Gibson filed a lawsuit November 18, 2010 in Federal court, the Central District of California, against WowWee USA and their Paper Jamz battery operated guitar toys charging trademark infringement.[27][28] The lawsuit claimed the Paper Jamz toy guitars copied the looks of some of Gibson’s famous guitars, the Gibson Les Paul, the Gibson Flying V, the Gibson Explorer, and the Gibson SG. On December 21, 2010 Gibson was granted a request for an injunction against WowWee and retailers in the United States which were selling Paper Jamz guitars: WalMart, Amazon (company), Big Lots stores, Kmart Corporation, Target Corporation, Toys “R” Us, Walgreens, Brookstone, Best Buy, eBay, Toywiz.com, and Home Shopping Network (HSN)[29][30][31] The case was dismissed with prejudice (dismissed permanently) January 11, 2011 by Federal Judge R. Gary Klausner.[32][33]
Also shown in ’60s Bizarre Guitars, but not in the Teisco book photo, is a ca. 1954 Hawaiian Teisco EG-R which was sort of shaped like a Gibson and which had the same pickup as the J-1, with more elaborate symmetrical metal rocket shapes on the sides, housing the volume and tone controls. A chrome dome sat in front of the pickup between it and the dot-inlaid fingerboard. The head was stubby and rectangular. This was very “Moderne” looking, very Buck Rodgers.
Guitar amplifiers generally incorporate at least a few effects, the most basic being tone controls for bass and treble. There may be some form of "overdrive" control, where the preamplifier's output is increased to the point where the amplitude overloads the input of the power amplifier stage, causing clipping. In the 1970s, as effects pedals proliferated, their sounds were combined with tube amp distortion at lower, more controlled volumes by using power attenuators, such as Tom Scholz's Power Soak, as well as re-amplified dummy loads, such as Eddie Van Halen's use of dummy-load power resistor, post-power-tube effects, and a final solid-state amp driving the guitar speakers.
This is our top pick for the best dreadnought guitar under $500. It has the looks of something you’d see in a honky tonk bar. It is a really cool looking acoustic guitar. It is a classic with it’s sunburst color and decorated hummingbird pick guard. It is the more affordable version of the Gibson Hummingbird. It has a solid spruce top with mahogany back and sides. It also has a pickup so you can amplify it for gigs. Owners describe it as having a big sound with great playability. Nice low action will make playing much easier. The tapered neck is great for beginners and makes forming chords less difficult. See more pictures of this guitar here.
it has 3 lateral braces after the soundhole, 1 before, so I guess so. the saddle makes it so the truss is the only set up option. The action is high right now for me, so I hope a decent allen wrench will turn it and its not an old peice'o'poo worn out latter brace deal. when I looked for a "belly" it could have just been straight tilted over I guess and not looked the same.
For larger venues such as stadiums and outdoor music festivals, or for music genres that use bass instruments with an extended lower range and high stage volumes (e.g., heavy metal music, grunge, hardcore punk), bass players often use a more powerful amplifier (300 to 2000 watts or more) and one or more separate speaker cabinets (often called "cabs") in various combinations. Using a separate amplifier cabinet and speaker cabinets is colloquially referred to as a "bass stack". An example of the powerful, loud bass amplifier systems used in grunge is Alice in Chains bassist Mike Inez's setup. He uses four Ampeg SVT-2PRO amplifier heads, two of them plugged into four 1x18" subwoofer cabinets for the low register, and the other two plugged into two 8x10" cabinets.[7]
Firstly, we advise sticking with a brand name you can trust. We’ve established that there’s nothing particularly premium about the guitars on offer at $200, but by sticking with Fender, Ibanez, Yamaha, Epiphone, Oscar Schmidt and the others on this list, you at least guarantee a guitar from a renown guitar manufacturer with some history, instead of something thrown together by a company who don’t specialise in instruments.
Double bass players performing in genres where the bass is slapped, either by pulling the string until it snaps back onto the fingerboard or striking the strings, such as traditional blues, rockabilly, psychobilly jazz, folk, and bluegrass often blend the sounds picked up by a piezoelectric transducer with the sounds picked up by a small condenser microphone mounted on the bridge. The microphone picks up the resonance coming from the body and the sounds of the strings being plucked, bowed, or slapped. The two sound signals are blended using a simple mixer and then routed to the amplifier. While many upright bass players use combo amplifiers, bassists in genres that use high stage volume, such as the punk-rockabilly genre of psychobilly use "bass stacks". Some jazz bassists and other bass players who play in small venues use specialized, expensive upright bass amps, like the Acoustic Image combo amplifier.
Everyone listens to music for different reasons. The transition of 'acknowledgment' to 'love' of an artist or song is an entirely unique experience, starting from smell, location, time of day, time of year, repetitions over time etc., that triggers interest. Obviously, anyone who bashes John Mayer is stuck on radio feeds and needs to explore his music before judging on pop tunes, and almost all Hendrix aficionados are late adopters that buy trends (a marketer's dream).
This is a subsidiary guitar brand owned by Gibson. Epiphone makes the same models as Gibson - SGs, Les Pauls and what have you. The only real difference is the electrics, the circuitry, the wood and the finish, which to the normal eye/intermediate guitar player won't be able to tell apart from a Gibson. In fact, most of the musicians started out with an Epiphone because Gibsons are too expensive. John Lennon famously continued using Epiphone even after being able to buy Gibsons because he loved the imperfection of his Epiphone Casino.
Originally, a signal would be recorded to two tape machines simultaneously. The playback-head output from these two recorders was then mixed together onto a third recorder. In this form, minute differences in the motor speeds of each machine would result in a phasing effect when the signals were combined. The “flange” effect originated when an engineer would literally put a finger on the flange, or rim of one of the tape reels so that the machine was slowed down, slipping out of sync by tiny degrees. A listener would hear a “drainpipe” sweeping effect as shifting sum-and-difference harmonics were created. When the operator removed his finger the tape sped up again, making the effect sweep back in the other direction.” Famous tunes using flange effects are “Unchained” by Van Halen, “Spirit of Radio” by Rush and “Bold as Love” by Jimi Hendrix. The flange on “Bold as Love” is credited as being the first recorded use of the effect in stereo.
The Epiphone Broadway is a hollow body archtop guitar that has been in the Epiphone guitar lineup since 1931. The Broadway was initially an acoustic archtop, but after Gibson took over Epiphone in 1957 the “Broadway” designation was given to a new electric archtop. The electric model was reissued in 1997 and continues to be in production, and we’ve selected it for this list of best electric guitars.
Near the beginning of Epiphone's thinline semi-acoustic range is 'The Dot', based on the timeless and legendary Gibson ES-335. The Dot feels comfortable to hold and play, and the neck, while by no means clubby, feels substantial in your palm, probably due to the 43mm width at the nut. Its slightly flattened C-profile increases marginally in depth further up the neck, making for a suitably vintage feel. An acoustic strum issues forth a pleasing, resonant ring. We'd wager that the Dot's all-maple construction has got something to do with that, but more obviously, the hollow bouts bolster the acoustic tone, inducing wry smiles to those listening. Before plugging in, listen to Ronny Jordan, then Noel Gallagher, then BB King, then George Harrison and John Lennon. It becomes immediately apparent that this style of guitar is hugely versatile. This Dot is no exception: the pickups, while not packing the punch of USA PAFs, offer everything form smooth and moody, front-position mellowness to screeching, bridge position rawk. It's one of the best electric guitars for jazz at this price point, too. The Dot looks fine, sounds great and plays great. To our minds, that's value for money indeed.
Now as for flipping the whole bridge, yes, in some cases this may help you. Try it out and see what happens. Just an extra mm or two could make all the difference. One thing to watch out for, though. The notches on your saddles might not all be the same. Often you will have wider notches for the wound strings and thinner notches for the unwound strings. So you might have to swap these all around.
Delays can also be set to many repeats that take a long time to be reiterated.  This creates a very spaced out sound that envokes large environments.   Be careful with how loud and how many repeats you get going, because older analog delays will begin to experience a feedback loop and can blow out your speaker easily.  Some players learn to control this and have an entire new effect in their arsenal.  Delays are a super powerful tool that just never seems to run out of new sounds.  You can tweak knobs for days and never get bored!
First of all we have to make special mention for the build quality of the RP500. It has a cast-metal chassis and vacuum-style footswitches like on an actual stompbox, and it just feels like it’s built better than any Line 6 or Boss multi-effect we’ve tried. On the rear of the RP500 you’ll find a ¼” input for your guitar, stereo output, headphones jack, AUX in, balanced XLR stereo out, and a USB port. A power supply is included, so points for DigiTech over Boss for doing users that courtesy. A look at the front panel layout reveals it’s pretty unique. It doesn’t have the side-by-side stompbox look we love so much in the Zoom G3X, it has fewer knobs than the Boss ME-80, and yet it looks more straightforward to use than the Line 6 POD HD500X. The dimensions and weight are almost exactly the same as the Boss ME-80 (about 20 inches wide, and weighs approximately 8 lbs).
Martin factory action was traditionally higher than that used by makers like Taylor. Bob Taylor made his bones by offering acoustic guitars that felt and played like electric guitars. Martins had thicker necks, and higher action often called “Bluegrass action.” If you pick very hard, or do a lot of heavy hammer ons, lower action can be more of a problem if you want clean or pure notes.
The fact that there are a lot of us belies a truth about learning guitar: It’s kind of frustrating. Unless you’re moving to guitar from some other kind of musical training, there’s a lot to adjust to right out of the gate. While a piano can sound reasonably good if you simply press a key, playing that same note on a guitar requires you to hold both hands the right way, situate the guitar properly, and make sense out of holding a pick.
This Duo-Jet has the typical brown back and neck finish, original tuners, bone nut (which has never been off), ebony fingerboard and original frets, lefty thumbprint inlays, original Pat. Applied For Filter’Tron pickups with original wire harness including switches and capacitors. All solder joints are original. Original bar bridge. The lefty Bigsby tailpiece does not appear to be original to the instrument, and is probably a late 60s Bigsby, as there are screw-holes from another tail-piece on the bottom. The second to most recent owner acquired the guitar with its current tailpiece in 1971, and the only change he made to the Bigsby was in removing the black paint. The guitar was recently sent to Curt Wilson at Old School Guitar Repair(www.oldschoolguitar.net) at the recommendation of Gretsch guru, Edward Ball, where the front of the headstock was refinished to the correct black(previously Orange) and the center portion of the Bigsby was repainted black. Sadly, the previous owner removed and discarded the original lefty pickguard many years ago.
This is where you want to go. I brought Steve an old Telecaster with a faulty input jack. He not only had the parts needed to fix it, but came up with a better, more stable solution that would avoid the same problem later, all in a few minutes while I waited, and for the walking-around money I had in my pocket. He is professional, expert, friendly, and reasonable. I couldn't ask for more.

When consulting our buying guide, the first thing you need to think about is your budget. How much can you afford to spend? Generally speaking, musical instruments tend to get better the more expensive they get, although this is of course not always the case. And even if you would buy a really expensive guitar you might not be experienced enough to notice how good it is.

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There have been two documented 1970 Brazilian rosewood D-28's, which are anomalies. The first one was #265783, which was retopped with red spruce in 1993. The second one is serial number 265941. There are several D-35's with mixed woods in the 3-piece back. Like D-35 #258962, which has a Brazilian rosewood center wedge in the back. Note some post-1969 Martins have some Brazilian rosewood, in the bridge, bridgeplate, fingerboard, or peghead veneer.

Three CraViolas were offered. These had a strange asymmetrical shape with a pear shape, no waist on the bass side and sharp waist (and almost cutaway taper) on the treble. Soundholes were D-shaped with fancy rosettes, with a pointed tortoise guard on the steel-stringed versions. These had slotheads with a Woody Woodpecker-like peak pointed bassward. The bridges were similar to the mustache version on the Country Western. The CRA6N Classic ($150) had a yellow spruce top and full-grained Brazilian rosewood body, no inlays or pickguard. The CRA6S Steel String ($160) was a similar steel-string with pin bridge and diamond inlays. The CRA12S 12 String ($175) was the 12-string version.

