Guitar speakers typically exhibit a peak frequency response of between 5 and 6kHz, and sound brightest at the center. Because the top end of the speaker's reproduction is limited, the harsh upper harmonics of amplifier distortion are essentially removed, and what's left sounds pleasing and musical. Open-backed cabinets offer both front and rear miking opportunities for a nice blend, with increased low-end "thump" and "chug" emanating from damped low-string rhythm parts.
What a Beauty! This is a beautiful example of a RARE Vintage Japanese Alvarez 5053 made on 1/11/74. This one is Rare folks with its Old style script logo in mother of pearl inlay check that out...The first thing you can't help but notice on this guitar is how beautiful this guitar looks amazing fit & finish apperance is top shelf..its as good or pretter then others including the Martin ... its not just pretty guitar to look at and admire either it is really well build to play built using some very EXOTIC and beautiful looking tone WOODS as well very high end feel to this one ...as seen in the pics ( new better pics soon to come )It was built using a beautiful grained Sitka spruce top and the gorgeous Back is vivid book matched Brazilian Rosewood as is the sides BR and this examle overall is truly a stunning example, along with the backs center flamed maple section in contrast of the Brazilian Rosewood side sections WoW!, and the beautiful vintage hexagonal cellulloid inlays. modeled after the Martin D41, this guitar is in excellent used vintage collectible condition with only a few finish checks to this guitars glass like finish that one has that warm natural patina only a real 37 year old guitar can earn. Overall very good - excellent vintage condition! It's bound body is masterfully ornately - multi bound, as is the Honduran Mahogany neck & headstock is bound. Action is excellentt and can be easily adjusted up or down to meet your preference by way of an easily adjustable bridge . Truly is a great playing & sounding highly collectible Japanese vintage guitar in its own right. Its Very rare and it has old Alvarez Script Logo! Who cool is that....This is a super rare guitar that tend to go quickly that is getting harder and harder to find! in any condition let alone like this baby it both plays beautifully but it sounds fantastic! Let me know if interested Thanks for looking! Joe.

The McCarty Model - named after Theodore 'Ted' McCarty, Gibson's president during its 1950s to 1960s heyday and, much later, 'mentor' to Paul Reed Smith - originally appeared in the early 1990s and was the company's first attempt at a more vintage-informed guitar. It takes its name, primarily, from its scale length of 24.594 inches. However, the focus of the 594 is not just that scale length but a desire to recreate, as closely as possible, the 'holy grail' of vintage Gibson tone - a 1959 Sunburst, but in a modern double-cut guitar. A change comes with the pickups, which are PRS's latest date-series 58/15 humbuckers but with an 'LT' (Low Turns) suffix, which on a meter shows the bridge unit to have a lower DC resistance than the standard McCarty's 58/15, although the neck pickup seems virtually identical. The four-control layout (the first PRS double-cut guitar to use it) possesses the classic LP setup and feels immediately comfortable to any player used to the much-copied Gibson layout.  Full humbucking, or with the partial coil splits engaged, full volume, half volume, tones rolled off - not to mention the shades with both pickups on - there's not a duff sound that we can find. Dynamic, expressive - it purrs, it roars, it's one of the best electric guitars.
Bottom Line: The Line 6 HD500X is incredibly in-depth in the amount of options and editability it gives you. Doing all of it from the small screen on the actual unit is headache-inducing, but if you have a computer you can hook it up via USB and edit your sounds from there much more easily. There’s more of a learning curve with the HD500X than there is with the Zoom G3X, but the presets are decent enough and allow you to audition it if you’re the impatient type. Where the HD500X lacks is that it’s less of an immediate-gratification pedal, and it’s hard to tweak on-the-fly and come up with potentially inspirational sounds. Because of how the interface is, this is definitely more of a “sit down with headphones and tinker with it to get your perfect sound” type unit. If the effects quality of the Zoom G3X is a 7/10, the Line 6 HD500X is an 8.5/10. This is the one to get if you’re the type that likes to dig in and have control over every little thing. The price tag is a little on the high side, but considering what a powerhouse this unit is, it’s definitely not unreasonable.
It has great quality hardware and amazing sound because of the pickups. There are no flaws or nicks in the finish of the body. It needs to be set up though which can be difficult initially. Once you set up, you will be able to see its performance in action. The great thing about this guitar is that even though it is the cheapest electric guitar, it looks quite expensive to an observer.
This Fender Modern Electric guitar features an apine body and mini-toggle-coil-split-switch with modern humbucker pickups. It comes with a C-shaped maple neck, a maple fretboard with 9.5-inch radius consisting of 22 jumbo frets. It has a Stratocaster middle pickup, a three-ply pickup guide and a five-way pickup switching for maximum sound control and sustains.
Fender is well known for producing excellent quality musical instruments. Not just today, instead it always has topped the list of best guitar brands as an icon in the music history of America. It produces a brighter tone, accompanying single coil pickups rather than the humbuckers. The single coil pickups are specially designed in a way scratching through the mix with the glorious sound to produce the characteristic tone. The unique part of Fender guitars may cause issues with humming.
I have never reviewed anything, however felt that I had to share that this is a complete disappointment. I bought it two weeks ago for my daughters birthday and it is already broken. The mechanism to plug the amp line/chord into the guitar broke, rendering it useless. The amp itself is very cheap and the sound quality was a disappointment, crackling when in use. The strap has holes that connect the strap to the guitar, were too big and would not stay fastened so I had to tie the strap with rope to see that it stayed on while she played.
I must confess -- I am horrible at soldering. So after messing up another wiring harness with my soldering skills, I came across ObsidianWire and purchased out of desperation. Now I wish this would have been my first choice. The wiring sounds awesome, it was a breeze to install and the included switch and input jack completed the upgrade. I would HIGHLY recommend ObsidianWire harnesses." - Ross G Vintage 50s Wiring for Les Paul

Sennheiser's cardioid MD421 crops up almost as frequently in interviews, and has a wider frequency response, none of the low mid-range suckout, and an even heftier sensitivity boost upwards of 1kHz. This microphone also has a larger diaphragm than the SM57, and the off-axis response anomalies of the larger diaphragm, in particular, give a different character to the sound. Although obviously very popular, this mic seems more often to be used in combination with other mics than on its own.

The following year the Standard model received a short-lived redesign seeking to reduce production costs and price on American Stratocasters. This revised version lacked a second tone control, a newly designed Freeflyte vibrato system, and a bare-bones output jack. A reshaped ‘Comfort Contour’ body with deeper forearm and waist contours similar to an early 1960s model was introduced. What it did retain was the 1970s-style headstock decal. The 1982/83 version of the Standard Stratocaster has little in common with the Dan Smith guitar, apart from the period when they were sold, but is sometimes informally (and controversially) presented as a “Dan Smith-era” or “redesign” guitar. After the Standard Stratocaster was discontinued in 1984, Fender Japan produced a 22-fret version with a flat 9.5″ radius and medium-jumbo fretwire until 1986.[14]


During the first three decades of the 20th century, with the rising popularity of Hawaiian and big band music in America, guitar makers built larger-bodied instruments, using steel instead of gut strings, and metal instead of wood for the guitar body. Around 1925, John Dopyera designed a guitar with metal resonating cones built into the top that amplified the instrument’s sound. That suited twangy Hawaiian and blues music but not other genres. Then, in the 1920s, innovations in microphones and speakers, radio broadcasting, and the infant recording industry made electronic amplification for guitars possible. The volume was suddenly able to go up: way up.
Orion Blue Book Online (at UsedPrice.com): The Orion Blue Book Online will help you determine how much nearly anything that you own is worth, including guitars. This includes electric and acoustic guitars, as well as bass guitars, amplifiers, and other guitar peripherals. The company behind Used Price works in conjunction with Orion Bluebook, which makes this the largest website dedicated to pricing used musical instruments. The website is browsable by the first letter of your instrument's manufacturer or make. It has every major guitar manufacturer and most obscure ones.
The short-lived Elite Telecaster of 1983 incorporated two specially designed humbucking pickups powered by an active circuitry that featured a “TBX” guitar expander and an MDX midrange booster with 12 dB of gain. Other features included a “Freeflyte” hardtail bridge and die-cast tuning machines with pearloid buttons. This guitar was among the latest CBS-era Fenders to feature a BiFlex truss-rod system, low-friction EasyGlider string trees and active electronics. After CBS sold Fender to a group of employees led by Bill C. Schultz in 1985, production ceased on the Elite Telecaster and other Elite models. Fender Japan made its own version of the Elite Telecaster in late 1984, which featured a 22-fret neck with medium-jumbo fretwire and a modern 9.5 inch fingerboard radius. Notable Elite Telecaster players include Johnny Hallyday and Dave Davies of The Kinks. Michael Houser w/ Widespread Panic and Andy Summers of The Police.

Budget, feel and sound! Don't worry about who plays what or brand names. NONE of that matters if the guitar does not FEEL good to you and have the SOUND that you are looking for. Of course, most people have a budget and there is no need in trying $2000 guitars if you can't afford one, except for expanding your education about different types of guitar. That's the short answer.


Gibson Brands, Inc. is considered as an American producer of guitars and other instruments, which is located in Nashville, Tennessee. The brand was earlier known as Gibson Guitar Corp. The company was founded by Orville Gibson in 1902. They are famous for its innovative and superior quality guitars. They sell their guitars under different brand names. These guitars are available at little higher rates. The price range starts from Rs. 49,500/- onwards (approx). For more details, visit Gibson.com.

Fishing some thin wires through the jack holes from outside can work. I use stranded wire and strip the insulation from the end. I’ll divide the strands and wrap them around the pot shaft. It’s a delicate balance — you want enough ‘wrapping’ to grip the pot for pulling, but not enough to get in the way of getting the pot shaft through the mounting hole.
According to Harmony’s 1963 price list, the H1213 Archtone sold for $37.75. If we take inflation into account, this same guitar would actually sell for around $270 today. This is roughly the same price for most entry-level acoustic guitars these days, but the two main differences are that the H1213 is an archtop and it was made in the US (most modern entry-level acoustics are flattops produced in Asia).
Often forgotten when it comes to in-depth reviews, the best acoustic electric guitar can be pretty tricky to find. Guitarists often know what they’re looking for when it comes to a standard electric or acoustic guitar, but there are some additional things to look out for when it comes to the fusion of the two. On a bit of a budget? Check out the top acoustic electric guitars under $1000 here. Perhaps you are a beginner, if so - check out the top electro-acoustic guitars under 300 bucks! Want something more luxurious? Try an acoustic electric for under 700 bucks.
Recently picked myself up a second J28SCDL Jumbo, which was set up beautifully and I have to say it truly is an amazing guitar. It could give some of the higher priced guitars a run for its money. Lovely sound, creative design and clearly a lot of guitar for your money. I seriously encourage you not to over look Washburn when looking for a good guitar at an affordable price. Might end up your favorite guitar!
With the advent of hard-rock acts like the Kinks and Yardbirds in the 1960s, the thirst for crunchy, distorted sounds grew insatiable. Kinks guitarist Dave Davies even slit his speaker cones in a quest for extra-gritty sound. The demand for loud, distorted output led to the rise of England’s Marshall amps, which were enthusiastically adopted by rockers on both sides of the Atlantic.
Most of the better machine heads on the market these days use a standard .375" headstock hole, so swapping tuners isn’t that hard to do. The problem comes with the mounting at the rear of the peghead. Luckily, if you use the type that screw down from the front side with a nut and washer, you can swap and test before you drill additional mounting-screw holes.
I think for somebody reasonable, the right answer would be that yes, it has an effect on the tone of the guitar and the notes coming off the strings, but not nearly as much as other factors in the design of the guitar. If you think I'm wrong then you should read more about the overtone series, the physics of sound, difference tones, and how sounds interact both as vibrations moving through air, and digitally as numbers in a computer. It's just not as simple as to say wood doesn't have a magnetic field so therefore it can't possibly affect the tone. It's true that much of what we hear is a result of the ear-brain axis, but there are also many fundamentally measurable physical properties of sound as it occurs over time (as all sounds do) that can easily explain why different types or shapes of wood could have a subtle but real effect on the tone.
Nickel finish Frequensator style split trapeze tailpiece. This split fork design originated on archtop models from the 40's. The difference in fork length alters string tension behind the bridge to add depth to the bottom strings and brilliance to the top strings. Width of plate with mounting screws = 2 17/32 in. (64.3mm). Length of mounting bracket side with mounting holes = 1 39/64 in. (41mm) from end to bend Length of mounting bracket from bend to trapeze hook tops = 1 13/64 in. 30.5mm.) Length of short trapeze to top of string retainer bar (not including nut heights) = 2 1/2 in. (63.35mm). Short bracket width = 1 3/64 in. (26.65mm). String Bracket width = 1 3/16 in. (30.35mm). Length of long Trapeze section including string bracket = 6 in. (152mm). Widths of each trapeze and string bracket are equal.
Tempo Delay: Most plug-in and hardware delays now allow you to automatically sync delay times to MIDI clock and then specify the interval of the repeats in terms of note values rather than milliseconds. A trick here is to use two simultaneous tempo-based delays with, say, a triplet delay setting, panned hard left, and a straight-note delay panned hard right. Things can get more interesting still if you apply this technique using ping-pong delays, so that alternate repeats bounce from one side of the stereo spectrum to the other. To create a true 3D effect, play around with the amount of original signal left in the middle. Depending on the intervals between your repeats, you can turn simple guitar and synth lines into complex, arpeggiator-like patterns or totally spaced out ambient pieces. Stephen Bennett

