The SG Standard is Gibson’s all-time best-selling guitar. It was conceived in 1961 and originally released as the new Les Paul. It featured distinct horn-shaped cutaways, and the neck joint was moved three frets, which made the guitar lighter and allowed easier upper fret access. In addition to these changes, the body was slimmer than the Les Paul Standard and the neck profile was more slender. However, with Mr. Paul preferring the sturdier design elements of his original model and due to contractual complications, his name was ultimately removed. Where Les Paul saw a mutation of his original design, others saw genius—from ’63 on, the Les Paul name was removed and the SG, or “Solid Guitar,” was born.
Learning guitar with no source material to work with will require many different resources, overlapped to fill the blindspots of each. Most people take lessons, but you’ll be at the mercy and pace of your teacher, with little room for your own interpretation. These days, there are apps and online lessons which have their advantages, certainly. They also come with monthly fees, though these will likely be cheaper than a live local instructor.
Seller: bennick2013 (4) 100%, Location: Marietta, Georgia, Ships to: US, Item: 302905274242 Beautiful red body and maple neck looks great despite minor dings and scratches. Neck is straight and intonates well, action just fine with no divots or dead spots. Get it now before they become scarce and PLAY Condition: Used, Condition: Very Good, Brand: Lotus, MPN: Does Not Apply, String Configuration: 6 String, Body Type: Solid, Body Color: Red, Model: Strat, Model Year: ? See More
A final tip: not a lot of people know this, but Antares Auto-Tune works rather well with electric guitar. Of course Auto-Tune is monophonic, so it will dutifully ignore chords and double notes, but it will come into play when it detects a single note. You might reasonably ask whether a guitar tuner might not be a wise investment, but the reason I suggest Auto-Tune is not to compensate for a badly tuned guitar, but rather to pull imprecisely bent guitar stings into pitch.

So much has changed since our last refresh – where do we begin! First we answered some common questions that you might have. Then we reviewed our top ten chart and individual categories, and removed several older models including the Gibson Les Paul Faded T 2017, Epiphone’s G-310 SG, and the ESP MH-50. We added many others including one of the greatest guitars ever made, the Ernie Ball Music Man John Petrucci Majesty Monarchy, the premium Fender Eric Clapton Stratocaster, the Yamaha RevStar RS420 and Mark Holcomb’s signature PRS MHHB2 SE.


The Thunderbird IV was first introduced in 1963 and instantly became one of rock's most recognizable bass guitar designs. For almost five decades, the Thunderbird has powered artists as varied as Nikki Sixx, The Who, Kings of Leon, Cheap Trick, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Steely Dan and The Silversun Pickups. Turn on your radio and you'll hear a Thunderbird bass. Now, Epiphone takes all the vintage mojo of the original Thunderbird IV and sends it flying into the future with Gibson TB Plus humbuckers with ceramic magnets and all the 'Bird's original styling and features intact.