Music Go Round® is a registered trademark of Winmark Corporation based in Minneapolis, MN. Each franchise is independently owned and operated. Other brand names are trademarked or registered by their respective companies. The trademarks and logos used in this website are owned by Winmark Corporation® and any unauthorized use of these trademarks by others is subject to action under federal and state trademark laws.
A lot of EBay sellers have been calling the Hagstrom solid-bodies of the time Hagstrom-Kent. They are not. If it says Hagstrom on the body, it’s a Hagstrom. If it is one of the Hagstrom guitars that was sold as a Kent, it’s a ‘Kent, made by Hagstrom’. I wonder if the sellers think they can get more for a guitar by associating the Kent name with it. I don’t see how. Perhaps the fact that there are so many Kents floating around, the sellers wanted a more familiar name to hang on the Hagstrom.
I feel that most of the bad reviews are due to inexperience with electronics. Frustration caused by not knowing what the parts are or how they work. Missing parts is never a good thing, so I guess I was lucky that my kit came with everything. If you do buy this kit and did not manage to get it working please understand that you have probably made a simple mistake.
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24" (61cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Goldburst
Here we have a sweetie from the late 1970s folks they just don' make them like this anymore this is the RARE High End Lawsuit 5053 model this model was discontinued decades ago. This guitar was made nearing 40 years ago of woods said to have been aged 20-30 years at time of its being built.... food for thought. Fresh release from the JVGuitars Vintage Vault is a beauty seldom seen in this configuration and in this condition we have collected many 5053 Alvarez lawsuit era guitars not all are like this one is SPECIAL this is a must see and hear beauty! Based on the Martin top of the line D-45 this Japanese crafted D-45 copy was crafted with top workmanship only the top luthiers were allowed to use this precious expensive aged Brazilian Jacaranda rosewood on this guitar its back - sides - fingerboard - bridge and headstock are ALL made of this exotic tone wood, the neck looks to be a high grade Honduran Mahogany and proudly still displays it's original imported by Saint Lewis Music gold Medallion and fancy SLM truss rod cover see pics The top is Solid Sitka spruce this guitar is detailed and adorned with much perfling and inlay top to bottom including its fingerboard and headstock, this example is in top playing condition and cosmetically excellent as well and is VERY RARE in deed to find one so excellent. The neck is a nice handful like the old Martin a medium slim profile, its beautiful fingerboard is excellent as are its frets.... Headstock is striking with its A over A inlay in mother of pearl, tuners are original and still doing an excellent job, This guitar has the tone only the Exotic wood series guitars can produce unique rich and dynamic with excellent volume and clarity a fingerpickers delight. Just freshly received a JVG setup with a new Martin Bone & compensated sadle along with a fret dress and a new set of Martin 80/20 Phosphorius Bronze strings 12's x 54 for a substantial tonal upgrade from its old plastic. Overall rated 9.0 +++/10 well preserved it is over 40++ years old and has been lovingly played and well taken care of all these years is not new or mint of course it clearly is well above average used / vintage This comes with a good hard shell case ... and will protect it for the next 4-5 decades. Wonderful players guitar in excellent vintage condition when will I ever see another like this??? its here as of today ask if serious about owning this gem Thank you for your interest in our vintage guitar contact Joe to buy this guitar at: JVGuitars@gmail.com Pics soon to come.
When guitarists sit around and debate tone, they pontificate on the properties of this instrument or that amp. But frequently there’s a factor in the equation that is forgotten. Our templates of what we consider to be great tone are not simply a formula of instrument + amps + musician. Recording studios also play a vital role in the creation of those sounds.

You can do this using a fairly slow tracking time in Auto-Tune so that the bend dynamics aren't changed in any obvious way — it's just that when you finish bending, the note will come to rest on a precise value. Not that I'm suggesting you need to do this, of course, but the day will come when a client plays a never to be repeated take that is perfect apart from a few bend intonation problems...


Roger McGuinn's sparkling, chordal 12-string Rickenbacker riffs on the Byrds' early hits were the sonic bridge between folk and rock – and an irreplaceable color in rock's palette: Every indie band who's more interested in beatific strumming than screaming solos owes him a debt (the striking break in "Bells of Rhymney" could be on a Smiths record). McGuinn could do a lot more than chime, however, as demonstrated by his still-astonishing psychedelic-raga-Coltrane licks on "Eight Miles High."
Looper pedal: A looper pedal or "phrase looper" allows a performer to record and later replay a phrase, riff or passage from a song. Loops can be created on the spot during a performance (live looping) or they can be pre-recorded. By using a looper pedal, a singer-guitarist in a one person band can play the backing chords (or riffs) to a song, loop them with the pedal, and then sing and do a guitar solo over the chords. Some units allow a performer to layer multiple loops, enabling the performer to create the effect of a full band.[87] The first loop effects were created with reel-to-reel tape using a tape loop. High-end boutique tape loop effects are still used by some studio producers who want a vintage sound. Digital loop effects recreate this effect using an electronic memory.[88]
 The world-wide reputation of the company is not based on design data and performance alone. The real key to success of SWING is "Outstanding People". Every staff member at Swing has a background as a professional musician. Moreover, we were all career veterans in guitar engineering with decades of combined experience, well before founding our new vision; Swing Guitar Technology. If you are familiar with musical instruments companies or have seen their ads or brochures, you may notice their catch phrase like "It's about Music." Nothing could be closer to the truth, based on Swing's pedigree. From the selection of materials to their treatment and hand fitting. From mechanics to electronics. Each stage of each final product is mastered by SWINGers.
Sooner or later you may want to experiment further: What happens if I use a different opamp here, or change a capacitor value there? Specifying your own components is the next step. Two of the specialty jobs in building a typical effects pedal are the design of the circuit itself, and the production of the printed circuit board (PCB) on which to install the components. The next logical step from a kit is to order a pre-built PCB and then customize the component and enclosure choices yourself. AMZ effects, is the go-to place for a huge variety of pre-designed PCB’s. The cost is quite low and the projects include clear documentation providing guidance on different options and components.
This will only matter to some players (I’m looking at you, lefties), but if you happen to play guitar the non-traditional way (strumming with your left hand and fingering with your right) you may want to pay close attention to brand. Because left handed players are in the minority by a long shot, it can be difficult to find quality guitars of that orientation. If you are on the market for a left handed guitar, you may want to stick to Fender or Epiphone, as they are known to produce quality offerings in that category.
This mod is a little different—and definitely not as affordable as the ones we’ve been talking about up to this point. When players think about modifications that involve tuning machines, the subject revolves around tuning stability. That’s all well and good, but I’ve rarely encountered a quality machine that slips—because the mechanical torque required to turn the tuner’s capstan is pretty stout. Problems of pitch are usually more related to capstan wobble or a bad nut-slotting job.
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There were East coast and West coast distributors of wholly different instruments bearing the Hohner name in the late 70's-early 80's. One of them had decent guitars, the others were ****************e. Don't know which was which, but I do know the Hohner strat my friend bought new in Upstate NY c. 1980 was a stinkin' piece of crap. Not sure if it was a representative sample.
It's always hard to rate amps when mixing high gain with vintage, boutique amps and the mass produced monsters, but including S.S. and digital technology seems to be a unrealistic stretch. That being said, this manufacturer is making some of the best sounding vintage type tube amps I've heard to date. their lineup of vintage Fender style amps are all excellent, and considerably more affordable and reliable. If you are a fan of the tweed, black and silver faced gems, you have to give Victoria a try. If you prefer something with a unique spin they make their own unique creations as well and they are all serious tone machines. In so far as tube amps go, these guys are definitely in my top five. Speaking of boutique, where is Carr?
If there is one body shape out there that everyone will recognize, it is this one. In terms of finish, Fender chose a lacquer clear coat to show off the natural wood instead of their usual choice, and it looks pretty awesome (of course there's a 3 tone sunburst and olympic white too). Made of ash, this particular Strat offers a U-shaped maple neck with a maple fretboard that is bolted onto the body. In terms of pickups, we have a set of three single coils belonging to their vintage line. These come with Alnico magnets, giving you that classic tone we all love so much. The hardware follows the canon as well. Here we have Fender's well known synchronized tremolo bridge paired with a set of F tuners on the headstock.

Loop-based guitar plugins are slowly moving to the point of obscurity as virtual instrument technology is getting to the point where even string instruments can sound out-of-this-world good and blossom with character. But there still exists some gems out there such as Acoustic Revolutions, which updated to volume two as recently as 2015, doubling the number of loops.
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Another factor to consider is the frequency with which you play. If you’re an occasional guitarist who plays just a few times a month and tend to play with a light touch, you may find less expensive strings perfectly suitable. On the other hand, if you’re devout about practice or play often and hard, premium-grade, heavy-duty strings may prove a better buy in the long run. Many manufacturers grade their strings according to their durability.
• Why fret ends get sharp: Sometimes the end of the fret wire can become sharp or, more accurately, protrusive at the sides of a guitar’s neck. Besides being rough on the hands, this is an indicator of a trickier problem: that the fingerboard has become dry and shrunk. This means that the guitar has been kept in an environment that lacks the proper humidity. More careful storage is the ultimate answer, but using lemon oil on the fretboard also helps prevent this from happening by moisturizing the wood.
While Laney brand might not sound as familiar to the “uninitiated”, this brand has been producing quality amps for very good prices. The  LG12 is a combo amp with 12-watts. While 12-watts isn’t much it seems to kick in a punch when needed (and plus, you want it for practice and more practice amps don’t have a lot of wattages). Apart from that this combo offers  LG12 12 single channel with switchable drive, CD input, headphone socket (a much for practice) as well as Bass, Middle and Treble control. The tone of this amp is pretty crisp and clean. That’s partly due to the 6.5″ custom-designed speaker. The speaker is not only functional but looks pretty nice. Looks wise this model has top mounted construction, rubber feet for sturdiness and leather handle for ease of transportation. Apart from being a great practice amp, it is also great if you travel around and want a model that can take a punch or two.

This may be the most important piece of equipment you will buy if you are a beginner in terms of learning leads or just learning how to layer multiple guitars into a single song. There are certainly better boxes out there but not at this price point. The looper alone makes it worth the cost, especially since it allows you to layer on drums, basic guitar part and then leads or harmonies. Or all of the above. The only real shortcoming is the 30-second limit on the looper. But that's more than enough room to lay down a chord progression against which you can practice your leads.

Jump up ^ Wright, Michael. "Jack Westheimer — Pioneer of Global Guitarmaking". Vintage Gutiar (July 1999). In August ’69, the Valco/Kay assets were auctioned off and W.M.I. purchased the rights to the Kay brand name. W.M.I. began to slowly transition Teisco del Rey guitars to the Kay brand name, which gave them greater credibility with dealers. This change was completed by around ’73 and the Teisco del Rey name then disappeared. This explains why you will occasionally see a Teisco guitar with a Kay logo.
JAZZ :Al Di Meola , John McLaughlin ,Wes Montgomery ,Pat Metheny ,John Scofield,Django Reinhardt ,Larry carlton ,Joe Pass,Herb Ellis ,Eddie Lang , and again I still have in mind at least 10 more jazz guitar players that jazz is the hardest and more complex guitar composition and it is an awesome style or kind of music to play just because not everybody play can play jazz.
Sometimes a pitch shifter will retain the original signal while adding in the new shifted pitch.  The new shifted note can be set at a given intervallic distance from the original and will automatically harmonize any given series of notes or melody.  In short, it will harmonize the guitar by duplicating the melody at a 3rd, 5th, or whatever interval you define.

The phrase “guitar amplifier” in itself is almost a bit misleading. Sure, it “amplifies” your guitar — but guitar amps really do so much more. Arguably, even as much as your choice of guitar, your amplifier will have an immeasurable influence on your sound. Beyond the basics of volume, bass, midrange and treble, your amp can provide warmth or bite to your sound, or anything from a sparkling clean tone to a blazing distortion. Amplifiers are constructed utilizing different size (or even multiple) speakers and can derive their tone from tubes, transistors, or even digital modeling. They can be very basic with just one volume knob; or they can offer a variety of gain and EQ options along with built-in effects.


