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You can trace all things loud and riff-y right back to the Kinks' Dave Davies, starting with the fantastically simple power chords of "You Really Got Me," which he recorded at age 17 – setting off a run of proto-metal singles from "All Day and All of the Night" to "Till the End of the Day." Davies, who created the distortion on "You Really Got Me" by slicing an amp speaker with a razor, has laughed off claims that it was actually played by an uncredited Jimmy Page: "Who'd want to play a solo that crazy, anyway? Only Dave Davies could do that."
The standard practice for many distributors was to offer a line of guitars based on popular American designs like Les Pauls and Strats, for example, along with a few original designs. And all were offered at a bargain price or were at least inexpensive enough to compete with the American manufacturers. While the majority of imported Asian-built copies from the era aren’t considered to be of very good quality, the Lotus brand was an exception, mainly because of the factories they were built in.
So you want to learn how to play guitar but don’t know where to start? No worries. This how to play guitar for beginners guide will cover all the basic requirements to get you started with playing guitar. The guide is split into 2 sections: The Basics – where you’ll learn about the various parts of the guitar, how to hold the guitar and how to tune your guitar. Playing – where you’ll learn popular chords, strumming techniques, and how to read guitar tabs. This guitar for beginners guide is meant for guitarists just starting out, however there are also tips and
In Hamburg in 1960, Beatles guitarist John Lennon bought a Rickenbacker 325 Capri, which he used throughout the early days of The Beatles. He eventually had the guitar’s natural alder body refinished in black, and made other modifications including the fitting of a Bigsby vibrato tailpiece and regularly changing the control knobs.[7] Lennon played this guitar for The Beatles’ famous 1964 debut on The Ed Sullivan Show (as well as for their third Sullivan appearance, pre-taped the same day but broadcast two weeks later). During Lennon’s post-Beatles years in New York, this guitar was restored to its original natural wood finish and the cracked gold pickguard replaced with a white one.[7]
The diagram on the left shows you the fretboard on the guitar, with the thickest string on the left, and the E high string on the right. The numbers over the frets tell you where to press the string. At the top of the chart, you see an X or a 0 in near the strings. The X tells you to mute the string (not play it at all), the 0 tells you to play it open, without pressing any frets. So, in order to play the A chord as shown in the diagram, you should:
I’m also going to go out on a limb and suggest the earliest Univoxes also included the ‘Lectra, a version of the one-pickup Aria 1930 violin bass (made by Aria). These were basically violin-bodied basses originally inspired by the Gibson EB-0, and popularized among imports by Paul McCartney’s use of the Höfner violin bass, copied by EKO. This was a hollowbody with no f-holes, Cremona brown finish, single neck pickup, bolt-on neck with position dots along the top of the 22-fret bound rosewood fingerboard. Strings anchored to a covered bridge/tailpiece assembly.
The guitar is one of the most beloved musical instruments of all time. Guitarists tend to wear that title with pride, and their instrument becomes an extension of the player’s distinct personality. Because of this, players tend to develop a strict loyalty to the guitar brand of their choosing. Luckily, there are many great options out there today, with niches that cater to virtually all genres and styles. This guide will weigh the pros and cons of the five best guitar brands on the market, to help you make as informed a decision as possible on which brand will best suit your needs.
Higher strings can potentially induce some drawbacks that you will need to minimize. Before settling on your new action, you want to determine that strings don’t go out of tune in any fretting positions up and down the neck. You also need to ensure that using a capo, if you ever play with one, doesn’t throw all strings out of pitch too badly. Also note that if this experimentation results in raising your strings considerably from their previous position — and your guitar remains playable after doing so — you might also need to adjust your pickup height slightly. But, note that lowering the pickups further from the strings can often also help the strings to vibrate more freely (as discussed way back in Gibson Tone Tips #1), so leaving the pickups lower might be adding a double bonus to your new playing set up. Play with the options and see what works for you, and that will yield the “best right answer” for each individual player — and once you have achieved it for you, be sure to check and change your intonation, as necessary. If low action floats your boat, great, but it’s worth knowing that there’s a wealth of tone hiding in that thin slice of air between string and fingerboard.

Squier has now seen fit to introduce Fender's revered '72 Thinline to its own range, and it looks the business, with white pearloid scratchplate, finely carved f-hole and Fender- embossed humbuckers. While you'll find the gloss-finished modern C neck across much of Squier's Vintage Modified range, you're unlikely to find tones quite like the Thinline's anywhere else, certainly at this price. Cleans from the neck and middle positions are punchy and persuasive, not dissimilar to fat P-90-ish single coils, but flicking over to the bridge humbucker yields a burly, resonant voice that screams for big open chords and an overdriven valve amp. That's why it's one of the best electric guitars for Indie and alt-rock players.
ESP is yet another Japanese musical instrument brand. The brand has many artist endorsements and a ton of user recommendations. ESP was founded in 1975, and it started as a builder of custom made parts. Guitarists would use ESP parts to personalize their existing instruments. Now ESP is known for their creative versions of popular guitar shapes. The guitars are known for their fast play features and great sound. Their guitars are known for their unique and unconventional designs. For that reason, ESP guitars are most popular among modern rock and metal players.
Much like ESP, Schecter started out as a parts company which decided to start building their own guitars. Right from day one it was apparent that their mission was to deliver ultimate metal guitars. Everything from their design, to the choice of electronics pointed in this direction. It didn’t take long for Schecter to become one of the go to brands that has reached the elite level.
While the Vox lineup features modern marvels such as the Valvetronix modeling amplifiers, this company is really all about smooth tube overdrive. The AC30 is a rock classic, and one of the most legendary amps ever made. It’s still going strong today, but there are many other Vox models to choose from as well, all built around that amazing Vox tone.

The body is pre-drilled and crafted from basswood, while the maple neck is meant to be glued into the neck joint, something that requires a bit of care and precision. Because of its hollow body design, installing electronics can be a bit of a challenge, but very doable as attested to by reviews. Note that wood is raw and unfinished, so you'll need a bit more sanding and patching before you paint on it.
I just read all of the comments and couldn't believe how long it too for someone (John Corcoran) to mention Les Paul. As for the 'tard who "knows" better players than Robert Johnson, just remember that Johnson INVENTED the sound and everyone else is just copying him or building upon his foundation. This list might work better split up by genre. Segovia may be one of the best guitarists ever, but he doesn't work with the others on the list. Stanley Jordan is incredible, but he'd be out of place on this list. What about Charo – yes, the Coochie Coochie girl from Hollywood Squares plays a mean classical and flamenco guitar! TopTenzMaster – let's see a bunch of subcategory lists…
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The earliest sound effects were strictly studio productions. In the mid to late 1940s, recording engineers and experimental musicians such as Les Paul began manipulating reel-to-reel recording tape to create echo effects and unusual, futuristic sounds. Microphone placement ("miking") techniques were used in spaces with specially designed acoustic properties to simulate echo chambers.[22][23][24] In 1948 DeArmond released the Trem-Trol, the first commercially available stand-alone effects unit. This device produced a tremolo by passing an instrument's electrical signal through a water-based electrolytic fluid.[25] Most stand-alone effects of the 1950s and early 60s such as the Gibson GA-VI vibrato unit and the Fender reverb box, were expensive and impractical, requiring bulky transformers and high voltages. The original stand-alone units were not especially in-demand as many effects came built into amplifiers. The first popular stand-alone was the 1958 Watkins Copicat, a relatively portable tape echo effect made famous by the British band, The Shadows.[26][27]

Taylor 110ce Yes, there’s already one Taylor in the list, but we just can’t resist including the Taylor 110ce dreadnought. It certainly deserves a spot here because of its noteworthy qualities, which include a thin-profile neck, shorter nut width, well-balanced tone and plenty of projection. Plugged in, the guitar produces a natural electro-acoustic sound - just the way we like it.
I played a hollowbody Ibanez almost exactly like this Artcore back when I was studying Jazz guitar in college. For the aspiring Jazz beginners out there, this is the guitar to start with if you’re wanting to stick closer to the “traditional” Jazz-type guitar without spending a fortune. However, make no mistake, this isn’t just a Jazz guitar. With 2 humbuckers you’ve got plenty of muscle for Blues, Rock, Rockabilly, etc.
American Fenders and USA Gibsons are not NOT for beginners! They are for people like myself who have invested 15+ years into developing the skills required to defend a purchase of one. IF you want beginner guitars, go see Mexico Fenders or Epiphone Guitars. Better yet, worry more about your skill and not which brand in on your headstock. I played for 11 years before I upgraded my Epiphone to a Gibson.
But having at least a very basic foundation to build upon - such as learning some basic chords, will allow you to learn more songs faster. My best advice is to abandoned any idea of instant gratification and commit to the idea that learning guitar is a slow process in the beginning. It gets exponentially easier to improve your skills after you get past the huge hurdles you encounter in the beginning.

