We now know why series wiring attenuates the highs, but why is it louder? Why do you end up with such a beefy, meaty tone? Let’s assume each pickup on your Strat puts out 100 x of power. When wiring two pickups in parallel, each pickup loses 3/4 of its output when combined with the other. This drops each pickup’s output to 25 x, instead of 100 x. Together, you get a total of 50 x (25 x + 25 x). This power drop is why any dual-pickup combination on your Strat doesn’t sound as loud as a single pickup.
Double-coil or "humbucker" pickups were invented as a way to reduce or counter the unwanted ambient hum sounds (known as 60-cycle hum). Humbuckers have two coils of opposite magnetic and electric polarity to produce a differential signal. Electromagnetic noise that hits both coils equally tries to drive the pickup signal toward positive on one coil and toward negative on the other, which cancels out the noise. The two coils are wired in phase, so their signal adds together. This high combined inductance of the two coils leads to the richer, "fatter" tone associated with humbucking pickups.
1939: The #1 brace inside near the neck block changes from 5/16" wide to 1/2" wide, making it roughly twice as wide. This happened at the same time as the popscicle brace addition. The neck block thickness was also reduced by 1/4". About the same time neck width reduced from 1 3/4" to 1 11/16" at the nut, and the bridge spacing reduced from 2 5/16" to 2 1/8".
3.  This one is not so much a customer fix as customer negligence.  A crack in the top of an acoustic that is not addressed right away.  Dirt and grime are allowed into the crack and oxidizes the surfaces so that what could have been fixed with a diamond patch on the inside has now become a fix that includes taking away the rotten wood and inserting a splint.  It can be very difficult to match the new wood with the old, and you better make sure the customer knows that his or her guitar will not look brand new.

Aside from what brands to choose from and finding out the right budget to spend on an amp. Initial search for a guitar amplifier generally leads beginner players on figuring out that there are actually different types of guitar amps in the market. This is where they start to care deeply enough to know which amp sounds better and what will fit their playing the best.
LPM is an online music school. We teach a variety of instruments and styles, including classical and jazz guitar, piano, drums, and music theory. We offer high-quality music lessons designed by accredited teachers from around the world. Our growing database of over 350 lessons come with many features—self-assessments, live chats, quizzes etc. Learn music with LPM, anytime, anywhere!

No tricks here, the volume control allows you to adjust the output level of your signal. But, unlike your amp's gain setting, the best signal-to-noise ratio will be achieved with the pot all the way up. If you have more than one volume knob, it means each controls a pickup. Middle positions can be useful with amps that don't have too much power and distort very easily or to get a crunch sound with a fat saturation. We can also use it as an effect by turning the knob progressively and playing a chord to make it appear (or disappear).
The following open-tunings use a minor third, and give a minor chord with open strings. To avoid the relatively cumbersome designation "open D minor", "open C minor", such tunings are sometimes called "cross-note tunings". The term also expresses the fact that, compared to Major chord open tunings, by fretting the lowered string at the first fret, it is possible to produce a major chord very easily.[14]
Yes, split sound probably won’t be as loud as the other singles. The Cool Rails is really like a single coil sized version of our Jazz humbucker, so if you are after a more single coil sound, you can try the Vintage Rails, which is more of a single coil sound in a humcancelling format. You can always move the Cool Rails to the bridge position as well.
This guitar manufacturer started out as a parts supplier in the early 1970s. Atlansia didn't begin production of guitars under their badge until infamous engineer and designer Nobuaki Hayashi of Matsumoku fame became the company's president and chief designer in the late 1970s. Since then, Atlansia has continued to produce cutting-edge guitar designs in Nagano, Japan. The company did not make any other badged guitars other than namesake Atlansia.
Though the guitar is played through an amplifier which is often miked and recorded, the engineer or producer may later decide to use a different amplifier tone that's better suited to the character and timbre of the song, while preserving all the nuance and inflection of the original performance embedded in the direct track. The re-amp device allows the dry track to be sent to an amplifier again and properly miked and re-recorded for use as the final track.
In 1945, Richard D. Bourgerie made an electric guitar pickup and amplifier for professional guitar player George Barnes. Bourgerie worked through World War II at Howard Radio Company making electronic equipment for the American military. Barnes showed the result to Les Paul, who then arranged for Bourgerie to have one made for him. (info from Wikipedia, photo of Jimi Hnedrix from bassmiddletreble.files.wordpress.com)

Tone pots are similar to volume pots except they are wired in such a way as to only increase resistance on the high-end allowing the low-end signal to pass through unheeded. As you increase or decrease the amount of high end by adjusting your tone knob, your tone changes accordingly. Tone pots can be better thought of as filters, they filter high-end frequencies that ultimately affect your overall tone.
These handpicked guitars represent the very highest-end when it comes to collector-grade, vintage instruments. Take a look at these stunning, investment-level guitars and basses from the golden eras of Fender, Gibson, Gretsch, Martin, Rickenbacker and more. These stunning specimens are the things of gearhead dreams, and even if you can't afford one today, there's still plenty of fun to be had perusing and exploring these iconic guitars.
Roland has come a long way from its humble beginnings back in the early '70s as a rhythm machine manufacturer. The company grew to produce various other instruments and amplifiers, and is now one of the biggest music gear manufacturers in the world. With so many guitar brands under their name that could produce amps for them - like Boss and Line 6 - they still take the effort to build their own branded amps, and the success that they are enjoying is proof that they are doing the right thing. Their most popular amp is still the Roland Jazz Chorus, as used by artists like Albert King, Andy Summers, Metallica's James Hetfield and Kirk Hammett, Robert Smith of The Cure, Jeff Buckley and many more. These days they have a variety of amplifiers in the entry to mid-tier market, most of which continue to garner great reviews.

The reason being that guitar manufacturers will usually look to keep costs down in the pickup department. This is particularly true for budget models, which will usually be fitted with stock pickups that do the job, but fall short of truly impressing. So guitarists with an affordable, but playable guitar may wish to upgrade their pickups, to make their favorite axe gig-worthy.
If you’re one of those “I plug directly into the amp and don’t need no stinkin’ guitar effects pedals” kinda dude, then godspeed and thanks for stopping by. On the other hand, if you own a pedal board upon which you trip the light fantastic, stick around — this list of guitar effects pedals you must have will validate what you might know, illuminate what you don’t know, and quickly help you generate a massive and highly versatile sound palette.
In my own (first) project guitar, I did not know quite what to expect, so I built it with HSH pickups and two complete signal paths. The humbucking path uses 500k pots and an 0.047 cap; the single coil path uses 250K pots and a 0.022 cap. I did this with stacked, concentric CTS 250K/500K pots and an on/on toggle switch, all within the minimal confines of a standard Telecaster control plate. I created a custom 5-way selector switch to isolate the single-coil wiring from the humbucking combinations, but in the end when I flip the switch I opted for just the stand-alone single coil for the warmest sound. As I said above, the tapped humbuckers just didn't compare. This project is a work in progress; I hope this helps you find your own path.
As similar as the two instruments are, bass guitars have enough differences from electric guitars that bassists should definitely look for effects designed specifically for their instrument. By doing that, you’re getting a pedal balanced for the low-frequency dynamics of the bass, and built to help it blend better with the other instruments in the band. Many bass effects have the same purposes as guitar effects described above, including chorus, reverb, delay, phaser and tremolo.
If you just want to send that current through to the amplifier unchanged, that would mean keeping all volume- and tone knobs turned all the way up. But the knobs can be useful. Underneath the volume knobs, the electrical signal is hooked up to two places; one line goes out towards the amplifier, and the other is effectively contained without being sent to the amplifier. The more you turn down the volume knob, the more of the signal you contain instead of sending it through the amplifier.
The acoustic solos Reinhardt recorded with the Quintet of the Hot Club of France between 1936 and 1940 are simply astounding displays of virtuosity, melodic taste and speed that left indelible impressions on players throughout several generations, including Les Paul, Jimmy Page and Michael Angelo Batio. Django didn’t even need all four fretting fingers either, using only two left hand fingers to play complicated chords and hyperspeed solos (his third and fourth fingers were badly burned in a fire).
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List of guitar brands that include the most reliable models available. Guitar brands include those from major manufacturers of musical instruments, including Yamaha, Gretsch, Gibson and more. This list answers the question, 'What are the best guitar brands?' Users looking for a new guitar will want to research a variety of different brands to find the one that best suits their needs, based on function and features.

That's actually a good question. There were several people working on the electric guitar at the same time... so it depends on what you're looking for, and what constitutes a real electric guitar. And to compound the issue, tape recording was also in an experimental stage, back in the 1930s when the electric guitar arose. So live recordings of early performances pretty much don't exist.

The initial single-pickup production model appeared in 1950, and was called the Esquire. Fewer than fifty guitars were originally produced under that name, and most were replaced under warranty because of early manufacturing problems. In particular, the Esquire necks had notruss rod and many were replaced due to bent necks. Later in 1950, this single-pickup model was discontinued, and a two-pickup model was renamed the Broadcaster. From this point onwards all Fender necks incorporated truss rods. The Gretsch company, itself a manufacturer of hollowbody electric guitars (and now owned by Fender), claimed that “Broadcaster” violated the trademark for its Broadkaster line of drums, and as a newcomer to the industry, Fender decided to bend and changed the name to Telecaster, after the newly popular medium of television. (The guitars manufactured in the interim bore no name, and are now popularly called ‘Nocasters.’) The Esquire was reintroduced as a one-pickup Telecaster, at a lower price.

Since digital effects use DSP, manufacturers have made the most of the processing power by adding amp modeling features. To the point that amp modeling has become a standard feature, and has even overtaken effects in popularity. If you already have a good amplifier, then amp modeling is not important, but it's still a good addition for the extra versatility amp modeling provides.


