether it be in your room, basement or wherever. You won’t be needing the wattage that much unless you are playing with other instruments or on stage. AND if you are going on stage, then you should be great enough not to need a practice amp, in the first place.
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