You will come across many people who'll give you different opinions regarding different brands, and also, there are several other reviews on the Internet too. Keep your research simple, experiment, and keep frequenting guitar shops and secondhand musical instrument stores to check out the different kinds of brands. Play as many guitars of different brands as you can, and one day, you will find your 'guitar-soulmate' (sic.), the sight and sound of which will make you go 'wow!' So, if you're new to the guitar world or have recently developed an interest in it, this Melodyful article will surely sort out your doubts. Here is a brief comparison of different guitar brands along with detailed descriptions of the tone and sound. Take a look!


This is one of our favourite cheap electric guitars and it certainly doesn’t suck thanks to its Alder body, comfortable “C” shape neck, snappy maple fingerboard and two Vintage-Style Single-Coil Tele pickups to provide that awesome tele twang. If you’ve always wanted a Telecaster and are just starting out in the world of guitar, this is a dream beginner’s guitar that is budget friendly and still completely high quality.
Most users are happy with what they got for the money, from its wood quality, to the included hardware and electronics. As expected, many of its buyers are fans of the Les Paul Jr who want to try their hand at customizing their own straightforward rock machine. Surprisingly, there are some who are happy with its default configuration, including the feel of the neck, the sound of the P-90 pickup and the quality of the tuners.
In order to play your favorite song, you’ll need to learn guitar chords. Use the images and instructions below to learn how to play each chord. The ChordBuddy device can be used for assistance in knowing where to place your fingers In the images the circles represent where you will be placing your fingers (I=index, M=middle finger, R=ring finger, P=pinky). The X’s represent strings that you will not be strumming while the O represents strings that will be played without any frets.
But it would be a mistake to think that this guitar is only suitable for Jason Mraz strumming and happy songs, because it’s just as good for heavy metal! That sweet little tone can easily be transferred to heavy music, or why not pop, jazz or blues? In other words, this guitar is extremely versatile and is the best option for musicians who play many different types of music and want a guitar that works well for pretty much everything.
Tempo guitars and amps offered in 1971 included three nylon-stringed guitars, three steel-stringed guitars, and two solidstate amplifiers. These were pretty low-end beginner guitars probably imported from Japan, though the heads have a Harmony look to them. The N-5 Folk Guitar ($31.90) was standard-sized with spruce top and mahogany body (presumably laminates), slothead, tie bridge, no markers. The GM-62 Steel String Guitar ($29) was also standard size, “light” top and “dark” back with dots, moveable bridge with saddle and stamped metal tailpiece. The GM-300 Convertible Guitar Outfit ($33.90) was a spruce and mahogany slothead with dots and a glued/bolted bridge which could be used for either nylon or steel strings. It came with nylons and an extra set of steel strings. Harmony made guitars like this for Sears in the early ’60s. The N-48 Nylon String Guitar Outfit ($82.50) was a grand concert classical with amber spruce top, maple body, marquetry strip on the slothead and gold hardware, hardshell case included. The N-40 Nylon String Guitar ($45) was grand concert-sized with amber spruce top and “dark brown” body. The F-34 Steel String Guitar was also grand concert-sized with spruce top, “dark brown” body, belly pin bridge, block inlays, and engraved hummingbird pickguard.
Growing up in the late '80s as a young teenage musician, my friends and I played on many a Japanese guitar. Sure, we thought Japanese guitars were cool and weird looking, but cost was the true deciding factor. You could pick up a Japanese guitar at any pawn shop in our town for under forty bucks. Harmony, Kay, Teisco, Univox, Silvertone, Lotus, and other names I can't recall were always popping up at practices and jam sessions. Nowadays, Japanese guitars from the 1960's and 1970's are increasingly hard to come across, but we are always on the hunt, and we have found some cool and interesting vintage Japanese guitars, amplifiers, and other stringed instruments from the Far East...
If you wanted to quantify what is meant by "best," which you really should, then we actually would need to consider the specifications of guitars in the given price range. Although there may be differences of personal preference when it comes to areas such as individual tone woods used, fretboard scale, and nut width, we could still make very good general assumptions about whether laminates are better than a solid wood model, whether synthetic fretboard material was favorable to natural wood, whether one pickup is better than two, and/or whether including a built-in tuner is preferable. In other words, Forget about the names of the manufacturers and do a real comparison of specifications of guitars in the given price range.

When you are also tracking a close mic at the same time, you might try variations of the approaches discussed in the sections above on distant-miking or ambient-miking to get a little or a lot more room sound into the brew. This often will capture the best overall sound for a range of musical styles – the close mic delivers punch and plenty of midrange grind (depending on mic choice), while the distant mic – placed from about 12″ away to several feet – adds depth, dimension, and the natural reverberation of the space. After careful consideration for both mic placements (using the “position, listen, re-position” techniques discussed above to find ideal on-the-track sound from each mic), some skill in the mixing process is also often required to make the most of any multi-mic setup. The discussion about phase alignment in the sidebar (“Correcting Phase Issues”) is often a big part of this post-tracking approach to maximizing multi-mic techniques, but also be aware that you can use whatever proportional blend of the two tracks works best, a variety of effects and dynamic treatments on each track, and whatever panning of the pair best suits your overall mix, from dead-on together to any different pan of each within the stereo field.
I was lucky. Went into to a small local music store and they had it for a long time and were trying to get rid of it quick. Got it for about $800. The previous Rick 12 I had (with narrow neck) I bought for $400, fixed broken nut, then sold to West LA Music for $750 cash so I could get the Petty model. Transactions that were definitely worth it at the time.
You have a huge range of effects at your disposal, which can be applied to both vocals (thanks to the XLR inputs) and line level instruments such as your acoustic guitar. You have 2 compressors, a boost, 3 Chorus types, as well as 3 types of delay and reverb effects to suit a wide range of sonic palettes, all of which have been optimised specifically for acoustic guitar. However, it’s the Acoustic Resonance selectors, 80 second phrase looper and anti-feedback feature that the acoustic guitarists will really take advantage of.
Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic - Body Size: Grand Concert - Top Wood: Solid Sitka Spruce - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Nut Width: 44.5mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 26" (66cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Bracing: X-Type - Hardware: Chrome, Grover Tuners - String Instrument Finish: Light Violin High Gloss Sunburst, Dark Violin High Gloss Sunburst
Guitar Tuners lets you tune your guitar in seconds for free using a microphone so that you guarantee the perfect pitch of your instrument every time. Just play a note, and Guitar Tuners will display which note you''re playing, and how close you are to having that note in tune. The needle on this Guitar Tuner will turn blue you have an exact match. Just play each note on your guitar (E, A, D, G, B, E) or other musical instrument, and get in tune !
Martin’s re-entry into electric manufacturing is related to the association of Richard (Dick) Boak with the C.F. Martin company. Dick Boak, with dreams of being a luthier and constantly working on guitar projects on his own, joined Martin in 1976 as a draftsman. In 1977 Boak was assigned to the project of designing an electric guitar for Martin. This resulted in the development of the E-18, EM-18 and EB-18 guitars and bass. The first prototypes of this new electric guitar series were produced in 1978, ten years after the demise of the GT-70/75, and production commenced in 1979 with guitar serial number 1000.
Electric guitars vary by type. Some are designed for beginners, while others are customized for professional guitar players. Most of the major electric guitar brands are available in a variety of different styles, each designed to best suit a customers' specific playing needs. The most popular electric guitars have great rock sounds and the best bodies. On electric guitars, strings affect the sounds too. Ease and sound are certainly big factors to consider when choosing a new electric guitar.