Fujigen Gakki began operation in 1960 as a classical guitar manufacturer, moving into the lucurative electric guitar markets in 1962. The company was the largest producer of Japanese guitars during the 1960-1980 period. They were known for producing high quality products, especially for the badged guitar market, which is why the company was selected by so many major American brands. It wasn't until 1970 that the company began making products for the venerable Ibanez brand, which was an unqualified success. Fujigen Gakki was the main manufacturer of choice for Greco badged guitars in the 1970 to 1980 period. They also produced guitars for major manufacturer Yamaha. Badged guitars made by Fujigen include Antoria, Epiphone, Jason and Mann. Badged guitars that may have been made by Fujigen Gakki were Marlin and St. Moritz.
The flanging effect is created by mixing two identical signals together while delaying the second signal by a small and gradually changing period of time. This delay is often no longer than 20 milliseconds. A simple way of thinking about the differences between phasers and flangers is that phasers work by affecting the frequencies with a filter, while a flanger affects frequencies with a time-delay.
I once did a setup on one that belonged to a friend but it was really wrecked so it wasn't perhaps a fair representation. It seemed to be well built though and the neck was nice enough. The tone was decent too although not exciting - exactly what you'd expect from such a guitar. Overall I'd say it was better than the cheaper squiers (SEs, Affinities etc).

I should also add that I said I expect the Authentics to come in the medium string height range, because they are trying to replicate the kind of vintage Martins coveted by Bluegrass musicians, who are either used to or seek out slightly higher action compared to modern guitars. There are exceptions of course since Tony Rice and Robert Shafer both prefer action so low it is practically resting on the frets.

I can't have them above Guild. Their usa made stuff and vintage acoustics are gems no doubt, but they set 7 or 8th for me. I just wish they still made American made acoustics. Like guild they are a hallmark name in the acoustic guitar world. Unlike guild they aren't being made in america. Guild and their supporters really lucked out with the Cordoba purchase. They're bringing Guild back where they belong. On top. Now if someone would do the same for Washburn. I really thought the usa made stuff would get back to greatness with that solo deluxe warren haynes model, but they stopped American made guitars all together which is a shame.
In 1966, Teisco guitars shed some of its adolescent awkwardness of the early ’60s in favor of a svelter, hipper look. While some of the tubby bodies and monkey grips remained, they were joined by leaner shapes, thin, pointed, flared cutaways and German carve contours. In many ways, the ’66 Teisco line is the quintessential year for Teisco, which is fitting since it would be the last under the original ownership.

These multi-effects pedals are exactly what the name suggests: all-in-one models that pack multiple effects into a single box. There are a few benefits to this, one of which is value, since getting more than one effect at once gives you great bang for your buck. They also tend to come with presets that give you customized mixes of their various effects, which can do a lot to teach you how different effects interact and how to mix and match them yourself.
It comes with two 6.5-inch speakers, delving out 100 W each for a total of 200. Now, the small woofer diameter might make these units work less-than-perfect for rendering stomach-churning bass noise, but ZT Amplifiers never intended for them to be used as such. Instead, they are supposed to deliver loud and clear enough sounds in the treble and mid ranges to make the guitarist hold its own even when a loud drummer is present.    

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This is an absolutely stunning OM acoustic in MINT/As New Condition. This has been in my personal collection for a few years. In the words of Bill Kraus, the builder: An OM model in my favorite combination of woods: Red spruce top, Honduran rosewood back and sides, curly Koa bindings. I first heard about Bill Kraus from my good friend, Scott Freilich of Top Shelf Music in Buffalo, NY. Scott has been a factory authorized Martin repair center since 1979 and has seen the finest 6 figure pre-war Martins. Scott was raving about Bill Kraus, his knowledge of tonewoods, and the insane quality of his guitars. I also learned that Stan Jay of Mandolin Bros. was equally impressed with Kraus Guitars and had started carrying Bill’s guitars in his store. Every Kraus guitar at Mandolin Bros. has sold!
Another +1 for shreddage. I have the PRS version and was trying it out through BIAS and TH3 the other day. Had an absolute ball, and was able to achieve somewhat realistic results with very little effort. I also love pretty much everything I have from Amplesound, though results through effects engines can be hit and miss. Their Taylor acoustic is lovely if that's what you're looking for. I've not found a really fantastic strum engine/option yet but then I will fully admit I haven't put the time into mastering what I already have in that department. I have heard demos using the guitar VIs that I have that do sound convincing so it is possible though maybe not easy.
Description: Body: Maple - Burled - Top Wood: Maple - Burl - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany & Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 20, Medium - Inlay: Pearloid & Abalone - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: ART-W - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Gold - Circuit Type: Passive - Pickups: Super 58 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Blue Lagoon - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case
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Searching 'guitar' on YouTube, Google, etc can be overwhelming. Ten billion results come up. I wish we could just be nice to kids with questions. I noticed this answer mentioned "pickups" several times. Kid probably has no idea what a pickup is. My brother showed me the switches, pickups, and explained them to me in five minutes, in person on a real guitar. It was like being taught magic.
You have tonnes of distortion models based on the likes of the classic DS-1 (Dist-1) and Pro Co Rat (Squeak) pedals and more as well as boost, delay and modulation effects. An onboard tuner, stereo/mono looper with up to 80- seconds of phrase recording, tap tempo, stereo headphone output for silent practice and the ability to use up to 7 effects simultaneously.
The full-size electric guitars we tested are the Epiphone Les Paul SL, Ibanez GRGA120 Gio, Indio 66 Classic, Indio Retro DLX Quilted Maple, Jackson JS11 Dinky, Squier by Fender Affinity Series Jazzmaster, Squier by Fender HSS Bullet Strat, and Yamaha Pacifica PAC012. The short-scale guitars we tested are the Epiphone Les Paul Express, Ibanez GRGM21 Mikro, Jackson Dinky Minion JS1X, Jackson Rhoads Minion JS1X, and Squier by Fender Mini Strat.
This guitar needs love. It is in used condition with the biggest flaw being near the input jack.  This is the super rare RT series that were only produced for a couple of years and it is MIJ. Has tremolo but no arm If you are reading this, then you know what these are about.. I am the second owner of this guitar. Was bought from a guitar shop locally in San Jose, CA. No returns please
So, you want a guitar that's absolutely packed with tone? One that has the vibe that it's been pulled straight out of the 1950s, but has all the playability, comfort, and stability of a brand-new instrument? Then get your hands on the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin. This stylish archtop smolders with personality. And with the P90 pickup onboard at neck position, you have an unbelievable vintage/atittude tonal combination working in your favor. You'll notice right away that the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin has plenty of projection and volume, and moreso in the low/mids than traditional archtop guitars. You'll love it for that. Why does the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin sound so good? Sure, it's that P90 working with the hollowbody design that gets things going. But the primary tonewoods here are pure North American perfection, including a Canadian Wild Cherry archtop, back, and sides. The finish here is a custom polish that gives each and every Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin a satin sheen that recalls French 19th century craftsmanship. Whatever your musical style, you'll have a friend on your side in the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin. It is, plain and simple, a great guitar. Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin Archtop Guitar Features at a Glance: Finish: Cognac Burst Archtop hollowbody electric guitar Canadian Wild Cherry archtop Canadian Wild cherry back and sides Silver Leaf maple neck Contoured high-gloss black headstock Custom Polished finish Rosewood Fingerboard Adjustable Tusq Bridge by Graphtech Cream Binding 1 x Godin Kingpin P90 single-coil pickup 1 x Volume, 1 x Tone 16" fingerboard radius 24.84" scale 1.72" nut width
Two brands are synonymous with this type of instrument: Gibson and Fender.  Not only were they the earliest to bring the electric guitar to the masses, but the designs they created are still employed today, preferred by budding beginners and working professional musicians alike.  Other companies have made their mark in the market by creating variants on Gibson’s and Fender’s original designs, but they are still identified through the names that the originals were given.

If you want to splurge just a bit more and opt for an instrument with a little more stylistic range, the Ibanez Talman guitar vault accessory kit might be right up your alley. It includes a lovely seafoam green Ibanez TM302SFG, 12 high-quality Dunlop Tortex picks, a strap, a gig bag, a Kyser capo, a polishing cloth, and a tuner. This is off the beaten path a bit, but for some players, that’s going to be absolutely perfect.
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Playing guitar is an exercise in memorization. There’s really no way around it. You have to remember stuff, and the primary thing you have to remember is where notes are on the fretboard. Eventually, muscle and ear memory will kick in and the remembering will get easier, but for the first little while, every time you play guitar, it’s like a pop quiz. It’s not fun to memorize something by brute force, but it pays dividends.
The Wah Wah pedal is one of the coolest guitar effects ever. Released in 1967 as the Vox Clyde McCoy. Oddly enough Clyde McCoy was a trumpet player as the pedal was to be used when amplifying the horn. Fortunately guitarists picked up on the almighty wah. The name Cry Baby has become de facto for the wah as it became the most popular. A wah is basically an active tone control that boosts lower frequencies through higher ones by using the sweep of the pedal. A guitar’s tone knob is passive and just rolls off high end, the wah electronically boosts frequencies.
Twelve and fourteen fret steel string models from the mid 1920's to 1944 are the most collectible of all Martin instruments. They have excellent craftsmenship, sound, and playability, and these model are of great interest to collectors and players. Some musicians prefer the sound and feel of 12 fret models, and these are close in value to 14 fret models of the same size and period. The larger size 14 fret 000 and "D" sizes from the 1930's are considered by most collectors and musicians to represent the golden era of the flat top Martin. Note war-time models (1941 to 1944) aren't quite as desirable as the 1930's models. Lack of materials, manpower, and general social uncertainty during the war contributed to this.
The Wave is a versatile stand-alone, tube driven analog spring reverb unit kit. It can be used in front of your guitar amp or as a line-level analog reverb effect for the recording studio. Two controls allow you to serve up a wide range of wetness from just a touch to over the top psychedelia. The "dwell" control adjusts the input signal level driving the tank and the "reverb" control adjusts the level of output reverberations from the tank.
Back in the mid-60s, a desire for independence in business led to John Skewes forming a small musical instrument agency and wholesale business based at his home near Leeds, England. Over time, his new business steadily began to take off, and soon included throughput of some self-branded lines of musical merchandise. That effective early decision to carry self-branded merchandise continues to this day, with their signature Vintage® acoustic and electric guitars and basses which were first produced and sold in 1985. Today, Skewes is the largest family-owned independent musical merchandise distributor in the U.K. and the Vintage ‘family’ includes Fret King® electric guitars, Pilgrim® Banjo’s and Mandolins, Laka® Ukuleles, Encore® electric and acoustic guitars, and Kinsman® cases.
Still in the line in ’41 was the Supro Amplifier No. 50, now also called the Supreme. This had been given an updated look, with rounded corners on the cabinet and a slight narrowing taper toward the top. It still had the round grill with two horizontal bars. It was now covered in tweed, with a tweedy grillcloth, and a flat leather handle. The oval logo plate still graced the upper left corner. The back exposed the chassis, with twin inputs and volume control on the bottom. It still had five tubes, 12 watts and a 10″ speaker. In April of 1942 the Supreme amp cost $76.50. This amp would make it all the way to the proverbial end of the line.