We are still in the testing phase with this system, and our representatives are still finding out how to give you the best possible experience. Therefore, it may happen that we do not understand you (please speak clearly in either German or English only), that equipment is being tried out by other customers temporarily, or that there are problems with the connection. Please do not hesitate to give us feedback whenever anything like this happens, so that we may learn from this and improve our service.
What we're looking at here is a standard Les Paul body made of mahogany and finished with an attractive vintage sunburst pattern. There's also a gorgeous heritage cherry sunburst and a straight ebony finish option as well. It features a pair of 700T humbuckers, one at the bridge and one at the neck position. These are pretty basic in nature, but their performance is more than good enough even for more experienced players and important recordings.
This is a wide range of electric guitar series that have a stylish body and deliver high-quality sound. Cort guitars are fabricated by South Korean manufactures and have been on the market since 1973. Those who are keen on the appearance of the guitar can opt for this brand of electric guitar. This is an electric guitar that is available at an affordable price range between 10,000 to 40,000 INR.
The Basic Principles: A Valve is an extension of the light bulb. Theoretically inside the valve is a vacuum. The hot filament is called ‘Cathode’ (Let’s not forget a T.V. is a’ Cathode ray tube’ ). Around the outside of the Cathode is a cylindrical metal tube called ‘Anode’. When a +Voltage is placed on the Anode and a -Voltage placed on the Cathode, a large current can flow between them, but not the other way around.
Pressing a string against a fret reduces the vibrating length of that string to the distance between the pressure point and the bridge, thereby controlling pitch. On nearly every Western fretted instrument, the distance between frets is a semi-tone of equal temperament, assuring the easy achievement of strong sounding chords and single notes that fit our hemisphere’s usual expectations for rhythm sounds and melodies. Understanding the virtues and limitations created by the order of frets opens up the door to ways to escape their constricts, like bending strings, playing slide, using whammy bars, delving into extended technique or trying fretless instruments.
Starting from the body, we see the standard Les Paul shape. The tonewood of choice is mahogany, as expected, but this time it comes with a maple top. The top of the guitar arches slightly just like the original Les Paul does. In terms of details, we see a white binding around the top section that really stands out on the dark matte finish.  It's something to behold.

After lowering the bridge (usually in a failed attempt at getting lower string action), the owner will eventually realize this is not the best solution. When this happens and a neck reset is preformed, the original bridge will now be *useless* (because it is too low!) The repair guy won't reset the neck to a low bridge, so a new replacement bridge will be installed. At this point the originality of the instrument is compromised.
Originally started as a replacement parts shop in Japan, ESP Guitars – which stands for Electric Sound Products – got their guitar manufacturing business off to a rocky start here in the United States. They were taken to court by Gibson guitars for producing instruments that too closely resembled the American brand’s guitars. But, they settled out of court in 1978 and ESP’s reputation eventually grew, thanks in part to George Lynch, the guitarist for the 80s metal band Dokken, and his signature axe pictured here – The Kamikaze Model 1. Now, ESP guitars are wildly popular amongst metal and hard rock clientele and you can hear their instruments on the records of some of the brand’s loyal artists – including the likes of James Hetfield and Kirk Hammett of Metallica, Page Hamilton of Helmet, and the guys in Children of Bodom.
Ibanez offers a wide variety of electric guitars, bass guitars, and acoustic guitars. They’re not the best at producing super high-end guitars for pros and enthusiasts, but they are excellent guitars for any beginner. The price you typically pay for an ibanez is usually between $200 and $500. If you’re set on Ibanez, they do offer higher end models that can cost over $2,500. Despite their reasonable prices, the quality of Ibanez guitars is decent. Ibanez tends to have good performance at economical prices. Not every aspect of their guitars are perfect as they are a cheaper brand, but they do tend to put a little more effort into areas that matter. For example, the necks of their guitars are typically mahogany or basswood. These materials are known as the high-end materials that the top guitar models would use.
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Invented in 1931, the amplified electric guitar was adopted by jazz guitar players, who wanted to play single-note guitar solos in large big band ensembles. Early proponents of the electric guitar on record include Les Paul, Lonnie Johnson, Sister Rosetta Tharpe, T-Bone Walker, and Charlie Christian. During the 1950s and 1960s, the electric guitar became the most important instrument in popular music.[1] It has evolved into an instrument that is capable of a multitude of sounds and styles in genres ranging from pop and rock to country music, blues and jazz. It served as a major component in the development of electric blues, rock and roll, rock music, heavy metal music and many other genres of music.
A comparable alternative at a fraction of the price to the Axe-Fx (which also made the list), the Line 6 Pod HD Pro offers a ton of amp models and effects within it’s 2U rack interface. With over 100+ premium effects, 16 different cabinet models, and even eight microphone models, the Pod HD Pro gives you complete control over every aspect of your tone. All of this is complimented by an intricate display that lets you know exactly what your virtual signal path is. Add the ability to use a mic, bass, or your Line 6 Variax guitar for recording or live scenarios, and you’ve got the best of every realm of music-making at your fingertips. Oh, and to answer the most important question: Does it djent? Yes.