Remember when I said that there were 2 amps widely used as practice amps and tools for guitar tech’s? Well, the Orange Micro Crush Mini Guitar Amplifier Combo is the other one. Warm ups before gigs, during set ups and maintenance work, this amplifier is relied upon to provide accurate sound and incredible tone anywhere, anytime. This is one of the best cheap amps available thanks to the fact it’s made by one of the most respected amplifier manufacturers in the world, powered via 9V battery and busts out some seriously amazing clean and dirty sounds.
It is nice that it starts easy and progresses as you improve, but there are some catches. If you are really good, you will be annoyed at the pace it adds new material. It also can be frustrating when it adds a few extra notes, you are caught of guard, it takes them away, and you have to play through the song a few times to get them back- at which time they catch you off guard again. I wish you could opt to lock them in, or just reveal all.
After you've made your selections from the best selection of guitar and bass tabs, you'll want to download the Musicnotes.com apps for your Android, iPad, iPhone, or other device to gain access to your digital library anywhere. The option to print the file is still available, and you will also have all of your sheet music stored in your personal account to access your digital file from any computer or mobile device. If any issues arise, make sure to contact our customer support of musicians, ready to help fellow musicians.
Lastly, we have the M-100FM. This guitar features a body that is similar that Super Strat style Ibanez is known for, packed with a great set of pickups. This is a mid range guitar, but one that is very capable compared to its immediate competition. If you need an axe that looks good and plays good as well, ESP LTD M Series M-100FM is the ESP for you.
Preamp, or gain, controls (sometimes called “volume” on master volume–equipped amps) let you dial in impressive-sounding distortion at low volumes, but excessive preamp distortion can sound too compressed and sizzling at high volumes. Turn down the gain and crank up the master volume until the amp is set at the output level you’d normally play at. Now, slowly increase the gain until the sound becomes as distorted as you want it to be. If the tone is buzzy and lacks dynamics, the amp will have all the onstage presence of an American Idol reject.
Dick Dale is a prominent Stratocaster player, who also collaborated with Leo Fender in developing the Fender Showman amplifier. In the early 1960s, the instrument was also championed by Hank Marvin–guitarist for the Shadows, a band that originally backed Cliff Richard and then produced instrumentals of its own. So distinctive was Hank Marvin’s sound that many musicians, including the Beatles, initially deliberately avoided the Stratocaster.[citation needed] However, in 1965, George Harrison and John Lennon acquired Stratocasters and used them for Help!, Rubber Soul and later recording sessions; the double unison guitar solo on “Nowhere Man” is played by Harrison and Lennon on their new Stratocasters.[10][11][12][13]

Buddy Holly was one of the pioneers of the Stratocaster and used the instrument on virtually all of his songs with the Crickets. During the recording of “Peggy Sue”, rhythm guitarist Niki Sullivan was not needed for the song, and instead stood next to Holly, and flipped the selector switch of Holly’s guitar from the neck pickup to the bridge pickup for the guitar solo.
Unlike the 60's and 70's, it is almost impossible to buy a poor quality guitar today. There are many hundreds of "brand" name guitars being produced in dozens of factories throughout the world, with these same factories producing instruments for the world's best known brands - and nearly all of these instruments are well made and perfectly playable. Don't worry about the name on the headstock. If you are buying the guitar as a gift, have a guitarist-friend advise you on the suitability of the instrument for the intended recipient. Even the world's best known and respected guitar manufacturers market instruments in a variety of price markets, and while there are differences in materials and tonal qualities, these are usually well beyond the beginner's ability to discern. All are playable; it is up to the player to make them sound good.
Overdrive pedals are intended to mimic the sweet sound of an overdriven tube amp. They are generally more subtle, warmer and a bit richer in sound. Overdrive pedals typically don’t produce the kind of heavy distortion needed in hard rock and heavy metal, but they are fantastic for blues, country, rock and anything else where you need warm, textured distortion. A good example of a quality overdrive pedal is the Ibanez Tube Screamer.
I had just finished signing up for guitar.com. I am a 54-year-old disabled Miner of 22 years, so I thought I would try to take up playing the guitar once again like I did when I was a kid. I forgot a lot about it through the years as life moved on, but now all I have is time. I came across your website and thought why not give it a try. so anything you suggest I will try once twice if I like it lol
Open Loop Gain: Feedback Solid-state amplifiers are inherently nonlinear. They have a very large ‘open loop gain’ approx 20,000. The amplifier output is (feedback) to the comparator input to reduce the gain to approx 50. Therefore 99.9% of this feedback corrects all instability and non-non-linearity of the amplifier, as explained in amplifiers. The speaker also acts as a large microphone. All non-linear movements and vibrations within the speaker cone, (caused by reflected nodes, chaotic resonances etc) of which there are many, are regenerated back into electricity by the voice coil. This re-generated signal from the voice coil is inadvertanetly fed-back to the solid-state amps comparator input, and re-amplified back to the speaker as recycled distortion.
Pyle Pro’s PEGKT15SB package is the next step up. This guitar has more of a vintage feel thanks to its sunburst finish. Like the Silvertone above, it features 3 single coil pickups, two tone knobs, a tremolo bridge system, and a full-scale neck complete with a 22nd fret. Also included in the package is a Pyle Pro gig bag, a small 10-watt amp with cable, 3 guitar picks, a strap, and extra strings.

Chorus: Though it can be overused, light distortion works well as a filler for choruses in Christian worship and most other genres.Verse: You won’t typically hear a distorted verse, though at times a two guitar group can make this work. Generally, you’ll want to leave distortion for the higher intensity portions of a song.Bridge: A lot of Christian songs tend to lower intensity during the bridge, which means light distortion becomes a little less usable. Though for bridges that keep the tempo up, it can work pretty well.


Besides his restoration of vintage guitars, one of the most important contributions Paul has made to the guitar world is passing the torch to a new generation of guitar masters by offering Luthier classes that teaches how to build your own electric guitar at his shop. People from all walks of life have attended his seminars, including Mark Colombo, a former offensive tackle of the Dallas Cowboys. Paul is not only sharing his love of building great guitars but also teaching the science of how the magic works. "I have what's known as the 'no-fail policy,'" he says and laughs. "If you can't do the work, I'll do it for you."
According to Harmony’s 1963 price list, the H1213 Archtone sold for $37.75. If we take inflation into account, this same guitar would actually sell for around $270 today. This is roughly the same price for most entry-level acoustic guitars these days, but the two main differences are that the H1213 is an archtop and it was made in the US (most modern entry-level acoustics are flattops produced in Asia).
In the early 1980s Collings decided to move to San Diego, California but never made it further than Austin, Texas.[3][4] He started out sharing work space with fellow luthiers Tom Ellis, a builder of mandolins, and Mike Stevens. A few years later he decided to continue on his own and take the craft more seriously, moving into a one-stall garage shop.
The best guitar I've found so far is my Westone Thunder 1a, from Matsumoku factory in Japan, 1982, which I got 2nd hand for £255. This has phase switching. coil split and an integrated preamp and EQ. It's got a 3 piece laminate neck with the centre strip at a right angle to the outer strips. It's got a brass bridge, nut, and knobs. It's 34 years old and the neck is as straight as an arrow. This guitar comes closest to having everything I could want in a guitar.

I've contacted them once before and they are SO eager to please. None of those steps is an issue for them at all. I don't condone buying out of China but that is a pretty sure fire way of squeezing the best quality guitar out of an otherwise shithouse marketplace. If you just order and wait, they are just going to pick one off the shelf, and that's not what you want. You need to push them to make your guitar.


hi-its the standard wiring for a strat-i have the push pull in the middle position-i have two wires going from two lugs on the push pull pot- one   giong to neck position on 5 way selector swich and the other to voloume on selector switch-when i have select     brige position when  i pull  middle pot i get neck and bridge -next position all three – middle position neck /middle .next neck middle and first position -neck=also if you put two tone  caps on one pot will it effect the pickup sound when it maxed to ten  and willit sound too bassy–thanks sean
All Vintage V6’s offer an extraordinarily high level of specification including the revered Wilkinson WVC original specification vibrato featuring authentic bent steel saddles for that classic sparkle and tone; precision machined pivot points for total ‘return to pitch’ accuracy and a stagger-drilled sustain block to prevent string hang-up. An adjustable, ‘vintage bend’ push-in arm completes this definitive vibrato system..
WET SANDING You can wet sand with 600 or 800 grit wet sanding papers that you can get from the hardware or auto body shop before you apply the clear coats. You can get precission paper from Stewart Mac Donald that are suppose to cut better, last longer and yeild a better result, but I have never tried them so that's up to you. When wet sanding there are a few things to keep in mind. First you will need to soak the paper overnight in water. You can add a little Murphy's Oil soap to it. It will act as a lubricant and help it cut better. You could even soak the paper in a solvent if you use a laquer finish but I use water because it cleans up easier and dosen't smell. Next be sure not to overly soak the areas that you have drilled holes in. If the water get in the wood it can cause a lift in the lacquer that could lead to cracks in the finish. This is why some people choose a solvent to sand with because it is more forgiving in that area. Start wet sanding with a 600 to 800 grit paper and gradually work your way up to a 2000 plus grit. If you use water you may experience a condition in you finger tips that comes with a prolonged exposure to it called "raisoning". Just let them dry out for a while and get back to work!
Description: Flamed 10-Top, Gold Hardware Model. Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Mother Of Pearl - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Gold, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 5-Way Switch, Locking Tuners - Pickups: Dragon II - String Instrument Finish: Blue Mateo, Ruby, Gold Metallic, Whale Blue, Dark Cherry Sunburst, Violin Amber Sunburst, Emerald Green, Vintage Yellow, Black Sunburst, Gray Black, Natural, Black, Amber, Tobacco Sunburst, Orange, Black Cherry, Vintage Natural
WET SANDING You can wet sand with 600 or 800 grit wet sanding papers that you can get from the hardware or auto body shop before you apply the clear coats. You can get precission paper from Stewart Mac Donald that are suppose to cut better, last longer and yeild a better result, but I have never tried them so that's up to you. When wet sanding there are a few things to keep in mind. First you will need to soak the paper overnight in water. You can add a little Murphy's Oil soap to it. It will act as a lubricant and help it cut better. You could even soak the paper in a solvent if you use a laquer finish but I use water because it cleans up easier and dosen't smell. Next be sure not to overly soak the areas that you have drilled holes in. If the water get in the wood it can cause a lift in the lacquer that could lead to cracks in the finish. This is why some people choose a solvent to sand with because it is more forgiving in that area. Start wet sanding with a 600 to 800 grit paper and gradually work your way up to a 2000 plus grit. If you use water you may experience a condition in you finger tips that comes with a prolonged exposure to it called "raisoning". Just let them dry out for a while and get back to work!