“Move up to Alnico IV and the power rating comes up and the frequency response flattens out – you get a balanced and natural- sounding response from the coils, but not so it’s boosting the treble. The mid-range stays quite constant as well. And then you go to Alnico V, which has the highest power. Then the bass and treble do get boosted and the sound starts to get more aggressive – more ‘rock ’n’ roll’, for want of a better term.
ARTIN IS NOT THE BEST ACOUSTIC GUITAR. Any Taylor of the same price range WILL BEAT THE BRAKES OFF A GUITAR IN THAT SAME PRICE RANGE! In fact, most profession guitar players switched from Martin to Taylor for that reason Dave Matthews Clapton jack Johnson BUT MARTIN OR TAYLOR ARE THE LEADERS IN THE ACOUSTIC GUITARS! Epiphone master built is another great choice if you are looking for a great 3-500 price range..the ONLY REASON THEY DONT COMPETE WITH MARTIN IS BC FEW PEOPLE KNOW ABOUT THEM! You can buy a Martin that sounds just same but you'll triple the price! Alvarez yari is another well built wonderful guitar but again &1000-1300 against the epiphone masterbilt. Low price great sound go masterbilt about anything else go Taylor

Our fretwork is one of the things we are most proud of. We go to the extreme to make sure that your guitar is going to play the best it can. The fingerboard is planed under tension. The fretting process is done with epoxy fretting. We use a special blend of epoxy that makes re-fretting very easy without messing up your fingerboard. This process is used for multiple reasons. One of the advantages to this type of fretting is that you lose the hollow gaps under the fret that you find with the traditional way of fretting. In traditional fretting, with each fret you put on, it is like driving a wedge into the fingerboard, which causes back tension on the neck. With epoxy fretting, all of these issues are eliminated. The epoxy under the frets helps to transfer string vibration throughout the neck to the body, and relieves all stress and tension on the neck that occurs with traditional fretting. This results in a stress-free neck, which allows the truss rod to work properly and to adjust the neck accurately.
Every guitarist would love to have a place all to themselves to play their heart out, but the reality is that we can't all be so lucky. Family, neighbors and roommates are usually a factor, and they're not as likely as you are to appreciate that you finally nailed that tough passage at two o'clock in the morning. Here's another situation where headphone guitar amps come through for you: since you're the only one hearing it, you can focus on your sound completely. With a headphone amp, there's no more curfew on shredding.
“The V100MU is everything I want in a guitar. The variety of tones from the Wilkinson W90SK pickups combined with the vari-coil enabling me to go from single coil to quasi double coil whilst the roller bridge and ‘classic’ vibrola is something I’ve never seen before on a contoured topped guitar. It really is a thing of beauty not just to look at but to play.”

One of the first solid-body guitars was invented by Les Paul. Gibson did not present their Gibson Les Paul guitar prototypes to the public, as they did not believe the solid-body style would catch on. Another early solid-body Spanish style guitar, resembling what would become Gibson's Les Paul guitar a decade later, was developed in 1941 by O.W. Appleton, of Nogales, Arizona.[27] Appleton made contact with both Gibson and Fender but was unable to sell the idea behind his "App" guitar to either company.[28] In 1946, Merle Travis commissioned steel guitar builder Paul Bigsby to build him a solid-body Spanish-style electric.[29] Bigsby delivered the guitar in 1948. The first mass-produced solid-body guitar was Fender Esquire and Fender Broadcaster (later to become the Fender Telecaster), first made in 1948, five years after Les Paul made his prototype. The Gibson Les Paul appeared soon after to compete with the Broadcaster.[30] Another notable solid-body design is the Fender Stratocaster, which was introduced in 1954 and became extremely popular among musicians in the 1960s and 1970s for its wide tonal capabilities and more comfortable ergonomics than other models.
Buying a new guitar amp is easy. But, as you will have seen, ending up with the right amplifier for you isn’t as straightforward. Amps are not something you buy every day, so take your time, read our guide, use our categories and charts as inspiration, and ultimately you will find something that will suit you and your playing perfectly. Good luck in your hunt for the perfect amp!

If you’re a guitar lover, you might be out for a unique look as well as your own sound. You might also be interested to learn more about how guitars are put together and function. If you have moderate woodworking skills, you can build your own solid-body electric guitar. To make things easier, you can even purchase some parts pre-made. Use your creativity for the finishing touches, and you’ll have a unique guitar and a story to tell.
Spanish-style electrics, which you could sling in front of you while standing and singing, proved to be much more versatile for many different musical genres. Gibson’s 1936 ES-150 (E for Electric and S for Spanish) had a sleek bar-shaped electronic pickup that was mounted into the guitar’s hollow body for a more streamlined look. The pickup earned the nickname “the Charlie Christian” thanks to the jazz virtuoso who is generally credited with introducing the electric guitar solo. In 1939, Christian stepped out in front of Benny Goodman’s band and performed long, complicated passages imitating the style of horn playing. He explained, “Guitar players have long needed a champion, someone to explain to the world that a guitarist is something more than a robot pluckin’ on a gadget to keep the rhythm going.”
I have been playing for two years. I use to play (and still have) a fender squier. Today I bought a Lyle on impuls. I wasn't planning on buying one, i just walked in and it looked so beautiful. I have a feeling it is about 10 years old or so, but the sales man didn't know much other than it was a Lyle and it had new tunning pegs on it. I got it for 150$ and i would REALLY love to know more about it. Thanks.
Bull necked and heavily tattooed, Mike Ness is not the kind of guy you’d want to mess with. The Southern California guitarist, singer and songwriter has known good times and bad, punching his way out of a serious drug addiction in the mid Eighties. He has funneled these experiences into some of the most hard-hitting, plain-dealing rock songs to come out of the SoCal punk milieu. Ness launched Social Distortion in 1978.
Another relatively drastic but easy and cheap way to hot-rod your guitar’s sound with its current components is to alter how and where its volume and tone pots are connected to each other. The difference can be subtle—and it’s more a matter of preference than what’s “correct”—but it can make the difference between a guitar that is just OK and one that really is a joy to play.
Taylor is other remarkable guitar brand which manufactures good looking guitar with easy instruction to play. And people can easily but it medium price budget. Just try out this brand and test once and you will get to know its specifications well. This has been placed on the eight positions due to its some unique characteristics including clear sound.
Considering a brand is only really important to a certain extent. Generally, certain top brands will have a reputation for being better at things than others, but given that most guitar brands now have a very wide offering, it’s really best to consider individual models. It’s worth doing a little extra research in some areas though, because there are interesting brand relationships that mean some more budget guitar brands have actually been designed by premium ones. Epiphone and Squier for instance are more affordable sub-brands of Gibson and Fender respectively, which means that you can often get a very high quality product that’s been made in Taiwan rather than the USA for instance. The Dove Pro is a good example of this.
Based on SGM-v2.01 (http://www.geocities.jp/shansoundfont/) with improved quality aoustic guitars (21mb) and basses (50mb) and also designed to run on apps such as Sweet Midi Player. This is a great GM SoundFont and the one I use on iPad/iPhone and PC.  You can comfortably run this GM Soundfont in Sweet Midi Player app on most iOS devices. For Windows PC you can install a new GM soundfont using the free program Coolsoft VirtualMIDISynth.
Proceed to the next two chords. The next chord you would play would be a power chord on the fifth fret of A three times. So you would play with your index finger on the fifth fret of A, your middle finger on the seventh fret of D, and your ring finger on the seventh fret of G. Then, simply shift this finger shape down one string so that your index finger is on the fifth fret of the E string with your other fingers on the seventh frets of the A and D strings. Play the chords in the sequence that they're highlighted with parentheses below:
If a metallic object (such as an electric guitar string for example) is vibrated above a magnetic coil the magnetic field is disturbed and an electrical current is produced. This current then travels through the pickups connecting wires, eventually making it’s way to your output jack where it is transferred to your guitar lead and ultimately to your guitar amp where the small signal is amplified to produce the sound associated with an electric guitar.
*When the item leaves our warehouse, they are generally shipped to EMS Worldwide Express Mail Service and it would usually take 7 – 10 days to United States. We ship our products from Mainland China where our manufacturing factory is located. We will inform you once your order has been shipped and we will be providing you with the tracking number so you can conveniently monitor the shipments progress on EMS Worldwide Express Mail Service website or SF Express and USPS and Parcel Force website.