These pedals essentially do the same thing with overdrive being regarded as a milder effect, similar to turning a tube amp all the way up and distortion a more extreme version of the same effect. Although these are designed for electric guitar, I’ve seen acoustic players use them to great effect through an amp or PA. If done well it provides a dramatic lift to a song. The most important thing is to be familiar with the sound and volume your pedal will create before you try it live.
Guitar amplifiers generally incorporate at least a few effects, the most basic being tone controls for bass and treble. There may be some form of "overdrive" control, where the preamplifier's output is increased to the point where the amplitude overloads the input of the power amplifier stage, causing clipping. In the 1970s, as effects pedals proliferated, their sounds were combined with tube amp distortion at lower, more controlled volumes by using power attenuators, such as Tom Scholz's Power Soak, as well as re-amplified dummy loads, such as Eddie Van Halen's use of dummy-load power resistor, post-power-tube effects, and a final solid-state amp driving the guitar speakers.
Yamaha is well known for the quality of their mass produced and affordable guitars, and they continue to be the brand of choice for students and even for teachers. The Yamaha FGX800C is tasked to represent brand in the sub $300 price range, and judging from reviews, it is doing very well in the market. Everything about this guitar is conventional, from its familiar dreadnought cut-away shape to its comfortable neck and string action. It also comes with built-in electronics that give you 3-band EQ control and a tuner. But what makes this guitar a bit more special is the use of solid spruce with scalloped bracing for the top, which ups the value of the instrument.
All six strings are made from nylon, or nylon wrapped with metal, as opposed to the metal strings found on other acoustic guitars. Nylon strings also have a much lower tension than steel strings, as do the predecessors to nylon strings, gut strings (made from ox or sheep gut). The lower three strings ('bass strings') are wound with metal, commonly silver-plated copper.
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I have a epiphone sg 50th edition and it does great by me in all I do. I play a lot of 60's music and otherwise all I want. It's very versatile and not to mention the cherry red wood grain finish makes it looks really awesome. Everyone I've ever met has bragged on it and I've been offered all kinds of guitars from Washburns to fenders. Just recently I went to a old guitar player of 30 yearsiin my grandfathers neighborhood and he absolutely loved the tone and playability. He said the only thing it might need to make it better was a professional setup which I'll soon be getting. When I first got it I complained a lot that the strings were a bit harder to push down due to the longer scale of the neck (the neck on it is pretty long) however. If you' work with it for about 2 days off and on its no problem. I love epiphone and judging from what I've played in ibanez guitars I might soon invest in one of them.

When considering the guitar from a historical perspective, the musical instrument used is as important as the musical language and style of the particular period. As an example: It is impossible to play a historically informed de Visee or Corbetta (baroque guitarist-composers) on a modern classical guitar. The reason is that the baroque guitar used courses, which are two strings close together (in unison), that are plucked together. This gives baroque guitars an unmistakable sound characteristic and tonal texture that is an integral part of an interpretation. Additionally the sound aesthetic of the baroque guitar (with its strong overtone presence) is very different from modern classical type guitars, as is shown below.
Chorus and flanging are created in fairly similar ways, the main difference being that chorus doesn't use feedback from the input to the output and generally employs slightly longer delay times. Phasing is similar to both chorus and flanging, but uses much shorter delay times. Feedback may be added to strengthen the swept filter effect it creates. Phasing is far more subtle than flanging and is often used on guitar parts. With chorus, phasing and flanging, the delay time, modulation speed and modulation depth affect the character of the effect very significantly. A generic modulated delay plug-in allows you to create all these effects by simply altering the delay time, feedback, modulation rate and modulation depth parameters. Most of the time, low modulation depths tend to work well for faster LFO speeds (often also referred to as the rate), while deeper modulation works better at slower modulation rates.
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when I started playing, if you wanted distortion, you "cranked up" the volume on the guitar and the amp. my old Gibson amp had reverb and tremolo. I used to play without reverb or tremolo. nowadays, in my old age, I use a little reverb for flavoring. I have pedals, but it's too much hassle to set everything up. so, I just plug into the amp with a little reverb. I'm happy and that's all that really counts. isn't it ?
Among the favorite brands of Gretsch lie the signature variants Brian Setzer and Chet Atkins models. Whereas, its Jet and Duo Jet are equally worthy. All these models are aimed explicitly at Jazz. In fact, you can think of them for Jazz as what you call Jackson for metal. For intermediate and pro players looking for affordability, its Electromatic Series is the desired option.
Pressing a string against a fret reduces the vibrating length of that string to the distance between the pressure point and the bridge, thereby controlling pitch. On nearly every Western fretted instrument, the distance between frets is a semi-tone of equal temperament, assuring the easy achievement of strong sounding chords and single notes that fit our hemisphere’s usual expectations for rhythm sounds and melodies. Understanding the virtues and limitations created by the order of frets opens up the door to ways to escape their constricts, like bending strings, playing slide, using whammy bars, delving into extended technique or trying fretless instruments.
Cool! Yes, this idea is definitely stolen from G&L!It would be cool to see a picture or schematic, but it’s probably going to be really close to this, if not identical. Meanwhile: Don’t be scared to open up your guitar — they’re build for it! Just be gentle till you learn what you’re doing. I always stand by the Maker’s Faire credo: If you don’t open it, you don’t own it. 🙂
This book comes from the former editor of Guitar One magazine who has been playing since he was 14 years old, so he has a reputation of knowing a his way around a guitar neck AND knowing how to write. Let’s face it, when you are trying to learn guitar through reading a book, the author's ability to write and communicate is crucial. Anyway, this book delivers a “workout program” for your fingers, giving you a technique driven approach to learning the guitar and actually improving in record time. The exercises are designed to help with dexterity and accuracy.

By placing two (or more) mics at different distances and angles from your speaker cab you will get two different sounds - and more variation will of course depend on whether these are the same model of mic, or different models. Mics placed further away will capture more room tone, and close mics are more upfront. Angled mics offer a less direct sound. Capture both feeds and blend or select from the two after recording.
An overdrive is almost always at its best played through a tube amp set at medium to upper-medium volume, since the amp itself is doing a major part of the job, the pedal just being the boot that kicks its butt into juicy break-up a little quicker. Conversely, demo one DI’d into a mixing desk or portastudio as described earlier, and in most cases the breed sounds absolutely awful: harsh, raspy, cold, and artificial. It can be a shocking look at the evil side of that $350 vintage Tube Screamer you just bagged from eBay. Now stop crying, and plug it back into your AC30.
But add some effects to the blend and the results can be even more interesting. Keyboard-like tones can be generated by rolling off the tone pots and employing digital delay, expanding the sound of your band without overstuffing the van, and the gentle application of a phase shifter or wah-wah can bring an interesting voice to warm, low tones. Jimi Hendrix’s “Pali Gap” is a classic example of the latter.

This guitar master started building guitars when he was 12 in the early '80s when Eddie Van Halen's Frankenstein guitar inspired him to create his own beautiful monstrosities. Since then, McCarthy worked at several music shops, doing repair work on the side, and learned from master luthiers working in their dungeons before finding a home at Dallas Repair Shop. Paul also does warranty work for Fender in its custom shop, which led to repairing Buddy Guy's guitar and Ted Nugent's. "Selling guitars at a guitar shop, you really have nothing to show for it," McCarthy says. "But here at the end of the day, I can see what I've done. Work with my hands, fix problems, and it pays pretty good, too."


