Hawaiian lap steels are not in the American Teisco Del Rey catalog, however, five laps remained in the ’66 Japanese Teisco catalog. Still available was the Harp-8, an 8-string console with two pickups and some sort of electronics controlled by four floor pedals. Still around were the H-39, the H-905 and the self-amplified TRH-1. Also available was the H-850, a single-pickup 6-string very similar to the H-905.


Description: Guitar Type: Bass - Body: Maple & Mahogany - Figured - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Cocobolo (Nicaraguan Rosewood) - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 24 - Inlay: White Dot - # of Strings: 4 - Headstock: 2+2 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Carbon Fiber (Graphite) - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Gold, 1x Volume Control - Pickup Configuration: Dual - String Instrument Finish: Oil
If you are a beginner then you probably don't know what a ‘floating tremolo' is. Have a look at Floyd Rose, who made the first models. If you are looking at a guitar that has little tuners on the bridge, then it's probably a floating tremolo. For a beginner, they are a total pain in the butt. They are very hard to tune and a real pain to change strings. The cheaper ones go out of tune a lot too. If you know why you want one, then fine, but locking tremolos on budget instruments are usually rubbish, so stay clear of those for now!
For players that want to start off purely in the world of metal playing, this Schecter bundle should be right up their alley. The guitar itself has a lovely midnight satin black finish, with ready access to its 24 frets thanks to a generous cutaway. The dual humbucker pickups will put out plenty of power as well, allowing for more extreme styles of music to be played with ease. This particular set skips the accessories in favor of a mere amp, gig bag, and instrument cable, but the quality of the main instrument makes up for the omission of picks and the like.

Imagine someone telling you about an old-time music store that had a huge stash of unsold guitars from the 1960s, plus some guitar effects from the ‘70s lying around in its upper floors in Newark, NJ. Well, you can bet it didn’t take long for me to beat a path to the door of Newark Music City (calm down; this was a long time ago and, while the company still exists, it’s long gone from Newark). Even though I was late in the game, there were still unmined treasures to be had. A real Temple of Doom!
For many guitarists, the only thing better than a Gibson Les Paul is a vintage Gibson Les Paul. From stunning museum-quality pieces from the '50s to road warrior axes from the Norlin era of Gibson production in the '70s, there are fresh Les Pauls added to this page every day including Les Paul Standards, Customs, Juniors, and more. Whether you're a veteran Gibson collector or a new inductee to the ranks of Les Paul fandom, you can find your next vintage LP here.
I have 2 Kent guitars. One like a Strat and one 12 string hollow body. I know they were made in the 60s and were distributed by Kent Musical Products. Address:5 Union Square, New York. 10003. And they were a subsidiary of Buegeleisen & Jacobson, Inc. Any further info on these would be appreciated. Most sold in the price range of 100 dollars and up.
Hi - Long ago I had a vaguely Mustang like guitar with a Samiel badge. I don't see it listed here, though I assume it was Japanese made. The guitar inspired my (so far) best known song "Sucker For A Cheap Guitar." I traded it off, and have been trying to track it back down, not sure I even have a photo anywhere that shows it. Discovered your page because I just acquired a nice Fender Jazz bass copy that says Eagle on it, but I see there's no information as yet. The guy I got it from is from Brazil, and he may have bought it there, perhaps it's even a Brazilian brand, like the amp (Attack Audio System) that I got with it. I was also happy to learn a little more about Maruha, I had a nice archtop Jazz guitar with that name on it, until trading it off, possibly for the Samiel and an autoharp, I can't remember now! It was back in the '70s. both were probably manufactured in the '60s.

Thirdly, yamaha has been known for musical instruments for a long long time and is the biggest producer of musical instruments. On its logo, it has got two tuning pegs meaning unlike any other musical brand, it is the most diverse. The only reason that people say fenders and gibsons are better is because they were the original makers of contempory electric guitars and the fact that they're well known. So basically, all you're paying for is the badge.


The common design of a standalone stompbox is simple and, thus, hasn’t changed much: The guitar lead plugs into an input while a second lead carries the output to the amplifier. In between, a multitude of knobs, switches, and pedals modify the signal. To connect two or more boxes requires “jumper” leads, which chain the boxes together to complete a circuit of circuits, each one powered by a 9V battery. Typically, stompboxes are activated by “stomping” on an on/off bypass switch. This simple design enables tinkering: The exterior casing can be easily removed, exposing the interior for modification. To do so requires only a basic grasp of electronics, solder tools (or a solder-less breadboard circuit), and patience. Lots of patience.
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Of course, any item is only worth what a willing buyer will pay to a willing seller. iGuide?is "just a guide." Please be aware that PRICES VARY WIDELY from region to region. Current estimated values are the result of much research. And we invite anyone to help add and update data. Read the "What's A Wiki" section below for more info on how to help.
In the late 50s, McCarty knew that Gibson was seen as a traditional company and began an effort to create more modern guitars. In 1961 the body design of the Les Paul was changed due to the demand for a double-cutaway body design.[17] The new body design then became known as the SG (for "solid guitar"), due to disapproval from Les Paul himself. The Les Paul returned to the Gibson catalog in 1968.
The Ibanez pickup sound is great and solidly diverse throughout the 5-options, providing lots of versatility for a variety of different music styles.The tuning is nice and extremely stable, and you can even dive-bomb on the whammy without throwing it out of whack. The frets are perfect, and the action is almost perfect, with that quality feel to it.
Rack-mount gear has become somewhat of a lost art for guitar players since the late 90’s. Nonetheless, rack gear is great for people who want programmability of preset tones, the ability to interchange components, and those who love seeing bright lights flicker as all of your gear goes to work! So for the rack-gear heads that still exist on this earth, we’ve compiled what we think are the 10 best rackmount pre-amplifiers of all time.