Here we have the very highly respected ... Alvarez Yairi dy91 ... This very unique and beautiful guitar is in AMAZING CONDITION and is based on the RARE exotic Hawaiian Koa tone wood and is one of more ornate & fancy D-45 Martin Drednaught Acoustic the Martin retails for well over $7,500 and this guitar offered here at JVGuitars is the Alvarez Yairi answer and is quite a HIGH END JAPANESE HAND CRAFTED GUITAR by one of the greatest Luthiers in Japan.... Reserve your Rare & Exotic Koa Yairi DY91 Today...this baby is in excellent vintage condition... This is THE DY91 to own... any questions please email me gr8bids@comcast.net All the best! General specs:About the DY91: These High End Yairi acoustic guitars are Handcrafted for outstanding projection, this example offers enhanced bass response and an articulate high-end register performance. As with this one many are Sculpted from some of the most precious rare sought-after tone woods from all over the world. This example is Hawaiian WoW! Here are the Specs: Handmade in Japan Saddle & Nut: Bone Neck Joint: Hand Fit Dovetail Finish: Gloss Body Style: D-45 Style Slope Shoulder Dreadnought Back & Sides: AAAA Figured Koa Top: Solid German Spruce Neck: Premium grade Mahogany Fingerboard: Bound Ebony Scale: 25 3/8" (645mm) Width at Nut: 1 11/16" Fingerboard Inlay: Large Diamond Bridge: Ebony-Inlaid Body Binding: Ivory & Abalone Soundhole Rosette: Abalone Head Overlay: Figured Koa Pickguard: Black Tuning Machines: Original Yairi Gold Die Cast Finish:Gloss Natural Electronics: None Original Semi-hard shell case: Case candy Included .
Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Casino Coupe™ Ltd. Ed. AJ-100 Acoustic Guitar PRO-1 Spanish Classic PRO-1 Classic 3/4-Size Epiphone Masterbilt® Olympic™ Acoustic/Electric Guitar Epiphone Masterbilt® Zenith Classic™ Acoustic/Electric Guitar Epiphone Masterbilt® Zenith™ Acoustic/Electric Guitar Epiphone Masterbilt® De Luxe™ Classic Acoustic/Electric Guitar Epiphone Masterbilt® De Luxe™ Acoustic/Electric Guitar Ltd. Ed. EL-00 PRO Mahogany Epiphone Les Paul SL™ Electric Guitar PRO-1 Acoustic PRO-1 Classic Acoustic Epiphone SG-Special VE™ Electric Guitar PR-150 Ltd. Ed. DR-100 Wine Red DR-100 Les Paul Express Les Paul Ukulele Outfit PRO-1 Plus Acoustic Ltd. Ed. Les Paul Special-II Wine Red Epiphone Les Paul Special VE™ electric guitar Les Paul Studio LT™ Electric Guitar Les Paul Special II Epiphone AJ-210CE Acoustic/Electric Outfit SG Special AJ-220S PRO-1 Ultra Acoustic/Electric AJ-100CE MM-30S Ltd. Ed. 1963 J-45 Ltd. Ed. 2014 Hummingbird Artist Toby Standard IV MB-100 Les Paul Player Pack PR-4E Acoustic/Electric Player Pack DR-212 EB-0 Slash "AFD" Les Paul Special-II Outfit Masterbilt DR-400MCE Epiphone Embassy PRO Bass Ltd. Ed. Wildkat Studio Ltd. Ed. EJ-160E Acoustic/Electric G-310 (LH) G-310 Ltd Ed "1964" Caballero Electar Inspired by "1939" Century Lap Steel Outfit Ltd. Ed. EJ-200 Artist AJ-220SCE Toby Deluxe IV Les Paul 100 Slash "AFD" Les Paul Performance Pack Toby Bass Performance Pack Ltd. Ed. Hummingbird PRO Jeff Waters "Annihilation-II™" Flying-V Worn G-400 Dot Studio PR-5E Toby Deluxe-V Hummingbird PRO Dove PRO EL-00 PRO PRO-1 Explorer Performance Pack PRO-1 Les Paul Jr. Performance Pack Goth Les Paul Studio Thunderbird-IV Goth Thunderbird-IV EB-3 G-400 PRO Les Paul Studio G-400 PRO (LH) Viola ES-335 PRO Ltd. Ed. 2014 Nighthawk Custom Quilt Ltd. Ed. ES-339 P90 PRO Ltd. Ed. 2014 Wildkat Wine Red 75th Anniversary Century Amplifier Les Paul Standard Dot EJ-200SCE Inspired by 1964 Texan (LH) EJ-200SCE (LH) Inspired by 1964 Texan Dobro Hound Dog Round Neck Wildkat Allen Woody Rumblekat Goth '58 Explorer Ltd. Ed. 2014 Les Paul Traditional PRO Ltd. Ed. 2014 LP Standard Red Royale Les Paul Standard (LH) Casino Coupe ES-339 PRO Ltd. Ed. James Bay Signature "1966" Century Outfit Les Paul Custom 100th Anniversary Ltd. Ed. Björn Gelotte Les Paul Custom 2015 Joe Bonamassa Les Paul Standard Epiphone Les Paul Traditional PRO-II™ Wildkat Royale Ltd. Ed. Riviera Custom P93 Red Royale 1956 Les Paul Standard PRO Ltd. Ed. Les Paul Standard Plustop PRO Tamio Okuda Elitist Coronet™ Outfit Tom Delonge ES-333 Riviera Custom P93 Wilshire Phant-o-matic Thunderbird PRO-IV Les Paul Standard Plustop PRO Thunderbird Classic-IV PRO Blueshawk Deluxe Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Korina Explorer Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Korina Flying-V Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Korina Explorer Bass Les Paul Standard Plustop PRO (LH) Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Johnny A. Custom Outfit Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Lee Malia Explorer Custom Artisan Outfit Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Lee Malia RD Custom Artisan Outfit Masterbilt® De Luxe Classic™ 4-String Acoustic/Electric Bass Guitar Les Paul Custom PRO Dobro Hound Dog Del. Square Neck Dobro Hound Dog Del. Round Neck Casino Epiphone Stagebird™ 6-String Electric Banjo Epiphone Les Paul ES PRO™ Epiphone Inspired by “1966” Century Archtop Mayfair™ 5-String Banjo Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Joe Bonamassa "Treasure" Firebird™-I Ltd. Ed. ES-295 Premium Ltd. Ed. Emperor Swingster Blue Royale Ltd. Ed. Les Paul Standard Blue Royale Ltd. Ed. Riviera Custom P93 Blue Royale Ltd. Ed. Wildkat Blue Royale Allen Woody Rumblekat™ Blue Royale Ltd. Ed. Jack Casady Blue Royale Bass Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Wildkat KOA Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Les Paul Custom PRO KOA Ltd. Ed. LP Custom Blackback PRO Ltd. Ed. LP Standard Florentine PRO Les Paul Classic-T FT-350SCE Ltd. Ed. Wildkat Red Royale Ltd. Ed. Brent Hinds Flying-V Custom “MayDay Monster” Les Paul Standard Ltd. Ed. Brendon Small Snow Falcon® Outfit Les Paul Custom PRO (LH) Masterbilt DR-500MCE Masterbilt 2015 AJ-45ME Dave Navarro "Jane" MM-50E Professional Dobro Hound Dog M-14 Metalbody Zakk Wylde Custom Plus Bullseye Joe Bonamassa Les Paul Standard PE Ltd Ed Jack Casady Signature Bass Tommy Thayer "White Lightning" Epiphone Sheraton™-II PRO Joe Pass Emperor-II PRO Les Paul Custom Classic PRO Masterbilt® MM-40L Mandolin 1984 Explorer EX B. B. King Lucille Emperor Swingster Les Paul Tribute Plus Outfit Les Paul Ultra-III Prophecy Les Paul Custom Plus EX Prophecy Les Paul Custom Plus GX Matt Heafy Les Paul Custom Les Paul Black Beauty 3 Epiphone Ltd. Ed. 20th Anniversary Jack Casady Bass Outfit Emperor Swingster Royale Broadway Jack Casady Signature Bass Masterbilt EF-500RCCE Matt Heafy Les Paul Custom-7 Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Inspired by "1955" Les Paul Custom™ Outfit 2014 Tak Matsumoto DC Custom Ltd. Ed. Masterbilt AJ-500RCE Ltd. Ed. Lee Malia Les Paul Custom Ltd. Ed. Tony Iommi SG Custom Ltd. Ed. Tony Iommi SG Custom (LH) Gary Clark Jr "Blak & Blu" Casino Gary Clark Jr "Blak & Blu" Casino Bigsby Ltd. Ed. Union Jack Sheraton ES-175 Premium Ltd. Ed. G-1275 Doubleneck Slash "Rosso Corsa" Les Paul Standard Ltd. Ed. Elitist "1965" Casino Vintage Ltd. Ed. Elitist "1966" Custom Riviera Ltd. Ed. Elitist "1964" Texan Elitist Casino Epiphone FT-100 Player Pack Epiphone FT-100 Acoustic Epiphone Ltd. Ed. "1961" G-400 PRO Epiphone SG-Junior Electric Guiter Player Package FT-100CE Ltd. Ed. Tommy Thayer "White Lightning" Explorer Outfit Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Matt Heafy "Snøfall" Les Paul Custom Outfit (7-string) Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Matt Heafy "Snøfall" Les Paul Custom Outfit (6-string) Ltd. Ed. Björn Gelotte "Jotun" Les Paul Custom Outfit Ltd. Ed. Richie Faulkner Flying-V Custom Outfit Ltd. Ed. Joe Bonamassa 1958 "Amos" Korina Flying-V Outfit Ltd. Ed. Slash Les Paul Standard Plustop PRO Ltd. Ed. Slash Les Paul Standard Plustop PRO Premium Outfit Thunderbird Vintage PRO Bass Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Jason Hook "M-4" Explorer Outfit Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Dot Deluxe CE Coupe (Nylon String) SST Coupe (Steel String) Hummingbird Tenor Acoustic/Electric Ukulele Les Paul® Tenor Acoustic/Electric Ukulele Ltd. Ed. Peter Frampton "1964" Texan Premium Outfit Ltd. Ed. Peter Frampton "1964" Texan Ltd. Ed. Peter Frampton Les Paul Custom PRO Premium Outfit Ltd. Ed. Peter Frampton Les Paul Custom PRO Ltd. Ed. Slash Firebird Ltd. Ed. Slash Firebird Premium Outfit Ltd. Ed. John Lee Hooker 100th Anniversary Zephyr Outfit Ltd. Ed. "Mayday Monster" EJ-200SCE Outfit
By the late 1970s, costs of manufacture in Japan had risen to such an extent that it was difficult to make student-grade guitars over there. It was far less expensive to manufacture instruments in Korea. Numerous factories were built, and existing facilities in Korea were expanded. Samick built a factory capable of producing one million instruments a year. Japanese companies invested heavily in Korea so that they would be able to produce their low-end models in Korea and high-end models under the same brand names in Japan. The early Korean-made instruments were not as good as the Japanese ones, but it did not take nearly as long for Korean quality to improve as it did for the Japanese to go from making crude low-end models to sophisticated instruments suitable for professional use. The Koreas had the benefit of all of the Japanese experience especially in the cases of factories with Japanese ownership or management.
Joe Perry is the American distillation of the good-old Keith Richards/Jimmy Page recipe for sideman/lead guitarist cool. He’s got the look and the licks, and he’s maintained both over the course of three or four decades—despite all odds. Jagger and Richards are the Glimmer Twins, but Perry and Aerosmith singer Steven Tyler went down in history as the Toxic Twins.
Gibson gave this guitar a comfortable V neck profile, which together with shorter 24.75" scale length and 1.725" nut width make this guitar one of the easiest instruments to play in this list. My only complaint with this guitar is its bank breaking price, but this steep price point and exclusivity play an important role in making this iconic instrument more appealing. Start saving now if you want to be one of the privileged few who can play this guitar.

This guitar was first introduced in 2014, and has since been one of their more popular acoustics - thanks to its USA hand-crafted quality which you can own for a relatively accessible cost. The guitar is built using North American tonewoods that include solid walnut back and sides, along with a solid Sitka spruce for the top. This configuration, along with Gibson's premium build quality results in a balanced and full sounding acoustic voice, that elegantly matches the vibe of the instrument.
The origins of the modern guitar are not known with certainty. Some believe it is indigenous to Europe, while others think it is an imported instrument.[32] Guitar-like instruments appear in ancient carvings and statues recovered from Egyptian, Sumerian, and Babylonian civilizations. This means that the contemporary Iranian instruments such as the tanbur and setar are distantly related to the European guitar, as they all derive ultimately from the same ancient origins, but by very different historical routes and influences.
Black trapeze tailpiece with a diamond. For Gibson guitars including the following models- L-50, L48, ES-125, ES-330, etc. Please make sure to check the specs to see if they match your instrument to verify it is the correct replacement. Overall length of Tailpiece not including hinge = 4 5/8 inches. Side to Side width at bar = 3 19/64 inches. Width of string bar = 47/64 inches. String Spacing at Bar = 1 61/64 inches. Important Hinge/Mounting Specs: Mounting Area of Hinge length = 1 1/2 inches. Mounting Area of Hinge Width - 2 inches. Mounting hole location bottom center = 11/32 inch from bottom edge. Two Mounting hole locations from side edges = 5/16 inches. Two mounting hole locations Apart from eachother = 1 25/64 inches. Upper side of hinge length = 1 1/8 inches. Upper side of Hinge width = 1 25/64 inches.
Modelling effect – Many BOSS modelling effects use COSM or Composite Object Sound Modelling, which uses computer-processing power to digitally precisely model the electronic, mechanical, and magnetic characteristics inherent to an instrument, amplifier, or speaker, and also to create completely new sounds. Modelling effects can be dynamic or time-based – it can even make your guitar or amp sound like a completely different type of guitar or amp.
To repair your guitar’s body, glue in any broken wings. Also, repair strap buttons that have come out and bridge holes that have been stripped by putting glue on a toothpick and applying it to the holes. When the glue is dry, you can re-insert the strap buttons or re-thread the bridge holes. You can use the same technique to repair bolt-on holes if the screw holes are stripped or are larger than the threads. If the holes are too large, just leave enough toothpicks glued into the hole to take up the extra space before you re-thread the screw.
the switch is to change pickups and the knobs are for volume and tone. u only need to mess with them if u want to change the sound of the guitar for various songs or styles of music. to tune the guitar u use the tuning pegs on the headstock (at the end of the neck). u need to tune it if it gets out of tune and make sure u replace the strings fairly often especially if u get a nice guitar like a les paul. old strings get tighter and can pull the neck and make it bow forward making it harder to push the strings down to the frets.
Rotating speakers are specially constructed amplifier/loudspeakers used to create special audio effects using the Doppler effect by rotating the speakers or a sound-directing duct. The rotating speaker creates a chorus-type effect. Named after its inventor, Donald Leslie, it is particularly associated with the Hammond organ but is used with a variety of instruments as well as vocals. The Hammond/Leslie combination has become an element in many genres of music. The Leslie Speaker and the Hammond Organ brands are currently owned by Suzuki Musical Instrument Corporation. The stompbox that simulates this effect is the Uni-Vibe pedal.
If you want to invest in a guitar that replicates the famous ’70 guitars, look no further than the model offered by Fender Vintage. This product was designed to feature a basswood body that is a replica of the famous workhorse Fender guitars. Moreover, the device has a “C” shape neck that was constructed from maple, and that is said to be quite resistant.

With such a vast array of effects available, it can be hard to know where to start. One good way is to find out which effects your favorite players use. Artist interviews can be a great source of such information. Additionally, most players are happy to discuss their gear with fellow musicians. Talk to other guitar players you know, or chat up the guitarists or bassists at the local club before or after their sets.


• We'll add EQ to give some polish and let the guitar cut through a little better in a mix. Enable a stage in the standard channel EQ (which comes after the inserts in the signal chain), and choose the Parametric II response. Add a boost of around 4‑5dB at 3.5kHz, with a Q of 0.2.This screen shows the VST Audio Channel Settings and the roster of effects used to create our basic guitar rack.
Worked fine. The product is as advertised. The solder joints looked prfessional, the wiring was neat. I'd say you wouldn't want to put this in a boutique level guitar but if you have a cheaper guitar that needs new electronics, these'll do the job fine. you won't find a cheaper wiring harness but you need to keep in mind that you're getting what you pay for. If you want a top quality harness, you'll pay at least 3 times as much.

