• Now let's add some slap-back room delay. In the seventh insert (which, incidentally, comes post‑fader in Cubase, as does insert eight), go to Delay/StereoDelay. In the left channel, try setting Delay to 1/16T, Feedback to 6.5, Lo to 50, Hi to 15000, Pan to ‑100, and Mix to 20, and enable Sync, Lo Filter, and Hi Filter. Use the same values for the right channel, but with Delay at 1/16, Feedback at 7.3, and Pan at 100.
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If you just start playing into a Windows PC, you’re going through a software construct called an audio device driver, through another software construct called the Windows Mixer, and finally into your recording program. If you then loop that back to play out so you can hear your guitar plus all effects, you again go from that DAW program to the Windows Mixer and to the device driver. That can take a really, really long time in music terms.
OLD Morris looks to be equal in all respects to our Yairi CY116, exotic wood construction with very nice old woods and excellent workmanship - fit & f instance they make the fit & finish is amazingly nice on the Terada factory made Morris. If your not familiar with Terada they are responsible for some of the finest Japanese guitars on the planet for instance Ibanez George Benson GB10's and all that high end line, most of Ibanez's Artists, and several other top of the line Japanese legends and they know how to make exceptional guitars and this Morris Classical is no different it sounds beautiful and has the vibe that is if you love the looks and feel of a well seasoned fully broken in 40 year patina and your OK with the top finger drag wear your going to love this vintage beauty yes it has plenty of vibe bit it sounds deep and rich too. Nice meaty neck plays easily with great action and with absolutely no cracks oh it has minor doinks and scratches here & there but nothing horrible this guitar qualifies for a VERY GOOD JVG rating overall vintage excellent but with the wear as seen the neck is still pretty slick no major abrasions and the fingerboard is nice too. Yes this is a very nice Ole Classical that has another lifetime of wonderful service to its new owner. I think you will be very pleased. Any questions just drop me an email to JVGuitars@gmail.com . Thanks for looking Joe.
Here’s one more British amp company, and one that might fly a bit under the radar for a lot of guitarists. Check out the Ironheart, Lionheart, VH and GH series for awesome British tube sound. Laney’s Linebacker or PRISM series of modeling/emulation amps might be just what you need if you’re in a situation where you have to nail a lot of different tones. No matter what your style or genre there is probably something in the Laney lineup to meet your needs.

You have 16 different modulation effects including chorus and flange, 12 overdrive/distortion effects including high gain monsters and smooth creamy overdrives, 14 mono and stereo delays and reverbs and 22 amp models including tube and solid state amps from Fender, Marshall, Orange, Diezel, and mesa Boogie. It’s safe to say, you’ll find it hard to get bored of this thing!

Phasers like the popular DOD-Phasor 201 are a perfect example of what a solid phaser pedal should sound like. Modern designs allow you to control many aspects of this effect, which makes them pretty versatile and suitable for most genres of music. Guitar players like Van Halen heavily rely on phasers to build their foundation, while some have even become famous due to their use of phasers. Phase shifters are generally very flexible and are among the most utilized modulation effects today.
National Reso-Phonic Guitars - World renowned for their resonator instruments. Unlike acoustic guitars, where the vibration of the wooden body creates the sound, in a resonator instrument the body acts as a speaker cabinet. When the strings are plucked, the vibration is transmitted through the saddle to the resonator. The resonator, or speaker cone, then amplifies that vibration.
The strings movement moves the magnetic field creating current in the coil of the pickup. The string does not create the current the movement does. If you placed a solenoid beneath the pickup and moved the pickup you would also create a current in the coil. If you took the strings off the guitar, and held a hammer head over the pickup and activated the solenoid you would get a current in the coil.
Being part of Schecter's upper tier guitar line, this one comes packed with premium appointments, including a nice looking arched quilt maple top that follows the double cutaway shape of the mahogany body. It also has a 3-piece set mahogany neck that can withstand angry riff playing while the ultra access heel allows for easier upper fret access when you want to hit your audience with high note solos. The guitar has a Sustainiac Humbucker on the neck (known for long sustained notes) and the high output EMG 81 Active Humbucker that's great for metal riffs. Other features include Floyd Rose 1000 Series Tremolo, 25.5" scale length and 1.625" nut width.
Mundt Music of Longview, LLC is your one stop guitar shop. Located at 2312 Judson Road, we have everything that you need whether you’re buying your first guitar or adding to your growing collection. Make sure to join us in store on October 10, 2016 at 6:30pm, for our “Taylor Road Show” event. Guests will enjoy an evening of guitar talk and demos with Taylor factory staff and guitar makers from El Cajon, CA. It’s an event that any guitar enthusiast won’t want to miss.
Gibson: These guys have been making musical instruments for well over 100 years. Founded by Orville Gibson back in 1890 and not producing guitars at the time (and certainly not electrics because those hadn’t even been invented yet), Gibson has had plenty of time to cement itself as one of the leading guitar companies. They are one of the few to keep their main brand name as a prestige-only brand and applying a different brand name (Epiphone) to their imported, lesser-priced instruments. They invented the arch-top guitar and created some of the most iconic instruments in guitar-history. These includes their by far most famous model, the Les Paul. Other iconic models are the SG, Explorer, Flying V, ES-175 and the Firebird. The ES-175 was to become the first really popular electric guitar. This happened before solid body guitars had even been invented. To this day, the Gibson Les Paul remains one of the most desirable and expensive guitars in the world. In order to tap into various price-points, Gibson creates less expensive Les Paul models around the $1,000 range, like the very popular Les Paul Studio. The more expensive models such as the Les Paul Standard are up in the $2,500+ range. Finally, there are even more expensive models such as the Les Paul Custom in the vicinity of $3,000+. Off course, they also create some very special limited run guitars than can easily fetch close to the $10,000 mark. In line with the car analogy earlier: While not Italian, I’d be happy to call the $2,500+ Gibsons the Ferraris of the guitar industry.
But add some effects to the blend and the results can be even more interesting. Keyboard-like tones can be generated by rolling off the tone pots and employing digital delay, expanding the sound of your band without overstuffing the van, and the gentle application of a phase shifter or wah-wah can bring an interesting voice to warm, low tones. Jimi Hendrix’s “Pali Gap” is a classic example of the latter.
On regular occasion I have stuff come through to me after the instrument owner has already taken it to another shop that, for whatever reason, could not fix or solve the problem. This time, a supposedly professional and legitimate shop... and after the customer PAID FOR WORK THAT DID NOT YEILD THE DESIRED RESULTS. That just boggles my mind a bit. I would never charge a customer unless they are happy and satisfied with my work.
Much like any other job or hobby, building guitar pedals requires specific tools in order to get the job done. Furthermore, before you start putting together your first build, it is vital that you have a significant understanding of how to solder circuit board electronics – otherwise you may find yourself at a loss due to faulty soldering (believe me, this is not a fun issue to troubleshoot).  If you need to practice soldering, here is a helpful video.
Budget, feel and sound! Don't worry about who plays what or brand names. NONE of that matters if the guitar does not FEEL good to you and have the SOUND that you are looking for. Of course, most people have a budget and there is no need in trying $2000 guitars if you can't afford one, except for expanding your education about different types of guitar. That's the short answer.
Description: Body: Alder - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 6 - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Fulcrum Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Duncan Designed - Pickup Configuration: S-S-S - String Instrument Finish: Transparent Colors
Since the early days of the electric guitar, blues musicians searched for different ways to overdrive their amplifier's signal. Of course, when rock'n'roll took off, the process of "distorting" a guitar tone became a lot easier thanks to new amp and pickup designs. Soon, musicians like Link Wray were making a name for themselves with the use of distortion. By the mid-60s, fuzz pedals were being used by teenage garage rockers around the world while performers like Dave Davies and Pete Townshend made distortion and overdrive a part of their signature sound. Today, distortion and overdrive effects pedals are a dime a dozen, and a quick glance at this section will make that obvious.
In 1942, Valco unveiled a new Hawaiian lap steel, the Irene, which was offered as a Silvertone in the ’42 Sears catalog. Clearly inspired by the Supro’s first wood-bodied Hawaiian with the pear-shaped body from ’36-37, the Irene had a slightly narrower body and more squared-off corners, and was covered in white pearloid. It also featured a light-colored, painted-on pickguard with dark position markers. Basically, this had the same pickup and control plate as featured on the Clipper.
The Tone knob is basically a filter to cut highs. And, once again, the pickup will sound best when turning it all the way up. With the ever-growing amount of effects amps have to offer and those available in pedal format, we often forget that this setting even exists. This basic control allows you to, for example, smoothen a jazzy sound or choke a way-too-shrilling fuzz, or anything else in that line that comes to your mind. Only your ears can tell if the sound is convincing or not!
The foot pedal is usually the only control on a wah pedal (especially on famous models like the Vox V487 and Dunlop Crybaby), but some come with controls to change the Q, or how wide the sweep of the wah is and how prominent it sounds. They are great for adding extra attitude to your bends and giving funky riffs some extra punch. The intro to “Voodoo Child” is probably the most recognisable use of a wah pedal. These are great fun and we’d recommend them to anyone – if lead guitar or funky rhythm is your thing you can’t do without it!
May Music Studio's Guide: The May Music Studio isn't a true "blue book." Rather, it is the website of a guitar studio that provides a quick tip guide to help you determine the fair market value of your guitar. The studio has years of appraisal experience and though they no longer offer appraisal services, their wisdom is distilled in the evaluation tips that they describe on their site.
The MC5 were the nexus where radical politics and proto-punk belligerence first came together. This dangerous mixture touched off an explosion that’s still rocking the world today. The group burst out of Detroit in the cataclysmic year of 1969, with its roots firmly planted in mid-Sixties garage rock, and mutated by injections of inner-city R&B and free-jazz mayhem.
STEM educators will take part in an intense five-day electric guitar design/build institue. Each faculty member will build his/her own custom electric guitar and will engage in student centered learning activities that relate the guitar design to specific math, science and engineering topics. Participants leave this weeklong experience with their custom-made guitars, curriculum modules with short term assessments that can be immediately integrated into the faculty team school curriculum.
Some guitarists consider the notion of modifying an electric guitar from its stock configuration distasteful, while others consider it mandatory. As a custom builder with a decidedly vintage background, I fall somewhere in between. Generally, I’m most in favor of maximizing an instrument’s usability without jeopardizing the ability to return it to original condition.
The Effect: Loop pedals essentially operate as recorders that have the ability to infinitely spin the recorded bits and possibly alternate them in a variety of ways. The main function of any looper is to be able to record a musical part, and then automatically put it on loop until ordered not to do so anymore. Depending on the complexity of the pedal, loopers can offer multiple layers, overdubs, as well as options of recording more than a single instrument. They range from simple single-switch stompboxes all the way to powerhouse loop workstations. Check out our full reviews to see which one is your perfect match. If you are looking for the quick winner, the Boss RC 3 is a great contender.
Multi-effects devices have garnered a large share of the effects device market, because they offer the user such a large variety of effects in a single package. A low-priced multi-effects pedal may provide 20 or more effects for the price of a regular single-effect pedal. More expensive multi-effect pedals may include 40 or more effects, amplifier modelling, and the ability to combine effects or modelled amp sounds in different combinations, as if the user was using multiple guitar amps. More expensive multi-effects pedals may also include more input and output jacks (e.g., an auxiliary input or a "dry" output), MIDI inputs and outputs, and an expression pedal, which can control volume or modify effect parameters (e.g., the rate of the simulated rotary speaker effect).