I put the pots into a wiring jig I made for Les Pauls: a piece of pickguard plastic with holes to match the LP control arrangement (cardboard works just as well). This lets me do my wiring outside the body, and everything fits back in neatly.The guitar’s controls were on a metal mounting plate. We decided to ditch the plate, sticking with the ’50s theme.


Editor’s Note: My previous top choice, the Yamaha APX500iii, is now replaced with a newer and better model, the Yamaha APX600. What make’s it better, you ask? Well, there were some complaints regarding the previous model for having a lack of bass response and a “bland” sound when unplugged. Yamaha addresses this issue by changing the guitar’s bracing pattern, thus improving it’s overall sound response, making the APX600 a good choice for an acoustic-electric guitar. I suggest you go check this bad boy out.
Every single pickup on this Godin XTSA is awesome in its own right, but the best part of it all is dialing ina combination of the two. By virtue of its quality, it gives plenty of power, possessing a wonderful sounding high end cutting through, which makes it possible for you to hear it over the keyboard and the bass. With this electric guitar, you can get a beautiful acoustic sound and a really fat and great sound as well.
Bridges and Tailpieces – These two parts of the electric guitar work in unison to control the tone and playability of the guitar. The bridge is mounted on the lower portion of the guitar. The strings are routed over the bridge before ending in the tailpiece. Bridges help to tune the strings of varying length, thickness and metals and they allow easy adjustment of the string length.

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Pedals that fit this description usually end up being more of a problem than anything else, but that’s not the case with Behringer. We get rudimentary but functional controls, which allow you to dial in a decent variety of reverb effects. Same goes for shaping said reverb. You have a certain amount of maneuvering space to work with, which might not seem like a lite when you put this thing next to a boutique model.

For any venue, it's important to bring along the right amp. A huge amp in a tiny club is not only overkill; it's also extra setup work that you can avoid altogether with a smaller combo amp. On the flipside, a little amp in a big theatre could mean that some of the audience won't even hear you. Take your time deciding what the best option is for you.
OK, our math isn't so great, so we've gone ahead and included an 11th amp in this list of 10. Although it's way too soon to be declared "iconic," PRS Guitars' brand-new Sonzera series of amps have been hot topics in gear land since they were introduced at the 2017 Winter NAMM Show. Let's just call them "instant classics." Featuring a rugged steel chassis, custom transformers and road-ready construction, each Sonzera model delivers serious tone with maximum reliability.
Pitch correction/vocal effects: Pitch correction effects use signal-processing algorithms to re-tune faulty intonation in a vocalist's performance [96] or create unusual vocoder-type vocal effects. One of the best known examples of this is Autotune, a software program and effect unit which can be used to both correct pitch (it moves a pitch to the nearest semitone), and add vocal effects. Some stompbox-style vocal pedals contain multiple effects, such as reverb and pitch correction.

In some modern valve effects, the "dirty" or "gritty" tone is actually achieved not by high voltage, but by running the circuit at voltages that are too low for the circuit components, resulting in greater non-linearity and distortion. These designs are referred to as "starved plate" configurations, and result in an "amp death" sound.[citation needed]
Ok, whoever downvoted me needs to explain their reasoning, since I clearly laid out my reasoning. The person said they're interested in punk/rock/experimental, and there's no possible way you can tell me that a multi-fx pedal is better than a Big Muff and/or a DD3 delay. I will laugh in your face and point if you suggest such a thing. You could get both pedals for the price of any multi effect pedal, they hold their value, and they sound great. If you don't like a Muff, whatever, swap it out for a Rat. – Dan Gayle Aug 1 '14 at 17:39
In the Guitar Setup course, the third DVD is devoted to acoustic guitar setup. Acoustics are very, very different than electric guitars, when you get right down into the mechanics of them, and as such they truly do need a section of their own in any guitar setup guide. You’ll learn how to setup the action and intonation properly on your acoustic, as well as many other tips and tricks that will help you keep it in top working order.
The slide part on that track was quite difficult to simulate, but again, the guy I have playing in my band, that I've been playing with for a while, can do it, and he and my son are the only two guys I know that play it right. Recently, I had Ronnie Wood playing with me, and he did a good job with it. I think if you have your head on it, it can be done.

Here at Dave’s Guitar Shop we are proud to have a staff of world class Guitar and Amp technicians. Be it simple guitar setups, restrings, grafting on broken headstocks or restoring timeless classics our techs work at the highest quality. With a shared experience of over 50 years and access to one of the largest collections of historic guitars for reference you can rest assured that your repair or restoration will be completed accurately and with great care and precision.
The epic storylines, adrenaline-pumping action and explosive thrills are back. The Fallout franchise returns with Fallout 4. Grab your controller and get ready to dive back into the enveloping storyline of this legendary series. Get ready to return to the epic, award-winning franchise with Fallout 4. This newest chapter brings an all-new open-world environment to life, and has been created by Bethesda Game Studios, creators of Game-of-the-Year-award winners Fallout 3 and The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim. Will you be prepared for the next Fallout installment?
Solid body guitars were the next step in guitar development, with Leo Fender creating a modest instrument called the Broadcaster, which was then rebranded as the Telecaster. The Stratocaster came later and, in addition to the changes in the pickups, included contours in the body that made the guitar more streamlined and easier to play while standing up. Today, the Stratocaster is still the most iconic electric guitar shape; it’s associated with guitar wizard Jimi Hendrix, and many beginners end up with a Stratocaster-style guitar. Gibson introduced their own line of solid body guitars, the considerably swankier Les Paul.

You may also be looking to get into individual guitar effects pedals right away, and maybe you’re wondering what are some of the popular overdrive, dynamic, or modulation pedals. If that’s the case, please stay tuned for our upcoming series of articles where we explore individual categories of pedals. In those articles, we will discuss price ranges, popular pedals, and the pedals that your favorite artists use.

Today, Van Halen is one of rock’s most influential and imitated innovators. As unpredictable and flamboyant as Hendrix, Van Halen has had an unmeasurable impact on the guitar community. By the mid Eighties, his self-described “brown” sound, over-the-top techniques (including two-handed tapping), and revolutionary trem-bar effects inspired a generation of aspiring guitarists who bought the one-pickup, one-volume-knob, Floyd Rose–equipped Strat-style guitars that Van Halen made famous.

As an acoustic guitar player, and not a very good one at that, I'm always looking for some advantages, and by advantages I mean something that will make me sound better, not necessarily play better. So when I heard about a device that can add distortion, or reverb, or echo effects to an acoustic instrument, without needing to plug in to an external amp, I didn't believe it until I saw/heard for myself.
DISCLAIMER: Hoshino owns the copyright to all of the catalogs scanned in here. This website has NO RELATIONSHIP with the Hoshino Gakki Group and makes no claims to ownership of the linked scans. These catalog scans are provided solely for personal academic/research purposes, so that collectors and others who own one or more of these fantastic guitars can properly identify the model and year of manufacture.
Kay was indeed one of the earliest American manufacturers of electric guitars. Things progressed, and by 1934, the company was officially known as the "Kay Musical Instrument Company". The company became larger and more successful over the years, leading to the addition of a new factory in Elk Grove Village, Illinois in 1964. But somehow by 1965, the company had hit rough times and was bought by Seeburg, a jukebox manufacturer that sold Kay to Valco in 1967.