Here’s my intuitive explanation to why we are hearing what we are hearing: What makes a guitar sound like a guitar, as opposed to for example a piano or a harp, is the spectrum of overtones that are generated when the strings are plucked. This also makes two guitars sound different from each other, despite having the same make/model of pickups. Any component that is involved in how the vibrations in the string is created (this is kind of what the myth debunking video refers to as “timbre”, but then goes on to equate to amplitude and frequency, as if the tonewood would alter the notes, as opposed to the tone) affects the sound. For example:
There is not one standard # of frets, but the three most common are 21, 22 and 24 frets. The extra frets simply mean you can play some additional high notes. If you are just starting out, you will probably be just fine choosing 21, 22 or 24 frets. But, you should probably avoid the fretless option unless you're specifically learning how to play fretless instruments.
Likewise, six Folk/Country Western guitars were offered, with flat, corner-notched heads, belly pin bridges and tortoise pickguards. The 14″ GS240 Concert ($79.50) was a Spanish shape with natural spruce top, mahogany body, and dot inlays, presumably on a rosewood fingerboard. The 15″ GS350 Grand Concert ($99.50) was another Spanish with natural spruce and figured Brazilian fruitwood body, with diamond inlays and wood rope binding. The GS380 Grand Concert ($109.50) was the same as the GS350 except for a Brazilian rosewood body. The GS460 Country Western ($129.50) was a 16″ dreadnought with a spruce top in red sunburst, cherry-finished mahogany body, a black pickguard, sort of mustache bridge, diamond inlays and white binding. The 16″ GS570 Auditorium ($149.50) was another dreadnought with yellow spruce and full grained Brazilian rosewood body, diamond inlays and fancier rosette. The GS680 12-String Auditorium ($185) was another 16″ dreadnought 12-string otherwise the same as the GS570.
Directional mics, such as cardioids and figure-of-eights, exhibit different frequency responses off axis — broadly speaking, off-axis sounds tend to be duller, although it's a complex effect which is different for each model. Professional producers are well aware of this, and employ the effect to refine their sounds. For instance, Chuck Ainlay comments "I'll usually start with a [Shure SM57] on the amp; but not straight on axis with the middle of the speaker; it's usually off-centre, angled towards the middle of the speaker and generally just off the grille." Jay Graydon refers to a fairly similar setup: "I position the mic about one inch left of the edge of the speaker-cone centre, using a 22-degree angle, and about one inch back from the grille cloth." Andy Johns, on the other hand, has said that "the miking technique I used on electric guitars for years was two [Shure SM57s], one straight on, and one at 45 degrees. Put 'em together, and it always works."
Finally the ease and portability of the small amp will allow you so much more flexibility with when and where you can practice. Just weighing a couple of pounds is already a great advantage over the rest of the amps available on the market. And being able to take it on road trips, travel trips, backpacking trips (for a bit of extra buck, we all have thought of doing it) means you can practice anywhere, any time. Small storage requirement means a great storing capability where you don’t have to worry about taking up too much space in your tiny room or apartment. It is great stuff, honestly.
For under £400 you get a set of Paul Gagon-Designed Alnico Pickups which provide a massive sound ranging from smooth and cool surf rock to all out grunge distortion. The AW4470B humbucker in the bridge position is complemented by an AP4285B P-90 neck pickup which ensures you have an array of tones at your fingertips – ideal for clean and distorted amplifiers. The addition of a push/pull coil tap allows you to split the humbucker so you can enjoy the classic sounds of a single coil. A mahogany body and maple neck provide the resonance, depth and snap you need for a wide range of tones and the G&L Saddle Lock Bridge with its six individual saddles offer incredible intonation as the saddles actually lock onto the strings.
Dont buy too cheap. The cheaper the guitar, the harder to play and the less quality the sound. You want a rewarding feel and sound or you will get discouraged. Buy a better guitar used than a new one cheap. Are you going to learn chords or fingerpicking ? Some guitars are better sounding for one than the other. Some like Taylors are versatile and provide good sound for both. Be smart. Good luck.
I have owned a lot of amps over the years. I am also a dealer in music accessories. Please note that we do not sell these amps, so I am not endorsing and using something my shop sells. I recently have bought a couple of amps in a series (I bought one first and then bought another) and have been really impressed. The Vox AV series. http://www.voxamps.com/AVSeries
One of the very first things you will play is either an open C or and open G in standard tuning. These are chords and serve as the very fundamental unit of song construction. Getting a new player up and running with a few chords they can strum is one of the first sign posts on the way to playing. It’s pretty rewarding to get that G to ring out clearly. That said, the greatest guitar masters use moveable chord forms to construct thoughtful lead work and intricate guitar lines.
Having lived in an apartment when learning guitar, it was painful. Using headphones works, but most days you just want to hear it from an amp like it was meant to be. Your only real solution is to try out some of those tiny lunchbox amps and see if they can fill that void. Another option is to start saving for a house, or find a friend who has one to jam out in.
“You can also think of it as what the signal path in a studio situation would be if you were to plug your guitar directly into the input of your amplifier, and process that sound through outboard effects. You’re not going to have your echo first before going into your distortion boxes—unless you’re looking for a specific sound—because you want the echoes to die out naturally, and not with your distorted sound.”
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Electronics, guitars and otherwise are as standardized as this book would have you believe. My problem was the 5-position switch. The one I took off the guitar was not the same as the replacement and the descriptions in the book were not sufficient to help me understand how to hook up the different switch. Fortunately, the rest of the circuit descriptions were right on and I got the guitar running (I had to use the old switch). If they author had described the signal flow through the switch I might have been able to figure it out. But the book is an invaluable resource for the DIY'er. I'm sure I'll be using it a lot more.