Blend potentiometers (essentially two potentiometers ganged on the same shaft) allow blending together two pickups in varying degrees. The operation is the same as in a balance control found in stereo equipment – in the middle position (often marked with a detent) both pickups supply their full output, and turning the pot in either direction gradually attenuates one of the pickups while leaving the other at full output.[13][29]

One look at its distinct bowl-back body, and you already know that the Ovation Applause Elite AE44II is not your average wooden guitar. This distinct back is crafted from Lyrachord, the same material which is said to be used in helicopter blades and more. This results in a lightweight instrument that's not as fragile as wood. Still it does come with a solid spruce top and other wooden components, so it doesn't sound or look too out of the ordinary. Finally, the guitar comes equipped with an undersaddle piezo and preamp system, which features a 3-band EQ and built-in tuner.
We currently recommend the very popular Seagull S6 Original Cedar Slim as one of the leading beginner guitars and we named the Seagull Maritime SWS SG as the equal second highest rated acoustic guitar between $500 and $1,000 in October 2016. And in August of 2017 we named the Seagull Entourage Rustic CW QIT as the highest rated acoustic-electric guitar under $500.
The Ibanez TSA15H gets most of its high ratings from users who love the sound of a cranked tube amp, because this is where it excels. This is especially true of guitarists who use single coil guitars, but there are some humbucker users who are just as impressed. Even experts commend the amp's dynamic response, Premiere Guitar's Kenny Rardin comments: "It feels and responds like a good tube amp, and varying the controls dials in the response even further". Value for money and reliability are also commended, as expected from Ibanez.
Graph Tech Ratio Locking Guitar Tuners (3+3)   New from$118.96In Stockor 4 payments of $29.74 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Babicz Full Contact Strat Tremolo   New from$142.95In Stockor 4 payments of $35.74 Free Ground Shipping Gibson Vintage Tuners/Tuning Machines (Set of 6)   New from$89.99In Stockor 4 payments of $22.50 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Graph Tech Ratio Locking Guitar Tuners (6 In Line)   New from$118.96In Stockor 4 payments of $29.74 Free Ground Shipping See All Electric Guitar Parts
You may be questioning why we’ve not covered bass pickups in this article. However, to keep things simple, we decided to stick solely to guitar pickups. If you are looking for a new tone or more power for your beloved bass, check out our dedicated articles on Jazz Bass pickups and Precision Bass pickups for all you need to know, as well as recommendations.
In the years following Electric Mud and Muddy's Death in 1983 from heart failure , the record itself started building a cult around it, comprised of acid rock fans, record collectors and curious people. By 1996, the resurgence of popularity in the record matched with its scarcity led it to being reissued in a deluxe edition by Chess with new line notes by Mark Humphrey and Marshall Chess. Despite all the bad press Electric Mud received, Marshall Chess never stopped claiming it was a brilliant, misunderstood record.
It comes with a single coil pickup in the neck position and a humbucker at the bridge - switching between the two pickups gives you both a strat like sound and an LP like tone. The pickup selector is 3-way so you can play with both pickups at the same time. It sports a shorter 24.75" scale length and smaller 12" radius on the rosewood topped mahogany bolt-on neck with a 1.6875" nut width making it very playable and accessible to guitarists of all levels of experience. Many customer reviews suggest the Empire HG feels and plays like a more expensive guitar.
Another Quality Ibanez Guitar ....This example is MODEL VINTAGE # V302 BS...And it IS A REAL GEM and it has a Premium German Sitka SOLID Spruce Top, WoW! what a nice original finish this one has...AAA Mahogany Sides-Neck & Back "see quality og the grain in the pics" . Lots of Full-and Wonderful rich tone from this baby. Its real ez to play & stays in tune well. It is a crafted in Japan guitar and it compairs favorably to Gibson, Guild or Martin! Please Note: If you prefer the guitar in Natural and not sunburst see our other listing for another V302 non sunburst we have in stock & available.. thank you for your interest, Joe .
Late 1944 to about 1949: the bracing was tapered. This stopped in the late 1940s, and was a progressive thing. So unlike scaloped bracing that had a definate endpoint, tapered braces evoloved into "straight" braces by 1949. This is why 1945-1949 Martins are still highly regarded as "better" than their 1950s counterparts, but not as good as the 1944 and prior scalloped braced guitars.
Unfortunately it’s during this critical time that a lot of people get discouraged and may even give up on playing altogether. The first 6 months of learning guitar are critical, statistics show that if someone can still be playing at 6 months they will be much more likely to go on to play guitar for life, so the first 6 months are actually the most important time.
From the 1920s to the 1940s, upright bass players who wanted to strengthen the acoustic sound of their instrument had to use small portable PA systems or guitar amp combos designed for acoustic guitar or archtop guitars. Since these systems were not specifically designed to amplify bass instruments, it is unlikely they provided good low-frequency sound reproduction (particularly guitar amps, which are not designed to go down as low in pitch as the low E (41 Hz) and A (55 Hz) strings). In the early 1920s, it was very hard for an upright bass player (indeed for any musician) to find any amplifier and speaker system to make their instrument louder. The only speakers that could be bought during the early 1920s were "radio horns of limited frequency range and low acoustic output", and the cone speaker (which is widely used in modern-era amp cabinets), was not offered for sale until 1925. The first amplifiers and speakers were PA speaker setups; while an upright bassist could potentially have used one of these early PA systems, they could only be powered with large batteries, which made them heavy and hard to carry around. When engineers developed the first AC mains-powered amplifiers, they were soon used to make musical instruments louder.
At the more reasonable end of the price scale compared to other Gretsch guitars, sits the Gretsch G2655T Streamliner. While not an arch top like the guitars listed previously, this guitar does feature a hollow bodied design. As such, it perfect for clear, ringing chords and lead lines. Also in its favour is the G2655T Streamliner’s thinner body depth. This makes it more comfortable and slightly less cumbersome than the bigger, more traditional jazz guitars. You’ll also get more versatility from a ‘regular’ semi acoustic, meaning you can dabble in blues, rock and country with the Streamliner models.
by pedalhaven Black & white board from  @alexjacob_ ! Here’s the signal chain: Boss TU-3 Chromatic Tuner EarthQuaker Devices Palisades Boss NS-2 Noise Suppressor Hotone Nano Legacy BritWind (Effects Loop) Boss NS-2 Noise Suppressor Joyo D-SEED Digital Delay TC Electronic Arena Reverb Don't forget to DM/Tag us to submit your photos! ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️  #pedalhaven   #pedalboard   #guitarpedals   #knowyourtone   #ambienttones   #pedalboards   #pedalnerds   #pedalporn   #guitar   #gearporn   #gearnerds   #pedalboardpeople   #shoegaze   #geartalk   #guitarsdaily   #gottone   #tonefordays   #guitargear   #reverb   #gearpost   #boardshot 
While anything with decent gain could be used for metal, a dedicated metal amp is the only thing a dedicated metalhead would want to use. These amps are actually very similar to other styles of amp, with one big difference – they are loaded with massive gain, which is essential for metal. A perfect example of what makes a great metal amp is the EVH 5150III. Designed with Eddie Van Halen, this all-tube amp head is an absolute beast in term of power and gain, with face-melting distortion and 50 watts of power.