Since there is little difference outside of the individual guitars featured in this series, I will nitpick a bit and say that RealLPC has the worst GUI of the four.  Where there was never any difficult-to-read text on RealStrat, there is some here, and the weird navy green parameter boxes along with a black Les Paul with gold trim doesn’t sit well for me.  
Then, in the late ‘60s, two things happened. First, Unicord was purchased by conglomerate Gulf+Western around 1967. Then, Unicord was merged with a company called Merson, which housed brands like Tempo, Giannini and Hagstrom. It’s not certain what the exact timeline of these events were, but once the merger occurred, Univox up and moved its production from New York City to Westbury, NY. However, that didn’t stay static for long.
Richie Sambora: features an alder body, a 22-fret neck with maple fingerboard, mother of pearl “star” fingerboard inlays, Floyd Rose “Original” locking tremolo, 25dB active mid-boost circuit with active/passive switch, two Fender Texas Special single-coil pickups (neck/middle) and a DiMarzio PAF Pro humbucker in the bridge position. Updated in 1999 with American Vintage hardware, dual-coil Ceramic Noiseless pickups and a 12dB active mid-boost preamp with “no-load” tone circuit and bypass switch. Also available as a “standard” version with a poplar body, rosewood fingerboard with 21 medium-jumbo frets, DiMarzio PAF Pro humbucker with two standard alnico single-coils and a Floyd Rose II locking tremolo. Discontinued in 2002.
: Just in a vintage excellent beauty with a fresh JVGuitars set up is ,New Martin strings bone nut & saddle and solid ebony with brass ring and Abalone inlay bridge pins, all old plastic cheap tone robing parts are tossed out for the JVGuitars TONAL UPGRADE to 2017 specifications otherwise she's ALL ORIGINAL see for yourself She's pretty darn clean and in better than 40 years old average vintage condition For a song. The Takamine F360 was DISCONTINUED decades ago This is the Lawsuit version Specifications Top Sitka Spruce Back Rosewood Sides Rosewood Finger Board Rosewood Electronics None Finish Natural Gloss Faithful D-28 style Dreadnought The most popular body shape of the past half century, the Dreadnought delivers a strong low end with plenty of volume. Structural integrity is excellent as is neck applignment its action is very good low and it plays with ease, new strings and sounds great this fine vintage Japanese instrument is ready for another 40 years of enjoyment. She is not new its actually 40+ years old and has been played, frets are still excellent and have been JVG dressed and she has a few minor and insignificant doinks or scratches and nothing to detour from its vintage patina beauty she's a true vintage quality instrument and is faithfully based on the great D-28 a playable work of art you can hear and enjoy for decades to come. Well taken care of California one adult owner that took really good care over 40 years just for you! Get her before she's gone. any questions or to purchase now contact Joe at JVGuitars@gmail.com .
If you are familiar with - a special kind of - programming, you can use something like Pure Data or Max MSP. Pure Data (PD), for example, is an open source, visual programming environment for manipulating streams of data like audio (or video). With PD you are able to build your own individual FX chains or use community contributed patches (In PD speech "programs" are called patches). But I think it's not as trivial to use as out of the box products.
A. Most electric guitars have several control knobs on the body. The amount of knobs and what they do can vary, so it's worth experimenting, but we'll go over the most common configuration. The majority of electric guitars have three control knobs and one switch. One control knob is for volume and the other two are for tone, with one controlling the neck pickup, and the other controlling the bridge pickup. The switch is to change between using the neck or bridge pickup.
Pickups are meant to capture (pick up) the strings' vibration. Now, the pickup closest to the neck captures the strings' vibrations at their highest amplitude, which results in a warm sound with lots of lows. Conversely, the pickup closest to the bridge captures the strings' vibrations at their lowest amplitude, rendering a bright and sharp sound. So, the same pickup will have a different sound depending on its position. That's why most guitars are equipped with several pickups.
Near the beginning of Epiphone's thinline semi-acoustic range is 'The Dot', based on the timeless and legendary Gibson ES-335. The Dot feels comfortable to hold and play, and the neck, while by no means clubby, feels substantial in your palm, probably due to the 43mm width at the nut. Its slightly flattened C-profile increases marginally in depth further up the neck, making for a suitably vintage feel. An acoustic strum issues forth a pleasing, resonant ring. We'd wager that the Dot's all-maple construction has got something to do with that, but more obviously, the hollow bouts bolster the acoustic tone, inducing wry smiles to those listening. Before plugging in, listen to Ronny Jordan, then Noel Gallagher, then BB King, then George Harrison and John Lennon. It becomes immediately apparent that this style of guitar is hugely versatile. This Dot is no exception: the pickups, while not packing the punch of USA PAFs, offer everything form smooth and moody, front-position mellowness to screeching, bridge position rawk. It's one of the best electric guitars for jazz at this price point, too. The Dot looks fine, sounds great and plays great. To our minds, that's value for money indeed.
The Tune-o-matic bridge was the brainchild of legendary Gibson president Ted McCarty in 1954, setting the standard for simplicity and functionality that has never been bettered. The 2008 Les Paul Standard features TonePros locking Nashville Tune-o-matic in a chrome finish, which has saddle adjustment screws on the pickup side, and pre-notched saddles for quick installation. The chrome locking stopbar tailpiece is also from TonePros. These parts come with locking studs designed to secure both components firmly to the body so that there is no lean, yielding a great union between the strings and body which results in excellent tone and sustain.
Categories: Guitar manufacturing companies of the United StatesGuitar amplifier manufacturersManufacturing companies based in ChicagoManufacturing companies established in 1890Companies disestablished in 19681890 establishments in Illinois1968 disestablishments in IllinoisDefunct companies based in IllinoisMusical instrument manufacturing companies of the United States