"Rocksmith" came out in 2011, following in the footsteps of "Guitar Hero" and "Rock Band" in look if not in game play. Developer Ubisoft claims that it can teach you to actually play the guitar. Unlike its predecessors, where you play along with any number of hit or classic rock songs, pushing the right button at the right time to earn points and unlock rewards, "Rocksmith" requires an actual guitar that you plug into your console. Thus, you're playing the actual notes to the songs, which increases the difficulty of the game.
This is not a complete list of former or current American guitar companies. Among the omissions are Steinberger electric guitars and basses, now part of Gibson and Carvin, who is still independently owned and sells only direct, not through distributors or stores. I have not included the past great archtop luthiers such as D’Angelico, D’Aquisto or current archtop makers such as Bennedetto. Nor have I included the many smaller USA luthiers who are currently building excellent guitars such as Huss & Dalton, Foggy Bottom or Collings.

Jazz guitarists integrate the basic building blocks of scales and arpeggio patterns into balanced rhythmic and melodic phrases that make up a cohesive solo. Jazz guitarists often try to imbue their melodic phrasing with the sense of natural breathing and legato phrasing used by horn players such as saxophone players. As well, a jazz guitarists' solo improvisations have to have a rhythmic drive and "timefeel" that creates a sense of "swing" and "groove." The most experienced jazz guitarists learn to play with different "timefeels" such as playing "ahead of the beat" or "behind the beat," to create or release tension.
Of course, no-one says you have to use the same mic on each speaker cone. For example the SOS interview with Toby Wright shows an SM57 and an MD421 on separate speakers, and Don Smith mentioned using an SM57 and an AKG C451 on separate speakers when recording Keith Richards. Sylvia Massy Shivy also uses the SM57+MD421 combination, but sounds a note of caution when deciding on the exact positioning of the mics: "You have to be very careful with phase, just check it until the signal is the strongest."
There are a few approaches you can take to get started browsing all this tablature. For example, you might start by looking for music that fits a certain theme. Alfred's 2015 Modern Christian Hits, the Hal Leonard The Ultimate Christmas Guitar Songbook and the Hal Leonard VH1 100 Greatest Hard Rock Songs are just three examples of tab books aimed at specific genres or occasions. Another idea would be to narrow down your options to tablature with included CDs; they give you the option to play along, making the songs easier and quicker to learn.

Sometimes, I find the way that they progress songs odd, and that it actually makes them more difficult by causing you to use screwy timings, use easy and incorrect finger movements that you have to completely change when new notes are added, or when it would be simpler to just use cords (for example, in higher ground there is a part where you first play through and have a G and then an A on the 6th string. A beginner will probably play the G with the index finger and then the A with the ring finger. But later these turn to power cords and this no longer works as you have to slide your hand down. I've found that type of issue common, particularly with this song - I've only played about 6 songs so far in the game). Likewise, the strategy of playing is not always the best, for example they'l play a 2, 3, and 6 on the 6th string and maybe an open 5th string and the 2nd fret of the 5th string. Much easier and more efficient to convert the 6th fret on the E string to the 1st on the 5 string to keep everything within a reasonable reach(cheating by moving the note does work since the game is based on tone, but is not something a beginner would know)
A Distortion pedal is a must, it really helps bring out those chords, solos and riffs and makes sure they stand out. It gives you the volume jump when you need it and changes the overall sound of your guitar, giving it power and aggression. Of course, you don’t always have to dial in the pedal for bone crushing riffs as a distortion pedal can provide a smoother sound, but at least the option is there!

Bought an ovation a couple of years ago and it hasn't failed me yet. Mine's a fairly lower in the range Ovation Celebrity, but it's excellent. One of the most comfortable feeling guitars I've ever held, good projection, nice tone, even been known to out do a Gibson further down the neck. Plus bonus feature is that it does sound so much clearer and warmer out of the amp
But having at least a very basic foundation to build upon - such as learning some basic chords, will allow you to learn more songs faster. My best advice is to abandoned any idea of instant gratification and commit to the idea that learning guitar is a slow process in the beginning. It gets exponentially easier to improve your skills after you get past the huge hurdles you encounter in the beginning.
Loaded with a strong basswood body, this fella is the closest you can get to that booming mahogany tone of high-end instrument. The iconic combination of three single-coil pickups is of course there, and so is the three-way pickup selector. The sound is very resonant and articulate, making the guitar very well suited for the realms of classic rock, blues, jazz, and country. Metal is also within its reach, and so is light pop on the clear side.
Interesting site.I searched make before break and you appeared.Ive just bought a Squier Classic Vibe Butterscotch telecaster and it has stock Alnico 5 pups. It got me remembering how, back in the 1960s I used a standard U.S. Tele and did the jamming in between thing. If you were careful it balanced and held in place.I always loved that position. I think, if I remember correctly, you could get between bridge and both and also neck and both.I think it was a superior sound to any 5 way switch I’ve heard. Is it possible to modify my make after break classic vibe switch to make before break or do I need a new switch? And can you buy make before break switches for a 2 pup Tele ? Thanks much.Mike.U.K.

At one point or another in your musical life someone is going to as you what the best guitar brand is.  By now you’ve probably figured out that there’s no single “best guitar brand.” The verdict would likely go along the lines of what is the best guitar brand for you or your needs as a guitarist. There are some good suggestions that can be made with the above information along with some personal insight. Things like:


The C3M comes with Savarez Cristal Corum high-tension strings, but you can always change them out for something different if you prefer. Aesthetics-wise, the guitar has a matte finish (the “M” in the model name), but it really has no bearing on the way the guitar sounds.All the same, you’ll want to protect your guitar from nicks, cuts and other damage.

When guitarists who play jazz and other more complex styles improvise, they use scales, modes, and arpeggios associated with the chord progression. The must learn how to use scales (whole tone scale, chromatic scale, etc.) to solo over chord progressions. Soloists try to imbue melodic phrasing with the sense of natural breathing and legato phrasing used by players of other instruments. Jazz guitarists are influenced by trumpet, saxophone, and other horn players. Celtic fingerstyle players are influenced pipes and fiddles.
Muddy Waters is obviously one of the most recognized and influential blues artists of this century. When his name is mentioned phrases like "slide guitar" and "electric Chicago blues" are associated with it, but what about "wah-wah" and "psychedelic"? For a small period in history, Muddy Waters' image became one of a psychedelic icon and if there weren't records still around from then, most people would doubt it had ever happened. The sixties were a strange time for music and musicians- none felt stranger than musicians from the previous decade trying to stay afloat then. Many times in music, established artists will try to expand upon their work and take a chance with something different. They should at least be praised and encouraged when they try to experiment with their sound. If music were condemned to always following a strict guideline of rules, it would be pretty boring. Music should be allowed to grow and explore new territories because everyone can agree that it's not exciting if it's always predictable.
If you're a beginner, you'll love an option like the Yamaha RBX170 Bass or the Epiphone Thunderbird IV Bass. These bass guitars offer great tone and style all at a price you can easily afford. Best of all, their durable construction will withstand all the paces an eager learner will put them through. Maybe you're already an established player and are looking for a new challenge? If that's the case, you'll love the American Deluxe Jazz Bass V 5-String Electric Bass from Fender. This beautiful five string is loaded with updated electronics and Noiseless pickups for a tight low-end response you're definitely going to appreciate. Its alder body helps to give it a wonderfully clear tone that any bassist will want to hear every time they strap in. You'll also find acoustic basses in this section such as the EAB Acoustic-Electric Bass from Dean and the stunning A5 Ultra Bass Fretless SA 5-String Acoustic-Electric Bass Guitar from Godin. These basses are perfect for performers who demand the ultimate versatility. It won't matter where you're gigging with these gorgeous basses, you'll have the freedom to play them acoustic or plug in for a louder sound that can fill larger venues. The bass has always been an unsung hero in popular music, but that doesn't mean it doesn't play a crucial note. With any of the top quality basses available here, you'll have no trouble keeping the band in the groove and having them sound tighter than ever before.
There were actually two bolt-neck DT-250s, both with basswood bodies and the very nice locking Powerocker vibratos. The regular model came in black or white and had a rosewood fingerboard. Well, a little boring. But the Transparent Red TRs came with a maple fingerboard stained red. Yes, that’s what we’re talking about! If you’re going to have a red guitar, you ought to have a matching red fingerboard. Hard maple, made slick with the red polyurethane.
The 1960s were the Golden Age for guitars in America. The folk music boom was followed closely by the British Invasion and the demand for guitars skyrocketed as young people by the millions started making their own music. The Silvertone Amp-In-Case model 1457 was the entry point for thousands of them. Some of the most sought-after Silvertones are from this era … more
Unfortunately, not many reference materials are available to document in complete detail, but we can hit some of the highlights, and illuminate a number of relationships along the way. If you have catalogs, ads or pictures of guitars that can help fill in some of the blanks, please let me know (Michael Wright, PO Box 60207, Philadelphia, PA 19102).
Gibson, like many guitar manufacturers, had long offered semi-acoustic guitars with pickups, and previously rejected Les Paul and his "log" electric in the 1940s. In apparent response to the Telecaster, Gibson introduced the first Gibson Les Paul solid body guitar in 1952 (although Les Paul was actually brought in only towards the end of the design process for expert fine tuning of the nearly complete design and for marketing endorsement [2]). Features of the Les Paul include a solid mahogany body with a carved maple top (much like a violin and earlier Gibson archtop hollow body electric guitars) and contrasting edge binding, two single-coil "soapbar" pickups, a 24¾" scale mahogany neck with a more traditional glued-in "set" neck joint, binding on the edges of the fretboard, and a tilt-back headstock with three machine heads (tuners) to a side. The earliest models had a combination bridge and trapeze-tailpiece design that was in fact designed by Les Paul himself, but was largely disliked and discontinued after the first year. Gibson then developed the Tune-o-matic bridge and separate stop tailpiece, an adjustable non-vibrato design that has endured. By 1957, Gibson had made the final major change to the Les Paul as we know it today - the humbucking pickup, or humbucker. The humbucker, invented by Seth Lover, was a dual-coil pickup which featured two windings connected out of phase and reverse-wound, in order to cancel the 60-cycle hum associated with single-coil pickups; as a byproduct, however, it also produces a distinctive, more "mellow" tone which appeals to many guitarists. The more traditionally designed and styled Gibson solid-body instruments were a contrast to Leo Fender's modular designs, with the most notable differentiator being the method of neck attachment and the scale of the neck (Gibson-24.75", Fender-25.5"). Each design has its own merits. To this day, the basic design of many solid-body electric guitar available today are derived from the original designs - the Telecaster, Stratocaster and the Les Paul.
I'm actually the designer of this devices and I myself had bought all the software in Apple. I'm really a big fan of JamUp, Bias, and Ampkit. Personally I like all the functions provided by JamUp such as JAM, LOOP, 8-track recording as well as the guitar effects and amps. But the Amps in Bias is a litte more juicy than in JamUp. A good way is using Bias amps in JamUp which just make a good combination of the two software. They can be used in that way :)
	Ibanez Artcore AF75 Electric Guitar	Another hollow body guitar to whet your appetite! The Ibanez Artcore AF75 isn’t as “old” as the other models here but it has earned a huge following because of its affordability, quality workmanship and versatile sound. Suitable for a variety of music styles, the Ibanez AF75 Artcore is also perfect for beginners eager to get started on a moderate budget.	

The Line 6 Spider Classic 15 is similar in many ways to the Fender Champion 20. It offers digital simulations of various amplifiers and built-in special effects. The two amps are usually priced identically. The reasons we didn’t make the Spider Classic 15 our top pick is that it’s much larger and heavier than the Fender (about 40 percent overall, at 14.7 by 15.7 by 8.3 inches and 18.4 pounds), and its controls work in an unusual fashion that sometimes frustrated our panelists.
I have a Gemtone guitar tube amp that was made in Canada in early 70's I think. This is the only Gemtone I have ever seen and the only information I could find out about it (but not verify) is that it was a sub-company of Regal Instruments. I would love to find some more info about this amp but have nearly given up after several years of searching. Sorry its not really an answer but my hope is to fire up the thread again so someone with more concrete info can chime in.