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Whenever I can do that, it’ll be a good day. Instead, we’re looking for a the correct combination of quality and cost, just like the aforementioned guitars. Ibanez usually gives you a great guitar for what you pay, so here we’ll narrow things down a little more and look at some of the best Ibanez guitars and "honorable mentions" for our greater list.
The moral of this story is simple, if you have an old Terada, Yamaha, Ibanez, Suzuki, Yairi, Tokai, Takamine, Emperador, Morris, Pearl or Tama (yes! they made guitars to) just to name a few, you probably have a guitar that given the right bit of TLC will wipe the floor with most of its modern competitors, including those beautiful guitars that cost $2000.00 plus. Ok Then, enough of my yacking, enjoy the pictures.
Yamaha is famous around the world for its incredible, quality, instruments. Its electric guitars are no exception. The Yamaha Pacifica Series PAC112V Electric Guitar, Old Violin Sunburst is another example of Yamaha's on point production. This guitar has a solid alder body, a maple bolt neck, rosewood fingerboard, and a five-position switch with coil tap. Plus there's the tremolo - a vintage tremolo with block saddles.
Zactly!!!!!!!! Terry Kath, hands down the greatest ever! Hendrix is on everybodies list as the best, well Jimi said Terry was the best and if Jimi said it it's good enough for the rest of us. I just can't believe it took until Sept. 24th 2009 for someone to put his name down! To bad he valued the band concept more than his ego or he would be more well respected.
The Pacifica family of guitars was launched years ago to address this market in particular. They’re excellent guitars for the working man and student alike. After a break-in period, these machines should provide stable, frustration-free operation for many years, with enough tone and versatility to play any style. The video below even demonstrates how, with a solid amp, you might not even know it was inexpensive.
Did I say WoW....your going to love this one...Here we have a VERY rare GREAT FIND and premium example at that this over 35 year old vintage mandolin has absolutely beautiful flamed AAA Fiddle grade Maple to both the back chevron 2 piece & sides .... this piece is simply gorgeous and has an aged & wonderfully grained figured Sitka spruce top this a VERY High Quality. This is a Japanese made Artist grade Mandolin from the prime Japanese Law-suit era ... the very talented Luthiers built this example... this one was made in the mid 1970's at the famous Ibanez factory in Japan this example is cleverly labeled with a beautiful mother of pearl logo then unheard of " CARLO ROBELLI "... This is a Gibson exact REPLICA of the " F Style " MANDOLIN this M-700 M700 ACOUSTIC Mandolin in excellent vintage condition WoW! its so nice dare I say Near Mint...its over 30 years old and has that aged and mellowed tone and has emerged as a great sounding professional quality constructed PRO level beauty that is available for a fraction of what the very same vintage Ibanez or Aria m-700 Logo'ed Mandolin will cost... ( same factory built those to ) same luthiers same materials... as seen with the great original golden plush lined hard shell case.. all & all one of the best sounding & playing mando's available under $1600.00 vintage F style and beautifully flamed & figured Maple ..looks like old school nitrocellulose lacquer but no visible checking cracks but just one short 3" finish check on back and is almost impossible to see... a few buckle mars on back but so faint not threw finish and again almost impossible to see... guard is also in top shape not all scratched up..this baby is in under the bed for 30 years condition it looks more like its one year old condition wise as it is actually 30+ years old...as you can tell the finish has that aged patina and warm appearance of a vintage Mando.. here is a great one w/ its original hard shell case ..WoW! Its being cleaned up now and is looking as new... the guard's glue just came loose so it will get cleaned prepped & re-glued and ready for another 30 years. I will also be restring her with a new set D'Addario strings we have in stock and set her up... she will ring like a sweet bell and be ready to record with or tour. Copy & paste this link to view many new pics of this beautiful Vintage Japanese crafted Mandolin... https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/70sCarloRobelliFMandolin?authkey=Gv1sRgCNbp6p6_1cicsQE#slideshow/5588480984817011186.

New from Stewart-MacDonald are guitar wiring kits with the premium brand pots, switches, jacks, capacitors and cloth wiring used in original Gibson Les Paul and SG guitars. The kits make it easy to order top-quality components for wiring or re-wiring a 4-control / 2-pickup guitar with a 3-way switch. The kit components include Switchcraft toggle […]
The process of building our kit guitars and basses is straight forward and requires little experience in woodworking or in instrument building. The entire instrument can be assembled with a few simple tools. Setting the instrument up for your playing style is also straightforward. We will guide you though the basic process in our instruction manual. For more complex or particular setup requirements, we suggest that you work with a professional for setup - just as you would with any instrument that you purchase.
I signed up for the Free GuitarTricks Trial and the first lesson that I checked out was titled something like “Blues Style Level 2 – How B.B. King Starts The Blues”.  You wouldn’t believe it. Shortly after starting this lesson I felt that my playing sounded the way it should be sounding. It sounded kind of the same as how B.B. King sounded. I was over the moon. This was simply an amazing experience and I never looked back. Today I am almost sure that I would probably be a Rock Star today if Guitar Tricks would have been around 20 years earlier ;-).