: Decca's flat-top acoustic guitars seem to usually sell for $50-75. They're not highly regarded because (a) acoustic guitars don't have the collecto-mania of electric guitars, except for certain brands (Martin, Gibson, etc.), and (b) the tonewoods Decca used were inferior to solid spruce as used by the aforementioned makers. Indeed, Decca often used plywood, which doesn't yield very good tone in an acoustic.


Well, that’s not exactly what he said. Although, it would seem that way, if you take time to browse the company's Facebook photos. Every guitar the company makes is truly enticing and a work of art. Moreover, the quality of each instrument is astoundingly good. Take the Xuul Katan VI. While the guitar is certainly unique, it also boasts a strong specs list:
Every year we bring a new opening act on tour with us, and every year I have the harsh task of going on stage after some of the finest players in the business. This summer’s tour was no exception. With Montgomery Gentry in the support slot of the Toby Keith Biggest and Baddest tour, I had my work cut out for me. Two of the best axe slingers the music scene has to offer—Frank Bowers and Bo “two-timechampion” Garrett—have some of the greatest chops and sounds on the circuit today.
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SOLD OUT ...Here is yet another GREAT Sounding and PLAYING Nippon Gakki 000 Red Label made in the famous Nippon Gakki plant in Japan. Absolutely surprising Booming tone from a small package who would have guessed these sound so great... This one is in excellent vintage condition that is to say all the important structural components of this guitar are in good shape that is to say that this guitar has GOOD BONES…. NO CRACKs its neck angle alignment is still good to this day its top is for the most part flat and its Bridge is nice and tight to its top … it appears to be a solid two piece center seam Sitka Spruce top and its cross braced like an old Martin , This guitar is over 40+++ years old and has been played and is not mint of course it has its share of superficial dings and drinks but nothing that can deter its ability to play great and sound great and look Fantastic with its Vintage Amber top and lush PATINA its a classic 000 that has THE SOUND!…. When we received it I loved the sound immediately it was pretty deep and rich sounding for such a small guitar with old cruddy strings I was thinking but like many of these Old Yamaha’s the action was too high so I did have to do our full JVGuitars UPGRADE set-up to it so I stripped its old strings off..its cheap plastic nut & saddle and bridge pins tossed to garbage, its fingerboard was remarkably clean and rut free and the pearloid inlays look great vivid with that patina of 40+ years and the frets were not bad with just minimal groves so I adjusted true rod -leveled -dressed & polished the frets, cleaned fingerboard and Lemon oiled the rosewood fingerboard and the bridge which is crack free as well.. all is looking and feeling great now.. Then using hyde glue installed a Martin Bon nut and a compensated bone saddle was fit following up with a quality set of fancy Rosewood bridge pins with Abalone and brass ring they fit sung for optimum tone resonance transfer. This has made a markable improvement in its resonance and its a bit louder now too SWEET sounding now! When we got this one it has a small chip at sound hole just under the fat bass E string looks like an aggressive finger style did the damage and was at the sound hole edge and I have successfully repaired this same sort of spot before so I wasn’t worried this one was nick named “Chip" for this reason I since repaired the spot using the professional woodworking Mohawk system of melting in a resin bar with jot knife that was spruce color then graining the repair and top coating brush tip matching lacquer to the repair spot area to blend…. its not really noticeable anymore now and is a non issue. I did notice that someone changed the tuners for other old Yamaha FG tuners tiny holes didn't line up but this makes no difference in performance what so ever and is not even noticeable they are Yamaha tuners. Overall structurally this guitar is still in top condition players and it really has that beautiful vintage 40+++ year old Martin like Patina aura about it.... i its VINTAGE PATINA and character is absolutely beautiful this is in the eye of the beholder of course but if your vintage lover you’ll appreciate this instrument for what she is. This Old guitar plays like a $ MUCH more expensive guitar any day... People of all walks of life worldwide on the net are comparing the sound of theirs to a Martin it take years for a guitar’s tone to naturally open up like this guitar has set up and plays and sounds amazing and the price is right Questions or to buy it contact Joe at: jvguitars@gmail.com .

Processed Pitch Shifts: Few pitch-shifting algorithms are transparent enough to allow you to transpose anything by more than a couple of semitones without obvious side-effects. If what you're processing is going through an amp modeller, however, you can get away with much more radical changes. You can even do effective swoops and dives in pitch by progressively increasing the amount of pitch-shifting you apply to a note, and pitch changes of an octave or more can sound good, although they probably won't sound natural at these extremes. Sam Inglis
Using, or not using, some piece of gear doesn’t make a player more genuine, harder, tougher, more real, more natural, or better than players who do. What does make people those things is the honest pursuit of their art, the skills and experience earned from practice and performing, their genuine expression, feeling, and the ability to play something that has an effect on the listener. All of this is MUCH more difficult and real than simply choosing not to use a piece of gear.

In the 1950's company called Don Noble and Co, was founded in the 1950’s by Don Noble, a well-known accordion player and entrepreneur.  He began by importing Italian made musical instruments, mainly accordions, in an era when the "stomach Steinway" was very popular and accordions were being sold door-to-door, and accordion academies were common in most larger cities. But he also imported guitars under the Noble brand name.

Taylor, Martin, Gibson all great production brands... Which is better comes done to what you like sonically, visually and of course the feel in your hands. It is also difficult to compare one brand versus another unless you are comparing similar designs using the same tone woods and in the same price range. Anyone espousing one is better than the other without doing this is not being honest with themselves. I own a Martin and two Taylors, all are great and have different voices and feels... Even the 2 Taylors are very different in sound and looks. In the end I vote for Taylor because I like the neck carve and feel that the looks and build quality are a bit better in the $3K - $4 price range. If your looking for something in a lower $500 - $1, 000range you probably should be considering Yamaha or Takamine. Though in the end you get what you pay for.
Description: Guitar Type: Bass - Body: Ash - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Nut Width: 42.5mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: Medium - # of Strings: 4 - Scale Length: 34" (86cm) - Headstock: 2+2 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome - Pickups: CAP Double Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Natural, Black

Chorus – a frequency-based effect that makes your guitar sound like more than one guitar is playing. The effect is created by doubling your guitar tone one or more times (using a short delay) and then varying the pitch of the double slightly up and down against the dry guitar tone. Chorus pedals have at least two controls: Depth and Rate. The Depth controls the lowest and highest pitches that the doubled tone varies between. The Rate controls the speed that the doubled tone moves up and down in pitch.


Although most of this article deals with miking regular guitar amps or using various DI options, there are also some great sounds to be had using very low-power guitar amps — even battery-powered ones. You can see these in music shops, often designed to look like miniature versions of Marshall, Fender or other top-name amplifiers. While some sound pretty grim, others sound surprisingly musical and raunchy. Obviously they don't have a lot of low end, but if you mic them closely to exploit whatever proximity effect your cardioid mic has to offer, and use EQ cut to tame the inevitable mid-range resonance, you can get some really great sounds. Best of all is that these things are cheap, so you can afford to experiment, and they also come in useful for their intended purpose, which is practising, something we all tend to do too little of when we get caught up in recording technology.
Locking vibrato: Often referred to as a Floyd Rose bridge after its inventor, like the two-point rocking tremolo, it provides individual intonation and height adjustments. It rocks on two bolts in the top of the guitar and is spring-loaded. The difference is that it clamps down on the strings at both the bridge and head nut. The result is rock-solid tuning, even when the vibrato arm is used radically.