@Umberto – Thanks for supporting Strymon! 🙂 The best place for the Lex is where it sounds best to you. If you like how it sounds in front of your drive pedals, I recommend using it in that location. I also want to note that turning up the PREAMP DRIVE on the Lex can lead to lower effect output volume and recommend using the pedals on-board boost (up to +6dB of boost) to counter this loss of volume.
Watching the short documentary posted above about Joe’s youthful experiences with MXR pedals was a real treat for me and sent me nostalgically back to those childhood days discovering pedals with my friends. I don’t know a whole ton about Joe’s use of particular pedals and such, but I’d definitely love to learn more. I do, however, appreciate how indispensable they are to an electric guitarist, especially a supremely talented one like Joe. Watching Joe’s fingers as he plays is magic, but I definitely need to start paying attention to how he’s playing guitar with his feet.
This is another budget guitar that is routinely praised for the excellent value for money it provides. Many reviewers point to its playability as its strongest point, which is not surprising given that this guitar is from Ibanez. There were even several people who wrote in their reviews that they liked the GRX20Z so much that they had bought it more than once.
Maton Guitars - Australia's leading manufacturer of Acoustic and Acoustic / Electric Guitars. Until the late 1930's the Australian guitar manufacturing industry was virtually non existent and good quality guitars were hard to find. The best guitars, it was well understood, came from the U.S.A. Bill May, a Melbourne born jazz musician, woodwork teacher, and luthier, decided to change all that.

A Wiki is a web page that anyone can make changes to. The job of maintaining accurate information is far too monumental for one person, but a community of enthusiasts can maintain many thousands of pages quite easily, each person adding a bit at a time. That's the idea behind iGuide?s "What's It Worth Wiki". The most famous example of a Knowledge Wiki is Wikipedia, of course. But, our vision is that someday iGuide?will become the Wikipedia of Art, Antiques, Collectibles, Memorabilia....and Guitars.
Primarily, reverb pedals tend to give you a lot more variety and control over the effect than you'll have with an amplifier. In fact, most amps that have reverb will have a single reverb knob that you turn up for more of the effect, or down for less. This can work if you use reverb sparingly, but if you're into the effect and like to use it a lot, that's not enough control to really get the most out of your reverberated tone.
This is definitely the coolest music store in the Pacific Northwest. If you are a high end guitar lover, you need to go. If you are a pedal nerd, you NEED to go. James, the owner, has relationships built with the coolest vendors in the country, and manages to collect the coolest gear. Earthquaker Devices makes a custom line of pedals just for this store, for christ's sake. I've never seen so many pedals in my life, and that's really neat because not many stores focus on that. The staff makes you feel right at home. They are so knowledgable and pleasant to be around. No highbrow guitar store attitude to be found here. So all in all, you need to go check it out. It's a super fun place to play some quality instruments. Plus, their logo is a monkey in a cowboy hat, named "Monk Williams". I'm not sure how it could get any better than that.

A passive pickup doesn’t produce a very strong signal, which can result in a small amount of volume and an anemic tone. However, the signal can either be boosted at the p.a., your amp, or the most versatile option' via an Acoustic Preamp. Active pickups don’t require any external technology to boost, though they do require a battery, but some people still use acoustic preamps for the tone shaping and DI benefits..
My interests are in the Kents with the script logo on the headstock, body, and pickups. The headstock is Gibson-ish with tuners on both sides. The pickup nearest the neck is tilted, regardless of how many pickups are on the guitar. One model, the 742 has four pickups with switches, volume and tone knobs for each. Overkill, to say the least, and I have read somewhere that they don’t sound very good. However, I have seen some youtube video where a 742 sounds pretty good in live performance. A lot of the sound comes from a proper setup and the hands of a skilled player. Hopefully I’ll be able to find out for myself someday. Regardless, the 742 is one funky-looking guitar.

It was also in January of ’64 that the Westheimer Sales Company, 1414 South Wabash Avenue, Chicago, began advertising its New Kingston, the “S” line of quality guitars. These double-cutaway guitars included the #S-1 single pickup, #S-2 double pickup, #S-3 three pickup, the #S-2T double with tremolo, and #S-3T with tremolo. These were most likely versions of the little MJ and WG guitars.


Searching for Guitars market values? You have come to the right place! IGuide?is proud to host the online Guitars Price Guide.The price guide is maintained by Jon R. Warren, whose price guide books have been the authority on collectibles values since 1985. The searchable database consists of detailed reports on a ever-growing list of items. Each report includes current market values in ten different grades, as well as a section for "Real Market Data", actual prices fetched at auction. The database is updated daily.


For years, Schecter has provided a nice counterpoint to the various Les Paul and Strat look-a-likes on the market (many of which are very good) at an affordable pricepoint. As my local guitar shop owner once said, for the money, they might make the best all around guitar south of $1,000. You can spend more than that, but the point is, they don’t skimp downrange.
On the other hand, if you know that you have spent a decent amount of money on something, you’re more likely to keep using it, so that you didn’t pay that much in vain. Getting a proper guitar from the start also means that you don’t have to get another one as soon as you get a little bit better and start to notice that maybe your $50 guitar wasn’t that amazing after all.
Wherever you play you're going to run into one of three sound setups: a full PA, a partial PA, or no PA capacity beyond vocal mics. The PA (Public Address system) is the primary sound system in any venue. A full PA has the board space and amplification capabilities to allow a sound engineer to apply a dedicated microphone to every instrument, amplifier, and drum head, as well as the cymbal spaces.
You're close, but not quite where you want to be with your tone.  You are officially a serious tone chaser; you've already swapped the stock burstbuckers in your awesome R9 Les Paul for something better ... but you are still only at 95-percent of the TONE you want, need, and hear in your head.  Keep seeking grasshopper, and you will find.  For only those who persist will drink from the holy grail.
The BOSS ME-80 gives you all of the effects needed to create that elusive signature tone. The multi-effects unit is a great way to learn how different effects interact with each other to provide you with crystal-clear tones to fuzzy, thick walls-of-noise. If you have an ME-80, download BOSS Tone Studio for an easy way to experiment and learn these effects, have fun and use your ears to build your best guitar sound.
I should also add that I said I expect the Authentics to come in the medium string height range, because they are trying to replicate the kind of vintage Martins coveted by Bluegrass musicians, who are either used to or seek out slightly higher action compared to modern guitars. There are exceptions of course since Tony Rice and Robert Shafer both prefer action so low it is practically resting on the frets.

Acoustic necks are usually listed as 12- or 14-fret necks. This number refers to the number of frets above the guitar body, not the total number of frets. On a 12-fret neck, the 13th and 14th frets will be on the body, and, thus, harder to reach than on a 14-fret neck, where they are extended beyond the guitar body. If you have small hands, look for an acoustic guitar with a smaller diameter neck.


If you’re a guitarist, chances are you’ve either owned or at least played on a Zoom multi-effects pedal. It’s basically an unwritten law! They have always and continue to make some of the best multi effects pedals known to the musical world, so naturally we had to include the Zoom G3n Multi-Effects Processor (as well as a handful of other Zoom models) in this list.
Youngman is also known for creating some of the best Frankenstein guitars in the Dallas/Fort Worth area. One of his favorites to build is his custom built Indian Esqu-wire Custom, a monstrous guitar with an SG body, a Telecaster neck and Fender pickups. "It's taking shit and making something playable," he says. And his touch must be golden because guitarslingers like Smokin' Joe Kubek, Bnois King and Rocky Athas each own one of his Frankenstein babies.
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: : Does anyone know for sure where these originated. I have been told Vox (the England years) made this flat bodied plank guitar in the skiffle days of early 60's/late 50's. Mine is painted white(by hand) with a large black pick guard that curves to envelope the two chrome "toaster" pickups ,bottom of neck, and three control knobs.The strings have a moveable maple bridge(not secured) and a small chrome hardtail heel.The neck has a zero fret at top and 19 more playing frets.There are dot inlays at the 3rd,5th,seventh,ninth,12th,and 17th frets.The headstock is of natural finish light maple with a top edge cut at a sloping angle like Hofner.It has brass tuning pegs,gears and gear plates and the keys are white plastic.The beautiful short neck is true ,natural maple.Along one of the tuning gear plates is the numbers: 35515 which are etched into the wood. Four bolts without any plate hold the neck base to the plain body and a green decal above the pegs at top face of headstock reads: Shadow. The fret board is rosewoodand is laid on neck without bindings.It has six strings and sounds like a short scale Baritone guitar. It also only has one strap peg at bottom since they used to put the other end of strap on a tuning key. No other holes are seen for any former peg at other end of body(where normally found). Please send any info on this small,early,simple but awesome sounding electric skiffle guitar from England(Vox?).Thanks!!!!!
The Original Blackout humbuckers are designed to be everything metal, handling thick rhythm play and well-defined lead melodies at higher speeds. The tone has an almost shimmering quality, especially on a clean amp setting. The tone profile of both the neck and the bridge version of this pickup emphasize treble with a hollowed out mid-range that helps give you the best of searing leads and heavy power chords.
Many of the Cordobas, such as the C7, come with a gig bag or case, which makes it easier to keep your guitar in great condition, especially if you purchase a humidifier block. If you head over to the Amazon listing for this guitar, you might see that the reviews are the same for this guitar as they are for another Cordoba instrument, so there really isn’t much extra information, unfortunately.​
For a guitar that sits comfortably in the mid-range segment of the market, Yamaha RevStar RS420 packs a decent punch. Body shape is more reminiscent of a PRS than anything else, but Yamaha definitely infused it with their unique details. The sound is tight, very flexible, and I had no issues dialing in the type of tone I was looking for. A well rounded model, that’s for sure.
For die-hard metal players looking for best electric guitar brands, Dean is another famous name you wish to check. The iconic ML design has become a signature instrument for rock because of Damageplan and Darrel Abbott of Pantera (late). In the ’90s, ML was revived by Dime, and then Dean stretched out the idea while sharpening the designs of it with a modern touch.