Plate reverb and spring reverb were the first attempts to simulate reverb in a portable device. The plate and the spring, respectively, are made of metal and attached to a transducer. The signal is fed to the transducer, which causes the plate or spring to vibrate. Reverberations bounce around the plate or spring. A pickup at the other end, converts the spring or plate's vibrations back into an electrical signal.
This is a really cool program. It let's you fiddle with a lot of cool effects, without having to spend a lot of money. The program works really well, after a bit of fiddling with the Jack server, and it far exceeds some of the commercial programs I have tried. I hope that this project gets some attention :) If I wasn't a "coding dyslexic", I'd be the first to sign up.
9. Boss Katana 50 1x12 Combo Amp ($199): The Boss Katana 50 is nothing to sneeze at. Perhaps one of the coolest functions is its immediate access to 15 awesome Boss pedal tones, supporting up to 55 of the BOSS family of effects. You can also customize your effects and amp settings via the Tone Studio Software or even download preamps from the Boss Tone Central website. You can also completely bypass the speaker by connecting the amps line output to a line input on your favorite device, which also comes in handy for connecting to a PA system.
Yes...I've seen a VST guitar plugin (can't remember the name) where you play chords on the keyboard with the left hand and the software converts them into guitar chord voicings, then you "strum" with the right hand by hitting different keys....and each key does something different...up-strum, down-strum, rake, mute, etc. I actually thought it sounded pretty damn good considering. Definitely close enough for background rhythm guitar work.
Besides instrument inputs and speaker outputs (typically via 1/4" jacks), an amp may have other inputs and outputs. These can include an auxiliary input jack (sometimes with its own level control, for a drum machine), "send" and "return" jacks to create an effects loop, a “line out” jack and an extension speaker jack. Practice amps sometimes have a 1/4" headphone jack, or stereo RCA or mini jacks for connecting a CD player, portable media player or other sound source. Some guitar amps have an XLR input so that a microphone can be plugged in for singing. Guitar amps that include a mic input are in effect small, portable PA systems. Some amps, typically bass amps, have an XLR connector to provide a balanced output from the preamp section to go into a PA system or recording input.
Russell, George (2001) [1953]. "Chapter 1 The Lydian scale: The seminal source of the principal of tonal gravity". George Russell's Lydian chromatic concept of tonal organization. Volume One: The art and science of tonal gravity (Fourth (Second printing, corrected, 2008) ed.). Brookline, Massachusetts: Concept Publishing Company. pp. 1–9. ISBN 0-9703739-0-2.
Beginners, take note! We’ve changed a few things in this article of beginner-friendly electric guitars, which included removing a few older models such as Squier’s Vintage Modified ’51 and the ESP LTD M100FM. We then added some new and popular models, such as the stripped-down Squier Affinity Jazzmaster HH, the super-cool Dean Vendetta XM, and the compact Jackson JS1X Dinky Minion. Also expanded the guide part of this article.
Home>Guitars, Amps, and Effects >Electric Guitars >Electric Guitars: 6-String PrintRefine your searchBy BrandCharvel (26)D'Angelico (28)Dean (32)Epiphone (65)Ernie Ball Music Man (30)ESP (67)EVH (7)Fender (141)Fret-King by Trev Wilkinson (3)Gibson (118)Godin (2)Gretsch (49)Guild (11)Hagstrom (9)Hamer (5)Ibanez (122)Jackson (54)Kramer Guitars (4)Line 6 (6)PRS Guitars: Paul Reed Smith (47)Reverend Guitars (9)Schecter (51)Squier (23)Steinberger (2)Sterling by Music Man (15)Supro (3)Taylor Guitars (6)Washburn (1)Wylde Audio (5)Yamaha (5)Play as you Pay® Eligible4-Payment Plan (542)6-Payment Plan (921)8-Payment Plan (885)12-Payment Plan (743)By Price$100 - $149 (5)$150 - $199 (19)$200 - $299 (24)$300 - $399 (60)$400 - $499 (73)$500 - $749 (183)$750 - $999 (233)$1000 - $1999 (245)$2000 - $2999 (93)$3000 - $3999 (65)$4000 - $4999 (34)$5000+ (13)Availability In Stock Items (860)Clearance Gear (229)By ConditionNew (914)Blemished (221)Scratch and Dent (18)Viewing products that ship to: Customer Kudos "zZounds is the best online company I've ever dealt with hands down." - Customer on October 21, 2017 1 MILLION+ Happy Customers learn more Guitar·Bass·Keyboard·Recording·Computer Audio·Live Sound·Drums·DJ·Accessories
A basic tone control consists of a capacitor and a potentiometer (the tone control itself).  The illustration below if the basic wiring for a tone control.  The view is as you would see it from the bottom of the potentiometer, wired for a right-handed guitar.  The oval "blobs" on the potentiometer casing are solder connections.  The ground wire should be soldered to the potentiometer casing for this tone control to work - and it helps shield out unwanted noise (really noticeable if not done this way and you use metal knobs).
Some guitarists design or modify their own pedals. Others use a combination of off-the-shelf effects. Kurt Cobain stomped on Electro-Harmonix Big Muff and ProCo Rat pedals to create his classic loud-soft-loud, "Nevermind"-era sounds. John Mayer kicked off his 2003 hit, "Bigger Than My Body," with see-sawing, arpeggiated sounds from his Roger Linn AdrenaLinn III pedal. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of different stomp boxes. Although there's a certain amount of gray area and overlap, pedal effects can all be divided into four general categories:
Included here after the filters are shifters like your standard pitch shifters, harmonizers, or octave pedals. You want to take care of any pitch changing (I'd argue even vibrato should happen here) before you add other effects into your signal, since they will react to the audio signal itself. You don't want to add reverb and then try to pitch shift, because the signal you send becomes too complex and inaccurate for such a precise effect.
What about the TAB and lyrics on this site? According to U.S. Copyright laws, there are allowable uses of copyright materials, such as extractions for educational purposes. Any TAB, or lyrics, shown on this site are specifically for teaching, using the reader's knowledge of the tempo and sound of a song to facilitate the written material. In addition, I show only excepts from familiar songs, not the entire song. I also encourage readers to obtain full versions of the sheet music from an MPA recognized site. The only exception to this approach is for songs no longer covered by copyright law (songs now in the Public Domain).
Compressors are often applied to electric guitar tracks to bring out the guitar’s natural sustain, as well as even out the overall dynamic range. Lead guitar parts usually benefit from a degree of compression treatment, while heavily overdriven rhythm parts often require very little or none at all, as the distortion naturally provides its own type of dynamic control. In the case of unnatural sounds, such as electric guitar, compression becomes a highly subjective topic, so experimentation is key to achieving the desired effect. As a starting point, therefore, try medium-fast attack and release times – an extremely fast attack time will blunt the transient response of the note. Remember that electric guitars can be inherently noisy and compression will generally exaggerate any hums and buzzes.
The Thunderbird IV was one of the most radical designs to come out of the Gibson and Epiphone Kalamazoo factory in the early '60s, thanks to legendary automotive designer Ray Dietrich, who was asked to put a new twist on solidbody guitars and basses. The sound of the Thunderbird IV was as cutting edge as its design and now the Thunderbird Classic-IV PRO returns with all of Epiphone's first-class quality and a lifetime guarantee, but without the hassles of owning (or hiding) a vintage instrument. Case sold separately.
Gretsch was founded in 1883 in Brooklyn, with their biggest boom coming in the fifties and sixties, at the birth of rock n’ roll. Famed for making hollow and semi-hollow models, their guitars were used by icons including Chuck Berry, Chet Atkins, Bo Diddley, and George Harrison. Since 2002 the production side of things has been run by Fender, although the Gretsch family still own the company.
I am a beginner and based on your recommendation, I bought the Dummies book, and signed up for Guitartricks.com as well. This combo is turning out to be really effective for me, I haven’t been playing long but I can feel the progress with each passing day. The videos at Guitartricks are my main guide through this maze of learning, and the Guitar for Dummies is my go-to resource for reading about anything I want to find out. I’m sure doing a search on the internet would get me the same result, but the Dummies book is easier to hit up I think, and at least I’m sure it’s accurate.
Even apparently crude solutions can produce useful results. For example, I was recording at a friend's flat many years ago and the amp I had only sounded any good when it was played flat out. The answer was to place the speaker cabinet on its back, place the mic right up against the grill, then cover the whole thing with blankets, sleeping bags and anything else that came to hand. It made the level in the room far more tolerable yet still produced the sound I wanted!
Top 4 in my opinion. Countless guitarists have played them on some of the best albums ever written. I've owned numerous vintage guilds and still own a vintage f50 and d55. Recently Fender bought guild and I bought a new d55 which was a bit over rated and over priced in my opinion. But Fender has sold Guild and I sold my fender owned guild d55 only to buy a brand new by the new owners who moved Guild to a California facility and I must say it holds its own with the vintages I have. Guild is back! A great name in acoustic guitars. A great build (thank God once again), and the quality has always been with the best. Long live guild and it's a top 4 brand just behind Martin, Taylor and Gibson.
1947: Open back Grover Sta-tites on 0, 00, 000 models style 21 and lower. These post-WW2 open back Grovers have thin seamed buttons and the pointed baseplates which were never used on the pre-war open back Grovers. Also all the pre-war thin seamed button tuners were 6:1 ratio. The post-war tuners (and the thick-button open Grovers after 1937) were 12:1 ratio This makes post-war open back Grovers more easily identifible. Otherwise the post-war Grovers are direct drop-in replacements for the pre-war versions.

that is not quite the reality since most are made in mexico or japan as they are of lower quality. You only meet those type of criterion when you buy a high handmade guitar which will be at least 1200 us or 1600 canadian. As you meet the entry level of solid wood prices better overall quality. It doesn't matter who makes the guitar : martin taylor, gibson, maton, collings, santa cruz, or even a high end a high high luthier like Olson, traugott or Ryan. The sound of the instrument and the perception that we have while we stroke a chord will define if we like the sound. We see how it feels, we look at a price that we feel comfortable with. Otherwise anyone would land a lowden, huss and dalton, bourgeois and the marquis version of Martin hd-28vs for instance. The personality of your style will infuence a lot of more then who makes it, because you buy the final product not the people who makes it.


Other handheld guitar and bass resonators on the market, manufactured under the tradename SRG, produced by Aescher Europa, in Germany, are available in both monophonic (one note at a time) and polyphonic (multiple notes at once) models, which include multiple onboard trigger switch effects, such as HPF (high pass filter) for enhancing harmonics and producing feedback effects, and LPF (low pass filter), producing a bass boost with a cello sound on heavy gauge strings. Later EBow models, such as the plus Ebow, contain a mode slide switch on the back, which allows the player to either produce just sustain or overtone feedback in addition to sustain.[69]

Solder is basically a low melting alloy, which in a nutshell means it’s melting point is far lower than the typical materials it will be used to join. It’s melting range is generally between 200 to 800 °F. Solder is available in either lead-based and lead-free. Most commonly you will use a 60/40 (60% tin, 40% lead) rosin core solder when working on guitar wiring.
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Quality replacement pot from Bourns.   Knurled 1/4" shaft fits most knobs.  Low torque, carbon resistive element, great replacement in many applications using passive humbucker or single-coil pickups.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  250K, Special A2 taper preferred by guitar and bass players.  Nut and washer included.  Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.