Guitar culture was pervasive, whether in movie houses (“Karate Kid” Ralph Macchio outdueling Steve Vai in the 1986 movie “Crossroads”; Michael J. Fox playing a blistering solo in “Back to the Future” and co-starring with Joan Jett in 1987’s rock-band drama “Light of Day”) or on MTV and the older, concert films featuring the Who and Led Zeppelin on seemingly endless repeats.
The C7’s back, fretboard and bridge are all rosewood, which makes for a stunning color contrast with the spruce. The strings are Savarez Cristal Corum, in high tension (500CJ), but according to one professional guitarist, the action is very easy no matter the tension, so a beginner should have no problems starting out on this model. Even someone who’s played a good while but simply wants something they can “jam” on whilst out on a recreational road trip, or play on a small-gig basis, will love the Cordoba C7 spruce-top.
The American David Schecter founded his company in 1976 in order to produce spare parts for guitars already available (especially Fender and Gibson). But since 1979 the brand has been manufacturing its own guitars. In the beginning they had only Fender-based models but nowadays, Schecter guitars are clearly conceived for hairy players (but not exclusively), with models like the Hellraiser or the Damien. Among their most famous users are Billy Corgan, Eddie Vedder, Pete Townshend, Mark Knopfler, Matthew Bellamy... And the brand also presented its first amps at the latest NAMM show.
If there is one body shape out there that everyone will recognize, it is this one. In terms of finish, Fender chose a lacquer clear coat to show off the natural wood instead of their usual choice, and it looks pretty awesome (of course there's a 3 tone sunburst and olympic white too). Made of ash, this particular Strat offers a U-shaped maple neck with a maple fretboard that is bolted onto the body. In terms of pickups, we have a set of three single coils belonging to their vintage line. These come with Alnico magnets, giving you that classic tone we all love so much. The hardware follows the canon as well. Here we have Fender's well known synchronized tremolo bridge paired with a set of F tuners on the headstock.
I think Washburn is one of the best out there, From their A series, to HM to x series they all rock. I've had a a-10 since 1980 and it plays great! I have also got the reissues still great quality over the years. The only issue I've seen is Washburn's commitment to catch/keep some artist. Either they can't keep um or they don't want to. Can't see it being the later. Its very difficult to try one of their pieces out as their are very few stores that even stock them. In the 80's early 90s they were everywhere, now?

Rocksmith displays six horizontal lines at the bottom of the screen that represent the guitar's six strings—E, A, D, G, B, and E—and show you which ones to play. The game color-codes them to try and make it a little easier to comprehend all this visual information at once, but there's no way around it—it takes quite a bit of practice and memorization to get used to this. You really need to practice to the point that you know intuitively which color belongs to which string. Otherwise you'll always be looking down to pick out which string you should be playing, and will never be able to keep up with the song.

Great info. I found an interesting connection when researching a recently-acquired Intermark Cipher, as it's said here to be a Teisco, yet it bears a close resemblance to a model of Pleasant, which was credited to the obscure Shinko Musical Company. I wish i could post pics, but essentially, both have the Teisco-like headstock, identical pickups with off-white covers and square pegs, body shape is virtually identical except for the upper cutaway having a slightly different contour, the Pleasant having one more pickup and larger pickguard, both having switches above the pickups. I came upon a drowinginguitars video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8-vhvYBy6os) describing in the video description how Kawai (-Teisco?) bought the "Pleasant Guitar Co." (Shinko?). This video isn't the model I have, my Cipher resembles the Pleasant sel-220.
I believe that the best electric guitar amp for beginners is a straightforward combo amp, represented by the amps on this list. Avoid the bells and whistles of the fancier, feature-rich combo amps until you’re confident you have a solid set of playing chops. Then you can either move up to a modeling amp, or start adding effects pedals to your rig. The great thing about all the amps profiled above is that they provide a solid base for what ever effects you want to add to the mix later on down the road.
Gibson Les Paul specifications during 1958–60 varied from year to year and also from guitar to guitar. Typical 1958 Les Paul Standard necks had a thicker “club-shaped” neck, thinner frets and lower fret height, which changed during the course of 1959 to develop into typical 1960 necks with a thinner cross-section and wider, higher frets. Les Paul Customs from the same period had totally different frets and were referred to as “The Fretless Wonder”, which were designed for jazz guitarists with thick flat-wound strings.[note 7][note 6]

Acurious phenomenon that ac-companies certain guitar compa-nies is an inability to translate success from one medium to another. For instance, Martin has never been able to transfer its reputation for high-quality acoustics to electric guitars. And Fender has never been able, on its own, to really succeed in marketing acoustic guitars. Instead, it purchased Guild.
Acoustic amplifiers are intended for acoustic guitars and other acoustic instruments, especially for the way these instruments are used in relatively quiet genres such as folk and bluegrass. They are similar to keyboard amplifiers, in that they have a relatively flat frequency response with minimal coloration. To produce this relatively "clean" sound, these amplifiers often have powerful amplifiers (providing up to 800 watts RMS), to provide additional "Headroom" and prevent unwanted distortion. Since an 800 watt amplifier built with standard Class AB technology is heavy, some acoustic amplifier manufacturers use lightweight Class D amplifiers, which are also called "switching amplifiers."

I inherited a guitar and am looking for any information I can about it. It is a Kent model 533 Videocaster. I have no idea when they were made or what this one might be worth. It is a solid body, but I know next to nothing about guitars so I am not sure what other info might be needed. It needs to be tuned/serviced and possibly needs a little restoration, but otherwise it works and is not in horrible shape. Any info would be appreciated.
Softer Delays: I'll usually have at least a couple of delays as auxiliary effects in a rock or pop mix, but I often find that bringing the general level of the delay as high as I want it makes any transients stand out too much. When I'm sending single notes on a clean electric guitar to a delay line, say, I tend to want to hear a wash of sound, not the rhythmic 'CHA-Cha-cha-cha-cha' of a repeated note attack. For this reason, I'll often put a gate or expander before a delay, with an attack time set to 10ms or so. This is enough to 'chop off' any abrupt transients, and makes the delay sound much smoother. Sam Inglis
The effect also took Nashville by storm in the 70’s as well and was a favorite of Waylon Jennings’ music and others. What the effect does is mix the guitars signal with a slightly delayed reproduction of the signal. This delay shifts the waveform a few milliseconds thus producing the out of phase sound. It then uses a LFO (low frequency oscillator) to control the sweeping effect of the phaser. This pedal is key to the classic VH guitar sound!
A compressor acts as an automatic volume control, progressively decreasing the output level as the incoming signal gets louder, and vice versa. It preserves the note's attack rather than silencing it as with an Envelope Volume pedal. This adjustment of the volume for the attack and tail of a note evens out the overall volume of an instrument. Compressors can also change the behaviour of other effects, especially distortion. when applied toward the guitar, it can provide a uniformed sustained note; when applied to instruments with a normally short attack, such as drums or harpsichord, compression can drastically change the resulting sound. Another kind of compressor is the optical compressor which uses a light source (LED or lamp) to compress the signal.
I just purchased a Lyle acoustic guitar in excellent condition. It's Serial # 204 and Model # 712. The top of the guitar says Lyle with a gold cross-like design up by the tuning keys. It looks like it was painted on the wood by the manufacture. The top tuning key head and neck are the color of milk chocolate with pearl-type fret inlays. The body of the guitar is a light tangerine color showing the natural wood grain under the clear lacquer finish. It has a dark chocolate bridge, and a black pick guard with a white pearl engraved inlay of a floral sprig or vine-type design. There is a set of three circles around the center opening (1 thin black line, a wide band of black and white lines and another thin black line. It has light tangerine and milk to dark chocolate stripped sides and back which is the natural wood grain showing through the clear lacquer finish. JAPAN is engraved on the back of the tuning key head in back.
Our original hand made guitar we’ve been building for 32 years that competes with guitars 3 times its price, the 50 Series has all the prerequisites of the traditional American guitar. Compared regularly to Martin D18 and Taylor 5 Series, but with easier playability and a lower price since you’re buying direct from our workshop in Lincoln, Nebraska. For 2018 Denny added a more detailed ivory zipper stripe binding and installed the new 2018 Fishman Isys Plus electronics system to make this guitar truly special. Shipped direct from Denny’s hands to yours. 100% money back guarantee, lifetime warranty.

For those who like that 1950s style Gretsch sound, you’ll appreciate the Gretsch Dual-Coil humbuckers which can go from glass like cleans to smooth low growls to all out riff worthy dirt when you add some distortion to your amp. The single cutaway design and maple neck with gloss polyester finish make it extremely comfortable to play too. A guitar beginners and professional musicians alike, can enjoy.
Clean or replace switches. To clean switches use solvent such as contact cleaner in a spray into the toggle itself, you may also use other solvents such as WD-40, always work the solvent around by using the switch as indented. To replace switches first obtain a proper switch that applies with your guitar, then soldering in accordingly. Work in a well-ventilated space to avoid harmful fumes from solder or solvents.
The Yamaha LL16 gives you high-end features for a lot less money, starting off with its solid Engelmann spruce top and solid rosewood back and sides. This all solid body results in richer and more detailed acoustic tone, something that you will have to pay top dollars for from other acoustic brands. It also sports a slightly smaller body that gives it an elegant appeal, adding to its already favorable affordable price and top-tier specs.