Effects pedals, or stompboxes, are effects units designed to sit on the floor or a pedal board and be turned on and off with the user's feet. Typically, effects pedals house a single effect. The simplest stompbox pedals have a single footswitch, one to three potentiometers (knobs) for controlling the effect, gain or tone, and a single LED display to indicate whether the effect is on or not. More complex stompbox pedals have multiple footswitches, numerous knobs, additional switches and an alphanumeric display screen that indicates the status of which effect is activated. An effects chain, or signal chain, may be formed by connecting two or more effects pedals together.
By panning the distant mics to the opposite side of the mix from the close mic, you can create interesting panning effects for solos. "If it's a rhythm part, you get this huge sound because the whole thing is spread across the stereo spectrum." When double-tracking lead or rhythm parts, a useful trick is to reverse the panning of the direct and distant mics. "If there were two guitarists in a band, I would record them like that, so you got a wall of sound that had a transparency that would allow the drums and bass to come through."
Alonso de Mudarra's book Tres Libros de Música, published in Spain in 1546, contains the earliest known written pieces for a four-course guitarra. This four-course "guitar" was popular in France, Spain, and Italy. In France this instrument gained popularity among aristocrats. A considerable volume of music was published in Paris from the 1550s to the 1570s: Simon Gorlier's Le Troysième Livre... mis en tablature de Guiterne was published in 1551. In 1551 Adrian Le Roy also published his Premier Livre de Tablature de Guiterne, and in the same year he also published Briefve et facile instruction pour apprendre la tablature a bien accorder, conduire, et disposer la main sur la Guiterne. Robert Ballard, Grégoire Brayssing from Augsburg, and Guillaume Morlaye (c. 1510 – c. 1558) significantly contributed to its repertoire. Morlaye's Le Premier Livre de Chansons, Gaillardes, Pavannes, Bransles, Almandes, Fantasies – which has a four-course instrument illustrated on its title page – was published in partnership with Michel Fedenzat, and among other music, they published six books of tablature by lutenist Albert de Rippe (who was very likely Guillaume's teacher).
To wire three two-conductor pickups we only need one pole. Common goes to volume pot input and 3 switched terminals are connected to pickup outputs. That way, we will select one pickup in positions 1-3-5 and two pickups wired in parallel in positions 2-4. When middle pickup has reverse polarity, noise will cancel out in positions 2-4 and they will be wired in so called “humbucking” mode.

This can all get a little tricky and can become overwhelming especially if you have never tackled this type of job before. If this is the case, I strongly suggest starting with one of the easier models in regards to wiring e.g. Telecasters are significantly easier to work on as the scratchplate will often be pre-loaded with pickups. However, if you purchase a kit guitar such as an LP or you want to upgrade your electrical components (which is often the case with an entry level kit) understanding some basics about guitar electronics is useful.


The Venue DI is essentially an amplifier without a speaker cab. If you go straight into a mixer or PA system this unit lets you customize your acoustic's tone in every way imaginable. While it's particularly ideal for someone who doesn't have an existing preamp in their acoustic rig, it outperforms most preamps that come standard in an acoustic guitar or even in an acoustic amp.

Let's look at how the professionals go about combining the close and ambient techniques we've looked at so far, in order to create specific custom setups for different recordings. Joe Barresi, for example, relies heavily on the trusty SM57 and MD421 combination, but he'll choose from a variety of other mics to give character to particular sounds. "The two microphones I use most for recording electric guitars are the Shure SM57 and the Sennheiser MD421, often both, close up, placed at the edge of the speaker, where the speaker centre meets the cone, or, if I'm looking for a more bright sound, dead centre. When I want more low end, I may have an AKG C414 on there, and when I'm after a little more personality, a Neumann U87, backed up a foot, or a ribbon mic, like the Royer 122, or an RCA BK5 or 77."
Take a guitar playing friend with you, decide on a price range and try out all the guitars you can afford. Then go to another shop and do the same. Include used instruments too, and don't worry too much about the appearance. The important thing is how it sounds and how well it plays. A guitar with a nice low action which sounds reasonably good will help a great deal toward helping you stick with it. A guitar with a high action that sounds horrible will make you give up before your fingertips have time to harden!
In 1959, with sales under pressure from the more powerful Fender Twin and from The Shadows, who requested amplifiers with more power, Vox produced what was essentially a double-powered AC15 and named it the AC30. The AC30, fitted with alnico magnet-equipped Celestion "blue" loudspeakers and later Vox's special "Top Boost" circuitry, and like the AC15 using valves (known in the US as tubes), helped to produce the sound of the British Invasion, being used by The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks and the Yardbirds, among others. AC30s were later used by Brian May of Queen (who is known for having a wall of AC30s on stage), Paul Weller of The Jam (who also assembled a wall of AC30s), Rory Gallagher, The Edge of U2 and Radiohead guitarists Thom Yorke, Jonny Greenwood and Ed O'Brien. The Vox AC30 has been used by many other artists including Mark Knopfler, Hank Marvin who was instrumental in getting the AC30 made, Pete Townshend, Ritchie Blackmore, John Scofield, Snowy White, Will Sergeant, Tom Petty, The Echoes, Mike Campbell, Peter Buck, Justin Hayward, Tom DeLonge, Mike Nesmith, Peter Tork, Noel Gallagher, Matthew Bellamy, Omar Rodriguez-Lopez, Dustin Kensrue, Tame Impala, and many others.
C.F. Martin was born in 1796 in Markneukirchen, Germany and came from a long line of cabinet makers and woodworkers. His father, Johann Georg Martin, also built guitars. By the age of 15, C.F. Martin was apprenticed to Johan Stauffer, a well-known guitar maker in Vienna, Austria. Martin returned to his hometown after completing training and opened his own guitar-making shop. However, he soon became embroiled in a controversy between two guilds.
Bridges and Tailpieces – These two parts of the electric guitar work in unison to control the tone and playability of the guitar. The bridge is mounted on the lower portion of the guitar. The strings are routed over the bridge before ending in the tailpiece. Bridges help to tune the strings of varying length, thickness and metals and they allow easy adjustment of the string length.
A great player knows a guitar is more than a few pieces of wood and metal.  Every Whalehazard guitar is handcrafted with incredible attention to detail and meets exacting standards of quality.  Each instrument is built in South Minneapolis by Andy Webber.  As a one-man operation, great care will be taken to make sure your custom guitar will take your playing and sound to a new level.  All materials and components are carefully selected for quality and longevity.  Designs are painstakingly contemplated and are constantly evolving.  From custom inlays to a hand-shaped bone nut, every detail of your instrument is studied and considered to make sure your Whalehazard guitar is a unique piece of craftsmanship that will stand the test of time.
On December 22, 1969, the Gibson parent company Chicago Musical Instruments was taken over by the South American brewing conglomerate ECL. Gibson remained under the control of CMI until 1974 when it became a subsidiary of Norlin Musical Instruments. Norlin Musical Instruments was a member of Norlin Industries which was named for ECL president Norton Stevens and CMI president Arnold Berlin. This began an era characterized by corporate mismanagement and decreasing product quality.
It comes with a single coil pickup in the neck position and a humbucker at the bridge - switching between the two pickups gives you both a strat like sound and an LP like tone. The pickup selector is 3-way so you can play with both pickups at the same time. It sports a shorter 24.75" scale length and smaller 12" radius on the rosewood topped mahogany bolt-on neck with a 1.6875" nut width making it very playable and accessible to guitarists of all levels of experience. Many customer reviews suggest the Empire HG feels and plays like a more expensive guitar.
Compressors are often applied to electric guitar tracks to bring out the guitar’s natural sustain, as well as even out the overall dynamic range. Lead guitar parts usually benefit from a degree of compression treatment, while heavily overdriven rhythm parts often require very little or none at all, as the distortion naturally provides its own type of dynamic control. In the case of unnatural sounds, such as electric guitar, compression becomes a highly subjective topic, so experimentation is key to achieving the desired effect. As a starting point, therefore, try medium-fast attack and release times – an extremely fast attack time will blunt the transient response of the note. Remember that electric guitars can be inherently noisy and compression will generally exaggerate any hums and buzzes.
While it definitely looks unique with its four sharp edges and sculpted cutaways, this guitar follows conventional super strat design, starting with a basswood body that is joined to a maple neck. For its price, its quite surprising to find that this guitar features a neck through design, which is normally only found on more expensive electric guitars. The 25.5" scale neck is topped by a 24-fret rosewood fingerboard with a nut width of 1.65", providing a familiar shred friendly feel. Giving this guitar its metal friendly voice are two LH-150 Humbuckers that are hot enough for mean high gain metal tones.

Hertz Guitar company was originated from Shanghai/China & North Korea. This brand of guitars produces electric and other wide range of guitars that can be used in studio recordings and live shows. This brand also manufactures guitar accessories. The starting price of guitar from this brand is 12,504 INR approximately. Anyone looking for an affordable electric guitar at a beginner and advanced level can buy this brand of guitar.
Overall, the reviews and comparison should not be the criteria on which you should decide the brand that you want. The best way to choose one is by listening to and feeling the sound that the guitar produces. The brands listed above are some of the best-known in the world. Of course, there are many other good brands out there too. If you feel we've missed out on some, please feel free to mention them in the comments section below.
In his informative, yet relaxed style, Sean takes us on a complete guitar recording journey starting at the vibrating strings and ending at the DAW. You'll first learn how to tune and prepare a guitar for recording. Next you're off to investigate the world of the electric guitar. You'll see microphones and mic placement techniques followed by a deep look at amplifiers and what to do when you're working with combos and stacks.
Guitar is well made. Sounds awesome. The overall height of the strings (in relation to the frets) were not bad. However, it needed to be setup. After having the guitar setup at my local shop, it is so much easier to play (don't have to press as hard on the strings). The Guitar gig bag that comes with the bundle offers zero padding. The Tuner works well, however, since the guitar comes with a built-in tuner, you don't need a separate one. I have not used the dvd that came with it. I use a different set of instructional dvds (purchased separately). Overall a great guitar. Definitely recommend it.
The earliest extant six-string guitar is believed to have been built in 1779 by Gaetano Vinaccia (1759 - after 1831) in Naples, Italy; however, the date on the label is a little ambiguous.[37][38] The Vinaccia family of luthiers is known for developing the mandolin. This guitar has been examined and does not show tell-tale signs of modifications from a double-course guitar.[39] The authenticity of guitars allegedly produced before the 1790s is often in question. This also corresponds to when Moretti's 6-string method appeared, in 1792.
By 1961, at least, the makeover was complete. The old mini Les Paul, the J-1, was changed to become a sunburst double-cutaway solidbody. These had widely flaring equal cutaways, a single rectangular neck pickup, a large pickguard which covered most of the treble side, a wooden adjustable bridge, covered tailpiece, volume and tone. The bolt-on neck now had a more Gibson-style open-book head shape (with round logo sticker). The fingerboard had the old large dots with two small octave markers. The J-1, in a number of forms, would survive at least through 1966, if not longer. It is presumed that the J-2 was still around and that it had also become a double-cutaway; it most certainly was still in the catalog, as a double-cut, in ’62.
The smallest bass amps, which typically have 10 to 20 watts of power and a small 6.5" or 8" speaker, are known as practice amps. They amplify the instrument enough for individual practice in a small room, such as a bedroom. Practice amps do not typically produce enough volume or low-frequency sound reproduction to be used in a band rehearsal or show. As such, they are mostly used by beginners or, when used by professionals, for warm-up or individual practice. They are more likely than full-size combo amp cabinets to have an open-back design, like an electric guitar combo amp. The use of an open back cabinet in small practice amps makes these models different from most bass combo amps and speaker cabs, which are closed-back (often with bass reflex ports or vents, or less commonly, with passive radiator speakers, both of which are designed to boost the low-frequency response). Some buskers playing on the street for tips may use battery-powered practice amps, a feature available on some models.
Here you get a very bright sound but the output will be less than if it were wired in series and you no longer have hum canceling. Since you are using just one half of the humbucker, "coil-cut" sounds best when using a high output pickup (DiMarzio "X2N", DiMarzio "Distortion", Seymour Duncan "Invader", Seymour Duncan "Distortion", etc). A coil cut switch is relatively easy to wire up and it is just a matter of connecting one end of an SPST switch to that junction that was created for series wiring and connecting the other end of the switch to ground. So, we now have another 2 tone humbucker arrangement that can easily be switched back and forth between 2 tone options.