Cordoba is a fast growing guitar builder that specializes in nylon string acoustic instruments, played by artists like the Gypsy Kings and Bon Iver just to name a few. And with their ever increasing reputation, we find it only fitting to give them a spot on this list, specifically for the impressive quality and tone of the GK Studio. This nylong string guitar incidentally provides a refreshing break from the many steel-string acoustics that are featured here.
The following chart will help you choose the right sized guitar for your child. It is important to note that guitar size is only one part of making it easy for your child to play. An un-adjusted guitar will not be easy to play, even if it is the right size. Here at FirstGuitar.com, each guitar is inspected, properly adjusted and set up so that the strings are easy to press down and the notes ring clearly.
He may have spent much of his Guns n' Roses prime shirtless, drunk and surrounded by snakes, but Slash brought good taste and restraint back to hard-rock guitar. "It was a stripped-down rock & roll sound compared to what everybody else was doing," says Slash. He could riff like Joe Perry, and intertwine, Stonesstyle, with Izzy Stradlin. And lyrical solos like the from-the-mountaintop grandeur of "November Rain" were permanently laced into the songs' fabric. "It's hard to play those solos any other way," says Slash. "It will sound wrong."
Join the "Cigar Box Revolution"! This La Vox Cigar Box Electric Guitar is built from a decidedly uptown-looking round box. Neck-through construction means it is heavier than most cigar boxes, and it performs more like a standard electric guitar. Play some raw, smokin' blues, back-alley funk, or whatever else wells up from deep down inside.  More details...
In 1966, Teisco guitars shed some of its adolescent awkwardness of the early ’60s in favor of a svelter, hipper look. While some of the tubby bodies and monkey grips remained, they were joined by leaner shapes, thin, pointed, flared cutaways and German carve contours. In many ways, the ’66 Teisco line is the quintessential year for Teisco, which is fitting since it would be the last under the original ownership.
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That hand-built prototype, an anonymous white guitar, had most of the features of what would become the Telecaster. It was designed in the spirit of the solid-body Hawaiian guitars manufactured by Rickenbacker – small, simple units made of Bakelite and aluminum with the parts bolted together—but with wooden construction. (Rickenbacker, then spelled ‘Rickenbacher,’ also offered a solid Bakelite-bodied electric Spanish guitar in 1935 that seemed to presage details of Fender’s design.)


It is possible to perform a setup at home, but it can easily become a laborious and time-consuming process. You can instead bring your instrument to a local store or other professional. Guitar setup cost is usually a large value in comparison to the work it would take to do the job at home. You should consider that the cost of a guitar setup includes the addition of new strings but may not cover the actual cost of them. Whether or not strings are included in the price is something that should be investigated prior to having an instrument professionally setup. Guitar setup cost may also increase if the tuning keys need adjustment, or if you have a complicated bridge system (like a Floyd Rose) that requires extra knowledge and skill to be properly fine-tuned.
The size and shape of the ME-80 is comparable to the Line 6 POD HD500X, though the Boss measures a few inches smaller, and also weighs a few lbs less. This is a Boss product, and as such it’s built like a tank. No worries whatsoever over the build quality of the chassis, knobs, and footswitches. Starting with the rear of the ME-80, you can see the I/O is pretty basic - mono input for your guitar, stereo output, a headphones jack, AUX in (so you can plug in your iPhone and jam along to your favorite tracks), and a USB port. Like the Zoom G3X and the Line 6 POD HD500X, you can use the Boss ME-80 as a USB interface for your computer and record your guitar straight into your favorite DAW. Oh and one small inconvenience is that you’ll need to buy the power supply separately. Why Boss doesn’t just include one for a unit of this quality and price, we don't really understand. If you do end up getting the ME-80, this is the power adapter you want. It can also use 6 AA batteries which is good if you need to use this on-the-go, but we don’t recommend it as it will suck those batteries dry in no time.
Chosen by artists over 3 decades for use on stage and in studio, the Zager 80 Series is the “go to” guitar for the touring musician or veteran player wanting a professional grade lifetime instrument. Consistently rated in the top 5% of acoustics in national and international publications competing with guitars 2 and 3 times its price, yet costs 50% less since you’re buying direct from our workshop in Lincoln, Nebraska. If you enjoy the deep rich bass that’s common in rosewood guitars, a solid cedar top takes it to the next level providing a very mellow, sweet response.  Combined with legendary Zager playability and you have a guitar that will go head to head with any acoustic on the market today…regardless of price.
Of course, no-one says you have to use the same mic on each speaker cone. For example the SOS interview with Toby Wright shows an SM57 and an MD421 on separate speakers, and Don Smith mentioned using an SM57 and an AKG C451 on separate speakers when recording Keith Richards. Sylvia Massy Shivy also uses the SM57+MD421 combination, but sounds a note of caution when deciding on the exact positioning of the mics: "You have to be very careful with phase, just check it until the signal is the strongest."
Just ask any savvy stompbox builder or low-tuned 7-string player: Sometimes the best way to add power to your low tones is to remove a bit of bass. That’s because the lowest frequencies in your signal disproportionately overdrive your amp and effects. Siphoning off just a bit of bass can add clarity and focus. At extreme settings, the filtering can produce sharp, squawking tones akin to those of a ’60s treble booster pedal (not a bad thing). If you’ve ever grappled with high-gain tones that make your amp fart out, here’s your flatulence remedy.

Bass amplifier equipment manufacturers include a variety of different types of companies, ranging from companies that only make individual components (e.g., Accugroove loudpeakers, a speaker manufacturer) to companies that only make bass amplifiers and loudspeakers (e.g., Gallien-Krueger). At the other end of the spectrum are companies that offer bass amplification equipment as part of a much broader offering of different types of instrument amplifiers and public address systems (e.g., Peavey, Carvin A&I or Yorkville Sound.)
Softer Delays: I'll usually have at least a couple of delays as auxiliary effects in a rock or pop mix, but I often find that bringing the general level of the delay as high as I want it makes any transients stand out too much. When I'm sending single notes on a clean electric guitar to a delay line, say, I tend to want to hear a wash of sound, not the rhythmic 'CHA-Cha-cha-cha-cha' of a repeated note attack. For this reason, I'll often put a gate or expander before a delay, with an attack time set to 10ms or so. This is enough to 'chop off' any abrupt transients, and makes the delay sound much smoother. Sam Inglis
George Harrison of the Beatles and Roger McGuinn of the Byrds brought the electric twelve-string to notability in rock and roll. During the Beatles' first trip to the United States, in February 1964, Harrison received a new 360/12 model guitar from the Rickenbacker company, a twelve-string electric made to look onstage like a six-string. He began using the 360 in the studio on Lennon's "You Can't Do That" and other songs. McGuinn began using electric twelve-string guitars to create the jangly, ringing sound of the Byrds. Both Jimmy Page, the guitarist with Led Zeppelin, and Leo Kottke, a solo artist, are well known as twelve-string guitar players.
If you are a first time builder or an experienced professional you know the value of building your instrument on a solid foundation. The Custom Shop Jag body is beautiful, high quality and made to spec. The Allparts neck is manufactured under license by Fender. The materials and quality level meet the standards set by Fender. Using these high quality materials will give you the sweet tone and sustain you are looking for.
There are a couple of tricks you can try. One is to get an allen key wrench that is SLIGHTLY too large and take a small file to it to taper all six sides slightly. The other trick, which I use sometimes on Stratocaster saddle height screws, is to use a suitably-sized Torx wrench. They're already tapered, and since they're six-sided-star shaped, they grip the corners really well, even if there's a bit of crud stuck in the screw.

Practical - These sessions will involve exercising your fingers. For example, fingering chords would fall under this category, as the focus will be on getting physically comfortable with positioning and changing between chords, or experimenting with new strumming patterns. With lead guitar, the physical side covers techniques such as legato (you'll learn what that means soon enough!), string bends, speed drills and anything that involves the physical side of playing guitar.
Slicer – A dynamic effect that sounds like your guitar tone is chopping in and out. This percussive effect is akin to sequencer-type effects used by synthesizers. The effect turns the volume of the signal on and off, and sounds like the signal is being “chopped up” or “sliced” in a specified pattern. The BOSS SL-20 Slicer features 50 patterns to turn your guitar into a groove machine!

According to the Amazon page for this guitar, the item weight is 18 lbs, but that’s likely due to the inclusion of the case. There are no other reviews of this instrument, but just keep in mind that with a spruce top guitar, you’re going to have higher, clearer treble sounds than with a cedar top. Also, compared to higher-priced guitars from the Ramirez workshop, this particular model—considered an “entry” model—is a bit more affordable, which was Amalia Ramirez’s aim in reviving the 3N series.
The Gibson ES-335 certainly had an alluring appeal in the mid 1900’s, and it’s easy to see why. With a beautiful Arched top, lovely smooth curves and a tone that can knock your socks off, and a beautiful white binding, these truly are beautiful guitars. Whether you want to play some classic blues, or dip into some catchy jazz, this guitar is sure to impress.
Jazz guitarist Les Paul spent years tinkering with his own electric guitar designs, but his first creations were initially rejected by Gibson’s parent company in 1946. But just a few short years later, on the heels of Fender’s success with the Telecaster and Paul’s growing popularity as an artist, Gibson struck a deal with Paul to play and endorse their new design for a solid-body electric. Gibson released the guitar as the Les Paul signature model in 1952, and since its release, it has become one of the world’s most imitated and sought-after guitars, with late ’50s vintage models being among the most prized instruments in the world.
Another Quality Ibanez Guitar ....This example is MODEL VINTAGE # V302 BS...And it IS A REAL GEM and it has a Premium German Sitka SOLID Spruce Top, WoW! what a nice original finish this one has...AAA Mahogany Sides-Neck & Back "see quality og the grain in the pics" . Lots of Full-and Wonderful rich tone from this baby. Its real ez to play & stays in tune well. It is a crafted in Japan guitar and it compairs favorably to Gibson, Guild or Martin! Please Note: If you prefer the guitar in Natural and not sunburst see our other listing for another V302 non sunburst we have in stock & available.. thank you for your interest, Joe .
Jazz guitar playing styles include rhythm guitar-style "comping" (accompanying) with jazz chord voicings (and in some cases, walking basslines) and "blowing" (improvising solos) over jazz chord progressions with jazz-style phrasing and ornaments. The accompanying style for electric guitar in most jazz styles differs from the way chordal instruments accompany in many popular styles of music. In rock and pop, the rhythm guitarist typically performs chords in dense and regular fashion to define a tune's rhythm. Simpler music tends to use chord voicings focused on the first, third, and fifth notes of the chord. In contrast, more complex music styles of pop might intermingle periodic chords and delicate voicings into pauses in the melody or solo. Complex guitar chord voicings are often have no root, especially in chords that have more than six notes. Such chords typically emphasize the third and seventh notes of the chord. These chords also often include the 9th, 11th and 13th notes of the chord, which are called extensions, or color notes.

This is another budget guitar that is routinely praised for the excellent value for money it provides. Many reviewers point to its playability as its strongest point, which is not surprising given that this guitar is from Ibanez. There were even several people who wrote in their reviews that they liked the GRX20Z so much that they had bought it more than once.
This little-known company is responsible for the St. George badge. This particular badge was made from 1963-1967. It also produced the rare Shiro guitar. It is possible that the company may also be responsible for the Pleasant guitar badge after 1966. This company may have been a small offshoot of Aria Guitar Company, founded by Shiro Arai, but that has not been verified as of today.