In general, the typical situation is that HSH gives me options of cleaner/thinner/clearer tones which aren't as achievable with HH (even with volume and tone pots in use!). These are options I use very frequently, and I'd feel pretty restricted with HH! Though of course, this isn't the case for everyone. Indeed, I'm quite fascinated at the variety of tones Ron Thal and Andy Timmons get from the overly-simple SH set up they prefer!
This diagram shows 3 single coils wired in parallel, allowing seven tone choices. The typical 3 single coil guitar contains a 5 way rotary switch which allows you to get 5 sounds - each single coil; neck and middle in parallel and middle and bridge in parallel. This modification will give you 2 more sounds - all 3 pickups in parallel and Neck and Bridge in parallel.
Flanger pedals are based on a studio sound made when two tapes were mixed together and one was delayed. What this does is add shifting harmonic content to your signal, as well as modulation. Flanging is a very distinct effect that adds a unique whoosh or airplane-like sound. Used with restraint, the flanger adds an interesting dimension to your sound, almost synthesizer-like sound. Used at extreme settings, flangers will over take the tone and bring a solo to completely different sonic level.
Around ’77 or so (since the new shape was similar to the Magnum basses), with sales embarrassingly bad, Ovation took some Deacon bodies and added new contours, carving a dip into the top curve and adding angles. It didn’t help. The Breadwinner was officially axed in ’79, with the Breadwinner loosing its head in ’80, although the market had long passed them by.
Chicago’s vintage guitar shop is located in Ravenswood just west of Lincoln Square. Rock N Roll Vintage is your one stop shop in Chicago for new guitars, vintage guitars, Chicago guitar lessons, guitar pedals, and we are currently the largest synth dealer in the Midwest. Looking for a specific guitar? Rock N Roll Vintage Guitar Shop carries Fender, Gibson, Martin, Gretsch, Rickenbacker and other popular guitars and basses including boutique amps. We have one of the largest selections of effects pedals in Chicago with many hard to find boutique pedal brands.

This is obviously the most important value when it comes to any musical instrument. If the guitar doesn’t sound right, none of the other values will be able to make up for that. Guitarists are notorious for their attention to tone, and many players will form a tight allegiance to the brand they feel provides the perfect sound. The Gibson is sought after for its full bodied overdriven sound in rock circles, while others swear by Fender’s classic offerings. It all comes down to a matter of preference, so you will want to be well acquainted with the sounds of each brand. Look up your favorite guitarists and see what they play. That will likely put you on the right track.


Though not much is known about the production of the Hi-Flier after about 1977, it clearly came to an end — and clearly has had an impact on players in the vintage market. Used by guitarists like Cobain and Lee Ranaldo of Sonic Youth, as well as many others in a variety of bands, the Hi-Flier gained notoriety as a unique guitar with a sound as striking as its looks.
Not to mention the difference tones created when two pure tones (sine waves) are produced at the same time (which, important to mention - pure tones only exist in theory, every sound we hear is comprised of overtones...) - then the additional difference tones created by the interaction BETWEEN difference tones - it's basically a fractal relationship. Anybody who has spent a significant amount of time studying the physics of sound knows that the interactions that occur between sounds are so complex and immense that it's almost silly to assume that just because "wood isn't magnetic" that the natural resonance of the wood wouldn't in turn accentuate certain overtones over the fundamental tone coming off the string. You can't say that the note "has already left the string," when the note takes place over time - even a staccato note has an attack, sustain, decay, and release envelope much in the way that a synthesizer does (this is where the idea for artificial dynamics envelopes came from anyway).

One of my friend's first "good" guitars was a Lotus LP copy with a set neck. Your typical heavy brown 70s with a plain top LP copy but it had binding like a custom and real inlays. I helped him put dimarzios in it and we set it up. It was a pretty good guitar except for the color. His mother bought it new, and it was a medium priced guitar back then (not cheap really, it was $400 or so in the 70s).

Unintentional phase cancellation can also occur if a guitar's pickups are wired incorrectly, or if a new pickup installed in the guitar has different magnetic or electric polarity from the one it replaced. To fix this, the pickup's magnetic or electric polarity needs to be reversed (which one exactly depends on the respective polarities of the other pickup(s) and whether or not hum-cancelling combinations are desired). While the latter is usually a small matter of reversing the pickup's hot and ground wires,[24] the former may be more difficult, especially if it requires the magnet(s) to be removed and reinstalled in a different orientation, a process which can damage the pickup and render it unusable if not done carefully.[25] This is the case with most humbuckers. On the other hand, single-coil pickups with magnetic polepieces can simply be repolarised by applying a strong enough external magnetic field.
James Burton, another famous Twin user, put it best: “If you can plug your guitar into an amp and make it sound good, that’s what it’s all about. The amp I really enjoy playing, especially when I’m traveling, is the Fender ’65 Twin Reverb. It’s got everything you need for live playing and it has great tone. That amp just works for me and it’s real trustworthy. When I travel on the road, I do use a little digital delay and maybe a little chorus, but I just like the sound of the guitar and playing something that I think people will appreciate and understand.”
In the image above, the first higher peak we see is E4 (i.e. the low E-string on a guitar in standard tuning), the second peak is E5 (i.e. an octave higher) and the following high peaks are B5, E6, G#6, B6, D7, and so on. Remember that the test rigs only have two strings, both tuned to E, and plucked open. So what you are hearing is a mish-mash of tons of overtones that shape the character of the “tone” that you hear.
The search never stops for the best acoustic guitar to play during jamming sessions, recording sessions and live gigs. Every year, guitar brands keep on coming up with awesome acoustic guitars to take your playing to the next level. So what’s the latest? We have scoured through various models released in recent years all the way through 2018 and picked out 7 of the very best, chosen for their impressive build, unique tonal character, incredible value and overall winning quality. If you’re looking for the best acoustic guitar for your needs, consider this your short list.
Of course, we’ve already mentioned the cool offset Jaguar shape of the body, which will turn plenty of heads whenever this budding bassist hits the stage. But with an active bass boost circuit, you also have the option to bump the sound of this way up past what’s normally afforded in a passive bass. Not to mention, the chrome hardware and the curved vintage logo print on the head really put this bass guitar over the edge visually.
I participated in what I think was perhaps Gibson's best SG...a prototype made for Robbie Krieger. It had my then-patented carbon fiber "T" cross section fingerboard which absolutely took care of the #1 problem with SGs...the rubber neck syndrome. It also had a beautiful flame maple top on the mahogany body and it got a cherry sunburst. Fabulous guitar. Robbie must still have it.
As the text says, the pick wasn’t exactly identical with all the samples. This would make for the differences alone: The movement of the string must not be imagined as a plain two dimensional one. In fact it’s rotating in three dimensions, while the pickup only senses that part of the movement which is perpendicular to the deck of the guitar. The vibrations direction changes all the time and does so for each frequency component (read: harmonics) independently.
The first successful guitar pickup was developed in the early 1930s by Rickenbacker® to help amplify Hawaiian lap steel guitars which were popular at the time. The first pickups were single-coils and while they do a good job of picking up the guitar signal they are also susceptible to picking up interference from nearby electrical devices. The Gibson® humbucker (US Patent 2896491) was developed in the 1950s to eliminate the "hum noises" resulting from electromagnetic interference. The humbucker uses two coils and a pair of pole pieces (having opposite magnetic polarities of each other) for each string. The coils are wound and connected to each other in such a way that the current produced by the moving guitar string in the two coils adds up (in-phase), while the current produced by electromagnetic interference in the two coils cancels (out-of-phase). Not only does the humbucker drastically reduce noise from interference, but it also has a different characteristic sound. The single-coil pick up is commonly considered to have a thin, clear and bright (more treble) sound, while the humbucker is known to have a full, but dark (less treble) sound with more overall signal output.
Originality of an instrument is very important. Modifications (any modifications), are a bad thing in the eyes of a collector. This will greatly influence value. Modifications can often be determined by looking at the model specs for a particular year guitar in this web page, and compare to your instrument. On flat top martins, the most common modifications are a replaced bridge, replaced tuners, or replaced frets.
Most users and experts agree that the Zoom MultiStomp MS-50G is a high quality and high value pedal. But it's not just about bang per buck, because many are satisfied with the quality of its effect and amp emulations. Even Music Radar is convinced of its performance saying, "While not all of the sounds are going to appeal to all players, there are enough usable tones here to make this a very practical item for just about anybody who uses effects."