Instead of a Tremolo bridge, the Telecaster has what we call an “ashtray” bridge.  This name came about from the original metal covering over the bridge that players decided to remove and use as an ashtray!  Underneath that cover was where the magic was happening.  Instead of six saddles, the original ashtray bridges had three that, in conjunction with its single coil pickup and larger metal surface, created a “twangy” sound that was perfect for any country chicken picker.
Besides insulting Taylor Swift in a way even Katy Perry would bristle at (“Nobody would confuse the pop star’s chops with Bonnie Raitt’s. But she does play a guitar.”), Edgers manages to make it through an entire history of the electric-guitar industry as it stands without quoting more than one female guitar player — the Runaways’s guitarist Lita Ford. Any person who has actually interrogated the music landscape deeper than, say, an Eric Clapton record would recognize that the electric guitar isn’t dying. The throngs of women who play electric guitar just don’t get exalted or celebrated in the same way as aging men. But there are legions of women playing guitar — maybe Edgers just hasn’t been paying attention.
Next important control knob is usually labeled as time or rate. This defines the length of echoes in a reverb. You can have them short or you can have them last for a fairly long time. Which side you will lean more towards is going to depend on the nature and tempo of your music. Slower, more subtle riffs can easily deal with long reverb times while faster sections usually work best with short reverb. Again, experimentation is the key here.
Most Gibson guitars feature two humbucking pickups, giving them a very full, clean sound. They are very simple in design, and easy to use with a focus on quality. Maintenance is also easy with Gibsons. Their bridge style places the strings closer together than the likes of Fender or Ibanez guitars, making them slightly different to play. While there is slightly less room for error in finger placement, the strings’ proximity makes them a better fit for small hands and for instrumentalists who need to rapidly navigate the fretboard.
The reason being that guitar manufacturers will usually look to keep costs down in the pickup department. This is particularly true for budget models, which will usually be fitted with stock pickups that do the job, but fall short of truly impressing. So guitarists with an affordable, but playable guitar may wish to upgrade their pickups, to make their favorite axe gig-worthy.
TAB uses a series of hyphens to represent the strings. Each string is identified on the far left by the name of the note produced when played open. The high-e (string 1) is at the top; low-E (string 6) is at the bottom. There is no restriction for how long a line of TAB can be, but for readability it should be kept short enough to prevent wrapping on a web-site or printed page.
This is a guitar tuning and style of playing on the Classical Guitar that has been developed by Ian Low. It was recently publicized in the form of a series of videos posted onto his YouTube channel on 14 July 2016. The 6 strings are tuned to F, G, C, E, C# and C using the standard guitar strings EADGBE strings to allow a different style of harmonic playing.
Read Full Review If you’re looking for a lightweight guitar aside from a Stratocaster. You prefer the quality of tone produced using humbuckers than a single-coil can deliver. This SG model from Epiphone meets that requirements on the overall sound, playabilty and price that fits the under two hundred dollar budget of a beginner. As well as for seasoned players looking at the market for an affordable studio or back-up guitar to bring on stage.
Fretsizes can be confusing.  They are small measurements but have a big impact on feel and the size designations can vary.  Its best in my opinion to think and talk of frets in their actual crown widths and heights rather than the old Dunlop numbers (the originator of the 6xxx numbering system) as they can mean different things to different people; i.e. Warmoth lists 6105 as .095-.047" while USACG has is at .090-.055" - these are two very different feeling fretsizes. 
Smaller-scale instruments are produced to assist children in learning the instrument as the smaller scale leads to the frets being closer together, making it easier for smaller hands. The scale-size for the smaller guitars is usually in the range 484–578 mm (19.1–22.8 in), with an instrument length of 785–915 mm (30.9–36.0 in). Full-size instruments are sometimes referred to as 4/4, while the smaller sizes are 3/4, 1/2 or 1/4.
By the early ’80s, MTI was importing Westone guitars from Matsumoku, which had made its earlier Univox guitars (and the competitive Westbury guitars offered by Unicord). Wes-tone guitars continued to be distributed by MTI until ’84, when St. Louis Music, now a partner in the Matsumoku operation, took over the brand name and phased out its older Electra brand (also made by Matsumoku) in favor of Electra-Westone and then Westone. But that’s another story…

There are times when a single-coil just doesn’t have enough twang. I’ve encountered Strat neck pickups that are just too wooly to provide me with that saucy, SRV/Hendrix-style rhythm juice. Or, sometimes an anemic bridge pickup just needs an extra dose of snap to push it into Tele-like territory. If so, this simple mod could be just what you’re looking for.
I have a Kona Signature Acoustic with beautiful inlays in the wood. I believe the body is mahogany, decent resonant tone, and once I shimmed up the saddle bridge (which technically should have been replaced all together due to notching), sounds better than my Martin in many ways, where it better distributes the low, high, and mid-range tones. The Martin is too bassy sounding, but have ordered new bone bridge saddle, which hope it improves the cheap plastic one it came with...
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But it would be a mistake to think that this guitar is only suitable for Jason Mraz strumming and happy songs, because it’s just as good for heavy metal! That sweet little tone can easily be transferred to heavy music, or why not pop, jazz or blues? In other words, this guitar is extremely versatile and is the best option for musicians who play many different types of music and want a guitar that works well for pretty much everything.
Decide between mic recording or using a direct box (DI). Recording the sound of your electric guitar by miking your amp is a great way to simulate studio quality sound. However, this will require expensive equipment, like a quality amp, microphone, and potentially sound dampening equipment or material. On the other hand, you can plug your guitar right into a DI to record your guitar.[1]
Paul Reed Smith is a relative newcomer having been born just 2 years after the Stratocaster was created, and founding PRS Guitars in 1985, but in that relatively short period of time PRS have made a huge impact on the guitar world, have been used by the likes of Carlos Santana, Ted Nugent, Dave Navarro. and Mark Tremonti, are now the 3rd biggest electric guitar manufacturer in the USA, and have earned their place among the best electric guitar brands.
Want to write blazing leads and screaming solos? Crank the pitch bend up, use one of four vibrato modes, and shred to your heart's content. Need some ultra-chunky rhythm chugs? S2 features both single-note and powerchord palm mutes with up to 5 layers and 8 variations each, offering superior realism and maximum options. While it excels at rock & metal playing (both lead and rhythm alike), it is also well-suited for many other genres thanks to its clean tone and huge range.
This is the first, and quite possibly the best reason to invest in a good miniature guitar amp. It will allow you to play with a tone that’s enjoyable at a volume that won’t get you kicked out by your condo board. Even if you live out in the middle of nowhere, and can blast your Dual Rectifier full stack as loudly as you’d like, you still have to take the feelings of those you live with into account. Few marriages remain happy when a loud instrument is in the mix. That’s also why a mini amp is a great gift for a young student guitarist. You won’t have to hear them butcher the relatively simple line from a David Bowie tune for days on end.
When someone says: "I've got a Gibson Les Paul with Bare Knuckle Pickups" I tend to think well, you don't really have a "Gibson" Les Paul at all then, because you've removed the elements of the guitar that make it sound like a Gibson. But guitarists are a conservative bunch and tend to hold on to their beliefs, biases, and myths. I've not long managed to let go of mine and it's made me happier with the guitars I now have, and has saved me a lot of money!

We can visualize the operation of a potentiometer from the drawing above. Imagine a resistive track connected from terminal 1 to 3 of the pot. Terminal 2 is connected to a wiper that sweeps along the resistive track when the potentiometer shaft is rotated from 0° to 300°. This changes the resistance from terminals 1 to 2 and 2 to 3 simultaneously, while the resistance from terminal 1 to 3 remains the same. As the resistance from terminal 1 to 2 increases, the resistance from terminal 2 to 3 decreases, and vice-versa.
If you choose, every hole is drilled for each component, including neck, bridge, pickguard and strap button mounting holes. If you choose the optional snap together wiring, then no soldering is required; all electronics connect together with easy to attach connectors. We have done most of the hard work for you! The body needs finish sanding only but should require no filling.
Could be a couple of things. Either it's hitting off a high fret, or more likely the saddle is killing the string's vibration (that can be caused by the string sitting in a slot that does not have a sudden enough drop-off, for example). Try slackening the string and lifting it to the side slightly on the saddle (like 1 or 2 mm), then tune it up again. If that sorts out your problem, at least you've identified the cause.
More and more are finding themselves downsizing their pedalboards, if not totally swapping all their stompboxes for a multi-effects unit. There are also many who are looking to upgrade their existing guitar processor. Whatever your case may be, it is our intention to help you find one that fits your needs, or at least point you to the right direction.
Ok, whoever downvoted me needs to explain their reasoning, since I clearly laid out my reasoning. The person said they're interested in punk/rock/experimental, and there's no possible way you can tell me that a multi-fx pedal is better than a Big Muff and/or a DD3 delay. I will laugh in your face and point if you suggest such a thing. You could get both pedals for the price of any multi effect pedal, they hold their value, and they sound great. If you don't like a Muff, whatever, swap it out for a Rat. – Dan Gayle Aug 1 '14 at 17:39
Some guitars are equipped with active pickups that require batteries as an energy source and incorporate a preamp for sound-shaping. Active electronics may also include filters and equalization circuits for added sound control. Guitars with active electronics generally have a higher output than magnetic pickups and produce cleaner, clearer sound. Most guitar pickups are passive.
The Stratocaster’s sleek, contoured body shape (officially referred to by Fender as the “Comfort Contour Body”[5][6] ) differed from the flat, slab-like design of the Telecaster. The Strat’s double cutaways allowed players easier access to higher positions on the neck.[7] The body’s recessed “beer gut” curve on the upper back, and a gradual chamfer at the front, where the player’s right arm rests, aided player’s comfort. The one-piece maple neck’s wider “dogleg”-style headstock contrasted with the very narrow Fender Telecaster’s headstock shape. The strings are anchored on a through-body pivot bridge attached with springs to a ‘claw’ in the tremolo cavity on the back of the guitar.
Searching for Guitars market values? You have come to the right place! IGuide?is proud to host the online Guitars Price Guide.The price guide is maintained by Jon R. Warren, whose price guide books have been the authority on collectibles values since 1985. The searchable database consists of detailed reports on a ever-growing list of items. Each report includes current market values in ten different grades, as well as a section for "Real Market Data", actual prices fetched at auction. The database is updated daily.
If the Schecter wasn’t quite fast enough, this lower priced version of Steve Vai’s signature guitar should get the job done. The Wizard III neck is a direct copy from its more-expensive variation, and when combined with the 24 jumbo frets, creates a speed machine. Because Vai himself is a versatile guitarist, though, this guitar can pretty much do it all, though if you like a chunky neck for chords, you’ll have to look elsewhere. You even get the Tree of Life inlay at twice price, which looks great.
My first guitar was a fender knockoff. My first professional guitar was a Gibson LP custom. I like the richer tone of the Gibson for ballads, folk and country and the Fender gives you the edge you need for rock, garage and loud stuff. Foot pedals get the sounds you need for just about any style of music with either brand. The fender neck is a bit easier to move over because it is thin and fat-fingered guys like me need a bit of help that way. The Gibson reminds me more of my acoustic guitars. Strings are an important selection for any guitar to be comfortable and get the right sound.
Distortion and overdrive: Distortion and overdrive units re-shape or "clip" an audio signal's wave form so that it has flattened peaks, creating "warm" sounds by adding harmonics or "gritty" sounds by adding inharmonic overtones. In tube amplifiers, distortion is created by compressing the instrument's out-going electrical signal in vacuum tubes or "valves".[52][53] Distortion pedals produce perfectly flattened peaks or "hard" clipping. Overdrive pedals produce "soft” tube-like distortion by compressing the sine wave without completely flattening it. Much like tube amps, overdrive units produce "clean" sounds at quieter volumes and distorted "warm" sounds at louder volumes. Distortion and overdrive pedals may either be transistor-based or digital.[54][55] While distortion pedals are most associated with electric guitar, they are also used with bass guitar (fuzz bass), Hammond organ and electric piano.
Of course, as guitar players we still want to remain open to a number of tonal aspects that happen after the front end of the initial attack. These elements aren’t necessarily in the front part of the very beginning of a guitar tone, nor are they delegated to the trail of lingering sustain. “The reason why people sound a certain way is because of little nuances, those little pull offs, those hammer ons, those plucking [dynamics]— the sequence of those things. Think of it as a sonic palette. That sequence is what makes the artist sound like himself.”
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I agree with play with effects if you want to, they're a lot of fun. I do think playing with distortion and practicing with it on is a good idea. I don't think it's a good idea to practice with distortion all the time. It will mask a lot of mistakes and imperfections in your technique. If you can play something in a clean tone perfectly, it will sound that much better when you add effects. – Tony May 3 '13 at 20:09
Our 4 yr old grandson picked this guitar out and we purchased it for him as his Christmas present, he absolutely loves it. His dad has been teaching him to play it and he said that you can actually plug the guitar into his amp instead of the one that came with it. Our grandson will most certainly grow into this guitar and will get many hours of playtime with this guitar.
Anytime you hear a screaming or raunchy sounding harmonic by way of loads of gain come jumping out of your speakers, it’s likely a result of pinch harmonics. Pinch harmonics follow the same basic idea of harmonics, except this time the contact is made with the skin of your pick hand thumb right after picking a note. Where you do this determines the pitch of the harmonic.