A typical digital multi-effects pedal is programmed, with several memory locations available to save custom user settings. Many lack the front-panel knobs of analog devices, using buttons instead to program various effect parameters. Multi-effects devices continue to evolve, some gaining MIDI or USB interfaces to aid in programming. Examples include:
You have a 2 band EQ as well as independent gain and master controls as well as a headphone/line out jack for either silent practice or recording directly to your audio interface. There’s 10 watts of solid state power flying out of the 6.5" speaker so you’re covered for smaller gigs and practice sessions whilst the classic VOX grille cloth and chicken head knobs provide that unmistakeable VOX look. A fantastic amplifier that will provide you with lush tone and typical VOX reliability – you can’t argue with that for under £70.
Hopefully, that explains the basic components and tools. As mentioned guitar electronics can be a little daunting and my best advice if new to guitar electronics is to avoid seeking out information on guitar related forums as you may leave your head spinning, feeling more daunted than you did in the first place. We will cover the basics here and in most cases that will be more than enough to help you put together a great guitar.
NEW ARRIVAL SORRY SOLD OUT QUICKLY ...She's super clean Genuine Ibanez Hoshino Factory release this is a cool collector piece of Japanese Law-suit modle guitar history WoW is this well made guitar Beautiful in person just impressive . This vintage J200 is now over 39 years old that plays with ease and has a HUGE SOUND... really sweet beautiful tone that rings out pretty loudly and its playability makes this guitar fun to play and an excellent choice in your next cool Japanese Vintage guitar... she's in better than average cond too well taken care of Adult owned right here in California she's in top form folks. With its Nice medium slim taper flamey maple neck 1-11/16ths at the nut. Classic beautiful original pick guard looks exactly like the old age Gibson, the detailed workmanship fit & finish you will be sure to notice and love. Ready to tour or record tonight! every time you pick it up to play. TO SEE THE PICTURE GALLERY OF THIS GUITAR CUT & PASTE THIS LINK THEN CLICK OR RETURN: https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/73ElDegasJ200BlondFlamed?authkey=Gv1sRgCKTqjqGy09roBw#slideshow/5573434646760239042.
Once you’ve gotten past the touch-or input level–intensive effects, your next primary goal is to refine your tone while at the same time minimizing noise. If you use a compressor, its ideal location is directly after the pitch shifter/harmonizer, envelope follower/auto wah and wah pedals. Because a compressor compresses the entire signal, it’s not recommended to place one after a boost, overdrive or distortion/fuzz pedal as those pedals often generate noise that will be boosted by a compressor along with the guitar’s signal.

Now I'm talking to the owner of my local mom & pop shop who sold me my Affinty (which is great but the string spacing sucks). Guy is leaning toward making a deal for an Austin. Maybe I'm dead wrong, but I don't like Austins, they are crap IMO. I told him I have some extra cash and maybe we could work something out, but I just feel like this guy has a lousy inventory of cheap guitars and I will be hard pressed to escape with a decent instrument.

Their 200-series is reasonably priced, and a great value for a Taylor guitar. They also make the Baby and Big Baby, and the GS Mini—smaller-bodied guitars perfect for intermediate players and beginners with a few extra bucks in their pockets.These are awesome acoustic guitars with a big sound. They might be small, but veteran guitar players love them for the tone and portability.
Speakers and speaker stacks are a necessary partner for standalone amplifier heads. Take the total power level into account when you're looking at speakers, ensuring you're getting a stack with the muscle you need for the venues you play. Speaker configuration is also important, with larger woofers delivering more powerful bass and smaller tweeters bringing through the high-end.
I just noticed that no-one has mentioned Robben Ford – another master of both technique and taste and a certain contender for my top ten list, fighting for a place in the same space as Larry Carlton and John Scofield. (John Mayer can certainly play, but for me, any of those three offers at least as much technique, and a wider range of accomplishments, than JM – check out their various versions of “I don’t need no doctor”).
The AEG10II combines laminated spruce top with mahogany back and sides, and packs both in a thin profile body. Thin bodied guitars, while more resistant to feedback than their larger counterparts, don’t have the breadth of tone or the volume of a full sized acoustic guitar. The cool thing about this guitar is that, it’s one of the cheapest ways for beginning musicians to get a solid gigging instrument.

The original run of Marshall Silver Jubilee amps were designed to celebrate Jim Marshall's 50th anniversary in music as well as 25 years of Marshall amps. These beautiful sounding (and highly sought after) amps have been brought back from extinction with the Marshall 2525H Mini Silver Jubilee Head, matching cab and combo and have been constructed using the original 2525 diagrams. This means you have all that vintage sounding goodness with modern reliability. You can even switch it from 20 Watt to 5 Watt power so you can go from live sound to home practice easily without ever losing your tone. A great amp for stage, home and studio recording.
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The EB-18 was supplied with a quality hard flight case. The EB-18 body fits into the shaped recess and the case takes account of the oddly shaped ‘lizard-looking head and large tuning lugs. There is a pair of compartments inside forcables and other items. The inside is lined with a soft, burnt orange color, fur-like material. The case is closed with four toggle latches and has a centrally placed carrying handle.
Guitar from Spain is the best online store to buy the best spanish guitars online: Classical guitars, Flamenco Guitars, Acoustic Guitars and electro acoustic guitars made in Spain from the best spanish guitar makers at spanish local prices. These unique guitars will be delivered from our warehouse or from the manufacturer's bench to your door, avoiding extra costs or double margins. Because we only sell guitars from the most reputable Spanish manufacturers, you will be assured to buy only the best spanish guitars available with 2 years warranty and certified from origin. Spanish guitar brands like Alhambra Guitars, Raimundo Guitars, Ramirez Guitars, Admira Guitars, Camps Guitars, Rodriguez Guitars or Prudencio Saez Guitars are among the most reputable and best sounding guitars in the world. These guitars are manufactured in Spain, the land of the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar. At Guitar From Spain you can also buy steel stringed acoustic guitars, western guitars and electro acoustic guitars made with the same traditional craftsmanship and know how acquired through centuries of guitar making. We also have special guitars as Bandurria (Spanish mandolin), Laud (Spanish lute), Cuban tres, timple canario and special sized guitars as Cadete (guitar 3/4) Requinto (Guitar 1/2) and Senorita (Guitar 7/8). Compare our Spanish Guitars with any other "asian made guitars" at the same price and you will be amazed with the diference in quality and sound that you can get. Do not settle for imitations, buy the original, buy Guitars from Spain.

In 2013, Gibson introduced the Government Series of Les Paul, SG, Flying V, Explorer and ES-335 guitars which were constructed solely of tonewood the US government seized but later returned to Gibson after the resolution of the company's Lacey Act violation in 2011. The guitars were finished in "government grey" and also featured decorations which intended to draw attention to the issue of government. A year later in 2014, Gibson released the Government Series II[77] of guitars, which were essentially the same as the first series, only finished in a new color: "government tan".
Having a tuner on your pedal board is useful but these days I more often use a clip-on tuner, specifically the TC Electronic Polytune Clip (Buy at Amazon UK, Amazon US). I don't like the main signal to run through the tuner all the time if I can help it (I use the GigRig G2 switching system) but if you don't have that luxury, then look for a tuner with True Bypass like the TC Electronic Polytune 2 (Buy at Amazon UK, Amazon US) or use a Volume pedal that has a Tuner Output (many do these days!).
Having a tuner on your pedal board is useful but these days I more often use a clip-on tuner, specifically the TC Electronic Polytune Clip (Buy at Amazon UK, Amazon US). I don't like the main signal to run through the tuner all the time if I can help it (I use the GigRig G2 switching system) but if you don't have that luxury, then look for a tuner with True Bypass like the TC Electronic Polytune 2 (Buy at Amazon UK, Amazon US) or use a Volume pedal that has a Tuner Output (many do these days!).
"Acousterr's tab maker is a tablature maker application which can be used to write down and compose music. Users can create tabs, play them out, explore tabs created by other users. They can choose any instrument like guitar, bass guitar, piano, ukulele. The sounds are mathematically modelled to be generated at runtime for any combination of notes and effects like hammer on pull off etc for different types of instruments. This gives a beautiful listening experience. Multiple tracks can be added in a single tab which play out simultaneously, so as to simulate an entire song with various parts like bass guitar, lead guitar, rhythm guitar etc. The UX for editing multiple tracks has been meticulously designed to allow tab lines to synchronise easily. With great keyboard support, notes can be easily added and chords can be created on the fly by pressing shift key and selecting multiple notes. Scale helper is there to allow composing solos easily. Designed to work well on mobile browsers too."

this is literally the worst piece of cow dung in the industry. I wouldn't even call it a guitar, it's so poorly made. Management, especially the CEO, don't care a bit about quality, the only thing that matters is their unrealistically high production numbers. the production processes are so archaic they are amateur, and they have the audacity to call it the worlds finest guitar. all of this stems from the CEO and his manic psychotic neurotic management style (he has to sign off on EVERYTHING: new hires, transfers within the company, promotions, raises, budgets, any funding for new parts or machines.
Chorus and flanging are created in fairly similar ways, the main difference being that chorus doesn't use feedback from the input to the output and generally employs slightly longer delay times. Phasing is similar to both chorus and flanging, but uses much shorter delay times. Feedback may be added to strengthen the swept filter effect it creates. Phasing is far more subtle than flanging and is often used on guitar parts. With chorus, phasing and flanging, the delay time, modulation speed and modulation depth affect the character of the effect very significantly. A generic modulated delay plug-in allows you to create all these effects by simply altering the delay time, feedback, modulation rate and modulation depth parameters. Most of the time, low modulation depths tend to work well for faster LFO speeds (often also referred to as the rate), while deeper modulation works better at slower modulation rates.
When guitarists who play jazz and other more complex styles improvise, they use scales, modes, and arpeggios associated with the chord progression. The must learn how to use scales (whole tone scale, chromatic scale, etc.) to solo over chord progressions. Soloists try to imbue melodic phrasing with the sense of natural breathing and legato phrasing used by players of other instruments. Jazz guitarists are influenced by trumpet, saxophone, and other horn players. Celtic fingerstyle players are influenced pipes and fiddles.
With the massive range of options available, you'd have to spend the whole day here to go through every one. There are six and twelve-strings, models specifically made for beginners, limited edition double necks; you name it, you'll find it! For a real classic, strap on a Rickenbacker 330 electric guitar. A staple in 60's mod culture, the unique hollowbody construction, slim neck and contoured body make the Rickenbacker 330 so easy to play that it has held the status as one of the all-time greatest guitars for decades.
Despite what the Peate copy says, these instruments are not Dobros, but rather Supros. The guitars and mandolin shown in the Peate catalog are identified as being “The New Dobro Electric Guitars,” part of National Dobro electric guitars. However, the No. 1 Hawaiian shown is clearly the Supro frying pan (recall that the Hawaiian in ’35 was the fancier Dobro), and the No. 2 Spanish Guitar and No. 3 Mandolin are clearly labeled “Supro.”
So few 1958-1960 Explorers were ever made that sightings of these are rarer still. The most notable, however, is likely the ’58 acquired by Eric Clapton during a U.S. tour in 1974 from Alex Music in NYC. I saw Clapton during the 461 Ocean Blvd. tour of 1974 at the West Palm Beach International Raceway. I recall him playing this guitar – he played it for a few cuts before the weather turned bad(there were tornados in the area that day).
We have done hundreds of guitar 'set-ups' / repairs / restorations over the years and know how to do them to a degree that 95% of 'players' will be very satisfied. We're not just changing strings and polishing. We'll check and adjust the neck for correct string height at the 7th fret (should typically be about the thickness of a .010 gauge 'E' string when fretted at the first fret and the 12th fret). We also check for a 'body bump' in the neck as if that can't be addressed to a 'playable' degree, then the balance of the adjustments will be for naught. As we're in a very dry climate, we will check for 'fret overhang' due to neck shrinkage and 're-dress' the frets accordingly. If it's a 'bolt-on' neck, we'll check for neck joint / screw integrity and repair as necessary. We check and adjust for correct intonation using our 'Peterson' strobe tuner and our other 'analog' tuner. Electrics are typically intonated with 'fresh', .010 strings installed (if you want it intonated with a different gauge, just let us know). We inspect and test the electronics, especially looking for any 'aftermarket' re-wiring / mods / incorrect repairs. We inspect the integrity of the tuning machines and repair as necessary. Of course we do all the standard cleaning, adjusting and test playing once the 'basic integrity' of the instrument has been addressed.
Some emulator designs include switchable filters, enabling them to simulate open or closed-backed speaker cabinets, and can come very close to the sound of a close-miked amp, while ambience can be simulated using a reverb processor or plug-in. Even if the amp has a good spring reverb, a little additional digital ambience (mainly early reflections) will help create the illusion of the amplifier being recorded in a room.
If you’re a very dynamic player who likes to play soft and loud, a compressor is a must have: by raising the soft parts and lowering / adjusting the loud parts, you will get an even sound that works for most applications and won’t make ears bleed: the simplest way to describe it is as an “automated” volume control. The EQ, on the other hand, is crucial if you have a problematic guitar, an amplifier with limited tone-shaping control or, simply, need a creative way to alter the way your guitar sounds. EQ can be placed in front of the amp for shaping the sound going inside the amp or in the send/return (after the amplifier section) as a volume boost/eq boost.
Electric guitar strings are thinner than acoustic guitar strings and closer to the neck and therefore less force is needed to press them down. The ease with which you can bend strings, clear access to the twelfth position, the use of a whammy bar and the manipulation of pots and switches whilst playing has led to the development of a lead guitar style that is unique to the instrument. Fret-tapping is a guitar technique for creating chords and melody lines that are not possible using the standard technique of left-hand fretting and right-hand strumming. The sustain, sensitive pick-ups, low action and thin strings of the electric guitar make it an ideal instrument for fret-tapping.