"Emulating guitar sounds is problematic – or it was until Impact Soundworks launched Shreddage. Version 2 for Kompact 5 is rammed full of chords and articulations to get the most authentic sound possible […] The quality of the samples here is really good. Although aimed at Rock and Metal, it lends itself to any genre. For those more accustomed to keys than strings, it is ideal with its impressive soundset and amount of control." CM Reviews (Computer Music)


I've been a lazy person in terms of writing product reviews, but had to chime in on the Epiphone LP purchase. First of all, I did research on new guitar options at the local Guitar Center website and settled on this instrument. They had it for $199, so for kicks I looked on Amazon two nights before I had planned to test and buy at our GC on a Sat. Amazon had it for $159 and $199 for lots of extras. I already had a case and nice Marshall Amp, so only needed the guitar. The best part, it arrived on Sat about the same time I would have purchased locally. The reviews were so good, I was not worried about testing live before purchase and it was a great choice.

In the entry-level market, brand-name guitar companies are usually forced to make their guitars with cheaper materials. There is a simple reason for this. Most major brand-name companies have a brand owner (sometimes an American company). That company buys from a factory in China, and in Australia they will have a distributor who will sell to a retailer (your local music store). It’s pretty easy to see why they can be forced to use cheaper materials. There is a lot of price pressure to get a guitar manufactured at a low enough price for everybody to take their cut of the profit down the chain.
Jazz guitarists learn to perform these chords over the range of different chord progressions used in jazz, such as the ubiquitous ii-V-I progression, the jazz-style blues progression (which, in contrast to a blues-style 12 bar progression, may have two or more chord changes per bar) the minor jazz-style blues form, the I-vi-ii-V based "rhythm changes" progression, and the variety of modulation-rich chord progressions used in jazz ballads, and jazz standards. Guitarists may also learn to use the chord types, strumming styles, and effects pedals (e.g., chorus effect or fuzzbox) used in 1970s-era jazz-Latin, jazz-funk, and jazz-rock fusion music.
Last week we talked about choosing the right “Guitar Effects to Expand Your Sound” with sub-topics of “Guitar Effects Used By Your Favorite Pro Guitarists” and “Guitar Effects To Use For Each Music Genre”. Now that you’ve hopefully acquired some pedals of your own, there is another important topic that greatly influences the outcome of your tone – your pedalboard order.
When you're learning your instrument, having Books, Sheet Music & Media on hand is absolutely invaluable. It doesn't matter if you're a first time player or an old pro, this type of literature is going to help you to enhance your skills and become a better player overall. Think of having books, sheet music & media at your disposal like having the world's most diverse roster of teachers at your disposal 24 hours a day, seven days a week. By being able to learn on your own schedule, you'll find yourself playing new chords, progressions and songs in no time. So which books, sheet music & media are right for you? Well, as you can imagine, that's just going to be a matter of skill level and personal preference. If you're looking for a serious method book that will give you a solid basis in guitar technique, be sure to check out the Hal Leonard Guitar Method Complete Edition. This book and CD combo is designed to help anyone learn to play their acoustic or electric guitar. With convenient teaching ideas and fantastic audio assistance from Greg Koch, this set will help you cover all of your bases.

I want to focus on acoustic guitar but some electric is alright. Mainly I want to build up a repertoire of songs that MOST people will know if heard and be able to sing a long. Currently I know very few songs such as this but I have been playing off and on for years. Any really popular (old or newish is fine) songs that are not impossible to play would be great. Thanks!