It’s hard to definitively name the best guitar books. Everyone is working with a different skill set, and you’ve all built up your skills in a different way. However, all of the books below provide enough information to help you improve some aspect of your playing. They may help some of you more than others, but they all have enough helpful tips in them to justify their purchase. Our team read these and many more, and these were the titles we found most inspiring. It turns out we aren't alone in loving these books, since these books get great reviews all around, but these were the ones we found most enlightening. The fact that we were excited to practice and couldn't wait to pick up these books to learn more is ultimately the reason they made this list. We think these books will provide or build a solid foundation for anyone looking to learn the guitar in an efficient way.
Whoa whoa wait, what? This pop artist? A guitar player? If all you’ve ever heard from Mayer is Your Body Is Wonderland, or Daughters, then you’ve got to give his album Continuum a listen to. He is no Shakespeare, but his guitar playing speaks to your soul. His songs will make most glorified tough guys miss their old girlfriend, and the rest just go to a corner and cry. If you think that his songs are all too depressing, then watch some videos of him playing. His guitar face is priceless.
This guitar is a good example of the late 1960s Matsumoku made imports that were flooding the Americas.  This model with these pickups were made for many years, starting around 1966 through the early 70s.  That’s a good run!  Based on my research this particular model probably dates from the late 60s.Most of the time I see these guitars with chrome or tortoiseshell pickguards, and this is the first one I’d seen with a white guard.  Has a cool shape too!  These pickups were exclusive to Matsumoku and generally have a good sound.  I’ve measured about 10 of these pickups, and the reading are often all over the place.  Some of these read out near 9k, and some read out under 5k, so obviously the specs changed over the years.  I think the hotter reading pickups came from the later 60s era.Now that Lyle name was owned by the L.D. Heater Music Company out of Beaverton, Oregon.  They had some cool electric models here and there and seemed to really focus on acoustic guitars back in the day.  Most, but not all of the electric models were made by Matsumoku.Most Matsumoku guitars were made rather well, especially the wood parts.  Bodies and necks were always top notch and their finishes hold up better than the average import guitar.  They did some great, burst finishes!  But one weak point on all these Matsumoku electric guitars were the pickup switches.  They just weren’t made to withstand constant use and almost always fail.  Dano at Happy Guitar Repair knows how to rebuild these switches, and it’s just about the only way to bring them back to life.The all-telling Matsumoku plate is back there and the neck pockets on all their guitars were really solid.  If you’re looking to get into these vintage Japanese guitars, Matsumoku models are always a good place to get your feet wet!Mike Dugan loved this particular model, even though the frets were vintage Japanese tiny, and the pickups read out a little weak, sometimes a guitar just has a little chime and zing, and this one had it.  Enjoy peeps!
You should have been making all the above adjustments with the preferred gauge of strings, but since you have probably loosened and tightened the strings a number of times over the course of this process, you should now put on a fresh set and do a final check of all the settings Neck adjustments in particular can tend to settle in over the a couple hours after they have been done, so I find it best to then let the guitar sit overnight and do a final check the next day. The bottom line in ending up with a quality set-up is making each of the important adjustments in the correct order: Neck- then Nut- then Bridge saddles.

The filters and shifters group also shapes the waveform but in a different fashion than the dynamics group. First and foremost, now that you've gotten rid of noise and extreme volume variances, you want to use an equalizer to tweak your tone. You may roll off extra bass frequencies and increase some high frequencies while dipping the mids. You want this done before you apply the more obvious effects in the next groupings.

Many people "re-amp" direct guitar tracks recorded to a DAW using amp-modeling software, with good results. Plug-ins are wonderfully suited to the virtual  recording environment, allowing for fast access to a plethora of modeling amplifier and speaker cabinet combinations, hence tones, effectively replacing a roomful of amps, cabs and microphones. Programming the virtual amplifier is the same as tweaking the knobs on the real thing, and the same is true for programming software dynamics and effects processors in relation to their hardware equivalents. As the realism and sophistication of modeling technology continue to develop, so does the viability of virtual re-amping as a production technique.
Our site has a wealth of information about what goes into making a Taylor guitar and how to make this very important decision. We have guides for how to find the right fit for you. Learn about the subtle differences in shapes and styles. Delve into different types of woods and construction, which are vital to the flavor and tone of an acoustic. Explore the Taylor line by series to find the look and style you want for your instrument.
Electric guitars have been popular and prominent for decades. For quite some time, being a left-handed musician was considered a hindrance and artists often had to make due with a right handed guitar. Now, there are plenty of fantastic options for lefties so they can make their mark on the music world. As a left-handed musician you probably know that many legendary artists were lefties too- Paul McCartney, Jimi Hendrix, Kurt Cobain, and Dick Dale are just a few examples of musicians who paved the way for up and coming lefties to seriously rock out. Electric guitars are perhaps the most notable and distinctive instrument in pop and rock music. Heavily used on stage and in the recording studio, the electric guitar provides some of the most memorable parts of a song or tune.
The core metal used for strings is an important variable to consider.  Not only does the string core affect tone, but it affects the tension strength as well.  The heavier the string gauge, the stronger the core metal needed.  You don’t want premature string breakage, especially during a gig.  Your options absolutely depend on the tone you desire, but they also depend on the string gauge you prefer for the genre of music you play.
Gotta say a tele has to be the hardest but most rewarding to play. If you make a mistake, you will definitely hear it, but it just helps you're playing get more clean. Les pauls are a lot easier with the shorter scale length and forgiving pickups. Haven't played any metal guitars but I figure it has a lot to do with their setup that makes it sound so easy. You can do just about anything with the tremolo arm into a van halen kind of setup and it'll sound cool. Or you can whack one off with your guitar like steve vai
The Thunderbird IV was one of the most radical designs to come out of the Gibson and Epiphone Kalamazoo factory in the early '60s, thanks to legendary automotive designer Ray Dietrich, who was asked to put a new twist on solidbody guitars and basses. The sound of the Thunderbird IV was as cutting edge as its design and now the Thunderbird Classic-IV PRO returns with all of Epiphone's first-class quality and a lifetime guarantee, but without the hassles of owning (or hiding) a vintage instrument. Case sold separately.

Matsumoku is one of the Japanese manufacturers that did not survive long after the heyday of the 1970s guitar market despite having a long tradition of quality stringed instrument craftsmanship. Matsumoku produced guitars for major manufacturers Greco, Guyatone and Yamaha. Matsumoku made Arai, Aria, Aria Pro II and Aria Diamond badges, with Aria being their primary badge for a majority of this time frame. Badged guitars known to have been made by Matsumoku include Apollo, Arita, Barclay, Burny, Capri, Columbus, Conrad, Cortez (electrics only), Country, Cutler, Dia, Domino, Electra, Epiphone, Granada, Hi Lo, Howard, Ibanez, Lindberg, Lyle, Luxor, Maxitone (this guitar differs from Tama's Maxitone badge), Mayfair, Memphis, Montclair, Pan, Pearl (electrics only), Raven, Stewart, Tempo, Univox ,Vantage, Ventura, Vision, Volhox, Washburn (in 1979 and 1980), Westbury, Westminster and Westone. Possible Matsumoku badges include: Bruno, Crestwood, Conqueror, Eros, Mako, Memphis, Orlando and Toledo.
When buying your first guitar, it’s sensible to stop and think about what you are buying it for. Is it just something to learn on? Will you be upgrading in a year or two when you start thinking about forming a band, gigging, and recording? If so, you may be better off trying one of these affordable electric guitars, which all offer a solid platform on which to learn.