Obviously listing something as subjective as musical greatness is tough and inevitably going to cause disagreement, but this is another level. Including John Frusciante and Jack White was a little absurd. Excluding players like Yngvie Malmstein, Dave Mustaine, and Slash was questionable. Excluding Eric Clapton was shocking, offensive, but almost admirable. Very little genre diversity, too. By my count, half of these players are blues or heavily blues-based. The complete absence of heavy metal is glaring. This list is ambitious, but golly, this is pretty darn bad.
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Top 4 in my opinion. Countless guitarists have played them on some of the best albums ever written. I've owned numerous vintage guilds and still own a vintage f50 and d55. Recently Fender bought guild and I bought a new d55 which was a bit over rated and over priced in my opinion. But Fender has sold Guild and I sold my fender owned guild d55 only to buy a brand new by the new owners who moved Guild to a California facility and I must say it holds its own with the vintages I have. Guild is back! A great name in acoustic guitars. A great build (thank God once again), and the quality has always been with the best. Long live guild and it's a top 4 brand just behind Martin, Taylor and Gibson.
For beginning electric guitarists—or experienced players who want something inexpensive and portable—we think the Fender Champion 20 is the ideal amplifier. We researched 24 models, then put the 10 most popular to the test for 20 hours with two professional instructors, a guitar student, and our Wirecutter West Coast musical instrument testing team. With a colossal variety of sounds, plus built-in effects and intuitive controls, the Fender Champion 20 was a nearly unanimous top pick.
Ovation backed off from its more exotic design directions and in ’77 introduced two more conservative models, the Preacher and the Viper, and its first solidbody basses, the Magnum I and II. The Preacher featured two equal cutaways, whereas the Viper sported more of a Les-Paul-style single cutaway, though neither would never be confused with a Gibson equivalent. Their shape was, in fact, essentially a downsized version of the Ovation acoustic outline. The Magnum shape was derived from the earlier Breadwinner and Deacon, with more contouring.
We're not suggesting you become your own handyman 24/7. If your house roof tiles are falling to bits, you'd call a pro, right? But basic setup can be done, and if you eventually need help from a guitar pro, it's good to be able to explain what your bugbear is. Guitar players and guitars are all different, and it's simply good practice to think about what you do and don't like about your treasured instrument.
The best way to get this sound out of an Octavia is by using the neck pickup on the guitar and by experimenting with the tone knob to get a more pronounced octave effect. Some other famous Hendrix tunes using the Octavia are “Who Knows” and “Machine Gun” from Band of Gypsies. If you want to put together a Jimi Hendrix pedal board, the Octavia is a must. There are many great reissues of this pedal on the market, but if you get a chance, like fuzzes, try a few of them next to each other. Even a few of the same pedal, as they often sound very different. One may have more of an octave effect, or be warmer sounding etc. This is due to the use of the transistors that can often have slightly different values that can make big tonal changes.
The brand’s biggest boom through the fifties and sixties was largely down to the birth of rock n’ roll. Thanks to their excellent hollow and semi-hollow models, Gretsch guitars were used by icons including Chuck Berry, Chet Atkins, Bo Diddley, and George Harrison. Since 2002 the production side of things has been run by Fender, although the Gretsch family still own the company.
Every new 2008 Les Paul Standard will benefit from Gibson’s proven chambering technique, which leaves each guitar with perfect tone, balance, and weight. Prior to gluing the maple cap on top of the mahogany body, the expert craftsmen at Gibson USA carve out carefully mapped-out chambers in the body using a Computer Numeric Controlled (CNC) router. The positioning of the routes was established after careful examination of the resonant characteristics of the Les Paul. Gibson approached this process with the awareness that every change to the formula would have repercussions on the instrument’s sound. So, in addition to relieving the stress on a player’s back and shoulder, these lighter Gibson guitars also enhance the tone palette in a manner unique only to these guitars. The results are comfortable, lightweight guitars that are acoustically louder, with increased sustain and resonance.
By far the best bang for the buck. These guitars are beautifully made with good attention to details such as fret ends, bridge fit and neck joints. They also have wonderful finishing and are made from quality materials. The 'snob' factor is the only thing against them, they are not Gibsons. Martin's or Fender's, BUT they do play just as well and quite frankly, only those with a good ear and perfect pitch could tell the difference in a rock environment. I have Fender, Gibson, Taylor, Columbus, Washburn, Squire and Maccaferri Guitars, as well as Richwood. Sadly like the great majority of guitarists, the guitars themselves are more capable than I am, and I am happy to admit it. Having an exceptional guitar will not make you an exceptional guitarist, just as a more professional camera won't make you a professional photographer. The Richwood Artist / Master series of guitars are good, believe me! For the average guitarist, pro or am, you can buy more expensise guitars but not better as far ...more
Among other things, Peavy is somewhat famous in the guitar amps world for being one of the first manufacturers to produce a close-to-tubes type of sound from their transistors amps. While this achievement might not have seemed perfect for the most discerning of ears, their solid state guitar amplifiers are good enough for the general public not to tell the difference.

Harmoniser – a frequency-based effect that sounds like a second guitarist is playing in harmony with the original guitar signal. The effect is created by doubling the guitar input signal and then shifting the pitch of the double up or down at a certain interval (usually a 3rd, 5th or octave). The harmony effect is often used in the metal and hard rock genre to play solos.


The Dean Vendetta pack offers a sharp looking metallic red super Stratocaster style guitar with dual humbuckers, a tremolo bridge for fun dive tricks, and a 24 fret neck. This is perfect for players that want to start learning lead guitar as soon as possible. The neck is quite fast for a guitar in its price range. Also included with the purchase is a 10-watt practice amp, gig bag, instrument cable, picks, a tuner, and a fairly comfortable strap.
The color black is powerful, mysterious and evokes a sense of potential and possibility. It’s widely regarded as the single most popular color for Rock ‘n’ Roll thanks to rock pioneers such as KISS and AC/DC. Get back in black with these fine offerings from Dean with our vivid take on the classic black electric guitar with a few other shades thrown in for good measure. Plug in and play. Get your wings!
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If the book had been proofread better, I'd give it 5 stars. For example, there are places where the text has both a fret number and standard musical notation, and the fret number is wrong. The book refers you to play along with the instructional CD backing tracks, but it doesn't tell you which track number to play. It's easy enough to figure out what was meant, but a little more care would have been better.
Fretsizes can be confusing.  They are small measurements but have a big impact on feel and the size designations can vary.  Its best in my opinion to think and talk of frets in their actual crown widths and heights rather than the old Dunlop numbers (the originator of the 6xxx numbering system) as they can mean different things to different people; i.e. Warmoth lists 6105 as .095-.047" while USACG has is at .090-.055" - these are two very different feeling fretsizes. 

The first popular humbucker was introduced by Gibson in 1955, and the world of music was never the same again. In general, the humbucker offers a thick, rich tone, with a medium to high output, which is why they are staple of heavy rock and metal (although equally popular in jazz music). You will find that humbuckers are used by everyone from Eddie van Halen and Dave Mustaine, to Jimmy Page and Dimebag Darrell. Humbuckers feature two coils wired out of phase with each other, and – as the name suggests – are used to eliminate the unpleasant 60-cycle hum that plagues many single-coil pickups. Gibson’s ’57 Classic Plus is a legend in the world of humbuckers, although be sure to check out our humbucker page for more excellent models.


Made most famous with the release of Bon Jovi’s 1986 Top 10 hit song, “Wanted Dead or Alive,” Richie Sambora’s double neck Ovation became one of the world’s most instantly recognizable guitar models. The all-new acoustic/electric Richie Sambora Signature Series Elite Double Neck model features a Sitka Spruce top in Gloss Black, Ebony fingerboard inlaid with mother of pearl stars, Teak/Paduk/Walnut/Mesquite inlaid rosette/epaulettes, gold hardware, a mother of pearl star inlay on the body and finished with Sambora’s signature in gold on the headstock.