On guitars with tremolo bridges, the bridge must be stabilized before any adjustments are made. Regardless of the manufacturer, the correct position for any bridge, under string tension, is going to be parallel to and essentially flush with the top (or up to 1mm, or so, above the top). Ultimately, we want the bridge assembly to sit such that we have a range of adjustability over the bridge saddles, so that we can dictate the preferred string height over the fretboard.
Delay – a time-based effect that sounds like an echoing of your guitar tone. A delay pedal creates a copy of your guitar tone that repeats like a fading echo. Delay pedals usually have a time knob that allows you to choose the time of the delay intervals, an effect level knob that controls the volume of the delayed sound and a feedback knob that controls how many repeats are sounded before the effect fades. See different types of Delay below:

His first solo album, Texas Flood, was released in 1983 and featured blistering renditions of “Testify” and “Texas Flood” as well as now-classic originals like “Pride and Joy” and “Lenny.” Several other successful solo albums followed. On August 27, 190, Vaughan perished in a helicopter crash while returning form a gig he shared with Eric Clapton, Buddy Guy, Jimmie Vaughan and Robert Cray.
The first electric instrument amplifiers were not designed for use with electric guitars. The earliest examples were portable PA systems, which appeared in the early 1930s when the introduction of electrolytic capacitors and rectifier tubes allowed the production of economical built-in power supplies that could be plugged into wall sockets, instead of heavy multiple battery packs, since rechargeable batteries would not become lightweight until many decades later. While guitar amplifiers from the beginning were used to amplify acoustic guitar, electronic amplification of guitar was first widely popularized by the 1930s and 1940s craze for Hawaiian music, which extensively employed the amplified lap steel Hawaiian guitar.[2]
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Sunburst, Amber
You have 6 strings that are always made of metal. Then you have a number of pickups - these are actually magnets. Sometimes you can see a round magnet under each string. When a metal string vibrates over a magnet, a current is produced; this current is what ends up being converted into sound waves, but it is very weak. Thus you have to send it through an amplifier.
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According to the official information Guitar Tricks has more than double the number of song lessons than any other guitar learning site. It goes on to say that there are more than 600 but I feel that the number could be even higher by now because new songs are added regularly. The songs available on Guitar Tricks are the ones that I want to learn, oldies and modern songs from major artists like The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Eagles, Blink-182, Extreme, Good Charlotte and many more. Check out this list of Guitar Tricks Artists. Did I mention that lots of songs have a beginner and an advanced level lesson? I just love that the advanced level songs are taught based on the original arrangement and not some vague resemblance used to avoid copyright issues. This is because Guitar Tricks has licenses for teaching the original songs.
Gretsch was founded in 1883 and started out making banjos - it wasn't until the 1930s that they began producing guitars - but during the 1950s their guitars began to take on legendary status. During the 1960s their popularity hit stratospheric levels because George Harrison was playing a modified 1957 Gretsch Duo Jet that he bought second hand for £70 from a ship crew member in Liverpool who had bought it brand new in New York. Most collectors agree that the 50s & 60s are the most sought after Gretsch guitars.