Joe Perry is the American distillation of the good-old Keith Richards/Jimmy Page recipe for sideman/lead guitarist cool. He’s got the look and the licks, and he’s maintained both over the course of three or four decades—despite all odds. Jagger and Richards are the Glimmer Twins, but Perry and Aerosmith singer Steven Tyler went down in history as the Toxic Twins.

Got this beautiful guitar less than a month ago and played a couple of solo acoustic gigs. People were wowed by the way the sound of this guitar fills the space ( I played it through a Bose tower). Loved the feel of the fretboard. Though the body is a jumbo, it doesn't feel like a dreadnought. The guitar looks very attractive too and I had one person come over during a break just to admire the guitar. So now here's why I have given it 4 stars. The electronics were faulty on my guitar. The tuner switch didn't turn off automatically after I hit them to tune the guitar. The light stayed on till the batteries were drained out. This happened twice to me after which I decided to send it back. I also noticed a big hum building up during my second gig with the guitar - I
Death By Audio Reverberation Machine Spring type Reverb/synthetic atmosphere creator with Altitude control that allows the reverb to distort. Also has a light/dark switch to control color of the reverb. Pedal was used in a smoke free studio, never gigged and has no velco on bottom. Pedal has small speckled blemishes in paint next to volume knob. This has no effect on function. Pedal is in perfect working order. This is a great pedal for people who want to add more texture to their sound. Ive used it on synths, drum machines and samples- handles any source without discretion. The only reason for letting it go is that i have too many spring type reverbs. Thanks for looking .
Mahogany is a very dense, strong wood used in all parts of guitar manufacture except fretboards and bridges, which require harder wood. A mahogany neck and back are often found on short-scale guitars with maple tops. Another common combination is an all-mahogany body and neck (excluding the fretboard). Because mahogany is not very hard, it emphasizes the midrange and bass frequencies for a mellower guitar tone. Mahogany is a very resonant wood which enhances a guitar's sustain. It is generally a uniform rich brown color.
A bit underrated and under the radar, Blackstar makes some superb amplifiers at a fraction of the cost you’ll find from bigger name brands. And while it’s a shame they don’t get more recognition, it’s good news for you, the user. This particular amp might just be the best option for apartment living – due to its small stature and low-level volume paired with the fact that it is still a tube amp. But don’t let the fact that it’s only 1-watt fool you – thanks to the simple truth that it uses tube amplification, it can still get plenty loud. Of course, if you’re overly concerned about noise, this option also comes with a headphone jack, and it’s one of the few tube amps to even offer that convenience.
I'm actually the designer of this devices and I myself had bought all the software in Apple. I'm really a big fan of JamUp, Bias, and Ampkit. Personally I like all the functions provided by JamUp such as JAM, LOOP, 8-track recording as well as the guitar effects and amps. But the Amps in Bias is a litte more juicy than in JamUp. A good way is using Bias amps in JamUp which just make a good combination of the two software. They can be used in that way :)
Like most affordable super strat guitars, the Omen-6 has a basswood body, carved into the elegant looking shape that Schecter is known for. The neck is crafted from mahogany and joins the body via a bolt-on joint. It is topped by a 14" radius rosewood fingerboard that has 24 jumbo frets. It comes setup for fast and comfortable playability, with its 25.5" scale length, 1.65" nut width and stylized fretboard markers. Giving this guitar its voice are two Schecter Diamond Plus pickups, which are passive pickups but are still hot enough for driving high-gain pedals and amps.
The previous drawing illustrates the electrical and magnetic function of a single-coil pickup. Some pickups might use six permanent magnets in place of the six pole pieces to create the magnetic field, but the idea is the same: create a steady magnetic field around a coil in proximity to the guitar string. The name "single-coil" pickup becomes more significant when compared to the humbucker or "dual-coil" pickup.
I started using cobalt .010 and I've found they have plenty of clarity and bite. Please keep in mind there are many factors going into your sound. Amp, guitar pickups, strings, pick type, etc. Don't be disappointed if you get some premium strings that don't change your sound if your pickups can't pick up the movement very well. Start at a regular light. .010 is plenty flexible, and they won't break as often as a 8 or 9. Don't get caught up in the rookie mentality of "THIS is what kind of guitarist I will be, so I need everything to fit that." Experiment with different sizes and types.
Explorer-style guitars dropped off the radar after the mid 1980s, but were revived again under the influence of late Pantera guitarist Dimebag Darrell Abbott toward the end of the ’90s. Weird shapes were back, if anything can ever be said to be “back.” What goes around comes around. There’s clearly an algorithm going on that originated back in 1958!