Along with repairing instruments, we do complete restorations. Restorations often come in the way of family heirlooms and antique finds. After acquiring these instruments, you may think of them as only keepsakes, or something to put a shelf. We want to take these old instruments and restore them to their full use. There's nothing like playing on a violin or guitar that's been in the family for generations, and we want you to experience that.
Though the guitar is black, the wood for the top is spruce, with meranti back and sides, and a rosewood fretboard and bridge. This is a full-size guitar (52mm nut), though there is a 7/8” size available. The only thing is, with the 7/8” size you won’t be able to get the black color. The one thing in common between the two is the gloss finish, as well as the types of wood used.
Yowza, here’s another excellent guitar for rock and metal beginners. It’s similar in some ways to the Ibanez RG (a fast, thin neck, jumbo frets, 2 humbuckers, and a 3-way switch), but has some important differences. This guitar sports a compound radius fretboard, carved quilted maple veneer top, Les Paul-style bridge, and a bound fingerboard. Very classy appointments that aren’t often found in a beginner guitar. Jackson makes amazing guitars, and this one’s a beauty.
You have to take into account that these are low budget guitars, so there will be compromises in terms of materials, pickups and hardware. The experienced guitar player might require a higher standard. That being said, if you have between a 100 and 300 dollars to spend and you do want to learn to play guitar than these guitars are really worth the investment.

I work out of my home shop in Idaho Falls, Idaho.  I do repairs for clients and guitar shops all over the United States.  I’d love to help you repair or restore your guitar.  Repair prices are based on a rate of $60 per hour.  These prices apply to guitars in otherwise good working order.  Your repair may vary depending on the condition of your guitar and the specifics of the work needed. Please contact me using the contact page if you have a repair that you would like to discuss.  Consultations are always free.


As one of the best electric guitars under 200 dollars, the instrument utilizes an agathis body, a bolt-on maple neck, a sonokeling neck, and a classic rosewood fingerboard with 22 frets and white dot inlays. The electronic section features a peculiar combination of one humbucker and two single pickups, allowing the guitar to cover plenty of sonic ground.

Nitrocellulose lacquer is prized as a coating by some guitarists as it is thinner than some other coatings, which some claim leads to a better sound (though we’re not going to wade into that argument here). It’s also easy to blend with paints, and easier to repair. It does have its downsides, however. The solvents used in the lacquer can be potentially damaging to the respiratory systems of workers applying the coating during the guitar’s manufacture, and for this reason other options were sought.

Transistors are related to crystals. Their individual function is non linear and have to be arranged in compound groups to behave as a linear circuit. Solid-state amps operate at low voltages (10 - 100V). Valves amps operate at high voltages (200 - 600V). Speakers operate at approx (0 - 40V). The Output Transformer converts the high operating voltages of valves to the lower operating voltage of speakers. A transformer has 2 separate coils of wire (primary and secondary) wound around an iron core. Electricity flowing through wire causes a magnetic field around the wire and visa versa, a changing magnetic field causes electricity to flow through wire.


You might recognise this in the tone knob above. The only difference is that R11 is a variable resitance from 0 to 250 Kohm, and C4 is a fixed value. Several guitars have several combinations of R11 and and C4 to achieve different cut-off points. When R11 is 100% position, the resistance is maximised, so there is little incentive for eelctrical current to flow to C4. The signal is not affected as much.
With analogue delay (and simulations thereof), each subsequent echo is not only quieter, but also more distorted. Dub reggae tracks often make prominent use of this effect -- look out for the effect where the engineer momentarily turns a knob so that the echoes get louder instead of quieter, surging and distorting before he turns it back down again so they can die away.
Pre-owned, in good condition. Fully tested and works perfectly. Cosmetic blemishes in the form of dings, scuffs, scratches, and discoloration. Supersonic foot switch is a bit dusty (not shown in photos because I hit the photo limit). Spring reverb works well. Tubes work, but could probably stand to be replaced. The Vintage channel contains pre-gain tone controls and 2 switchable voices. The guitar amp’s Burn channel contains dual gain controls and post-gain EQ, allowing tonal experimentation. The Fender Super-Sonic 60 combo also features the long-spring Reverb by Accutronics; Ivory “radio” knobs; and a 3-button footswitch.
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But Harmony produced a lot of instruments other than guitars: ukuleles, banjos, mandolins, violins etc; the company was proud of it's history, proudly American, and as proud of its skilled workforce, as it's use of modern technology "We've produced millions of instruments but we make them one at a time". This long history of instrument manufacture explains why Harmony had the expertise to produce so many well-built acoustic and hollow-body electric instruments; guitars like the Meteor and Rocket were very well received. They were slow, however, in committing to the solid body market; although they released the H44 Stratotone neck-through solid body in 1952, it was gone by 1957, and there were only hollow bodies until the release of the Silhouette in 1963.
The Telecaster has also been a long-time favorite guitar for hot-rod customizing. Several variants of the guitar appeared throughout the years with a wide assortment of pickup configurations, such as a humbucker in the neck position, three single-coil pickups and even dual humbuckers with special wiring schemes. Fender offered hot-rodded Teles with such pickup configurations, the US Fat and Nashville B-Bender Telecasters around 1998. The Deluxe Blackout Tele was also equipped with 3 single-coil pickups, a “Strat-o-Tele” selector switch and a smaller headstock than a standard Telecaster. The most common variants of the standard two-pickup solid body Telecaster are the semi-hollow Thinline, the twin-humbuckerDeluxe—and the Custom, which replaced the neck single coil-pickup with a humbucking pickup. The Custom and Deluxe were introduced during the CBS period and reissues of both designs are currently offered.
There was a second single-cutaway version, also called the TRG-1, with a thick waist and vaguely tubby Tele shape. It had a different grill shape and a slightly more rounded version of the Bizarro Strat head, but otherwise it was the same. There was also a version of the double-cutaway guitar with a vibrato. This was a small, metal-covered tailpiece with three springs in the housing and a handle that screwed into a hole in the cover.
“Ceramic is a much more powerful magnet again [than Alnico V]. The bass and treble get boosted significantly. A lot of people think ceramic magnets scoop the mids out, but when you analyse it you find the mids tend to stay where they are – it’s just that the bass and treble get boosted so much you get a V-shaped taper in the EQ. Ceramic pickups tend to suit players who need a very fast and percussive pick attack.”
A phaser pedal is similar to a chorus as it thickens up your sound but also adds a sweeping effect – almost as if the speaker within the amplifier is spinning around or moving up and down. If you pretend the speaker is moving away from you and moving closer and back again – you’ll get an idea as to how it sounds. You can change the length of the effect and how quickly the movements are via the pedal.
Note: For additional information and history on Ibanez guitars, please check Wikipedia. For a great overall resource for Ibanez guitar questions, check out the Ibanez Collectors World website. The ICW is a gathering of Ibanez collectors who relish in the challenge of not just collecting Ibanez guitars, but of identifying old models, dating guitars by serial numbers, and generally watching the vintage guitar marketplace to understand how interest in Ibanez guitars is evolving.

As mentioned earlier, technically, magnetic pickups are small magnets with fine wire coils. These small magnets produce a magnetic field around them. When the metal strings of the guitar are strung by the user, a vibrating motion is generated inside this magnetic field which changes the magnetic flux of the field. According to the law of electromagnetism, this change in the magnetic flux produces an electric charge in the wire coil around the magnet.
It's always hard to rate amps when mixing high gain with vintage, boutique amps and the mass produced monsters, but including S.S. and digital technology seems to be a unrealistic stretch. That being said, this manufacturer is making some of the best sounding vintage type tube amps I've heard to date. their lineup of vintage Fender style amps are all excellent, and considerably more affordable and reliable. If you are a fan of the tweed, black and silver faced gems, you have to give Victoria a try. If you prefer something with a unique spin they make their own unique creations as well and they are all serious tone machines. In so far as tube amps go, these guys are definitely in my top five. Speaking of boutique, where is Carr?
I have inherited a heater "H300N" acoustic guitar but I can't find any info on it. The most I could find is that it was from the L. D. Heater Music Company that was based out of Beaverton, Oregon. They were best known for being a distributer of Lyle Guitars. Can anyone else offer additional information or where to find it? It's a bueatiful guitar and I want to know more info before I give it to my nephew or sell it.
Again, as with the bridge saddle, too low of a bridge will decrease the "drive" of the strings. Thus the sound and tone will suffer. Also a low bridge is structurally not a good idea, as the bridge can more easily crack (and damage the top of the guitar). Most original Martin guitar bridges are about 3/8" tall (from bottom to the highest part of the bridge).
GuitarPCB.com – designs and sells printed circuit boards (PCBs) with a boutique look for classic and boutique pedal designs. Their active forum provides support for builders using the PCBs. A theme throughout their site is that you expensive boutique pedals are simply classic older designs with little or no modification, and you can easily build your own.
In the 1970s and 1980s, with jazz-rock fusion guitar playing, jazz guitarists incorporated rock guitar soloing approaches, such as riff-based soloing and usage of pentatonic and blues scale patterns. Some guitarists used Jimi Hendrix-influenced distortion and wah-wah effects to get a sustained, heavy tone, or even used rapid-fire guitar shredding techniques, such as tapping and tremolo bar bending. Guitarist Al Di Meola, who started his career with Return to Forever in 1974, was one of the first guitarists to perform in a "shred" style, a technique later used in rock and heavy metal playing. Di Meola used alternate-picking to perform very rapid sequences of notes in his solos.
One very interesting and strikingly modern Teisco guitar, the YG-6, appeared in Japan in 1965. It was very near the classic Strat shape, with offset double cutaways and Strat-like contours, but the horns were more pointed. The neck had the new hooked headstock and the rectangular edge inlays. A large multi-laminated pickguard stretched from the upper horn down to the lower bout control extension. Three large rectangular single-coil pickups, with chrome sides and black center insert (exposed poles) sat in front of a roller bridge and the clever platform vibrato design. Three on/off rocker switches sat above the strings, plus a small sliding switch, presumably a mute. It had one volume and one tone control, and is an exceptionally handsome guitar.
Das Musikding is your online store for building guitar effect pedals, bass effect pedals , guitar amps, bass amps, synthesizer and many other musical related electronics projects. You can get pedal parts or complete kits, for all stages of building experience. Effects are great for guitar and Bass! Guitar effect kits available are Distortion, Booster, Fuzz, Overdrive, Delay, Tremolo, Compressor, Switches, Loopers and many other. We also feature kits and modules by GuitarPCB.com and Molten Voltage Pedalsync. Amp kits are available by Madamp, great kits for a great price. Building guitar and bass effects made easy! You can get resistors, capacitors, potentiometer, knobs, jacks and plugs, aluminium and steel enclosure, transformer, wire and cable and many more things. Manufacturer are Wima, Alpha, Neutrik, Switchcraft and many more. Our shipping costs are low and the prices very good. If you need a special offer, just ask us!
It's not subjective. When you're setting up a guitar you measure the height of the strings, typically you're at about 4/64" for the high E and 5/64" for the low E. You can go above or below the recommendation but if you go too low you can start to get a bit of fret buzz. How low you can go is not a function so much of what guitar you own, but how level your frets are and your neck relief. Most good guitars can be set up to play "fast". Obviously they don't get faster when you paint them fluorescent orange, or make the headstock pointy.
The Dean Custom falls right in the middle-range for guitars under $500. For around $350, this guitar has some great perks such as the Floyd Rose locking tremolo. The beauty of the Floyd Rose is in its ability to keep the guitar in tune even during crazy changes in pitch. Greats like Steve Vai and Eddie Van Halen are just a few notable artists to rock out using the Floyd Rose. With a carved flamed maple top and a lightweight basswood back, this guitar has the looks, the sound, and the ability to keep rocking in tune no matter what you throw at it.
Many compressor pedals are often also marketed as "sustainer pedals". As a note is sustained, it loses energy and volume due to diminishing vibration in the string. The compressor pedal boosts its electrical signal to the specified dynamic range, slightly prolonging the duration of the note.[92] This, combined with heavy distortion and the close proximity of the guitar and the speaker cabinet, can lead to infinite sustain at higher volumes.