Well... I'm researching this to since I have a Norma Accoustic. From what I have found they were only made between 1965-1970something. Most were made in japan including mine although some were made in Italy. They were made in the same factory as the Sear silvertone's. Most are considered vintage guitars especially the electrics from the 60's. From what I have seen electrics in good condition are worth a good bit of money. I'm still trying to find more info on mine though. Like what woods is it made of. and what was the exact year of manufacture. It says FG-10 on it. It plays great. Has great sound and plays prety easily except mine doesn't seem to like you using the first fret. lol... just trying to add some info here
First established in 1952, Guild has a long history of building guitars, and they draw from this experience with every guitar they produce. The company was previously acquired by Fender, and was sold to Cordoba back in 2014 - and they have since been making a steady comeback in the market. The Westerly Collection D-120 is a great example of what keeps the Guild brand alive - having impressive specs at accessible price points with Guild's characteristic old school appeal.

The original electric guitars were hollow. Well, scratch that — the original Electric Spanish guitars were hollow (stick with us for the third installment of “Fundamentals of Guitar Anatomy” on pickups. The first pickup was made for a lap steel guitar!) Gibson took the words Electric Spanish and turned them into an acronym — ES. We commonly refer to these as hollow body guitars.
Ibanez' strategy to have virtuoso guitarists as endorsers have paid off big time, allowing them to not only produce signature instruments, but to also improve on their production line guitars using the ideas they compiled from various artists. Among their many signature instruments, the Ibanez JEM series is easily one of the most easily identifiable, thanks to its affiliation with guitar wizard Steve Vai and its unique monkey grip handle, which is carved into the body.
This pedal has been a great start, it has been looked after very well and is in excellent condition. I am upgrading my sound which is the reason for the sale. “Great guitarists know it's all about nuance. With its built-in expression pedal, the Zoom G1Xon allows you to add subtlety and refinement to your performance. Add in 100 great-sounding guitar effects and amp models—with the ability to use ...
Portable speaker chambers represent another viable solution. These units are thick, reinforced wooden boxes outfitted with both interior and exterior insulation, housing a built-in speaker and an adjustable microphone stand, along with speaker and microphone cable connectors. Think of a miniature portable iso-booth. They're used professionally in the studio and on stage, preventing unwanted leakage and greatly diminishing stage noise, with excellent results.
Anyone who commented that this was a good list needs to reconsider what makes up a great guitar player. It’s about being multi-faceted musician. Creativity, technicality and musicality all come in to play when your talking about the highest quality players. When I listen to a “shredder” like Steve Vai, I think..yes he is fast but his music makes me feel absolutley nothing emotionally. Truth be told…SRV and David Gilmour are probably the only players on this list that deserve to be there.

Yamaha’s also excel in terms of their playability, which is an especially important characteristic for beginners. Too many players sacrifice quality to save money on their first guitar, with the result being that they now have to deal with difficult playability that poses extra challenges to the learning process and can sour the learner’s experience with the new instrument. Yamaha offers an enticing balance between cost and quality.
If you are a first time builder or an experienced professional you know the value of building your instrument on a solid foundation. The Custom Shop Jag body is beautiful, high quality and made to spec. The Allparts neck is manufactured under license by Fender. The materials and quality level meet the standards set by Fender. Using these high quality materials will give you the sweet tone and sustain you are looking for.
We indicate and report to EMS Worldwide Express mail service that the guitar is sent with a lower declared value than the purchased price and as a gift so that there will be a possible exemption on custom clearance fees, taxes or you may need to pay a little amount but it is necessary, or the custom will open the package and revalue the guitar. Based on our experience, the custom fees in the Europe, USA, Canada, Australia and Asia are very minimal since we declared the guitar as a gift and lower purchased price in order to lessen the custom fees or even possible exemption and we have not received complaints from our valued customers regarding custom fees, taxes and tariffs.
Gibson makes authorized copies of its most successful guitar designs. They are less expensive than those bearing the Gibson name. A former competitor, Epiphone was purchased by Gibson and now makes competitively priced Gibson models, such as the Les Paul and SG, sold under the Epiphone brand,[69] while continuing to make Epiphone-specific models like the Sheraton, Sorrento, and Casino. In Japan, Orville by Gibson once made Gibson designs sold in that country.[70] Gibson has sought legal action against those that make and sell guitars Gibson believes are too similar to their own.

I too have a similar Alvarez made in Japan, 4 digit model no. etc. Mine is a 5059 autumn heringbone model and there is actually a production date on the tag in the sound hole of 1978. The tag is identical to yours as is the headstock logo inlay. Tuners are different however. Based on the similarities to yours I would date it around the same years, '77-'80. I know the model name due to an Alvarez advertisement clipping that depicts the model I have. I too am getting ready to do some much needed TLC to mine as it has been my most loved acoustic for 20 years now. It was a gift from my mother who used it in a country band way back when. These are great guitars that can be bought very cheaply when you can find them. Good luck with the search!

An excerpt: “The Dobro brand name has been identified with resonator guitars since 1929 and is currently owned by Gibson Guitar Corporation. Despite its registered trademark status, the Dobro name has at times been used generically to refer to woodbodied instruments with 1) an aluminum cone or “resonator” mounted so that the cone opens toward the top of the instrument and 2) an 8-armed spider assembly supporting the bridge.”
Flamenco technique, in the performance of the rasgueado also uses the upstroke of the four fingers and the downstroke of the thumb: the string is hit not only with the inner, fleshy side of the fingertip but also with the outer, fingernail side. This was also used in a technique of the vihuela called dedillo[40] which has recently begun to be introduced on the classical guitar.
FeaturesThe Gibson LogoAngled HeadstockAdjustable Truss RodNew Asymmetrical Neck Profile22-Fret Rosewood FingerboardAlloy Fret WireTrapezoid Inlays Set-Neck ConstructionPlus Maple TopChambered Mahogany BodyPickups: Gibson Burstbucker ProsTonePros Locking Tune-o-matic Bridge and Locking Stopbar TailpieceNitrocellulose FinishBody BindingCustom-Made PotentiometersLocking Neutrik JackLocking Grover TunersRevolutionary Plek Set UpNew Enlarged Neck Tenon
The body of the guitar is usually made of wood; different types of woods are used by different manufacturers, and there is ongoing debate concerning which is best. Typical woods include maple, mahogany, swamp ash and alder for quality guitars, and plywood or pine for cheaper, less durable guitars. While the type of wood used in the solid body of an electric guitar will noticeably affect the sound it produces, the quality of the sound is most affected by the pickups which convert the vibration of the strings into an electrical signal, as well as the amplifier that's used to shape and model such signal. We could go on and on dissecting the technical aspects of electric guitars, and yet never get close to that which makes that music unique: it's soul. That's something that can be clearly felt and experienced by players and listeners alike, but which all the while can hardly be put into words. Enjoy the electric guitar music loops!

Guitarists and bassists who want to extend what their instruments are capable of have a huge arsenal of effects pedals and processors they can turn to. From subtle to outrageous, guitar and bass effects pedals and multiprocessors help you capture inspiring sounds off recordings as well as spark your own creativity. Keep reading to get the details on the many types of guitar and bass effects you’ll find at Musician’s Friend. We’ll also get up close with some completely unique stompboxes.


If a guitar is going to be our other half it has got to be comfortable to play. Does that fit in on this one? It sure does! It would be easy to assume that if they have spent so much time making it look good they probably didn’t have time to make it ergonomic, but that’s exactly what they’ve done! The guitar has a deep belly cut, a hidden forearm contour and a neck joint that makes it easy to play high up on the fretboard.

Electric Guitars- Vintage, new & used / Second-hand electric guitars by Kay, Teisco Del Rey Ray ET J-1, Univox & Silvertone. Cheesy Japanese, Surf Guitars. Also guitars by Ibanez, Gibson, Fender, Peavey, Martin, Zon, Gretsch, Rickenbacker, Diasonic & More. Les Pauls recording, lap steels / slide guitars, Barney Kessel style, Fender Stratocasters, Telecasters, Squire Bullet series, Peavey Falcon neck Martin Acoustics, bass guitars, Zon Legacy Elite 5 string Bass, Diasonic double single cutaway, Rickenbacker, archtop, Gretsch TW-100T Traveling Wliburys guitar, Hamer Mirage 1, Yamaha sg-2000, Fender Jag-Stang, Gibson Howard Roberts, Ibanez Artist AR-100 to name a few.
You’d be hard-pressed to find a more distinctive guitar tandem in modern metal than Zacky Vengeance (Zachary Baker) and Synyster Gates (Brian Haner, Jr.). From their sound, to their look, even to their names, the duo routinely go down guitar paths other metal axmen don’t dare travel, spicing up Avenged Sevenfold’s otherwise dark and aggressive attack with, among other things, hooky, major-key melodies, laid-back acoustic picking, buoyant, carnival-esque rhythms and a whole lot of style.

Guitar tabs (which is short for tablature) is a type of musical notation for stringed instruments that show you which fret to play on each string, as opposed to standard staff notation, which shows you the pitch of a note. Beginner guitarists have a much easier time learning from tablature, but in the long run, it’s a good idea to learn the standard musical notation as well.
"Acousterr's tab maker is a tablature maker application which can be used to write down and compose music. Users can create tabs, play them out, explore tabs created by other users. They can choose any instrument like guitar, bass guitar, piano, ukulele. The sounds are mathematically modelled to be generated at runtime for any combination of notes and effects like hammer on pull off etc for different types of instruments. This gives a beautiful listening experience. Multiple tracks can be added in a single tab which play out simultaneously, so as to simulate an entire song with various parts like bass guitar, lead guitar, rhythm guitar etc. The UX for editing multiple tracks has been meticulously designed to allow tab lines to synchronise easily. With great keyboard support, notes can be easily added and chords can be created on the fly by pressing shift key and selecting multiple notes. Scale helper is there to allow composing solos easily. Designed to work well on mobile browsers too."
How a guitar feels is highly subjective – after all, even guitarists come in all shapes and sizes. While the acoustics in our list are all made in such a way that most guitarists will find them comfortable and easy to play, there’s still no beating being able to try several models out so you can choose which one feels like it’s a part of your body.

In 2013, Gibson introduced the Government Series of Les Paul, SG, Flying V, Explorer and ES-335 guitars which were constructed solely of tonewood the US government seized but later returned to Gibson after the resolution of the company's Lacey Act violation in 2011. The guitars were finished in "government grey" and also featured decorations which intended to draw attention to the issue of government. A year later in 2014, Gibson released the Government Series II[77] of guitars, which were essentially the same as the first series, only finished in a new color: "government tan".