Next up are the wonderful vintage Kluson reproductions by TonePros (Fig. 16). These are some of my favorites, and they weigh in at a moderate 186 grams with all hardware included. For many of my builds, the characteristics of these tuners are ideal. I enjoy the modern engineering these tuners hide within their vintage-styled exteriors, and the weight is almost perfect.
Fuzz is an indistinct, nasty overdrive that is synonymous with Jimi Hendrix. The Dallas Arbiter Fuzz Face is the most famous fuzz pedal, known for the way is breaks up and adds something special to any guitar tone. Fuzz pedals are most commonly used on top of clean or lightly overdriven tones, as this is where the character of the pedal can really come through; used on top of already distorted tones they can be great for making a load of noise! Two main types of fuzz are available – silicon (which sounds softer and more rounded) and germanium, which sounds harsher and more treble-y.

The solid body electric guitar was a major design advance introduced by Leo Fender in the early 1950s. The solid body guitar helped remedy the feedback problems of hollowbody instruments. They were also easier to make, which led to mass market production. Fender introduced the iconic Telecaster and Stratocaster. Soon Gibson also introduced their first electric guitars in a partnership with Les Paul to produce what would become the equally iconic Gibson Les Paul.

Alternatively – and often most effectively – you can fix phase issues in the digital realm. Record your two-mic signal on two separate tracks, then zoom in on the sound waves in each of the two channels in your DAW’s editing window until they are huge and you’re seeing the full up-and-down crests and troughs of the waves. Now, drag or nudge the sound wave of the ambient mic forward (i.e., to the left of the screen) a few milliseconds at a time until the sound waves line up perfectly. Listen again, and you should hear a very different blend that is fuller, richer, and more “together.”
Got myself a Palmer today 050627, it´s a doubleneck 12/6 and seems to be of rather good quality. Needs some neck adjustment but so did my brand new Gibson LP to :-). Mine was imported from Germany to Sweden from a firm called JJ Music (JoJo) but i also have trouble finding out were they are built, what kind of wood and so on is used. Would be nice if someone knew something about these guitars or were to find something about them on the net. I really don't want to disassemble the guitar to check what kind of mics and stuff are used.
This general tip applies to all so-called temporal effects. Anything that messes with the timing of the signal should come last. If you were to put reverb before distortion, which is often one of the first effects in a chain, that distortion would be applied to both the original signal and all of the echoes. In other words, you’d get a mess. Naturally, this isn’t a rule written in stone. There are always exceptions. However, it is best to start with reverb at the end as this is the most neutral position.
The offset body style includes three main instruments: the Jaguar, the Mustang, and the Jazzmaster. While there are definite differences between them, offset guitars all generally have a “jangly” sound. When we say jangly, we mean bright and clear with a subtle mid and low-end response. These guitars are also well suited to rhythm work depending on their tone knobs are adjusted.
Praises and recommendations continue to flood the reviews of the Fender Super-Champ X2 HD, pointing to its great value for money as its main selling point. Even users who are not happy with some of the extra features agree that the amp gives you more than what you pay for. As expected from a Fender tube amp, clean tone is well received, while others are equally happy with the other voicings. Another plus for the Super-Champ X2 HD is that it gets good feedback from guitarists of different playing styles and instruments, be it single-coil equipped or even those with active humbucker pickups.
The idea behind this site is to share my experience with Do It Yourself approach to guitars, amplifiers and pedals. Whether you want to save a couple of bucks by performing a mod or upgrade yourself instead of paying a tech, or want to build your own piece of gear from scratch, I'm sure you will find something interesting here. Also, this is the home of DIY Layout Creator, a free piece of software for drawing circuit layouts and schematics, written with DIY enthusiasts in mind.

The design goal of these hybrid micro heads was to provide usable power from a compact digital power amp section combined with a real analogue preamplifier in a very small and light metal chassis. The amps each weigh about 1.1 lbs, and fit in one hand (Dimensions (W x D x H): 135mm x 100mm x 75mm/5.31” x 3.94” x 2.95”). These amps are advertised as 50 watt heads, so the power section is a special Class D design as might be expected. What is unexpected is the preamp design that includes a new type of vacuum tube (valve) called the Nutube 6P1, which is the result of Korg working with Japanese vacuum fluorescent display (VFD) company Noritake Itron Corp.(Ise Electronics Corp). As such, the Nutube is a dual-triode vacuum tube packaged similarly to a VFD "chip" which makes it mountable on a circuit board using holes and pads not unlike a DIP. The miniaturised flat package topography, low power consumption, and low heat, long life attributes of the Nutube are key contributors to deploying an analogue tube preamp in such a small, lightweight footprint. Power consumption is only 3.43 Amps which is provided by a DC19VAC adapter, but Vox rates the MV50 power output at 50 Watts. However, note the 50W rating is for a 4Ω load; power output specs are as follows: Max 50W RMS at 4 Ohms, 25W RMS at 8 Ohms, 12.5W RMS at 16 Ohms.

Whether you’re young or old, there’s no better feeling than learning to play an instrument. While many attempt to learn the guitar, it is unfortunately very common for beginners to give up after only a couple of months. Guitar lessons with an instructor can be expensive and it can be frustrating if you’re not seeing progress immediately. That’s where ChordBuddy steps in, offering one of the easiest and quickest ways to learn to play the guitar in 60 days or less. Simple, effective, and affordable, this guitar learning device has shown great success among beginner guitar players of every age. Use this handy guide to learn everything you need to know as a beginner guitarist. You’ll be playing your favorite song in no time at all!
This is also an amazing choice for kids and guitar novices. It comes in many different colors and it is quite easy to set up and tune. Once you manage to tune it, it will run for a long time. It has four tone modes and you can select one of them using a switch. It has one tone knob adjustment and one volume adjustment. It is quite easy to play and also highly comfortable.
Another piece of advice most experienced guitar players will give you is to keep your reverb pedals near the end of your signal chain. The reason for this is simple but requires a more colorful explanation. Imagine your signal chain as a conveyor belt for ice cream. As the signal leaves your guitar, it is just a plain vanilla mass that gets another layer of flavor as it hits different pedals. Distortion might add a nice chocolate glazing, then we have the modulation with its meticulous icing, and so forth. A reverb pedal in this context are sprinkles. You don’t want to add them at the beginning since they can completely change the way every other ingredient that comes afterward behaves. You add sprinkles at the end. In appropriate amounts only.
But alongside Davy Graham and Jim Hall, the other musician I really wanted to remind you about was Martin Taylor. Astonishing technique – enough to make the shredders weep with envy, coupled with an exquisite feel for melodic line. Martin is one of the few guys (or gals) whose playing brings tears to my eyes regularly. When one of his albums gets into my CD player it stays there for weeks. In many ways, a natural successor to Django Reinhardt, truly a master of music as well as the guitar art and DR’s principal competitor for a top ten place in my list.
That's what I'm hoping to address in this post along with clearing some common misconceptions too. The guitar world and community is very big on the vintage thing, and that has filtered down to replacement parts of course too. It is very easy to get lost in the world of 'vintage' style parts making an improvement in tone, so let's cast those notions aside here and look at the facts of why in some cases that's both correct and incorrect. Tim McNelly of McNelly Pickups put it really well in a recent social media post '..New electronics won’t necessarily make your guitar sound any different than it does now. New pots won't NECESSARILY change the tone if you don't know the exact value of the pots coming out..'. I think this is a really great way to put it and a great starting point for this post and discussion (feel free to comment too!).
I just thought you'd like to know that Takamine produced for other names. I've just bought a 1973 Wayne which has a Takamine label inside stating it was made for Wayne. Its a Takamine 375 thats a Martin D35 copy. Wayne were guitar makers in Melbourne Australia in the 1950s and 60s and began importing under their name briefly in the 70s. It sounds amazing.

Rotating speakers are specially constructed amplifier/loudspeakers used to create special audio effects using the Doppler effect by rotating the speakers or a sound-directing duct. The rotating speaker creates a chorus-type effect. Named after its inventor, Donald Leslie, it is particularly associated with the Hammond organ but is used with a variety of instruments as well as vocals. The Hammond/Leslie combination has become an element in many genres of music. The Leslie Speaker and the Hammond Organ brands are currently owned by Suzuki Musical Instrument Corporation. The stompbox that simulates this effect is the Uni-Vibe pedal.
Fretsizes can be confusing.  They are small measurements but have a big impact on feel and the size designations can vary.  Its best in my opinion to think and talk of frets in their actual crown widths and heights rather than the old Dunlop numbers (the originator of the 6xxx numbering system) as they can mean different things to different people; i.e. Warmoth lists 6105 as .095-.047" while USACG has is at .090-.055" - these are two very different feeling fretsizes. 
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Not all guitars sound the same. The type of pickups, strings, wood, and body style all dictate the sound a guitar makes. One of the most important decisions a guitarist can make is whether to get a solid body, semi-hollow, or hollow body guitar. A solid body has a cutting tone with plenty of sustain, whereas a hollow body has a warmer, more rounded sound.
It’s important to remember that these setups are not set rules that must be followed.  You can get a variety of unique sounds by placing your effects in unorthodox locations.  It’s common to run into that special sound that came about as a ‘happy accident’ when setting up your effects.  Using these suggestions, you can build up your own pedalboard to suit your individual taste.
In the present scenario many brands are providing the better quality Guitars and serving their customers the best services. Nowadays music industry is demanding better performances. For performing the best people are switching one to other brands. The brands are competing with each others to maintain their selves in to the top 10 chart. So please strike down to your strings for the right notes.
Two-handed tapping was the hoariest of heavy-metal clichés until Marnie Stern reclaimed the concept on behalf of indie-prog bedroom shredders everywhere. No one would ever confuse Stern’s chops with Eddie Van Halen’s, but that’s kind of the point: If Stern’s shredding exudes the agreeably skewed internal logic of the self-taught, it also allows her to utilize the two-handed technique far more creatively than the pseudo-classical chest-puffing that usually comes with Dokken territory.