The tricky little lead lines with which she peppers St. Vincent’s already impressively broad catalog hint at Annie Clark’s almost casual mastery, but her true genius lies in the way she treats the guitar as a dynamic sound source rather than a static instrument. In her hands, and within a tautly complex compositional framework, the guitar sounds limitless, capable of screaming, squalling, soaring, and crying — as if Hendrix were sitting in with a downtown art-rock band.
As the ’70s dawned, the market for electric guitars began to revive, significantly but conservatively. Gibson retracted its hopes for the flagship SG and reintroduced the Les Paul in ’68. Fender, likewise, was moving away from Jazzmasters and Jaguars, concentrating on its earlier successes, the Stratocaster and Telecaster. Paced by Shiro Arai of Aria, who’d been inspired by the reissue of the Les Paul (a “copy” of the ’50s classic), Japanese manufacturers were beginning to explore making copies of popular American designs, and the “copy era” was getting underway.
When buying your first guitar, it’s sensible to stop and think about what you are buying it for. Is it just something to learn on? Will you be upgrading in a year or two when you start thinking about forming a band, gigging, and recording? If so, you may be better off trying one of these affordable electric guitars, which all offer a solid platform on which to learn.

Ovation backed off from its more exotic design directions and in ’77 introduced two more conservative models, the Preacher and the Viper, and its first solidbody basses, the Magnum I and II. The Preacher featured two equal cutaways, whereas the Viper sported more of a Les-Paul-style single cutaway, though neither would never be confused with a Gibson equivalent. Their shape was, in fact, essentially a downsized version of the Ovation acoustic outline. The Magnum shape was derived from the earlier Breadwinner and Deacon, with more contouring.


Guitars come in two basic flavors: acoustic and electric. From a hardware standpoint, electric guitars have more components and doohickeys than do acoustic guitars. Guitar makers generally agree, however, that making an acoustic guitar is harder than making an electric guitar. That’s why, pound for pound, acoustic guitars cost just as much or more than their electric counterparts. Both types follow the same basic approach to such principles as neck construction and string tension, and so they have very similar constructions, despite a sometimes radical difference in tone production.
My tak is an amazing sound an unforgiving strong clear medium to deep sound great feel it's a limited edition and kicks my buddies 3800 buck Taylor's ass my guitar was a bit pricey at 2800 but well worth it my 6000 price Martin is not as nice as my takemine maybe I got lucky and the guitar just turned out that way who knows it is the most amazing clean very vibrant and holds the notes so long I have played them all only one guitar has this sound and its this one only for deeper sounds I have my Martin and ovation has unique sounds and the Gibson is softer and Taylor sucks sounds like a osterizer blender if you tried my guitar you would be shocked by its sounds I have played the same model and the other ones sounded the same as each other I don't know why the one I own sounded so much different I guess I lucked out. I also have an old Hagstrom acoustic and it sounds phenomenal better than any Taylor I have ever played it sounds very much like a high end Gibson but not as soft. try a ...more

There are tons of different online retailers and ebay stores that you can find a great deal on parts and supplies, but those were just some of the ones that I have purchased on and been satisfied with their service and parts. NOTE: Do your research when it comes to parts and the quality of the parts you buy. I like to get feedback and reviews from Harmony-Central. You might not be able to get reviews on everything, but it helps you out allot.
Audio feedback: Audio feedback is an effect produced when amplified sound is picked up by a microphone or guitar pickup and played back through a guitar amplifier, initiating a "feedback loop", which usually consists of high-pitched sound. Feedback that occurs from a vocal mic into a PA system is almost always avoided. However, in some styles of rock music, electric guitar players intentionally create feedback by playing their instrument directly in front of a heavily amplified, distorted guitar amplifier's speaker enclosure. The creative use of feedback effects was pioneered by guitarists such as Jimi Hendrix in the 1960s. This technique creates sustained, high-pitched overtones and unusual sounds not possible through regular playing techniques. Guitar feedback effects can be difficult to perform, because it is difficult to determine the sound volume and guitar position relative to a guitar amp's loudspeaker necessary for achieving the desired feedback sound.[90][91] Guitar feedback effects are used in a number of rock genres, including psychedelic rock, heavy metal music and punk rock.

Interestingly, it’s the back of this guitar that’s the most visually attractive, with a drop dead gorgeous rosewood fretboard and quilt maple three-piece design. You’ll stare at it for some time before you can bring yourself to flip it over and start playing. That’s not to say the front doesn’t look good - the whole thing feels more upscale than the price.