Chorus pedals really made their mark in the 80’s with the likes of the Boss CE-1 and CE-2, the Electro Harmonix Small Clone and the TC Electronics Stereo Chorus. I found a nice definition of chorusing on Wikipedia: “Chorus pedals mimic the effect choirs and string orchestras produce naturally by mixing sounds with slight differences in timbre and pitch. A chorus effect splits the instrument-to-amplifier audio signal, and adds a slight delay and frequency variations or “vibrato” to part of the signal while leaving the rest unaltered.” A chorus is a modulation effect but the modulation we hear is produced by delaying the wet signal a very short duration causing the doubling effect we hear. So it is actually a time based effect.
Whereas tube amps are the traditional, solid-state amplifiers represent the modern guitar amplifier (even though they have been around for decades). While some guitarists refuse to consider solid-state amps worthy of their time, models such as the Roland JC-120 Jazz Chorus are proof that solid-state amplification is not only capable, but preferable in some cases. This high-end amp offers 120 watts of power, professional-grade tone and awesome versatility. It’s a good reflection of this segment, which offers endless versatility with affordable prices, low maintenance and incredible reliability.
Yet another awesome 6 strings right handed electric guitar. The body is finished in solid basswood while the neck has a bolt on . The fingerboard is made of rosewood with 22 frets . It mostly comes in  black colour. It is quite affordable, with prices ranging from INR 9,071 depending on various market factors. you can click below to get more product details such as offers available:
Next models is another semi-hollow design, only this time we are looking at a bit more neutral guitar. I wouldn’t go so far as to say that it’s somewhere between a solid body and a semi-hollow. That would simply be wrong, but it does have a harder tone for a model of this type. It didn’t take me long to find the right setup, and off we went. Sound, playability – everything is on point.
You can do this using a fairly slow tracking time in Auto-Tune so that the bend dynamics aren't changed in any obvious way — it's just that when you finish bending, the note will come to rest on a precise value. Not that I'm suggesting you need to do this, of course, but the day will come when a client plays a never to be repeated take that is perfect apart from a few bend intonation problems...
Here we have a beautiful player with great heritage.. This guitar was an Import from Japan back in 1978 its a very well built guitar and employs the same x bracing seen on Martins. Workmanship is very high as is materials the vintage tone woods are beautifully mellowen and the tone has opened up nicely on this and so the volume is good on this guitar with a new set of straings now sounds like quite big a Piano...clear and clean god volume and reasonible bass.. Very good sound from this one..t also plays quite nicely with good play action not to low not to high...it plays very wel.. structually no cracks or serious anything to speak up just the most minimap superficial nicks as this vintage guitar qualifies for the xcllent vintage condition catagory. The finsh is wonderful and glass like shine to it and has a beautiful warm patine to it you can't get without waiting the near 40 years for it to age this way... this guitar will make somon a wonderful D-18 /28 style instrumnt to enjoy for another 40 years... If your like us you love vintage instruments and this is a bargain of a great lttle player, for a song.. You will be pleased. Thanks for looking if interested contact Joe at : gr8bids@comcast.net .
I've been to Steve about a dozen times with my guitars, families and friends instruments and have sent several people there and have nothing but great things to say. He is reasonably priced and likely one of the most talented and experienced Luthier's in Boston. It's rare to see any establishment get 5 stars from so many people and Steve deserves it! Only thing is, if you're in a rush to get your instrument back, go somewhere else where they do it quickly and without much thought/TLC. Steve takes his time to do it right and has a lot of customers because he's the guy to go to in the greater Boston area. Highly recommend!
@NeilMeyer I used to believe that as well until I started noticing songs that used the flatted 7th degree chord instead. It's generally easier to play those major chords for a beginner than diminished chords. Since the answer is provided for beginning students, I presented the easier approach. Notice the chart also leaves out some major keys which feature more difficult to play chords. Keeping it simple for newbies. Tim referenced this (music.stackexchange.com/q/29817/16897) – Rockin Cowboy Jan 18 '16 at 17:26
Steve Albini, on the other hand, finds it useful to think in terms of blending 'bright' and 'dark' mics. "Normally I'll have two microphones on each cabinet, a dark mic and a bright mic, say a ribbon microphone and a condenser, or two different condensers with different characters." Eddie Kramer's discussion of his Hendrix sessions reveals a similar preference: "Generally speaking, it was either a U67 or a Beyerdynamic M160, or a combination of both, which I still use today. It might be slightly different, of course, but the basic principle's the same — a ribbon and a condenser."
Processors, on the other hand, comprise an entirely different water heating appliance filled with piscean vertebrates, as they tend not to need any of the dry sound, other than in a few specialist applications. As a rule, processors such as EQ and compression are connected only via track, bus or master insert points — at least until you have the necessary experience to understand why you might want to break the rules once in a while. Having got that off my chest, let's look at some specific effects (we'll look more closely at processors another time).
I want to talk about a session that I got hired for this week. On this particular session, I was asked to recreate a very early-to-mid 70’s guitar tone. Something in the vein of George Harrison. Maybe “All Things Must Pass” era.

So I want to talk about my method, and the process to get this sound. The first key element is guitar and amp. I always start here. I feel like this is the most important relationship in getting any era of sound.
Photo: Pick up an acoustic guitar and what you have in your hands is mostly empty space! Inside, the large wooden body (which is called the sound box) is filled with nothing more than air. As you pluck the strings, the wooden body of the guitar vibrates, the air inside the body vibrates too, and it's the vibrations of the wooden body and the air that amplify the string sound so you can hear it. Acoustic guitars have those big holes in the middle of the case, under the strings, so the amplified sound can get out and travel to your ears. In other words, the hole works the same way as the hole in the end of a trumpet, flute, or any other instrument. Photo by Greg Pierot courtesy of US Navy.
To ensure 100% customer satisfaction Bajaao offers 10 day return policy and we also pay for the return shipping to help you be free of the online shopping anxiety. Our content rich page is your one stop to get all the required information about the products be it the product description or the user generated hands on reviews. A friendly and knowledgeable staff is there to help you out with your queries should there be anything else you wish to know about the product, process, payment or after sale service. Our dedicated team will help you to select from the best of the products within your range. Call our experts to find out the best product to suit your style and need and buy electro acoustic guitars at the lowest prices in India.
If you're anything like me, you started out with a basic beginner's guitar, and over time you realized that you were ready for something better. I had a Squier Telecaster(standard series) and I was ready for a change. I was set on a Les Paul of some sort, possibly a used LP Standard. I read tons of reviews, then I started reading some of the Epi Les Pauls(the nicer ones, $400-500).
But here’s the thing: every single useful DAW is available for a 30-day demo or so. So you can at the very least try before you buy. The only downside is that some of these are only available in their full “pro” versions, so if you’re on a budget, you can get the 30 day (or more : REAPER has a 60 day demo and only costs $60 if you keep it, but I don’t know if you’d do live stuff with it… some of the fun will be figuring out all the tech).
With two decades of experience and thousands of local customers served I found myself unemployed/downsized in 2010 asking myself what I wanted to do next. After some searching I understood that I really enjoy the interaction that takes place in the local store between the customer and the shopkeeper. I know that we can offer the same prices as the big stores and hopefully make the experience more enjoyable.

By the late twenties, the idea for electrified string instruments had been around for some time, and experimental banjo, violin and guitar pickups had been developed. George Beauchamp had himself been experimenting with electric amplification as early as 1925, but his early efforts involving microphones did not produce the effects he desired. Along the way Beauchamp also built a one-string test guitar made out of a 2X4 piece of lumber and an electric phonograph pickup. As the problems at National became more apparent, Beauchamp’s home experiments took on a more rigorous shape, and he began to attend night classes in electronics as well as collaborating with fellow National employee Paul Barth.[1] When the prototype electric pickup they were developing finally worked to his satisfaction, Beauchamp asked former National shop craftsman Harry Watson to make a wooden neck and body to which the electronics could be attached. It was nicknamed the frying pan because of its shape, though Adolph Rickenbacker liked to call it the pancake.[6] The final design Beauchamp and Barth developed was an electric pickup consisting of a pair of horseshoe-shaped magnets that enclosed the pickup coil and completely surrounded the strings.[1]
If you’ve ever stepped foot into a music store, you’ve seen a Hal Leonard book. They’re iconic in the annals of guitar-learning lore. They’re not the hippest or the most accessible, but they nevertheless remain key fixtures. This compendium combines the three books of the method into one. Just about everything you need to know is in here somewhere, though it’s commonly said that an instructor is needed to parse the flow of information. Still, it’s a great reference and if it makes sense to you out of the gate, there’s the potential to learn a lot from this classic tome.
A. Electric guitars either have bolt-on, set neck, or neck-through neck construction. Bolt on necks are simply bolted onto the body, set necks are set into the body and glued, and neck-through construction is where the neck extends all the way through the body. The latter is generally considered the best and most durable, but won't be found on cheaper guitars.
Guitars. Having all your guitars set up properly is an obvious essential for dialing in good tone. I like low-ish action, and for low action to work, I need to set my guitar necks to have just a bit of relief so the strings won’t buzz and rattle, and in turn choke the tone. I’m always checking the neck relief on my guitars and adjusting the truss rod accordingly.
Basicly it is a HD digital sound interface plus with a MIDI controller and footswitch. It is has unique design with different HOST mode and switching MODE to work with the host softwares. We are proud of that it is now maybe the best thing you can find to use on stage with software FX. The special designed analog signal chain mixing with the digital codec give the best dynamic response and sound quality. We did AB with lots of other interface and be so confident on its performance.
The search never stops for the best acoustic guitar to play during jamming sessions, recording sessions and live gigs. Every year, guitar brands keep on coming up with awesome acoustic guitars to take your playing to the next level. So what’s the latest? We have scoured through various models released in recent years all the way through 2018 and picked out 7 of the very best, chosen for their impressive build, unique tonal character, incredible value and overall winning quality. If you’re looking for the best acoustic guitar for your needs, consider this your short list.
Providing all of the necessary features expected in a quality electric guitar at a budget-friendly price, the Epiphone Les Paul Special II is perfect for those just beginning their musical journey or the seasoned guitarist looking for an everyday guitar for practice. The 650R humbucker pickups combined with the open coil design deliver strong and sustained tones. As seen on all Epiphone guitars, the Special II has over 500K potentiometer for both tone and volume, and a toggle selector with a 3-way pickup to focus in on the clarity of the sound and decreased excess humming. The body and neck are made with mahogany, while the fretboard has dot inlays within the rosewood design. String changing is also made easier due to the stopbar tailpiece, which helps to add more sustain in sound when combined with the LockTone Tune-O-Matic bridge. With all of these features at such a reasonable price point, the Epiphone Les Paul Special II is a strong contender included on this list.
I'm not sure if it's been made clear or not yet, but the imported firewood that had a Kay brand name on it in the seventies bears no relation to the products of the the Kay Co. of Chicago USA. It's not all plywood either; they had a range of total crap to not-so-crappy models. I never much liked their p.u.s or their necks. This is a good body (late 40's K-44) with a better (Harmony!) neck.
Best Answer:  First, make sure you have new or clean strings that aren't dead. You should hear a metallic harmonic overtone to picked notes particularly on the low E, A, and D wound strings. If your low E sounds in tune but makes a flat dull boww boww boww instead of dang dang dang when you pick change them. Set your amp up for a fairly bright sound clean, playing off the bridge pickup. Make sure the guitar volume knob(s) are rolled all the way on and tones are all the way up, no roll off. If you can't get a nice clear clean sound that doesn't sound distant and muted then you have some issue with the guitar electrics or amp. If you're playing off the neck pickup that's a big muddier right there. The neck pickup is good for clean rhythm playing, jazz, and for a hollow warm tubey sound on single notes but tends to muddy overdriven power chords. Once you have the amp set for a bright clean sound that's not too brassy (if it has a master volume in addition to a gain or channel volume set the gain or volume low for a clean sound and use master for output level, let the RP90 do the effects work, not the amp preamp for now.) bring in the RP90. I'm not familiar with it but try it on a few overdrive and distortion settings. If you've only been an acoustic player high overdrive or distortion "power steering" takes a different play style.
If you’ve been playing for a while, chances are pretty good that you’ve probably already built up a collection of four, five or 10 stomp boxes, which now leaves you with the question of how to hook them all up and use them in your rig. Or perhaps you’ve hooked everything up and wondered why you get howling feedback, excess white noise, hum or silence whenever you engage two or more pedals at once.
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