Eric Clapton: select alder body with a special soft V-shaped maple neck/fretboard, 22 vintage-style frets, three Vintage Noiseless pickups, 25dB active mid-boost circuit and a “blocked” original vintage synchronized tremolo. Available in olympic white, pewter, candy green, torino red (Artist Series), Antigua burst, gold leaf, EC grey, daphne blue, graffiti canvas, mercedes blue, black and midnight blue (Custom Artist), as well in olympic white, torino red and pewter with a “Thinskin” nitrocellulose lacquer finish (Custom Thinskin Nitro).
Whereas tube amps are the traditional, solid-state amplifiers represent the modern guitar amplifier (even though they have been around for decades). While some guitarists refuse to consider solid-state amps worthy of their time, models such as the Roland JC-120 Jazz Chorus are proof that solid-state amplification is not only capable, but preferable in some cases. This high-end amp offers 120 watts of power, professional-grade tone and awesome versatility. It’s a good reflection of this segment, which offers endless versatility with affordable prices, low maintenance and incredible reliability.
PLUG THE PORES What you use to prep the body for paint depends on the chosen finish that you will go with. For a solid color finish you will want to fill any of the pores with a wood filler or Bondo glazing putty. I prefer Bondo because it dries quickly and sands smooth. Use one of those plastic speaders that you can get for mud at a paint or hardware store and press the filler firmly into the pores and gaps in the wood. Cut diagonaly accross and against the grain to fill the pores and gaps better. Use a sanding block and a 220 grit paper and after the filler dries to ensure an even flat surface. Only use your hands to lightly sand on the rounded edges or hard to reah areas of the guitar. The roundness of your fingertips can cause depressions in the woods surface so stick with the sanding block on the flat areas. Inspect the surface to see if any pores or gaps remain and repeat the steps if needed. Then clean the surface with a tack cloth to remove any dust.
I have a Dover, it was my great uncle’s guitar. It has seen better days but considering its age its in pretty good shape. Some one did some custom wiring inside so I had to replace the pots. One of the pickups was glued back together but it wasn’t done properly so now it doesn’t quite sit right. The plastic cracked at most of the corners where the screws hold the pick ups down.
The Thunderhead guitars would be offered until June of ’72, with several model designation changes along the way. In ’70, the K-1360 became the K-1213, and in May of the following year changed again to the K-1233. At the same time, the vibrato-equipped models also changed, the K-1460 becoming the K-1214 and then the K-1234. The Tornado lasted until the end in January, ’73, but also went through the model number changes along with the Thunderheads, the K-1160 becoming the K-1211 and then the K-1231. The vibrato Tornados went from K-1260 to K-1212 and then K-1232.
The original run of Marshall Silver Jubilee amps were designed to celebrate Jim Marshall's 50th anniversary in music as well as 25 years of Marshall amps. These beautiful sounding (and highly sought after) amps have been brought back from extinction with the Marshall 2525H Mini Silver Jubilee Head, matching cab and combo and have been constructed using the original 2525 diagrams. This means you have all that vintage sounding goodness with modern reliability. You can even switch it from 20 Watt to 5 Watt power so you can go from live sound to home practice easily without ever losing your tone. A great amp for stage, home and studio recording.
Set-ups include diagnostics, redressing and buffing frets, cleaning fret board, tightening hardware, restring, adjusting nut slots, truss rod adjustment, balancing tremolo, adjusting action, setting intonation, checking electronics, adjusting pick ups, detail and cleaning. Electro/acoustics get balance of output, and archtops have bridge located and taped.
Gretsch was founded in 1883 in Brooklyn, with their biggest boom coming in the fifties and sixties, at the birth of rock n’ roll. Famed for making hollow and semi-hollow models, their guitars were used by icons including Chuck Berry, Chet Atkins, Bo Diddley, and George Harrison. Since 2002 the production side of things has been run by Fender, although the Gretsch family still own the company.
I have found, like others, that I'm very comfortable with a 9.5" radius Modern C neck. I prefer it if the neck is on the chunkier side of Modern C, but I'm OK with most of 'em. Wider string spacing is helpful too, but would probably be a detriment to someone with shorter fingers. I rarely play fast (OK, I can't really play fast) so a flatter thinner "shredder" neck holds no advantages for me.
But no all are created equal, and I don’t really do this — I have live performance gear for anything I do, actually, way more than I need at this point. But a good friend of mine does the whole live-thing-throug-PC and has completely sold his soul to Ableton Live (Music production with Live and Push). You can find Ableton Live Intro online for about $99. It’s not just a live performance tool but also a DAW, you can use it for recording, composing, etc. Again, not one I use, but probably what you want if you’re going for live playing.
With the correct strings on the guitar, and the strings tensioned to the tuning you intend to use, place a capo at the first fret, or depress the low "E" string at the first fret. While doing this, depress the same string at the 12th fret. Site along the bottom of the string and note its relationship to the top of the frets up and down the fretboard between the fretted positions. The string in this situation, since it is under tension, is essentially a straight edge, and the curve, or profile, of the fretboard can now be seen. Generally, a gap of 1/64 - 1/32 " between the bottom of any string and the tops of the 6-7th frets (when fretting the string at the 1st and 12th frets or higher) is considered acceptable. You could go a hair flatter, or even a bit more curved depending on the needs of a given player, but start here.
A variation on Drop E, A with the G flattened one half step to F♯; this tuning is identical to 6-string Drop A, with two E strings added: one above, and one below. Like Drop E, A; this tuning allows easy fingering on the E since it is a standard fourth interval below the A. It also provides three high strings a fourth apart instead of the usual two. The tuning is used by Infant Annihilator on their album The Elysian Grandeval Galèriarch. A 7-string variation of the tuning without the high E (E-A-E-A-D-F♯-B) was used on their previous album The Palpable Leprosy of Pollution and is used by Enterprise Earth/Delusions of Grandeur guitarist Gabe Mangold.
Tone pot usually connected just as a variable resistor (one lug is not connected), so you got some “small” resistance (when compared to amp’s input) and a cap going to the ground. When you crank your tone there is no significant resistance, so all signal above cutoff freq is shunted to the ground (with graduate slope) — but still this is the brightest position of the tone pot.
There are of course, other buttons and positions featured on guitars. BB king’s Lucille had a switch to toggle different values for R11 (thus going from moody chords to punchy ‘Lead’ with a finger and no need for extra gear). Advanced guitars may have phase and antiphase switches for humbuckers or dual pickups. The jackson 5 Telecaster I think is an example as it has both a phase and anti-phase wiring on their pickup selector.
Jump up ^ Hicks, Michael (2000). Sixties Rock: Garage, Psychedelic, and Other Satisfactions. University of Illinois Press. p. 18. ISBN 0-252-06915-3. While most of the documentation on early fuzz boxes has been discarded or lost, the earliest such devices appear to have been introduced in 1962. The best known from that year was the Maestro Fuzztone FZ-1...
Finally, their taper. Taper refers to the gradual increase or decrease of the pots ohm as you adjust it. There are two types of pot taper, Logarithmic (Audio) and Linear (Lin). The human ear hears in a logarithmic manner, so in a gradual increase or decrease, whereas linear, to our ear sounds almost more like an on/off. Which you use is completely up to you, many players prefer a linear volume pot for example, but I find that a quality logarithmic pot in both volume and tone positions offers more scope for adjustment, if using a quality pot that is! Low quality audio taper pots, in my experience, offer unreliable tapers, often not providing a even, gradual adjustment as you roll off or on. A guitar's volume and tone pot can bring out so many great sounds from your rig, it offers versatility to your sound, and I love pushing an amp hard and finding those sweet spots on the guitar's controls to really capture a great tone. So I feel that's why a quality logarithmic pot with a perfectly gradual taper is an incredibly important component in the electric guitar. 