My Les Paul never did sound quite right. It was always off somehow. I discovered it had the same problem like yours with the intonation being off the scale. Once I followed your guide, I discovered the neck adjustment was far too loose, and gapped it properly. Shazaam, the intonation problem disappeared, and now it plays like butter with all the notes dead on! U R the MAN!
I am running the TimeLine, Mobius, Big Sky and Flint along with a few JHS drive pedals and a POG. I have a 5 channel true bypass looper and use a DMC-3XL and TNT tap to control my MIDI devices. In the past I have had all of my drives and POG in the 5 channel looper. But I have reduced significantly the number of drives I am running. I run a SP compressor and an EM-Drive at the beginning of my chain that are my always on pedals & I’m not sure I need them in my loop. I also cut down to 2 drive pedals (JHS Double Barrel & Jetter Gold Standard). Would I be able to run the TimeLine, Big Sky, and Mobius through the bypass looper and leave them always on but bypass through that? Should/Do I need to use a TRS to do this run since I am going straight into the in/out signals? I’m trying to do some experimenting but wanted to get your opinion as well.

The JEM70V is a Steve Vai signature model based on early JEMs he helped create. It comes with 3 different DiMarzio Evolution pickups that were handpicked by Steve Vai himself to give him the various tones that he needs for his expressive solo work, and intricate rhythm textures. The body is crafted from basswood, while the low profile 5-pc Maple/Walnut and 24-fret, 25.5" scale length rosewood fingerboard provide the fast playability expected of the brand. Other features include the Edge tremolo, 1.69" nut width, tree of life inlay, and it comes wrapped in Seafoam green finish.
Reverb pedals come with all kinds of different layouts. Even so, some of the controls are virtually universal. The first one we would like to mention is the dry/wet knob. This control is what you use to mix your original signal and the effect itself. When the knob is turned all the way to dry, there will be zero reverb present in the signal. As you move towards wet, the amount of reverb increases.
Players perceived a loss of the initial high quality of Fender guitars after the company was taken over by CBS in 1965. As a result, the late-1960s Stratocasters with the large “CBS” headstock and (from the mid 1970s) the 3-bolt necked models (instead of the conventional 4 bolts) with the “Bullet” truss-rod and the MicroTilt adjustment system fell out of fashion. However, many blues-influenced artists of the late 1960s soon adopted the Stratocaster as their main instrument, reviving the guitar’s popularity. Also, so-called ‘pre-CBS’ Stratocasters are, accordingly, quite sought-after and expensive due to the perceived difference in quality even compared with contemporary post-CBS models. In recent times, some Stratocasters manufactured from 1954 to 1958 have sold for more than US$175,000.
By the time After The Rain came out, the blues critics created enough of a backlash that it started affecting sales. Muddy must have realized that the records were upsetting his blues fanbase which had been loyal to him for over twenty years. Perhaps he feared he'd lose them forever if he stayed in this direction and that the young fanbase he had now might not stick with him as long. It wasn't until 1970 and after a more normal electric blues record (Fathers and Sons) that Muddy started talking badly about Electric Mud and then only mildly at first. Muddy released some great records in the rest of his lifetime, but he never experimented much with his music again.
This is my new, energetic positive corporate music track with confident bright mood, which contains happy optimistic piano and synth solo, driving electric guitars, drums and live bass. This track can be used as a motivational musical background for business websites, computer games, tv or radio jingles, advertising and commercial youtube video, etc. Enjoy!

This final trick is pretty cool for live use because these effects are very efficient, which means that you can have several tracks of 'racks' without straining your CPU. Go to the Mixer tab at File/Preferences/Project, and check 'Enable Solo on Selected Track'. Solo a track, and now all you need to do to call up a new sound is select a track, and the Solo will 'move' to that track. The change from one sound to another is instantaneous. Now it's time to amaze your audience!    
Overdrive pedals are very different to distortion pedals, and without getting too technical, they drive/push your guitar signal harder rather than changing the sound completely like a distortion pedal does. An overdrive pedal retains a lot of the original sound of your guitar and amp but pushes the amplifier harder to give it a heavier, thicker signal. They’re ideally used with valve/tube amps as they push the tubes to their limit and allow them to bring out the more natural distortion that tube amps are so renowned for. Incidentally, we wrote about the best tube amps for home use here, but if you wanted some great practice amps, we also wrote about them here too!

Now, let’s get to the amplifier. If you’re a traditionalist, this means you aren’t using some kind of high fidelity audio reproduction system to expose that weak signal for the anemic, naked thing that your tone really is at this point. You’re like the rest of us, depending on that signal working with a classic tube guitar amp to shape your sound and help you get awesome and loud. Well, that amp has got a host of things going on. The signal hits the high-impedance input and visits the preamplifier. See, the “natural” sound coming straight from our guitars, as big and tough and old school special as we might think think it is, really isn’t strong enough to directly power the power amplifier. It’s depending on a series of fairly intricate pre-amplifer gain stages to give the Popeye signal the spinach it needs before any filtering or equalization (oh, they don’t use them? Really? What do those knobs marked ‘bass’ and ‘treble’ say? Just because someone leaves them at “5” doesn’t mean they aren’t in use). It then may visit a phase inverter before hitting the tube power amp section, which finally gives you the high current signal to cause those speakers to go back and forth.
In terms of the Teisco brand, the moving force was Jack Westheimer and his W.M.I. company in Chicago. According to published accounts, Westheimer began importing Teisco-made Kingstons in around 1961, although these were not promoted in the trade press until the beginning of ’64. It was this connection that would make Teisco the dominant powerhouse it was to become.
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The Line 6 POD Farm program is famous for its amp simulation, however many users have realized that the quality of its modeled effects are equally superb. Some even use the POD Farm strictly for its effects! It has a huge collection of FX - up to 94 - and it modeled some of the most popular stompboxes including the MXR Phase 90, ProCo Rat, Uni-Vibe, Arbiter Fuzz Face and Big Muff Pi. It also includes modeled versions of old analog devices like the EP-1 Echoplex. Setting up is a breeze with its simple carousel-style interface, which lets you visualize your signal chain. Current Retail Price $49.00
click on the red highlighted portion of instrument that you want to download then click win 32 for 32 bit operating system..then copy the dll file and paste it into c:/program files 86 :/imageline /flstudio/plugins/vst and paste here refresh the fl studio by going add then channel and then more plugins and start scanning ..find that instrument by name and enjoy

For the hobbyist guitarist this is a great 'bang for the buck' investment. It has practice tools for the beginner but solid tones for the advanced guitarist. For home use, maybe even a garage band it's perfectly adequate. If I were a more serious musician doing gigs with high end audio going to the audience, I'd be investing more than a hundred bucks in my stage rig.
If straightforward lessons aren't what you're looking for, fear not: Rocksmith 2014 tries to refresh your picking skills through games that veer into the ridiculous. I tried out Return to Castle Chordead, which revels in delightfully bad NES-style graphics (the game challenges the player to zap the hungry undead by playing the correct chords). Scales Racer—which, you guessed it, teaches the major and minor scales—puts the player in a car fleeing the police. Pick the right notes and you zip between lanes, eluding the fuzz.
If you've ever seen an electric guitar, you'll have noticed that most of them have solid bodies that are thinner (and sometimes much smaller) than those of acoustic guitars. Although most electric guitars are wooden, the material from which they're made is not critical. As George Beauchamp (pioneer of the modern electric guitar) pointed out in his patent back in the 1930s: "The body may be varied considerably in size, shape and construction, and may be constructed of various materials without departing from the spirit of the invention"; his original design suggested the body could be made from "a simple integral casting of metal such as aluminum." Early electric guitars were made from all kinds of materials, including molded Bakelite (one of the first plastics) and sheets of soldered brass.
And its not just about the looks, because this affordable guitar comes with a solid spruce top with mahogany back and sides. This means that you are getting a mid-tier instrument for the price of an entry level guitar, a beginner guitar that will grow with you as your ears become sharper and you learn to play better. Because of its conventional build, this acoustic has a warm and balanced tone that can sound bland to some, but it should make for a great starting point for those who are still discovering their own musical voice.

i personally like epiphone/gibsonn a lot. if you are searching to BUY an electric guitar then you should go for your preference. go to guitar center, and play some guitars. find one that feels good to you. remember, the strings in there have been used a million times, so don't make that a factor. feel the guitar. along the sides of the neck, are the frets sticking off the neck a little? making it rough? its all about your preference. also it depends on what style you play blues is definatly Les Paul rock, probably an SG country, probably fender, i don't know much about that genre bluegrass type music is probably a hollow body electric.
Despite their small stature, some of the smaller amps on the market still boast features you’d expect to see on much larger models. For example, many include some degree of tone shaping and equalization. This can take the form of a single knob dedicated to presence or even a three-band EQ capable of managing bass, mid, and treble. If you know you want to route your little amp through a larger speaker, or your sound restrictions are so great that your sessions are limited to headphones, you’ll want an amp that boasts a headphone output. These are sometimes standard 3.5mm headphone jacks, though some larger models boast ¼-inch outs.