I doubt I can bring anything relevant to this discussion that hasn't been said already but since I liked the article so much and the subject has puzzled me since I got my first guitar, I jsut have to pitch in. My first guitar was a cheap Jackson-esque strat the brand was Cyclone. It was significantly lighter in weight than my friends Fender stratocaster and I liked it for that reason from the beginning. It was just much easier and more comfortable to play, esepecially while standing. Maybe because of this I've been biased to doubt the whole tonewood thing. My experience is that most 'guitar people' (at least here in Finland) seem to think that lighter wood is simply a sign of a bad quality electric guitar. I talked about this quite recently with a local luthier, who is very sience oriented and uses rosewood as the body. Guitars he makes are so light that when you pick them up at first, it is hard to believe they aren't hollow. So I asked him about his thoughts on the density and / or other qualities of the wood affecting the tone and his responce was pretty much consistent with the article. Anyhow he did mention the _theoretial_ possibility of the waves to traveling to the wood and reflecting back to the strings _possibly_ affecting the sustain. As someone stated, in real life physics there are never completely isolated phenomena but you can draw a line whether a factor is significant or not. John's comment above would support the more dense wood to be better but my guess is that when it comes to the sound that is audible to human ear, the material does not count. How a guitar feels is a totally different matter and shapes the way the player hears the sound drastically. My intuition says that lighter wood might convey the vibration to the players body which would partly exlpain Butch's experience with guitars with different materials. I've never thought about that before but do find anything else than the strings resonating (springs, screws..) uncomfprtable.
The tip of a soldering iron is very hot, around 700F, and can damage the board, component packages, and wire insulation in a fraction of a second, not to mention your own skin, so be careful the tip does not touch anything as you move it in and out of the soldering area. Put the pencil back in its holder when not soldering. Don’t leave a hot iron laying on a bench or table.
The question is, does koa do anything for the sound, or is it just for the esthetics? The material in instruments always affects the tone, and koa makes the tone brighter while still being deep and satisfying. Sound is always hard to describe in words, because we experience sound differently, but if you’re curious about what it sounds like, just check it out on YouTube.
Solid body guitars were the next step in guitar development, with Leo Fender creating a modest instrument called the Broadcaster, which was then rebranded as the Telecaster. The Stratocaster came later and, in addition to the changes in the pickups, included contours in the body that made the guitar more streamlined and easier to play while standing up. Today, the Stratocaster is still the most iconic electric guitar shape; it’s associated with guitar wizard Jimi Hendrix, and many beginners end up with a Stratocaster-style guitar. Gibson introduced their own line of solid body guitars, the considerably swankier Les Paul.

If this were a list of the best electric guitar brands for metal it is very likely Jackson would be near the top. This is a company practically synonymous with metal, and for decades the most extreme players on the planet have looked to Jackson to get the job done. But Jackson also has a strong presence in the rock and hard rock genres, and if that’s your bag you’d be smart to give them a good look.
There’s a huge range of cheap electric guitars out there that would not look out of place on the stages of the world thanks to high quality manufacturing and the brands actually caring about their products – “cheap” does not always mean poor quality and plenty of guitars out there will give you a fantastic playing experience for many years without breaking the bank.
Reverb's Free Online Price Guide: This specialty vintage guitar site is one of the largest, most carefully maintained used vintage guitar and bass shops on the internet. It sells hundreds of used guitars and basses of all makes and models. It offers a free online Price Guide where you simply type in the model of instrument you have, and Reverb will analyze its vast database of transactions and give you a large result filled with prices. This gives you a real-time look at the market and where your particular kind of instrument fits in. It is a living, breathing blue book, and (the best part) it is free.
The Epiphone Joe Pass Emperor II is the signature guitar of one of jazz music’s great guitarists. Joe Pass played on records with Ella Fitzgerald, and his influence has cemented his name among the greats of the genre. The guitar which bears his name is a fine example of a guitar geared precisely towards one genre. It won’t win any awards for versatility, but it is a fantastic instrument for jazz fans of any skill level. Featuring the classic hollow body arch top design of old but with two high quality Burstbucker pickups for a range of silky tones.
Pictured is a tremolo arm or vibrato tailpiece style bridge and tailpiece system, often called a whammy bar or trem. It uses a lever ("vibrato arm") attached to the bridge that can temporarily slacken or tighten the strings to alter the pitch. A player can use this to create a vibrato or a portamento effect. Early vibrato systems were often unreliable and made the guitar go out of tune easily. They also had a limited pitch range. Later Fender designs were better, but Fender held the patent on these, so other companies used older designs for many years.

The internal bracing has also been updated to a forward shifted pattern to further enhance the dynamic range of the soundboard and the guitar’s overall projection. The Taylor 214ce has a nice punchy sound and good articulation. If you need more output, just plug it in and let the onboard Expression System 2 (ES2) pickup do its job. The ES2 features a patented behind-the-saddle pickup and knobs for volume and tone, giving you total control over your tonal output.
the top five in no certain order are…….. JIMI HENDRIX .NIO EXPLANATION NEEDED……..RICHIE BLACKMORE he broght the strat into metal and he led his leads perfectly back into the song ……… .EDWARD VAN HALEN he was the next innovater after hendrix…………DIME BAG DARRELL….he was just plain the baddast ass of them all…………..AND ENGWIE MALMSTIEN he did everything else……..there are lots of great guitar players . but .these five guys set the bar for everyone else
As such, a velocity-sensitive MIDI keyboard is a must here, and the more experience you have with string instruments, the more you will get out of this VST. It's knowing things like how the string all have different weight and tension behind them and how the volume changes when a plectrum thwacks against the strings that will give guitarists the edge here.
In the Seventies, Clapton’s work with Derek and the Dominos and his first solo albums added a slew of masterpieces like “Layla” and “Lay Down Sally” to classic rock’s repertoire. The Eighties also saw Clapton’s music featured in movies (The Hit in 1984 and Lethal Weapon in 1987) and commercials (“After Midnight” for Michelob in 1987), while a string of albums produced by Phil Collins established Clapton as a pop/rock icon.
Believe it or not, Eddie Van Halen hadn’t even heard rock music until he and his family moved from the Netherlands to Pasadena California in 1967. After hearing Cream, he quickly abandoned piano and drums for the guitar, learning the instrument by picking licks off records by Eric Clapton, Led Zeppelin, Jimi Hendrix and Jeff Beck. These influences were merely a springboard, though. Eddie was quickly able to put his own mark on everything he played.
The MD400 has one Alnico V humbucker at the bridge and one Alnico V mini-humbucker at the neck. Both are ‘rail’-style pickups, which are quieter, and provide more consistent tone and sustain across the strings. Both pickups have been coil-split, too—so push or pull the master “Tone” knob to disable one coil of each humbucker, effectively turning them into single-coil pickups.
Laminate guitars are not made with solid pieces of wood. Instead, a laminate guitar is made with layered pieces of wood, like a veneer, to create the body of the guitar. Despite its reputation among music snobs, laminate guitars can be top-selling, high-performing instruments. Just check out the Fender CD-60CE Acoustic Electric Guitar for proof of a beautiful, all-laminate, highly-popular instrument!
the top five in no certain order are…….. JIMI HENDRIX .NIO EXPLANATION NEEDED……..RICHIE BLACKMORE he broght the strat into metal and he led his leads perfectly back into the song ……… .EDWARD VAN HALEN he was the next innovater after hendrix…………DIME BAG DARRELL….he was just plain the baddast ass of them all…………..AND ENGWIE MALMSTIEN he did everything else……..there are lots of great guitar players . but .these five guys set the bar for everyone else
Is there any particular reason you're opposed to Kontakt libraries? All of the plugins you mentioned are sample-based themselves, with the notable weakness that you would not be able to change the mapping, grouping, programming (etc), unlike with Kontakt. As someone who uses a lot of virtual instruments, I'd say it's always preferable to have a sample-based instrument in an open sampler plugin since you can see what's going on under the hood and change things like envelopes as needed. 