This style of volume effect rhythmically reduces and swells the volume of the signal in a regular cyclic fashion.  Often heard in Country and Western type guitar tracks, tremolo was commonly built into older amplifiers and is one of the earliest recorded effects.  The speed and depth of the effect is controlled on the pedal by way of one or two potentiometers.  When set to the tempo of a song, the player can produce an extra layer of rhythm on top of what is being played.
There are many varieties of speaker combinations used in guitar speaker cabinets, including one 12" speaker, one 15" speaker (this is more common for bass amplifiers than for electric guitar cabinets), two 10" speakers, four 10" speakers, four 12" speakers, or eight 10" speakers. Less commonly, guitar cabinets may contain different sizes of speaker in the same cabinet. Cabinets with eight 10" speakers are large and heavy, and they are often equipped with wheels and a "towel bar"-style handle for transport. Some cabinets use mixed speaker types, such as one 15" speaker and two 10" speakers.
The "Chrome Edition" harmonica is also based upon the MS reed plates. Featuring a crystal glass comb and specially engraved chrome-plated anniversary cover plates. The bottom cover plate has the serial numbers from 1 to 1857. It is also packaged with an anniversary booklet. The "Standard Edition" model features a clear acrylic comb and the top cover plate is specially engraved.

Pedals. I have a basic rule when it comes to overdrives, distortions, and fuzzes: When I engage them, I want the volume to either stay the same or increase a bit, so I’m “pushing” the amp with the pedal. Because drives compress the sound, they can tend to seem louder overall when you turn them on, but actually they might be reducing the overall peak level. I don’t want to diminish the natural output level coming out of my guitar, and I don’t want my guitar tone to vanish in the mix when I hit a pedal. As I mentioned earlier, I often run the tone control quite low on drive pedals, which I feel keeps them sounding warm and natural.
Originally, distortion of the guitar signal happened accidentally when tube amps were turned up too loud. While distortion was first considered undesirable, players soon came to recognize that a distorted signal increased the amount of sustain they could get out of each note. This essential discovery created a fundamental shift in guitar soloing styles to include extended notes such as those produced by a wind instrument or organ. Used on rhythm guitar parts, distortion thickens up the signal and allows for a much heavier, chunkier sound.
While he could put out an album of his farts or slap his name on any shitty guitar and still make millions, he is a painstaking perfectionist who spent years agonizing over every minute detail of his EVH Wolfgang guitar and EVH 5150 III amp before offering it to the public and who has refused to release a new Van Halen album until he feels it’s ready.
There are many, many variations of the electric guitar. Science has told us that in order for sound to be naturally amplified, there needs to be a chamber in which sound can resonate. Just look at the construction of the ancient amphitheaters, or the way that the human body has natural resonating chambers that allow us to use our voices, or a stand up bass, with its large, chambered body designed to amplify the resonating strings.
This multi-effects pedal lets you setup your virtual rig with up to five effects that include various modulation, distortion, compressor, delay, reverb and other effects. They can also run alongside the Zoom G1Xon's built-in amp modeling, which lets you choose between 22 different amps. Those are a lot of features in a small unit, thankfully Zoom implemented an interface that makes tweaking and configuring easier. As expected although you are still limited by two footswitches, it comes with an expression pedal, which adds even more to its value and usability.
This was my first attempt on building pedal. Now I'm hooked. It was such a joy putting it all together and quite a learning experience. I cannot emphasize on reading/studying the instructions thoroughly. I would rate the included instructions a 10, a 5 STAR. Very clear and easy for a novice pedal builder to understand and walk through. Very well illustrated as well. Take your time as you can easily overlook soldering connections. The main problem I encountered was a shorting problem. The two soldering terminals along each side of the tube socket were located very close to the tube base socket and volume/gain pots. Follow the instructions by running a wire between the volume and gain pots, as well as the tube socket. Once, I've addressed this problem, it was clear sailing from there.
Mic placement is pretty crucial. You can get a million different EQ responses depending on where you throw the mic in front of the cab. I personally have the best luck - or at least I think so - when I back the mic off a little bit. I know a lot of engineers throw it right on the grille to get the bass boost, the proximity effect and all that garbage, but I find that if I back it up about six inches, I get a more balanced EQ curve.
This is a great local shop.  I bought a new Floyd Rose bridge for one of my electric guitars and brought it to Franklin Guitar to be installed and set up.  I got the guitar back within 2 days and it plays so well that I brought them my other guitar for a set up the next day.  Again, within 2 days I had it back and it plays exactly like the other one...awesome.  I had both guitars set up for a little more than half of what another shop quoted me just to install and set up the new bridge on the one.  High quality work at a fair price in a reasonable time...I won't go any where else to have my guitars worked on.  They also have a good inventory of guitars and amps for sale to fit any budget.

Today's modern rock guitar sounds tend to be "drier" (less room ambiance and reverb), and most often use the close mic technique. There's really nothing to it. Simply use the close mic, run it through the compressor, set the compressor at a 3:1 ratio and adjust the threshold so that the compressor is usually working, but not squashing the signal too much. You will be able to make most of the tone adjustments you need at the amp or guitar, and chances are you won't need to tweak the console' s equalizer at all.

Compressor: Compressors make loud sounds quieter and quiet sounds louder by decreasing or "compressing" the dynamic range of an audio signal.[60] A compressor is often used to stabilize volume and smooth a note's "attack" by dampening its onset and amplifying its sustain. A compressor can also function as a limiter with extreme settings of its controls.[61]
2.  Cracked peg head.  Customer “fixed” with mystery glue and a wood screw.  Result:  Peg head and neck shaft not aligned. Fix: If the peg head can be re-broken you may be able to re-align the neck and re-glue (if it was glued with aliphatic glue you won’t be able to as the glue will not stick to itself).  The joint may have to be resurfaced and new wood may have to be inserted, possibly a spline as well.
First introduced as a 35th Anniversary Edition Guitar in 2009, it joined Taylor’s standard line up as a Specialty Model in 2010. The Baritone model features a Grand Symphony body and a longer 27-inch scale length which enables it to be tuned from B to B while maintaining normal string tension. It comes in either 6-string or 8-string option. The 8-string models incorporates a pair of octave strings that double the 3rd and 4th (D and A) strings. Solid wood back and sides available for the Baritone model are Tropical mahogany or Indian Rosewood with rosewood binding and an abalone rosette.
It’s also worth noting that Fender guitars are typically available with a few different pickup combinations. I’d especially recommend checking out a HSS Stratocaster for rock music. The humbucker in the bridge position gives you a thicker, hotter sound, but you still have all that great Strat tone in the from the neck and middle pickups. I’ve played a Standard HSS Strat for over a decade and it’s one of my favorite guitars.

The EC-1000ET is an all-mahogany single-cut loaded with an set of EMG 81 and 60 active humbuckers, a comfortably modern neck and a high level of construction quality. Its key selling point, however, is a fitted EverTune bridge -  unlike other tuning systems, it doesn't tune your guitar for you or offer altered tunings. Instead, once set and tuned, it simply aims to stay there, thanks to a series of tension-calibrated springs and levers. We tried everything we could to knock it out of whack: huge, three-step bends, wildly exaggerated string stretching... we even put the guitar into a freezer. It came back perfectly in tune every single time.  What's more, a guitar that's perfectly tuned and intonated up and down the neck seems to play much more musically. We're not aware of any tone compromises, either. The EC sounds as full and aggressive as ever, with the more mellow tones of the neck EMG being pleasantly rounded, and all bereft of any metallic spring clank. If never going out of tune is important to you, this is one of the best electric guitars going.
Once CNC (computer numeric control) equipment was introduced into guitar factories starting in the late 1980s and continuing on into the 1990s, it became far less of an issue where a guitar was made. Many of the CNC machines were made in Japan. In some cases the difference between an American-made guitar versus a Japanese-made guitar versus a Korean-made guitar was little more than where the machine was located. To make a guitar in the USA involved putting a Japanese-made CNC machine on a boat and sending it to the US whereupon it could be programmed in the USA and then American or other wood could be fed into the machine, which would spit out components made to tolerances within a few thousandths of an inch of the programming. By contrast a Japanese-made guitar would be produced by leaving the CNC machine in Japan, programming it with a disc done in the USA, and then importing wood to be put into the machine which would spit out components to the same specifications as those which would be made by a similar machine in the USA. A Korean-made guitar could be remarkably similar since the Japanese-made CNC machine could be sent to Korea whereupon the same process could be done there. By 1990 the quantity of guitars made in Japan was nowhere near what it had been earlier, but Korean production was in high gear. While some Japanese instruments have come to be viewed as quite desirable and collectible, I have seen little evidence of such activity with respect to Korean instruments, but the fact remains that the better-quality Korean guitars are remarkably good and most certainly are suitable for use on stage or in the studio.

First off, in any discussions about any effect pedals, no one is asking for or cares the slightest about the opinion of people who categorically don’t like pedals. While the Internet is a wonderful medium that expedites the broadcasting of a personal opinion (as I am doing here), I’m always curious about what motivates the person who categorically dislikes something to show up uninvited to express their feelings. Imagine you start a chat thread or post a status update or tweet with something like “Those of you who’ve seen The Avengers – how did you like Mark Ruffalo as Bruce Banner/Hulk?”. Now imagine you get a reply such as “I didn’t see The Avengers because I think movies suck. People should get back to reading books” – excuse me, but what on earth is that person contributing towards the discussion, and who the hell asked them?
The S2 Custom 24 features a mahogany body with book-matched flame maple top, that follows the same double cutaway shape and detailed arch as the original Custom 24. The guitar's mahogany neck is also not far off, being rafted from mahogany with PRS' distinctive 25" scale length. It has a 24-fret rosewood fingerboard that has a comfortably narrow nutwidth of 1.656". Finally, the S2 Custom 24 owes its voice to its dual humbucker pickups that include the S2 Vintage Bass and the S2 HFS Treble - which provide PRS' characteristically open and clear tone. You can push or pull the tone knob for single-coil tones should you need them.
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I participated in what I think was perhaps Gibson's best SG...a prototype made for Robbie Krieger. It had my then-patented carbon fiber "T" cross section fingerboard which absolutely took care of the #1 problem with SGs...the rubber neck syndrome. It also had a beautiful flame maple top on the mahogany body and it got a cherry sunburst. Fabulous guitar. Robbie must still have it.
Although most of this article deals with miking regular guitar amps or using various DI options, there are also some great sounds to be had using very low-power guitar amps — even battery-powered ones. You can see these in music shops, often designed to look like miniature versions of Marshall, Fender or other top-name amplifiers. While some sound pretty grim, others sound surprisingly musical and raunchy. Obviously they don't have a lot of low end, but if you mic them closely to exploit whatever proximity effect your cardioid mic has to offer, and use EQ cut to tame the inevitable mid-range resonance, you can get some really great sounds. Best of all is that these things are cheap, so you can afford to experiment, and they also come in useful for their intended purpose, which is practising, something we all tend to do too little of when we get caught up in recording technology.
Music Theory for Guitarists by Tom Kolb is one of the most comprehensive ways to learn music theory from a book that we can recommend. This book, and the combination of online audio that accompanies it, has helped many aspiring guitarists learn theory after being frustrated with trying to learn how to play the guitar. One reason that might be is because Tom uses very plain language to explain theoretical concepts that are often confusing and can come off as complex. Further, the book includes diagrams frequently, which really helps visual learners.
Finally, amidst all the considerations about tops and shapes and tones, don't underestimate the importance of choosing a guitar that you like. Choose one that feels comfortable, whether you are sitting or standing. Make sure you pick a guitar that responds to the way that you play, and don't settle on a "good" guitar if you don't like the way it sounds to your ears.
A simplistic design and an affordable price make the Squier Bullet Stratocaster SSS an ideal guitar for those who are just beginning their foray into the musical world. Here’s a huge drop in price and mentioned halfway in our list just in case you wanted to find a budget-friendly and cheap electric guitar to start with. With a basswood finish and a ‘C’ shape design, this electric guitar is lightweight and comfortable, making it ideal when just beginning to learn basic chord progressions and needing long periods of time to practice. The twenty-one frets that are included come in a medium-jumbo size, making it easier to learn the basics of strumming and moving from chord to chord. The string pickup is only a single coil, which provides an adequate sound and balanced tone when utilizing the 5-position pickup blade. With three different color options to choose from (Candy Apple Red, Sea-foam Green, and Lake Placid Blue) the Squier Bullet is one of the best electric guitars for those who are looking to begin their musical journey in style.