Make sure the notes you do want to play actually come out well-audibly. Good technique and dynamics go a long way here. Listen to your playing and take care that important melodic notes really come out, whereas accompaniment is often better subdued. Palm mute is useful so you can give notes a distinct loud attack without causing an indistinct muddle of cross-ringing notes. Also, make sure you play well in time and with good intonation.
I have a Samick Avion AV7 that I've been having trouble with a buzzing low E string when strumming with the first four frets. The bow is .013" and I set the 12th fret E string height to 2.5mm which helped, but not cured. I used a depth gauge to measure my frets, most measure at .043-.045" but the last two frets (21,22) measure at .052". At this point, would it be best to loosen the truss rod a 1/4 turn, or should I address the high frets, or could it be something else altogether? Thanks for the information.
Amps and effects don't have to be just for guitars and basses, either - nor do they have to play out loud. While the vast majority of amplifiers fit into the categories we've just been through, some exceptions would be amps made for keyboards and electronic drums, which can generally be used to amplify just about any instrument as long as you can attach a pickup or microphone. And if you want to practice the guitar or bass without waking up the neighbors, be sure to look into headphone amps as well: they'll push all the sound you love, but to your ears instead of a loudspeaker, so you can keep the sweetness to yourself... until you're ready to share, that is!
Optocoupling Compressor using a LED and a LDR. Similar to Colorsound Supa Sustain or DOD 280. As others have mentioned, instructions are a single photocopied sheet showing component layout. There's no mention that you'll need a piece of heat shrink to fab up your optocoupler. If you have some experience you can figure it out. Wire was not supplied.
Washburn was founded in 1883 in Chicago. The company was founded by George Washburn Lyon and Patrick J. Healy. Lyon and Healy were sheet music publishers who expanded to musical instruments. The current Washburn guitar company was formed in 1964 when Rudy Schlacher began importing guitars under the Washburn name. Washburn guitars are no longer made in the USA. Lyon & Healy is still in existence as a manufacturer of harps in Chicago.
Received it right on time. It was a gift for my best friend and it turned out to be a lot more beautiful than expected. The shade of blue looks real classy and different in different lighting ! Yamaha is known for its magical sound and they maintain their name with this piece too! The guitar comes tuned , and sounds absolutely amazing ! Other website reviews say that it's not as loud, I didn't think so. It has a complete resounding sound that is pleasing to the ears ! My friend went in shock at the surprise and I went in shock with the unexpected high quality ! Definitely recommend, as a beginner or a pro, it's an easy to handle guitar that cradles comfortably between your arms and sounds perfect.

One of the best defining features of Schecter guitars is their build quality. It seems that they always go an extra mile. Schecter’s bodies are solid, made of great tonewood depending on the application, and the array of finishes they offer are just impressive. In simple terms, build quality is not something you need to worry about with this brand.
Every guitarist seeks to produce an expressive and distinctive tone. Unfortunately, figuring out what kind of gear you need can be a baffling proposition. Here are the three main equipment categories that comprise your music-making rig: your electric guitar, guitar amps, and effects pedals and units. These components all work together to create your sound. And because you can swap out equipment and change settings, the creative possibilities are virtually limitless.
Compressors also have the ability to increase the sustain of notes beyond sounds that are normally usable on the instrument; yet another reason the effect is a popular tool in the soloist’s arsenal. The tiniest signal can be normalized to the same amplitude of a fierce pick attack, and a trailing note will resonate at the exact same volume until the string stops inducing a signal on the pickup.

We have already covered one Behringer reverb, which was the epitome of affordable and functional simplicity. However, this brand has a couple more aces up their sleeve, including the more advanced RV600 (click for full review). What this pedal offers is a significantly more versatile solution that brings you additional flexibility at a bargain price.

OLD Morris looks to be equal in all respects to our Yairi CY116, exotic wood construction with very nice old woods and excellent workmanship - fit & f instance they make the fit & finish is amazingly nice on the Terada factory made Morris. If your not familiar with Terada they are responsible for some of the finest Japanese guitars on the planet for instance Ibanez George Benson GB10's and all that high end line, most of Ibanez's Artists, and several other top of the line Japanese legends and they know how to make exceptional guitars and this Morris Classical is no different it sounds beautiful and has the vibe that is if you love the looks and feel of a well seasoned fully broken in 40 year patina and your OK with the top finger drag wear your going to love this vintage beauty yes it has plenty of vibe bit it sounds deep and rich too. Nice meaty neck plays easily with great action and with absolutely no cracks oh it has minor doinks and scratches here & there but nothing horrible this guitar qualifies for a VERY GOOD JVG rating overall vintage excellent but with the wear as seen the neck is still pretty slick no major abrasions and the fingerboard is nice too. Yes this is a very nice Ole Classical that has another lifetime of wonderful service to its new owner. I think you will be very pleased. Any questions just drop me an email to JVGuitars@gmail.com . Thanks for looking Joe.
We selected this guitar as our Top Pick because it’s an instrument that could suit anybody. It has everything you need from your electric guitar and it’s easy to play. A good classic that will stay with you for many years to come. It suits both beginners and guitarists who have been playing for a while. True, a professional guitarist would buy something pricier, but if you’re not super picky this guitar will do perfectly well!
Next important control knob is usually labeled as time or rate. This defines the length of echoes in a reverb. You can have them short or you can have them last for a fairly long time. Which side you will lean more towards is going to depend on the nature and tempo of your music. Slower, more subtle riffs can easily deal with long reverb times while faster sections usually work best with short reverb. Again, experimentation is the key here.

There’s a common belief that certain strings are better for beginners than others. While nylon strings can be easier on beginner’s fingers, the main thing that matters when it comes to guitar strings is the style of music you are planning to play, because the difference in feel and sound between the two materials is significant – even for a beginner.

Les Paul was an extraordinary pioneer of music and instrument development, and he also paved the way for popular music today from blues and jazz to rock, country, and metal.  The Les Paul electric guitar stems from one of the best electric git brands to date – Gibson.  This came to be with Paul’s and Gibson president Ted McCarty’s collaboration to find the best electric guitar with resonance and sustain but with less distortion.  Since they couldn’t find one, they had to make one.
Decide between mic recording or using a direct box (DI). Recording the sound of your electric guitar by miking your amp is a great way to simulate studio quality sound. However, this will require expensive equipment, like a quality amp, microphone, and potentially sound dampening equipment or material. On the other hand, you can plug your guitar right into a DI to record your guitar.[1]

Back in the 1930s jazz and big-band guitarists began to make the switch to electric guitars in order to compete with the volume of other instruments onstage. Early electric instruments were hollow-body guitars. They were big, and featured an arched top that helped with power and projection. They had f-holes to facilitate amplification acoustically, and the first rudimentary pickups that allowed the guitar to be plugged into an external amplification system.
This is a very general question, but I will attempt to answer. I'll not get into brands, buy what "feels" right and has a good tone. If, a beginner, a good acoustic can be bought new for $200.00 - $300.00. If, you are an experienced or professional player, "The Sky is the Limit" only limited by how much you want to spend. My first guitar was used, and I paid $50.00. Now, I play a Gibson Song Writer, $3500.00. Hope this helps.

With Dave Matthews playing an electric guitar in place of his usual acoustic, the band delivered a performance of “Samurai Cop (Oh Joy Begin)”, the lead single from Come Tomorrow, their record-breaking seventh-straight album to debut at #1 on the Billboard charts dating back to 1998’s Before These Crowded Streets. You can watch Dave Matthews Band’s performance on Ellen below:
I'm not sure if the same applies to LPs, but on my BC Rich Mockingbird (which has the same tone/volume setup) if one volume knob is all the way off it'll only mute the guitar in the center position. Say the bridge volume is at 10 and the neck is at 0, I'll still get sound if the bridge pickup is selected but I won't get sound if both or just the neck are selected.
The trust you place in a guitar master's steady hand, keen mind and eye for detail when you hand him your baby is almost too much to bear. It's more hope than faith. For you need someone who's knowledgeable, but not just book smart. A guitar master needs to know more than just how to solder the yellow and green wires together, glue a new bridge and replace a few strings. He must know its rhythm, that steady beat pulsing through the wood.

Reverb is one of the most fundamental effects for electric guitar, which is why it is already built into most amps. Reverb adds natural sounding depth to your sound. Used extensively in the recording world, electric guitars do not sound “right” without it. Just a little makes the guitar have more of a natural sound and decay, but you can go to the extremes and get cavernous depth to your sound. Plate and spring are the most common types, but with so many makers coming up with new sonic “spaces” to play in, finding your reverb sound is a priority.