Ease of Use: Multi-effects pedals are inherently more complicated to use than individual stompboxes. As such, we value multi-fx units that are not overly complicated, and require hours with the user manual to understand. Look for pedals with intuitive layouts and interfaces. Technology has come a long way, and most multi-effects pedals have good quality sound. To us, ease of use is a huge selling point (probably the most important behind price), and can differentiate the good from the great.
The Jasmine S35 acoustic guitar has its share of criticisms, most notably its heavier strings and bargain basement appearance, but what keeps it popular with customers is the starter kit. Other entry-level acoustic guitars rarely include the accessories that the Jasmine S35 offers. It is also valued as a good back-up guitar for advanced players who want a dependable spare on hand during performances.
You will be able to chord the guitar with comfort and has bend strings. You will be able to play with ease as it has c shaped neck with satin finished. Its three single-coil pickups can allow you to play the rock and jazz sounds, two-tone sound controls, 5-way switches to pick up. ITS Synchronized Tremolo chrome allows you to create a flat pitch and sharp sound. This is just the right guitar in your certain budget to get the best quality assurance and peace of mind. 
Multi-effects processors come in various configurations, too. Some are floor units that have built-in foot pedals and controllers so they can be operated while your hands remain on your guitar. There are rackmount processors (these can be fitted into a rack of recording gear in line with your signal chain) that incorporate a preamp for your guitar. The more sophisticated models have MIDI I/O for connecting guitar synthesizers to keyboards, modules, computers and other MIDI devices and include a divided pickup to attach to your standard guitar. These processors pack effects libraries that offer combinations of effects, amp models and stompboxes that can number in the thousands. Switching can be controlled by onboard knobs, foot controllers or guitar-picking technique. Expect to pay considerably more for a rackmount effects processor, in a range of three- to four-digit prices. 
Standard Series :[1] Brown Sunburst, Black, Arctic White, Lake Placid Blue, Candy Apple Red, Midnight Wine, Copper Metallic SunburstAmerican Standard Series (as of 2012):[1]Black, 3-Color Sunburst, Olympic White, Jade Green Pearl, Charcoal Frost Metallic, Candy Cola, Mystic Red, Mystic Blue (alder), Sienna Sunburst (ash)American Special Series (as of 2010): 3-Color Sunburst, 2-Color Sunburst, Black, Candy Apple Red, Olympic White, Surf Green
Merson emerges again as an importer in the late ’50s and early ’60s (as the guitar boom was building), marketing Giannini acoustic guitars made in Brazil and Hagstrom electric guitars made in Sweden. Recall that in the ’50s, the accordion craze had given great impetus to the success of music merchandisers. But by the end of the decade, the collapse of the fad left them holding the squeeze-box, as it were. After some meandering, the Folk Revival picked up at the end of the decade, creating a growing market for acoustic guitars. Hence the Gianninis.
Most lo-fi amplifiers in the 40s and 50s produced unexpected distortion or overdrive tones at higher volumes. Guitarists quickly discovered that the Fender Tweed Champ (originally marketed to beginners as the Champion 800 in 1948) produced a distorted sound at high-volume levels thanks to the Champ’s low power output and simple circuitry. Many of the classic guitar solos in the 1950s were recorded through a Champ, which resembled a wide-panel TV cabinet covered in tweed cloth. Leo Fender even went so far as to manufacture the first 100-watt amplifiers for surf guitar pioneer Dick Dale, who had blown hundreds of Fender amps and speakers from regularly turning up the volume.
Guitar Center added a replica of the “Black Beauty” Les Paul Custom, with three pickups, that Peter Frampton used as his main guitar from his days in Humble Pie through his early solo career, photographed playing the instrument on the front jackets of his albums Frampton and Frampton Comes Alive. It has all the same qualities such as the three uncovered humbucking pickups and missing pickguard. The Black Beauty was not issued until 1957; however, the one given to Frampton by a fan named Mark Mariana was a 1954 model that had been routed out for a middle pickup.
By far the most common way to sort out this tablature selection is by artist. Some best-selling highlights include the Hal Leonard Jimi Hendrix Complete Guitar Tab Library, Alfred Led Zeppelin Box Set I-V Guitar Tab Platinum Edition and Hal Leonard Eric Clapton Complete Clapton Guitar Tab Songbook. And those are just a few examples from a library packed with hundreds of books. No matter what sort of music you want to play, there's tablature ready to teach it to you.
Feedback is essentially the presence of a sound loop where the guitar’s amplified sound causes increased vibration in the strings. The sound of this vibration then gets further amplified, continuing the loop and resulting in distorted sound. Usually the source of the feedback is the guitar’s amp, but in cases of hollow-body guitars, the amp’s output resonates in the actual guitar body. For many music styles feedback is an undesirable trait, but it’s also been used as an awesome effect by prominent guitarists such as Jimi Hendrix and Kurt Cobain.
Aside from the superstrat ESP M-10 shown earlier. The ESP LTD EC-10 is also an affordable guitar but with a different body design derived from the Les Paul. The features of this LP inspired guitar that makes it different is the bevels on the body and belly cut at the back for comfort. Its major resemblance to a Les Paul is the humbuckers pick-ups equip on the guitar. Together with the bridge design for having a stopbar and tom bridge without a whammy bar.
Flanging: This effect involves mixing two copies of the same signal with one of them slightly phase shifted. Historically, it had its origin with studio engineers using reeel-to-reel tape recorders. They would make a copy of a tape and then feed the original and copy together to a recorder, having placed a pencil on the flange of one tape to slightly alter its speed. The slight speed change would not be enough to cause notable delay, but would be enough to cause the two waves to be "out of phase" with each other. The effect is described as a king of "swirling" sound, with notable pitch oscillations if it became more extreme.
I commented earlier that the guitar amp is the instrument as far as the mic is concerned, but if the guitar is played in the control room with the amp itself in the studio (assuming decent separation between the rooms), a capacitor microphone close to the guitar neck may be used to capture the direct sound from the guitar strings. This sounds a bit thin and naff on its own, but sometimes works well in combination with the miked sound. A similar effect can be achieved by splitting the guitar output, feeding some of it direct to the console via a DI box and then either removing some low end or using an enhancer to exaggerate the brightness. DI'ing the piezo bridge pickups (where fitted) may also produce a similar result, and any of these techniques may also be used with guitar recording preamps as well as when miking.
The RockJam RJEG02 is coming from the hills of RockJam’s successful 15 years of producing some of the best and highly selling brands in the market. This full size, quality guitar contains a whammy bar, a guitar strap, a 10-watt amp, spare strings, electric guitar picks and a gig bag—making it a complete package suitable for the beginner and professional electric guitar player.
The D-18E was a mahogany dreadnought with the neck pickup and a second bridge pickup. The typical Martin pickguard had the front point cut off and a notch in back to make room for the pickups rings. A three-way toggle was mounted on the upper treble bout. Controls included one volume and two tones, with the big plastic knobs. D-18Es are the rarest of these early Martin electrics, lasting only from the ’58 prototypes through 1959. These began with prototype #163746. Around 858 of these were produced.
The neck's profile and width affects the guitar's playability and the player's comfort when fretting. While most necks are either "C"- or "U"-shaped, the width and depth of the neck in relation to the player's hand is an important consideration. Players with smaller hands should seek out narrower, shallower necks while those with larger hands will most likely find beefier neck profiles more comfortable.
It also comes in a colour that is unique and leaves most other guitars in the dust - their OPB colour, or Open Pore Black finish. It’s a matte black guitar. Matte (or a satin finish) means that you won’t have the grubby finger marks or oil stains that a glossy finish would have. Plus, if you play for a while and your palms get sweaty, this matte finish won’t be slick and slipper - unlike guitars with a glossy finish.
The 85/15 “S” humbuckers here—again, they’re affordable versions of the Custom’s 85/15—are transparent, ‘hi-fi,’ articulate and high-output. Lush while clean and thick when clipped, the pickups have also been coil-split to take you into glassier, single-coil territory. However, you can’t coil-split them individually to form HS or SH combinations, for instance.
The Fender Stratocaster, or Strat® (as it's been referred to affectionately for decades), has become a favorite for players of all genres. Introduced in 1954, the Stratocaster ushered in a new era of guitar design and has been instrumental in the development of modern music as we know it. Like its older cousin, the Telecaster, it features single-coil pickups. But rather than just pickups at the neck and bridge, it has a middle pickup and five-way selector that allows for even further in-between tonal variations. Along with being the first solid-body electric to have three pickups, it was also the first to have a self-contained vibrato system.
Was skeptical at first since I own a couple of vintage Martins. Aside from the LX1E being a sustainable responsibly built guitar that has HPL back/sides, hybrid neck/fingerboard, and whose soundhole smells like a Lincoln Log toy set this is an amazing find. Yup- it’s perfect for the overhead bin on airplanes, comes with a good gig bag, and sounds great plugged in. Experimented with .11 gauge string set, but this guitar is really made for either .12 gauge or a true .13 (medium gauge) strings set. This guitar is designed for the combination of heavier strings and assertive strumming or picking to create a sound that belies its small size. It welcomes being pushed, muted, and/or percussively played. Found the same to be true of Martin’s DX regular size guitars which sound amazing for what they are. While the E Sheeran LX model has his logos on it, this
Remember, when you choose to buy an electric guitar by itself (not as part of a ‘starter pack’), you’ll also need to buy an amp, guitar cable, and a tuner. These are extra costs that you should budget for on top of the cost of your new guitar. I recommend that beginners keep their first amp purchase conservative–both in price and size. Here’s what I’d recommend:
It is useful to know the fundamental relationship between voltage, current and resistance known as Ohm's Law when understanding how electric guitar circuits work. The guitar pickups provide the voltage and current source, while the potentiometers provide the resistance. From Ohm's Law we can see how increasing resistance decreases the flow of current through a circuit, while decreasing the resistance increases the current flow. If two circuit paths are provided from a common voltage source, more current will flow through the path of least resistance.
#5? Are you joking? I have a PR-200 that I've owned for 15 years. I hate it. The action is ridiculous unless your fingertips are made out of adamantium or whatever the heck Wolverine is made from. The sound is muddled and a clash of midrange. Sustain is nonexistent. The frets have flattened on the high strings. News flash- I'm not spending $350 to re-fret a $279 guitar. Epiphone may make some good high end guitars but I don't trust them. If you make crappy low end guitars why should I trust your brand? You were supposed to get me to fall in love with the brand but you've made me hate it. My next guitar will be a Yamaha, Martin or Taylor.

Another great option if your budget for an acoustic is $500 or less is the BG 40 from Blueridge. It has a sitka spruce top with mahogany back and side. It features scalloped bracing for a clean and crisp tone. Owners describe it’s tone as loud and bassy, and compared the neck width to that of an electric. This could be a plus for those with smaller hands. This guitar also features a bone and nut saddle and East Indian rosewood fingerboard for smooth playability. Based on customer feedback, this is a great budget choice that won’t let you down.
In any given field there are a handful of companies that rise above the others. This is true whether you are talking about cars or golf clubs or chainsaws, and of course it is true if you are talking about electric guitars. Some brands have proven themselves as the best of the best. They’ve created the most legendary instruments in music history. If you are looking for a new guitar, one of these companies is a smart place to start.
Any vibration we can hear as "sound" is composed of some distribution of overtones above the fundamental frequency. Overtones exist in a set fashion based on the physics of vibrating waves and the ratios between them. The only difference in tone between any instrument is caused by a different prominence and distribution of these overtones. When a string is plucked on an electric guitar the vibrations move into the body of the guitar as well. The resonant properties of the wood will cause some of these overtones to be "summed" and exaggerated while others will "cancel" to some degree. The vibrating string will be influenced, however slightly, by the vibration of the guitar, in turn changing the distribution of overtones on the vibrating string - essentially creating a feedback loop.
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An amp head is an amplifier without the speakers. This is the type of amp that is most often used on stages of all sizes, from small clubs to huge stadiums. The reason is that amp heads tend to offer more power and can be hooked up to several different speaker cabinets. This allows you unrivalled power as well as the freedom to mix and match your favorite heads and speakers. Another plus is that they are much easier to carry around to gigs, especially if the venue has its own cabinet. The disadvantages of heads are that they are generally more expensive than a combo, while you will also have to factor in the cost of a speaker when purchasing one.
It is a common misconception that a new guitar player should start with nylon strings, because they are easier on fingers or easier to play. But nylon strings and steel strings are not interchangeable on the same guitar, so it’s not a matter of progressing from one kind of string to another with experience. What should really drive your decision is what kind of music you want to play.
In the 1980s, digital rackmount units began replacing stompboxes as the effects format of choice. Often musicians would record "dry", unaltered tracks in the studio and effects would be added in post-production. The success of Nirvana's 1991 album Nevermind helped to re-ignite interest in stompboxes. Some grunge guitarists would chain several fuzz pedals together and plug them into a tube amplifier.[47] Throughout the 1990s, musicians committed to a "lo-fi" aesthetic such as J Mascis of Dinosaur Jr., Stephen Malkmus of Pavement and Robert Pollard of Guided by Voices continued to use analog effects pedals.[48]
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