The Epiphone Company is a musical instrument company which was founded in the year 1873. Epiphone is specialized in making Guitars and are one of the largest producers of guitars in the world. Epiphone has several ranges to choose from, as they brand them in different groups. Few of the Epiphone ranges of guitars are, Epiphone Sheraton, Epiphone Casino, Epiphone Texan and The Dot etc. Besides guitars Epiphone also manufactured upright basses, banjos and other forms of stringed instruments.
In 1942, Valco unveiled a new Hawaiian lap steel, the Irene, which was offered as a Silvertone in the ’42 Sears catalog. Clearly inspired by the Supro’s first wood-bodied Hawaiian with the pear-shaped body from ’36-37, the Irene had a slightly narrower body and more squared-off corners, and was covered in white pearloid. It also featured a light-colored, painted-on pickguard with dark position markers. Basically, this had the same pickup and control plate as featured on the Clipper.
Many Rickenbackers — both guitars and basses — are equipped to be compatible with a “Rick-O-Sound” unit via an extra “stereo” output socket that allows the two pickups (or neck and middle pickup combined/bridge pickup, in the case of three pickup instruments) to be connected to different effects units or amplifiers. Another idiosyncrasy of Rickenbackers is the use of two truss rods (rather than the usual one) to correct twists, as well as curvature, in the neck.

We carry many new and ‘lightly’ used instruments. So called “low mileage” instruments, in near mint condition, are our specialty. Currently in house: Santa Cruz, Bourgeois, Eastman, Fender, Larrivee, Martin, Epiphone, Gibson, Gretsch, Guild, Giebitz, Huss & Dalton, Sobell, New World Classical Guitars, Cordoba Classical Guitars, Loar, Recording King, G&L, LsL, Breedlove. Amps from Magnatone, […]
The value of the guitar will also be an important factor that will contribute to the overall score – because spending $200 on a model that sounds like a $2000 guitar is always something that can’t be ignored! We rate the best acoustic guitars and the best bass guitar list in the same way. With every new model we add and review, we update the top 10 rankings.
Jack Douglas also points out a beneficial side-effect, in his experience, of recordings made using the phase EQ approach: "When you build a mix — I don't care if it's four tracks, eight tracks, or 96 — the real nightmare is when you put something up and the only way you can hear it is by blasting it. There's nothing worse than putting up something you're excited about, and it's gone. If you [record guitars] like this, I guarantee that as soon as you put the sound in the mix it will be there. Not only that, it won't wipe out everything else in the mix, because it will have such a separate and distinct character."
In regards to which is best I personally think you pretty much got it right! Folks can piss n moan all they want but the facts are facts. Gibson, Fender, PRS ect all make fantastic guitars, time-tested tools of the trade. Many of you feel the need to want to publicly put down a certain brand in favor of another, there's good n bad in all of them!! If I could afford a Gibson Les Paul I would get one! Sure I could pull out the plastic n get one but I don't wanna have to do that just yet. I have no shame in purchasing a cheap guitar as long as I like it, to me if a guitar has a good smooth fast neck ......... it's a good guitar!! You can always swap pups n hardware but the neck is a little more complicated. I have a Fender Squire Strat, it is an "E" series Squire, I think it was made from 1984-87, and I can tell you that I will be 50 years old in May of this year and the neck on this Squire is the best I have ever felt on any guitar I have owned!! and yes it was a fairly cheap guitar. Now I hear that the "E" series of Squire Strats are supposed to be highly sought after or something, I don't know all about that, all I know is that I love the way this guitar plays n feels in my hands n riding in front of my belly! So folks don't put a guitar down simply because you can't afford it, like I said they are good guitars for a reason, same goes for the cheap guitars, don't knock 'em 'til you try 'em, there are some mighty good players out there to be had for cheap $$$, bottom line ..... regardless of the name on the head ..... if you can afford it, if it feels n looks the way you like n has a good neck then buy it n give it the love it deserves, it'll love you back in ways you never imagined!! Happy pickin n God bless
Guitar picks are really cheap, maybe $.25 to $.50 each. The best way to know which kind you like best is go to a music store and buy $5.00 worth of picks of different thicknesses, sizes and materials, take them home and try them out over the course of the next several weeks or months as you learn to play. There is no right or wrong answer to this question, its all a matter of personal preference. You'll figure out for yourself which you like best.
I one day hope to be the man my dog thinks I am.WORDS OF WISDOM FROM VARIOUS MEMBERS"most often the guitar will rise or fall to the level of the player""people overthink ****************""Sometimes you gotta know when to shut the **************** up and have a little class. Not you, you're special.""If it sounds good to you then it sounds good"The bull**************** and myths in the guitar world are stacked very high.
A. It is never too late to learn how to play a musical instrument. An acoustic guitar does present some unique challenges for beginners, including the formation of calluses over time. Some working professional guitarists actually develop deep grooves on their fingertips after years of performing. But this is not a requirement in order to become an accomplished amateur guitarist. Practically every musical instrument places some physical demands on players, but developing skills like muscle memory and improvisation are tangible benefits of that extra effort.
Make sure the notes you do want to play actually come out well-audibly. Good technique and dynamics go a long way here. Listen to your playing and take care that important melodic notes really come out, whereas accompaniment is often better subdued. Palm mute is useful so you can give notes a distinct loud attack without causing an indistinct muddle of cross-ringing notes. Also, make sure you play well in time and with good intonation.
The Ford Model T was revolutionary. The only horses involved were under the hood, which was a big enough deal at the time, but we now know that the assembly line process behind it would go on to revolutionize the way we manufacture tools, vehicles, and the rest of our modern appurtenances. In all honesty, the Model T had a long way to go. Consider how that horseless carriage would hold up today. When we put nostalgia and historic significance aside, it’s the last car you’d want take a long trip in or depend on for daily commutes. From a modern day performance perspective, the Ford Model T was garbage.
too many to the point their incredibly over rated for me personally, there's a world outside of Gibson that cost a fracton as much and will blow peoples heads off. I have a custom 7 string I bought off craigslist someone made that's worth about 500 dollars because I didnt pay for some name on the headstock and so on. All my friends from blues and jazz lovers to metal would rather play my guitar. more frets for soloing than their les pauls active pickups a Floyd rose locking tuners 4 big reasons right there
This how-to guide will cover the aforementioned effects, as well as fundamentals like the function of typical delay controls, and where to place your unit in an effects chain. Although there are countless delays on the market—many of which have mind-boggling features—we’re going to use a basic delay pedal setup similar to what you’ll find on a Boss DD-7 as our reference point. We’ve also provided some sample settings so you can get the most out of your delay pedal right away.
We're just over the £300 price tag here, but for the shredders and jazz fans out there, the Schecter C-6 Plus in Electric Magenta is a great option, whether you’re a beginner or pro player. It’s one of our favourite cheap electric guitars, and one hell of a performer, featuring professional level appointments inspired by Schecter's  Diamond Series guitars  – this is a monster of tone, and well worth the extra investment.
In rock music (and even in some pop music), guitarists often substitute power chords for full chords to enable the vocal part to stand out more from the music. You can hear this kind of power chord sound in old songs such as “Johnny B. Goode” and “Peggy Sue.” The following figure shows the power chords that you use to produce this kind of sound. Play this progression by using either two- or three-string power chords.
The best way to get this sound out of an Octavia is by using the neck pickup on the guitar and by experimenting with the tone knob to get a more pronounced octave effect. Some other famous Hendrix tunes using the Octavia are “Who Knows” and “Machine Gun” from Band of Gypsies. If you want to put together a Jimi Hendrix pedal board, the Octavia is a must. There are many great reissues of this pedal on the market, but if you get a chance, like fuzzes, try a few of them next to each other. Even a few of the same pedal, as they often sound very different. One may have more of an octave effect, or be warmer sounding etc. This is due to the use of the transistors that can often have slightly different values that can make big tonal changes.
The Thunderbird IV was one of the most radical designs to come out of the Gibson and Epiphone Kalamazoo factory in the early '60s, thanks to legendary automotive designer Ray Dietrich, who was asked to put a new twist on solidbody guitars and basses. The sound of the Thunderbird IV was as cutting edge as its design and now the Thunderbird Classic-IV PRO returns with all of Epiphone's first-class quality and a lifetime guarantee, but without the hassles of owning (or hiding) a vintage instrument. Case sold separately.
For the guitarist who's frequently on the road or often plays out, the pedalboard is an indispensable aid. Many pedalboards include custom-fitted travel cases or gig bags. With your effects already mounted on the pedalboard, performance setups are fast: just unpack the already-configured board, plug in your guitar and amplifier, and you're ready to play.
    Kahler Tremolo bridges feature 6-way adjustable string saddles, which really allow you to dial in your string action and intonation. They have a fairly wide range-of-motion, but less than the Floyd Rose. The Kahler’s have a smoother feel compared to the Floyd Rose, and also have a convenient locking mechanism to convert the bridge into a fixed bridge.
The tuner goes first. This one is pretty easy. It doesn’t want to hear an effected signal; it wants to see the direct input from the guitar. Another reason for putting the tuner first is that if you’re using any true-bypass pedals, the TU-3 will give them a buffered signal, which will protect your tone from loss of signal in the cables when other pedals are off. This is another one of the reasons there as so many TU tuners in pedalboards worldwide, even ones using nothing else but boutique true-bypass stompers.
NOTE: Due to the nature of electric guitar construction, it is extremely common for these instruments to need fret work to play well. 80% or more of electrics, especially those with bolt-on necks, have high frets in the tongue area that must be addressed in order to play without excess buzzing. This includes most new electric guitars right off the shelf. Please see the section below for fret work pricing.
Most of Peter, Paul and Mary’s work had splendid fingerstyle guitar work. My favorite is “Don’t Think Twice It’s Alright”. Paul Stookey also had some fine acoustic work going solo with stuff like “Sebastian” and “The Wedding Song”. “The Wedding Song” was supposedly “must learn” stuff for aspiring acoustic players in the 70’s (so they could play at their friends’ weddings).