With a growing popularity of the Les Paul guitars, hundreds of unendorsed imitations and copycat versions had appeared on the markets. However, due to the lack of U.S. legislation to address patent infringements and restrict the import sales, oversea imitations caused legal and financial problems to the Gibson Guitar Corporation. An also troublesome thing was the existence of high quality imitations of vintage Les Paul (and vintage Stratocaster) produced by oversea manufacturers.
Also, if your slide playing includes any fretting at all, FORGET IT. While it certainly raises them well away from the neck, the strings are lifted to a height that makes trying to fret them pull them off pitch well before you reach the fret... and there is NO adjusting it. I used one on a wide neck 12 string strung for six. A neck designed for the tension of 12 strings easily takes the tension of a heavy gauge set in a raised open tuning. The "Slide Guitar Extension Nut" is ideal for such an application (if you don't want to even try any fretting) but I doubt Stewey Mac's sells very many of them.
SHAPING THE BODY This is totaly up to you. You can carve down the body however you want. For my project I chose to carve down the body as close to the way the guitar I was modeling it after was. I used a verity of different sanders. I used a belt sander for the arm contour on the top back of the guitar, a dremmel tool with a sanding attachment for the small carve down under the neck, a 6" sanding disk attachment on my drill for the body contour on the back of the guitar, and a Black and Decker mouse sander for the neck area and smoothe down of all the other areas that had previously been carved. One rule of thumb is to only sand with a 220 grit when carving the body down. This will prevent any deep scratches any lower grit will cause. Don't use any electric sander on the falt parts of the guitar either, like the top or the back. Use a 220 grit paper with a sanding block to smooth out those areas. You can also run a slightly dampened cloth along the surface of the body and let dry before the final hand sanding. This will raise the small grains in the wood so they can be cut by the paper easier. Sand in the direction of the grain.
Say that three times fast.  Don't even bother yourself about halfround strings.  They aren't that popular for a reason, but it is good to know they exist.  The roundwound strings feature a textured surface created by winding a round wire around the core metal.  Flatwound strings are far more flat along their length because the core is surrounded by a smooth wire, as pictured below:
Many guitarists with instruments that have more than one pickup spend most of their time on the bridge unit. Using a variety of pickup positions when recording will thin or fatten the sound as required, but also help free up space when it comes to the mixing stage. Think of a recorded mix as a layer cake; too much density in one frequency range will cause a headache for the mixing engineer.
A reluctant soloist, Yo La Tengo cofounder Ira Kaplan was credited with “naïve guitar” on the band’s first single in 1985 and didn’t begin taking the spotlight regularly until some two years later. Starting with a bucket of Velvet Underground moves, Kaplan became a consummate inside guitarist, too, a deceptively normal-looking dude folding in space jazz, barbed noise, spare country soul, and — when very occasionally called for — traditional feet-behind-knees rock jumps.
“He played an SG, a Les Paul, a Flying V, as well as a Stratocaster, but he always sounded like Hendrix,” Clive Brown states. “He didn’t suddenly sound like Jimmy Page because he played a Les Paul. That’s where everybody’s perception seems to go wrong. It’s the playing, and not necessarily the guitar.” In spite of an entire multi-million dollar industry revolving around selling musicians the latest gear, and in spite of thousands of axeslingers, aspiring and acclaimed alike, who readily gobble up that gear, it all seems to boil down to two implements— and we’re born with those.
I found a Decca guitar lying in my woodworks shop at school, and my teacher let me take it home. My friend and I have been restoring it, and we nearly have it finished, the only thing missing is the tremolo spring. However the model of the guitar is kind of odd as we have not found any record of what type of guitar we own. Its a double cut-away archtop, with a tobacco sunburst and 3 single coil pick ups. We have looked everywhere and haven't been able to find any record of a 3 pick up Decca guitar. We're still looking...

As a rule, acoustic guitars with laminated spruce tops do not have the same resonance as those made from unlaminated tonewoods, but the Fender FA-100’s fuller dreadnought design provides a richer tone than some customers may expect. If price is a consideration, the Fender has been described as a “cheaply made guitar with a fantastic sound.” What’s more, When you buy a Fender product, you're investing in quality. The Fender Musical Instruments Corporation has been manufacturing instruments and equipment since the 1940s.