I think I understand the value of not being tied to those things so your own technique can flourish -- not relying on anything, really. I think that it's cool to keep an eye on your purism sometimes. I'm glad I can pick up an acoustic guitar, and if it's not sounding too good, I just put it into a tuning until it does. I also have an appreciation for the almost novelty factor of being able to hit a couple of switches and go from one amp sound to another.
As cool as these little amps are, they only have a fraction of the features you’ll find in their larger, more powerful big brothers. But, they are more than enough for a newbie to get started on, and they meet and exceed the criteria I outlined in the beginning as what to look for in a good starter amp: They sound good, they are flexible with good overdrive, multiple channels, solid EQ sections and some even have built-in effects.
As an example of pre-distortion EQ, Eddie Van Halen places a 6-band MXR EQ pedal before the Marshall amplifier head (pre-distortion EQ). Slash places a Boss GE-7, a 7-band EQ pedal, before his Marshall amp. This technique is similar to placing a Wah pedal before the amp's preamp distortion and leaving the Wah pedal positioned part-way down, sometimes mentioned as "fixed wah," (pre-distortion EQ), along with adjusting the amp's tone controls (post-distortion EQ).
A looper pedal or "phrase looper" allows a performer to record and later replay a phrase or passage from a song. Loops can be created on the spot during a performance or they can be pre-recorded. Some units allow a performer to layer multiple loops. The first loop effects were created with reel-to-reel tape using a tape loop. High-end boutique tape loop effects are still used by some studios who want a vintage sound. Digital loop effects recreate this effect using an electronic memory.

Hybrid amps are a strange beast. As the name suggests, they combine multiple technologies to produce a unique hybrid amp experience. They may use the digital front end of a modeling amp with a tube-based power stage, or a tube preamp with a solid-state power amp. The benefits of this style of lesser-seen amp is that you can sometimes get the best of both worlds, with the awesome tone of a tube amp, but with the processing power of a solid-state amp. These amps tend to be cheaper than tube amps and generally easier to maintain.


From top to bottom, this Hummingbird creates a buzz. Whatever your preference in size, colour, tone and playing style, it’s difficult to avoid picking this Cherry Sunburst up. It’s such a simple guitar to play that it’s rare to ever feel like you’re incapable of striking the right chord - especially on a neck that’s just 12” in radius. While the traditionally ornate decoration and blushing finish have been lovingly retained, this modern Montana incarnation offers a discrete LR Baggs Element VTC system for plug-in power. It is unlike many we have seen and produces one of the best sounds we’ve heard from an electric acoustic. Throw in the pleasure of playing such a superb guitar and it’s tough to say anything bad about the Gibson Montana Hummingbird Cherry Sunburst.  
The pickups are made with mismatched coils and Alnico magnets and are wax potted to eliminate the ear-splitting squeal during high-gain playing.  The pickups are independently routed through volume and tone controls and the 3-system toggle switch.  You can activate single coil pickups with the push-pull method found on each of the volume controls for coil splitting.
This is a guitar that feels alot like a pre-CBS Fender strat. It has all the tones. If you didn't already know, G&L stands for George and Leo. As in LEO FENDER. The headstock is a little different, but the pickups are great, not Noiseless but definitely not NOISY either. Mine is a physically heavy guitar. It sounds heavy too - in a good way. Still, I can get all the tones I need from all the pickups. I believe that the neck pickup is superior to the Mexican Made Fender Strat. The pearloid pickguard is pretty. These Indonesian made strats sound great. They're made in the same factory as the Squiers but definitely sound different.
New Born has a great riff that starts at about 1:00. It is repeated a few more times during the rest of the song. To play this riff like Matthew Bellamy does, you'll need to tune down one of your strings. Click the button below to find out which string and how to tune it. Oh, and if you look closely at the video there are some clues there for how to play it!
Although Yamaha are a better known Japanese musical instrument company, Ibanez stands out from the crowd in rock guitars, not just in Japan - but the world over - with a number of big name guitarists such as Joe Satriani, Steve Vai, and Paul Gilbert having signature models. They originally built their American presence in the 1960s on the back of Gibson and Fender copies, however the RG series introduced in the 1980s was a more original design, based on Steve Vai's JEM Universal, and became one of the biggest selling metal guitars of that period and beyond.

Great Gretsch "pumpkin orange color", and a great sounding, and playing import reissue. Knobs replaced with dice, and a couple of decals added. Has factory installed Epiphone labeled Bigsby trem-tail piece, no longer available on this model. Chrome p-90 pick-ups. Guitar, and original hard-shell case in like new cond. New list on these is $1195.00 with original hard shell  case.
Steve's a great technician. He's done a great job on every single guitar I've brought to him. Helpful, easy going, friendly, and extremely good at what he does. After the first setup he did for me I stopped looking for other repair shops in town. He's just too good and is a pleasure to do business with. I hesitate giving 5 star reviews, but anyone who can turn a nigh-unplayable Dano baritone into a gigging instrument deserves it. Highly recommended.
ZPS (ZERO POINT SYSTEM) OF ZR TREMOLO Ressort principal Butée Bloc de vibrato Tige d'arrêt Une fois la guitare correctement accordée, réglez le ressort principal pour faire en sorte que la tige d'arrêt soit en contact avec le bloc de vibrato et la butée. Si la tige d'arrêt n'est pas en contact avec le bloc de vibrato et la butée, réglez la vis de réglage du ressort principal jusqu'à...

There is something special about musical instruments of a certain age. Guitars built from the mid 1950s until the late 1970s are generally held in high esteem; techniques and materials, particularly pre-1970 were vastly superior to today's 'mass-produced' standards. But is a vintage guitar really much different to a modern day equivalent? People often say wood is wood, but this is simply not the case. Centuries old trees that were regularly harvested for guitar manufacture in the 1950s are now protected, and it is these old trees with close grains and unbeatable tonal qualities that make the very best guitars. With rainforests rapidly diminishing their protection can only be a good thing. But it does mean that good quality older guitars, perhaps with a few modern upgrades can make some of the very best instruments available. What's more, much of the painstaking attention to detail lavished upon fine old jazz guitars by special order/custom departments and aimed at serious guitarists has been replaced by the continual churning out of 'limited editions', aimed at serious collectors. Whether these rare, but ultimately not-so-special guitars will be quite so desirable in 30 years time remains to be seen.


The Vintage El Dorado Leather Guitar Strap is meticulously hand-tooled in traditional Western motifs by leather artisans with decades of experience. Each strap is an individual and unique work of craftsmanship that you'll be proud to display on your guitar. The designs date back to late 19th century Western leatherwork, used extensively in the decoration of saddles, saddlebags, belts and holsters.
Meanwhile, in Sepulveda, Thomas Organ, after importing JMI's British-made amps for a short period in 1964–65, began to produce a line of mostly solid-state amplifiers in the United States that carried the Vox name and cosmetic stylings. With some assistance from Dick Denney, these amps effectively paralleled JMI's own transistorised amplifiers but were different from the British and Italian made Voxes in sound and reliability. To promote their equipment, Thomas Organ built the Voxmobile, a Ford roadster dressed up to look like a Phantom guitar, complete with a Continental organ and several "Beatle" amplifiers. Despite the huge marketing effort, Thomas Organ's Vox products did much to damage the reputation of Vox in the North American market for many years. By 1968, the company had also marketed a line of Vox drum sets (actually made by a German drum company, known as Trixon), which included a kit that featured a conical-shaped bass (kick) drum, that looked more like a wastepaper basket left on its side, and another with a bass (kick) drum, that looked like a flat tire. Such gimmicks did not help sales, and by the early 1970s Vox's American presence was virtually nonexistent.

As we mentioned before, the first mass-produced solid body electric guitar was introduced in the early ‘50s as a way for guitar players to avoid getting that unwanted feedback that amplified hollow body electric guitars were infamous for. Today, there are countless solid body guitars to accommodate any type of player and price range—from beginner guitar players to seasoned pros playing genres spanning hard rock, country, blues, heavy metal, jazz, and more! Some of the most popular solid body electric guitars include the Fender Telecaster, the Fender Stratocaster, the Gibson Les Paul, the Gibson SG, the Ibanez RG, and the ESP Eclipse.
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