The K161 Kay Thin Twin electric guitar was originally introduced in 1952 and was known as the "Jimmy Reed" or "Howling' Wolf" model. "T-Bone" Burnett played a Thin Twin with Robert Plant and Alison Krauss at the 2009 Grammy Awards. The Thin Twin was the first guitar that was able to create that unique Blues sound. The special Kay interior bracing made the instrument a favorite among Blues players as well as rockers of the '50s and & '60s. The hand-wound pickups and separate center chamber allowed an extra biting natural distortion without feedback. The combination was a mellow clean gritty sound with natural sustain. The pickups are so hot that they needed to be contained in the center chamber, which is why the Twin Thin and Pro Bass made anyone who played it feel there was nothing else like it. The Pro Bass had a unique feature of a switch that cut off the high frequencies to reproduce an "upright Bass" sound but in the off position the Pro Bass gives a punchy Jazz sound. The Pro Bass comes with electric flatwound bass strings.
I have a Vox Shadow that's sunburst, white pick guard that surrounds 3 solid chrome face pickups and the middle pick up has "VOX" engraved in it. 3 seperate volume controls and a master volume control. Tuning keys are all chrome, and the green decal on the face of the headstock reads Shadow, JMI Dartford, Kent. Neck is attached withthe help of a chrome plate, on the back side of the 'plank' body is an access plate for the jack that states made in England. Guitar also has the original roller/tremelo tail piece with palm lever. The numbers of 64728 are stamped on the back side of the headstock just below the tuning keys. Finish is beginning to crack a bit but it's all original, right down to the volume pots that have to be cleaned from time to time. It must be a rather unknown line that Vox had as I can't find out much on it either. Had this guitar for many years. Was handed to me in pieces in an old 'cardboard' case, (that has since gone away) put it back together and added it to my "music room".

My brother owns a Norma acoustic guitar modeled on the Gibson Hummingbird. He bought it used in the mid 70s. Solidly built but only average sound. I would guess that like many Japanese made guitars from the 70s, Norma was not a "company," but simply an American sounding brand name chosen by a larger Japanese instrument manufacturer to market their guitars in the USA. I own a mid 70s Penco acoustic, same deal, name was used on Japanese made guitars marketed through the Pennsylvania Music Company, thus Penco.
Amazing guitars, specially the Custom Series full solids. You can choose from variety of tonewoods and soundboard combination and 4 different shapes. Offering almost every player's preference. You can also choose options such as soundport off-the-rack. Great craftsmanship, amazing tone, and superb playabality at an amazing price. Great guitar, and definitely not an OEM brand. They only make their own guitars.
My interests are in the Kents with the script logo on the headstock, body, and pickups. The headstock is Gibson-ish with tuners on both sides. The pickup nearest the neck is tilted, regardless of how many pickups are on the guitar. One model, the 742 has four pickups with switches, volume and tone knobs for each. Overkill, to say the least, and I have read somewhere that they don’t sound very good. However, I have seen some youtube video where a 742 sounds pretty good in live performance. A lot of the sound comes from a proper setup and the hands of a skilled player. Hopefully I’ll be able to find out for myself someday. Regardless, the 742 is one funky-looking guitar.
If anybody needs a Bridge, I have a Teisco Roller Bridge for sale, it is a a copy of a Gretsch Roller bridge but includes a solid steel Base like a Rickenbacker Bridge Base. The string saddles are rollers which are adjustable side-to-side for proper string spacing, and each side of the bridge is adjustable for Height. It is in excellent condition, probably from 1965 thru 1968. On a scale of 0 to 10, it is a 8.
I have a epiphone sg 50th edition and it does great by me in all I do. I play a lot of 60's music and otherwise all I want. It's very versatile and not to mention the cherry red wood grain finish makes it looks really awesome. Everyone I've ever met has bragged on it and I've been offered all kinds of guitars from Washburns to fenders. Just recently I went to a old guitar player of 30 yearsiin my grandfathers neighborhood and he absolutely loved the tone and playability. He said the only thing it might need to make it better was a professional setup which I'll soon be getting. When I first got it I complained a lot that the strings were a bit harder to push down due to the longer scale of the neck (the neck on it is pretty long) however. If you' work with it for about 2 days off and on its no problem. I love epiphone and judging from what I've played in ibanez guitars I might soon invest in one of them.
I feel that most of the bad reviews are due to inexperience with electronics. Frustration caused by not knowing what the parts are or how they work. Missing parts is never a good thing, so I guess I was lucky that my kit came with everything. If you do buy this kit and did not manage to get it working please understand that you have probably made a simple mistake.
The first guitar amplifiers were relatively low-fidelity, and would often produce distortion when their volume (gain) was increased beyond their design limit or if they sustained minor damage.[3] Around 1945, Western-swing guitarist Junior Barnard began experimenting with a rudimentary humbucker pick-up and a small amplifier to obtain his signature "low-down and dirty" bluesy sound. Many electric blues guitarists, including Chicago bluesmen such as Elmore James and Buddy Guy, experimented in order to get a guitar sound that paralleled the rawness of blues singers such as Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf,[4] replacing often their originals with the powerful Valco "Chicagoan" pick-ups, originally created for lap-steel, to obtain a louder and fatter tone. In early rock music, Goree Carter's "Rock Awhile" (1949) featured an over-driven electric guitar style similar to that of Chuck Berry several years later,[5] as well as Joe Hill Louis' "Boogie in the Park" (1950).[6][7]
Reverbs and delays can sound particularly unruly when run into an amp set dirty. If you use natural amp distortion but still like using pedals, you can run some effects into the front of your amp, and run time-based effects into an effects loop (most modern amps with channel switching will have an effects loop). Some modern programmable pedals, such as the TC Nova System or Eventide Time Factor delay, allow you to switch between -10 and +4 operation, so you can use them in front of your amp at the instrument level or at line level in an amp effects loop. This is really handy, allowing you to create and store presets tailored for using the pedal either in front of the amp or in the loop. Of course you can also use studio-type rack effects in amp effects loops. Units such as the Fractal Audio Axe FX and TC Electronic G-Major work great in this configuration, allowing you to store many presets and get pristine time-based effects, whether you are using clean sounds or dirty sounds.
So, I've done what any self-respecting woman with a rather obsessive personality could do and trawled YouTube for all the best videos of Swift performing stripped down versions of her songs where it's just her singing against a minimal melody. I'm sure you'll agree that as much fun as queen of the squad, awkward dancing hero era Swift is, that these videos are all the proof you need that she doesn't need dance moves or supermodel friends on stage in order to rule.
One trait of most ribbon mics is the figure-of-eight polar response, and this is often exceptionally consistent across the frequency range. This polar pattern means, of course, that ribbons tend to pick up a little more room ambience than cardioids, given that the polar pattern is as sensitive behind the diaphragm as it is in front. Ribbon mics are also often characterised as sounding 'smoother' compared with typical condenser microphones, partly because their construction avoids the high-frequency diaphragm resonances normally inherent in condenser designs.

Japanese classical guitarist Shiro Arai founded the Arai Co. in the 1950s as an international importing company, which expanded to manufacturing in the 1960s adopting the "Aria" brand name. The explosion in popularity of the electric guitar in the 1960s led them to begin manufacturing and distributing several different brands, Lyle being one of them. Arai attended the NAMM trade show and saw many of the American guitar designs that had attained popularity in the U.S. This greatly influenced Arai to produce similar models.
The book discusses both tabs and notation which makes it easier to transition if you’ve been using the former. It covers a wide range of topics including scales and arpeggios. The approach the author takes is logically and accessible with plenty of examples and exercises to make it stick. The only downside is that there are no songs included in it.
What the hell!?!? Jimmy page is the greatest guitarist ever! And this is coming from a guy who has listened to many many types of music... Page is one of the reasons I fell in love Led zeppelin... From Hendrix to Vaughan to Clapton to slash to Johnson to sambora to gilmour to Santana nobody mesmerised me more than page did... He made his guitar TALK. Phhff, bucket head? Gimme a rest! Just give a listen to Achilles last stand or any song from led zeppelin 1, 2, 4, HOTH or Physical Graffiti. In my view all of the albums led zeppelin had produced rocked! Page forever!
In nature, reverb is an extremely fast series of echoes that reduce in volume over time.  Depending on the size of the environment, the number of repeats and the timing at which they occur will change.  Digital reverb pedals are very good at replicating the differing types.  Basically, you can take small tiled bathroom and the Grand Canyon (and everything in between) with you to your gigs.

The Squier Affinity series is a great beginner instrument. All of the bodies & necks have been CNC manufactured, so they are consistent and solidly built. In recent years, Fender has completely re-hauled the Squier series of instruments to make them decent introductory level instruments, at a great introductory cost to the beginner player. You can choose from Strats, Teles and even Jazzmaster style guitars!
If you’re looking for a solid start on how you will sound without settling for a tube amplifier due to its price, maintenance and back breaking weight to carry around. The Marshall MG30FX combo amp is surely one of the best out there on capturing iconic sounds, as well as the legendary Marshall tones that other brand of amplifiers frequently emulates, adding it to their bank of amp models.
:::I just bought one of these guitars at an auction. In Oregon U.S.A. It is a plank, with sunburst finish, 3 chrome toaster style pickups with one cover missing. The varnish has cracks in it like every other old Vox I have seen that date to the sixties or earlier. It has a white pick guard with 3 chrome knurled knobs and an old style switch that turns (not a flip switch) but is missing the knob that I assume is chrome like the 3 volume knobs. I haven't put strings on the guitar yet so I don't know if they are all volume or 1 volume and 2 tone. The roller/tremolo has VOX stamped in big letters and under that it says PAT.APP.FOR in smaller capitol letters. It has a plastic cover plate on the back that is stamped, Made In England. The neck is 19 fret with a fret just under the nut that has no use, as the string would never touch it and the neck is attached with a metal plate. Tuners are a single strap with gears steel not brass with plastic knobs. Just under the tuners on the back the headstock are the numbers 64523. A green VOX decal along with Shadow JMI Dartford Kent on the front. I was suprised to find this guitar, as I had never seen or heard of it before. I can't wait to play it and see how it stacks up to all the other VOX guitars I have and have played. Wish I could find out more about it but this is as close as I have come, so far.
This page contains information, pictures, videos, user generated reviews, automatically generated review and videos about Washburn XM DLX2 but we do not warrant the quality, accuracy or completeness of any information on our web site. If you have more information about Washburn XM DLX2 please write a review. Some reviews are automatically generated generated by using verbal representation of publicly available numeric rating information musicians entered while writing review of Washburn XM DLX2. User generated reviews of Washburn XM DLX2 represent opinions of credited authors alone, and do not represent Chorder's opinion.
These soundfonts were started by converting some presets from the gig files using cdextract demo and then altered using Viena, Swami and SF2Comp. The gig files are better as they contain more samples and a better variety of presets that were not possible in the soundfont format. For instance, I could not include the Fender reverb samples as the release samples would all play at the same volume no matter where in the envolope the key was released. So, if you have a chance you would be better off to use the gigasamples. They can be used in LinuxSampler of which is free and runs on windows and linux. Some people need samples in sound font format though, so I have created these samples out of the same samples that I used for the giga samples. I also have an impulse response of the Fender Reverb that I made with voxengo for download on the Other Stuff page so you can use that if you want to get the reverb sound with the soundfonts. At the moment I use Freeverb3 for realtime impulse in windows and Jconv in linux.
Play It Loud: An Epic History of the Style, Sound, & Revolution of the Electric Guitar is just that: a swooping, all-encompassing timeline of the instrument’s early days to its beyond-essential role in pop culture and music. Written by Brad Tolinski and Alan Di Perna, with a foreword by Carlos Santana, the book dives into the electric guitar’s place in our society, tracing its evolution in sound, style, look and purpose. Here are 10 things we learned from reading:
In his informative, yet relaxed style, Sean takes us on a complete guitar recording journey starting at the vibrating strings and ending at the DAW. You'll first learn how to tune and prepare a guitar for recording. Next you're off to investigate the world of the electric guitar. You'll see microphones and mic placement techniques followed by a deep look at amplifiers and what to do when you're working with combos and stacks.
In addition, there were other assessments. I went to Guitar Center to buy an amp. I was playing my guitar through a vintage tube amp when I noticed a man standing behind me. I said, “It sounds good.” He said “It sounds really good, are you going to buy it” as he pointed at my guitar. It was then I realized he was a customer and was interested in buying my guitar.
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