The blues was my inspiration-specifically, the late-'40s solo recordings of John Lee Hooker. "Hobo Blues" is an excellent example of early Hooker on which his violent string slapping-clearly audible in a blend of amp sound, haunting vocals, and trademark foot stomping-creates an indelible realism and engaging intimacy. My recording of Paris Slim's "The Day I Met The Boogie Man" (see the sidebar "Selected Discography") was one of my early experiments with this technique. Since that time, I have used a discrete "air-guitar" mic whenever I have had an available track for it. Guitarists may initially be skeptical of such unusual miking, but it's always a treat to watch their faces light up as they listen to the monitors deliver the bright, transient sounds that they have been accustomed to hearing during their years of practicing their instruments.
The Orchestra Model (OM) shape, with its sleek look and versatile acoustic voice, is one of C.F. Martin & Co's most popular guitar shapes. A number of iconic guitarists prefer this particular line, including legends like Eric Clapton and his protégé, John Mayer. I for one own an all-solid wood Martin OMCPA4, and it continues to exceed my expectations. While I have no regrets over my guitar, I have to admit that if I had the funds, I would have gone for the definitive Orchestra Model, the OM-28 E Retro.
Frets on finished fingerboards may be tough to measure accurately when the finish has appreciable thickness (think Rickenbackers, 70s Fenders) as these manufacturers spray the finish over the fretted neck.  I have measured a finish chip from a 70s Fender maple neck refret that was .010” thick – lowering the fret height by .010” (25% in the case of the stock medium wire at the time) from just finish alone.  I recently refretted a 2008 Fender Eric Johnson Strat where the fret height prior to any work was .040”, yet the crown of the fret removed from the fingerboard was .045”.  I personally do not like this feel and so often I will suggest refretting over a finished fingerboard when working with them rather than under the finish.
Martin is a famous America-based company known for is a variety of impressive electric and acoustic guitars. Their guitars are predominantly manufactured in Pennsylvania and Nazareth. The history of Martin guitars dates back to 1833. From then on, Martin has managed to maintain classiness and quality in their guitars to satiate the thirst of pro players in America.
And therein is the VST guitar's edge, as it continues to improve in quality, not matching that of performances by the late Jimmy or the long-standing Carlos or whomever one adopts as their personal guitar deity, but bringing in new qualities of its own. In computer science terms, improved controllers are providing ever more interesting views of ever more detailed models to listeners attuned to the particular environment augmented by the virtual model. The guitar VST is not your daddy, but it might be the little sibling with your daddy's eyes. In the long run.. well... forget that. We love you pops. My little sisters, brothers and I hope you live forever, or at least as long was we do.
If you prefer to pay monthly you can get started with $19.95. To take advantage of this offer follow the link below and key in your email address. I suggest that you wait until you receive an email from Guitar Tricks. You should get a username and a password. Use these details to logon to the site. Once you are inside of Guitar Tricks select the Upgrade button and choose the Monthly Membership option.

80/20 Bronze strings are a mixture of Bronze and Zinc.  They are also referred to as Bronze/Brass strings and are extremely common, much like Phosphor Bronze.  One of the main differences is this variety produces a very bright tone that enhances articulation and pick attack.   This effect can be lost very quickly depending on how much the player sweats and how often they clean their strings.  This choice can be a little more demanding on the wallet, due to having to change them more often.

Guitar Center Twin Cities provides comprehensive guitar repair services for the Roseville area. Our repair technicians are as passionate about your guitars and basses as you are, and we have the experience needed to keep them performing at their best. Whether you need a quick adjustment to make your guitar easier to play, or a complete guitar rebuild, we have the tools and know-how to take care of your instrument. Guitar Center Twin Cities can also help build a maintenance plan that fits you and your guitar or bass needs, including custom setups, restrings and more. We also take care of fret repairs, hardware and pickup installations, upgrades and customizations, bone and graphite services and more.
Through the 19th century, guitars were part of a musical ensemble. As performance spaces increased in size, stringed instruments like guitars were hard to hear over other instruments, especially horns. As a result, the traditional Spanish-style acoustic guitar—wooden with a flat top, a symmetrical hollow body, a sound hole in the center, and gut strings—began to change in size, shape, and construction. For example, in the late 1890s, Orville Gibson, founder of the Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Manufacturing Company, designed a guitar with an arched (or curved) top that was stronger and louder than the earlier flat-top design.
Primarily, reverb pedals tend to give you a lot more variety and control over the effect than you'll have with an amplifier. In fact, most amps that have reverb will have a single reverb knob that you turn up for more of the effect, or down for less. This can work if you use reverb sparingly, but if you're into the effect and like to use it a lot, that's not enough control to really get the most out of your reverberated tone.

I’ve never played a gig without an amp, but I am prepared to… Instead of spending a ton of money on AXE FX (which a good amp can be a small fraction of the cost of AXE FX, especially if you still need to buy monitors, power amp, etc…), I keep a Line6 Sonic Port in my bag I can use with my iPod, iPad, or iPhone. Cheaper than AXE-FX. I do use the Line6 Sonic Port into my iPad for recording tracks for different projects. A lot less than AXE-FX and easier to use. Another option.
Bass amplifier equipment manufacturers include a variety of different types of companies, ranging from companies that only make individual components (e.g., Accugroove loudpeakers, a speaker manufacturer) to companies that only make bass amplifiers and loudspeakers (e.g., Gallien-Krueger). At the other end of the spectrum are companies that offer bass amplification equipment as part of a much broader offering of different types of instrument amplifiers and public address systems (e.g., Peavey, Carvin A&I or Yorkville Sound.)
I had just finished signing up for guitar.com. I am a 54-year-old disabled Miner of 22 years, so I thought I would try to take up playing the guitar once again like I did when I was a kid. I forgot a lot about it through the years as life moved on, but now all I have is time. I came across your website and thought why not give it a try. so anything you suggest I will try once twice if I like it lol
1958-1969: replaces the "U" models and now has a double cutaway body with short horns. Masonite/poplar frame bodies, 13.25" wide. Models numbers include the "Standard": 3011 (black 1 pickup), 3012 (bronze 1 pickup), 3021 (black 2 pickup), 3022 (bronze 2 pickup), 5025 (blond 2 pickup). The 3021 is considered THE Jimmy Page model. "Seal" shaped pickguard and concentric knobs on 2 or 3 pickup models. Round control knobs.
By the early ’80s, MTI was importing Westone guitars from Matsumoku, which had made its earlier Univox guitars (and the competitive Westbury guitars offered by Unicord). Wes-tone guitars continued to be distributed by MTI until ’84, when St. Louis Music, now a partner in the Matsumoku operation, took over the brand name and phased out its older Electra brand (also made by Matsumoku) in favor of Electra-Westone and then Westone. But that’s another story…

Slightly out-of-tune strings on a bass may not jump out as much as on guitar (especially in chords), but when that bass line is sitting under other parts in the mix, even slightly off-pitch notes will make their presence known, and sometimes be harder to track down (why does this song sound a little “off”?). I’d use a tuner (h/w or s/w), but I’d also always verify by ear, before hitting record, and I’d check tuning periodically as the session progresses—just as with drums, hard players can easily put the instrument out after a few energetic takes.

Much like any other job or hobby, building guitar pedals requires specific tools in order to get the job done. Furthermore, before you start putting together your first build, it is vital that you have a significant understanding of how to solder circuit board electronics – otherwise you may find yourself at a loss due to faulty soldering (believe me, this is not a fun issue to troubleshoot).  If you need to practice soldering, here is a helpful video.