3,000 to 8,000 Hz - Brilliance and Presence: This is the range that can add shimmer or allow a guitar to cut through a mix when boosted. It can also be where you make cuts to keep a guitar from conflicting with a vocal. If making boosts in this range, keep an eye (ear?) out for noise, as any noise present from distortion/effects pedals will very quickly be accentuated as well

According to Harmony’s 1963 price list, the H1213 Archtone sold for $37.75. If we take inflation into account, this same guitar would actually sell for around $270 today. This is roughly the same price for most entry-level acoustic guitars these days, but the two main differences are that the H1213 is an archtop and it was made in the US (most modern entry-level acoustics are flattops produced in Asia).
Nickel finish Frequensator style split trapeze tailpiece. This split fork design originated on archtop models from the 40's. The difference in fork length alters string tension behind the bridge to add depth to the bottom strings and brilliance to the top strings. Width of plate with mounting screws = 2 17/32 in. (64.3mm). Length of mounting bracket side with mounting holes = 1 39/64 in. (41mm) from end to bend Length of mounting bracket from bend to trapeze hook tops = 1 13/64 in. 30.5mm.) Length of short trapeze to top of string retainer bar (not including nut heights) = 2 1/2 in. (63.35mm). Short bracket width = 1 3/64 in. (26.65mm). String Bracket width = 1 3/16 in. (30.35mm). Length of long Trapeze section including string bracket = 6 in. (152mm). Widths of each trapeze and string bracket are equal.
Though pitch-shifting is an effect, it is easier to control when used via an insert point. However, if you need to use the effect on several tracks in varying amounts, you can use it via a send/return loop, providing the shifter is set to 100 percent wet. That way, you can adjust the effects depth for individual mix channels by using the send control feeding the pitch-shifter.
Another popular value pack comes courtesy of one of the greatest rock'n'roll guitarists of all time. For those who have an appetite for destruction, look no further than the Slash AFD Les Paul Guitar Outfit. Endorsed by the Guns N' Roses shredder himself, this pack comes with the killer AFD Special-II guitar that's equipped with new Ceramic Plus humbucking pickups, and a built-in Shadow pickup ring E-tuner. Additionally, this pack also contains a custom gig bag with the Slash "Snakepit" logo, Slash signature Dunlop Tortex picks, and much more.
This product was not working and parts were defect. I don't know how some people made it works. The instruction was terrible and seller's wires description photos are more worse. I did not expect much for this little toy. Just piece of the junk. I was tried to return, but the seller said that I had to pay return shipping and he gave me a fake return shipping address.

Flat tops from 1970 to present are considered to be excellent utility instruments, but are not collectible. Staring in 1976, Martin has been undergoing many changes with numerous reissues, new models, limited editions, etc. Workmanship has improved greatly from the early 1970's, and Martin is now producing some of its best guitars in over 20 years. While not currently collector's items, these intruments have excellent workmanship, sound, and playability.
It depends on whether you are playing with someone, or you just wanna start to play home in your bedroom. If you play with others, you need an amp that can play loud enough to follow the bass and especially the drums. Marshall make some great tubeamps, but also Vox make some great amps, where this one on 40 watt with effects incl are real good. Sound like a tubeamp, and have a 12ax7 in the frontamp.
We make our Tone Bars / Ferrule Blocks (tone slugs) out of 360 brass and use them on most all of our string through custom guitars. You will notice an enhancement in sustain and beauty.  The ones sold here are not polished. Go to shawwoodshop.com to purchase slugs that are polished. Please ask any questions you might have about the Slug. I offer quantity discounts.

Neither player uses any sort of stomp boxes in their rigs. In an effort to emulate his heroes, Bo keeps it straight ahead, using no effects at all, while Frank opts to program his effects via rackmount gear and to make setting changes through a MIDI controller. The advantage is that he can change gain levels, EQs, and effects instantly with one tap, instead of having to do the stomp box break dance in time for the next down beat. Both axemen prefer to get their overdrive the old-fashioned way, by driving the tubes in their amps.
One of the most appreciated brands on the market at the current time, the Epiphone by Gibson surely won’t let you down. The company was founded 144 years ago by Anastasios Stathopoulos and is still running today. This brand is known for producing top-notch guitars that many players love and recommend, the reason why its popularity increased over the years.
The Seagull S6 is another very popular choice for those looking for an affordable but great sounding acoustic. Owners claim it sounds as good as guitars in the $800-$1500 range. The S6 has a cedar top with cherry back and sides. It features a wider nut, which means this guitar will be a great choice for those playing finger style or that have larger hands. Owners of this guitar are singing it’s praises, saying that they have no regrets. The sound of this guitar is big, yet soft. Described as being “alive” with tone. Seagull has been making quality guitars at an affordable price for many years, so the S6 will not disappoint. See more on this guitar here.
I want to combine an LED circuit with the 5 way selector so that it switches LED colors based on the pickup selected. Position 1 = Red, Position 2 = Purple (1+3), Position 3 =Blue, Position 4 = Green (3+5) and Position 5 = Yellow. The questions I have are: 1. The LED circuit has a 9V battery to light the LED. Would this affect the tone of the guitar. 2. I’ve also heard that this might introduce noise in the guitar circuit. Is this even possible?
Purists might question why we’ve lumped loopers in with delays but the simple fact is that both pedals repeat an element of what you’ve already played. Both are also great for helping you come up with new ideas that simply wouldn’t be possible otherwise. Basically, loopers take similar technology and allow you to record entire passages of play, then ‘loop’ them back (i.e. repeat them) whilst you play something new over the top. Lay down a basic chord progression, then solo of the top of it. You don’t even need to bother with pesky drummers or singers! We’re joking, obviously. As a tool for practice, they’re unparalleled, but in creative terms they’ve opened the doors to entire new genres of music. Ed Sheeran, KT Tunstall and plenty of other solo singer-songwriters have employed loopers in their acts to great effect.
Straight away, we have to talk about how good this guitar sounds. Lots of low-end and mid-range acoustics tend to do one tonal area well, but the Martin DRS2 does an awesome job all round. It’s got deep, booming lows, while the highs remain nice and crisp. And of course, all of this is available acoustically or electrically in the dreadnought cutaway acousticelectric guitar.
Guitar signals cutting out is a very common symptom of a simply wiring problem. Usually when your guitar cuts out, it means that you have a loose solder somewhere. Your guitar will sound fine when the solder connection is joined, but your guitar will cut out when the loose wire disconnects for the lug. Broken solder joints are common on electric guitars especially when your output jack becomes loose and rotates in the pocket. That is why it is extremely important to keep your output jack tight and secure at all times. If your output jack is loose and rotates, it will probably break the wiring connections inside the guitar. Luckly, loose connections are easy to fix. The only problem is trying to find them.
Pickups are complex devices. No matter what we do, we cannot model them with spot-on accuracy. They do have a series resistance (R6), but the L1 and C3 inductor and capacitance, respectively, but these are not real circuit components, but are a simple model placeholder for the complicated interactions that appear due to Maxwell’s equations, when we have a wire wound around magnets (see below image):

Their selection these days is insane, especially since they target a lot of awesome smaller brands that NOBODY else in the area carries. I'm pretty sure this is the only place in town you can go to play the Reverend line, not to mention damn near every PRS model currently in production. The locally-made boutique stuff they stock is awesome too, and I would have never even known about it had it not been for the shop.
 This Tempo guitar combo amplifier with tremolo and reverb effects is well-used, but still delivers great retro sound. If you're looking for genuine vintage guitar sounds, the Tempo delivers in a delightfully trashy way. The sound is twangy and clear, but you can overdrive the volume a bit to get a raw lo-fi sound perfect for garage punks, mod revivalists, surf rockers, etc. and This solid state amp was made by Japanese guitar manufacturer Tempo. It has three inputs, just like you'd expect from a late '60s - early '70s model. The temolo speed is adjustable from slow to fast, and though the intensity is not adjustable, it has a nice "just right" sound that's not too mellow or too choppy. The reverb sounds like a classic spring reverberation unit, and it gets the job done well. The cabinet measures 18 inches x 13 inches x 7 inches and houses one 8-inch loudspeaker. Check out the short video below to hear the Tempo in action and examples of the tremelo and reverb, both at maximum settings. Finding all of this great stuff for you guys has left me with virtually no free time, so please do not laugh at my years-out-of-practice playing style when you hear the sloppy Link Wray and Duane Eddy riffs...

I love this guitar! I am so happy with this axe and haven't put it down since it arrived. I don't think that you will find a better value in the Martin lineup, especially for an all solid wood guitar and a free HSC. People complain because this wasn't made in the USA, but I don't think that anyone would complain after playing this beauty. The action right out of the box was perfect, just like any high end Martin should be (plays like my HD28 and D18). This thing plays like butter and is silky smooth. Some people complain about the stratabond neck, but I love the feel of it and it is rock solid and should last forever! The finish and style of the guitar is very minimalistic, which is something that I love. It may be too plain for some people, but I love it. Something just
If you're looking for one of the best Strats Fender has to offer, be sure to check out the Fender American Professional Stratocaster. Developed with pickup master Tim Shaw, its brand-new V-Mod single-coil pickups are voiced specifically for each position, mixing alnico magnet types to produce powerful, nuanced tones with original Fender sonic DNA. For metal guitarists, have a look at the Jackson JS32 DKA electric guitar. Swift, mean, and easy to play, this guitar offers classic Jackson tone and playability at a more than affordable price. If you're looking for a Les Paul guitar, a great choice is the Epiphone Les Paul Custom PRO electric guitar. If you're ready to step up to a Gibson Les Paul, the 2019 Gibson electric guitar lineup is in-stock.
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