While it might look identical to the RevStar RS420, Yamaha Revstar RS320 is very different. The shape is the same, along with the most of the hardware. However, the tone is a whole different story. While RS420 comes with vintage humbuckers, the RS320 packs a set of extremely hot pups which are more modern. I personally liked this configuration more than the vintage one, simply because it offers extended versatility.
A brilliant musical tool, guitar is one of the most familiar instruments widely preferred by majority of people. Are you looking to buy a perfect guitar? If yes, then check the given Best Guitar Brands In India throughout this page. At some point of time, you must have thought to learn guitar because it not only provided inner sense of pleasure but also impress others. If you are a beginner and passionate to learn this brilliant musical instrument, then must consider below provided popular acoustic, electric and bass guitars. Most importantly the sound and price of guitars are mostly considered by the buyer. Even many Indian musicians have opted them .While it is very tough to choose perfect guitar brand at the beginning learning time.
Laminate guitars are not made with solid pieces of wood. Instead, a laminate guitar is made with layered pieces of wood, like a veneer, to create the body of the guitar. Despite its reputation among music snobs, laminate guitars can be top-selling, high-performing instruments. Just check out the Fender CD-60CE Acoustic Electric Guitar for proof of a beautiful, all-laminate, highly-popular instrument!
If you decide to choose a guitar, amplifier and accessories separately, consider spending more on the guitar than the amplifier. A better guitar will often suit a player’s needs longer, and a less expensive amp will be fine for early practicing sessions. If the player decides to upgrade down the road, often they may only need to upgrade the amplifier and not their entire setup.
The phrase “guitar amplifier” in itself is almost a bit misleading. Sure, it “amplifies” your guitar — but guitar amps really do so much more. Arguably, even as much as your choice of guitar, your amplifier will have an immeasurable influence on your sound. Beyond the basics of volume, bass, midrange and treble, your amp can provide warmth or bite to your sound, or anything from a sparkling clean tone to a blazing distortion. Amplifiers are constructed utilizing different size (or even multiple) speakers and can derive their tone from tubes, transistors, or even digital modeling. They can be very basic with just one volume knob; or they can offer a variety of gain and EQ options along with built-in effects.
Well, we are not part of the study! The study has been conducted, and he’s just giving you the results, it was written nowhere that you had to guess which wood was which or anything of the sort. This doesn’t imply that his little kid (cause this is his son’s science project, remember) performed any form of double-blind test, but still your remark is completely inapplicable and actually turns back on you, that make a big fuss about this article’s sloppyiness, only to attack it with wrong logical reasoning.
At the core of this pedal is the Line 6 HX technology, which emulates the behavior of actual amp and stompbox components. This means that instead of merely copying the sound, it recreates the entire pedal or amplifier in digital format, allowing the models to respond to guitar tone and adjustments much like the real thing. While it originally had 70 effects, firmware updates have raised this number to 104, which is more than enough to keep you busy for months, if not years. Amp, cab and mic models were also increased to 115. Since Line 6 is well known for providing updates, it is reasonable to expect more expansions in the future. It does everything that the Helix LT can, with some extras, most notable of which is the LED scribble strips for labeling each footswitch. The Helix Floor also comes with expanded input/output options to work with mics and other instruments.
I was paging through my daughter's Rolling Stone Magazine today and saw a small article with three different artists that use Harmony Guitars and they were singing their praises. I'm an old dude (or shall we say vintage)who's not familiar with all of the new bands popping up today, so I can't even tell you who these artists are. However, I did find it interesting that Rolling Stone did a spot on these guitars. I was too young to get my hands on many Harmonies when I was a kid, so I can't comment on their quality, but I know they were budget guitars and weren't considered anything special back then.
In attempting to amplify acoustic guitars, inventors and musicians alike soon discovered an issue that is still problematic for many of today’s acoustic guitarists — feedback. Hence, the evolution of solid body electric guitars, spearheaded by Vivi-Tone in 1934. Rickenbacker followed up by distributing the Electro Spanish in 1935 (Electro Spanish later being shortened to ES by Gibson for their line of hollow body and semi-hollow electric guitars), and the Slingerland Songster 401 was introduced in 1936. But some guitarists — mainly jazz and blues musicians — came to miss the warm, full-bodied tone that can only be generated by the free-space resonance of tops and backs made from quality tonewoods. And so it is that we also have the hybrid design of semi-hollow body electric guitars.

Now, for most players, deciding what should go where on a signal chain simply came through trial and error along with a good dose of common knowledge. And while a player’s signal chain should be his or her own, those of you out there new to creating a solid signal chain can benefit from some of the general 'rule of thumb' type of advice that can get you started in the right direction.


Over 20 years, Ovation produced some very interesting guitars. Not only do the American models feature innovative technology that alone makes them worth seeking out, they really handle nicely as players, despite their rejection at the time. Some were ahead of their time. Most were out of step with it, as well. After two decades of failed attempts to market solidbody (and some hollowbody) electrics, Ovation did what other companies who failed to successfully cross over from the genres that brought them their fame. In ’88, Ovation purchased Hamer guitars. Ah, but that’s another story…
As we’ve shown here, a lot of relatively small—and inexpensive (many are practically free)—tweaks can hot-rod your tone and maneuver it to an array of differing ports of call. In some ways, it’s like tossing a handful of dice instead of just two—because the way small tweaks interact can lead to exponential changes in sound. For that reason, my advice is to take it slow and only make a single change at a time to understand what it delivers. Besides, it’s more fun (and less stressful) that way, anyway!
The Boss GT-1000 Guitar Effects Processor is by far the best multi-effects pedal that the team at Boss have ever come up with. This is jam-packed with the entire back catalogue of Boss stomp box effects as well as tones from the coveted "500" series Delay, Modulation and Reverb multi FX pedals. So, you have over 116 types of effects to create music with – making it a no-brainer for Boss fans in general and those who need a huge array of expertly crafted FX.
Electric guitar necks vary in composition and shape. The primary metric of guitar necks is the scale length, which is the vibrating length of the strings from nut to bridge. A typical Fender guitar uses a 25.5-inch (65 cm) scale length, while Gibson uses a 24.75-inch (62.9 cm) scale length in their Les Paul. While the scale length of the Les Paul is often described as 24.75 inches, it has varied through the years by as much as a half inch.[citation needed]
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