When you’re just starting out you generally play in less than ideal conditions and your soundman, if one is present at all, isn’t going to be as well versed in his/her craft as someone who works in larger venues. Because the guitar is resistant to feedback and gives you the option to sculpt your tone without having to rely on a console, it will prove to be a valuable asset.


Because of the way the guitar is tuned and the amount of spread between the notes of each individual strings chords are voiced in certain very particular ways. These voicings are physically impossible to imitate on a keyboard, at least with any reasonable amount of facility. Conversely, keyboard voicings are generally unplayable on a guitar, as you'd have to be playing more than one note on a single string in many cases.
The AEG10II combines laminated spruce top with mahogany back and sides, and packs both in a thin profile body. Thin bodied guitars, while more resistant to feedback than their larger counterparts, don’t have the breadth of tone or the volume of a full sized acoustic guitar. The cool thing about this guitar is that, it’s one of the cheapest ways for beginning musicians to get a solid gigging instrument.
I would like to start off the list of the best small guitar amps by talking about one of the best small guitar amps out there, which unfortunately dedicated the entirety of its existence to being used for the purposes of laying acoustic guitars. Unfortunately, because I would love to have one of these to work with my electric guitars. On the other hand, the fact that the amp works with acoustic guitars best, means that those of you looking for a mini amp for your acoustic guitar are in luck. The amp does a great job of amplifying the sound of an acoustic guitar, keeping it clean and clear of any kind of electric distortion, so that if there was no increase in volume, nobody would understand the point of the pick up. While small, the pick up is still on the larger side as compared to the rest on the list. The design is vintage and cool, so that the guitar is enjoyable to look at for everyone.
Compressor effects help you control the volume variations of your guitar. The compressor basically makes the loud parts softer and the quiet parts louder. This can help you fatten up the sound of your guitar as the overall sound will have much more sustain and often the low-end becomes more pronounced. Some compressor pedals are also sold as sustain pedals, which certainly does give a clearer idea of one of the ways the effect can be used.  

When buying any instrument don't buy cheap. I've been playing 5 string for 36 yrs. The most important thing in a 5 string is the tone ring with a resonator. many good brands on banjo's. I have a alverez denver belle flat top tone ring, white eagle arch top tone ring but my favorite is a honher Artist flat top tone ring. Regarding a Good acustic guitar my favorite is a martin D-35 ease of play and tone are awesome. The tone is what you are after.
Taylor is other remarkable guitar brand which manufactures good looking guitar with easy instruction to play. And people can easily but it medium price budget. Just try out this brand and test once and you will get to know its specifications well. This has been placed on the eight positions due to its some unique characteristics including clear sound.
The musical revolutions occurring during the period in question created the first well-known guitar heroes, and gave their guitars iconic status. It is no surprise that the right guitar can immediately conjure a specific period in time, both with looks and sound. And modern day guitarists who want to capture an essence of that period will naturally tend towards these guitars. Nothing says 1950s quite like a Gretsch. Nothing says 1960s quite like a Vox teardrop or Phantom.
Inspiring, light, and upbeat corporate background music with motivational and optimistic energy. Positive and sunny tune for technology and business presentations, travel inspirational Youtube videos, success stories, unforgettable journey, slideshow, TV, radio. Featuring muted electric guitar, piano, synth pads, acoustic guitar, drums, bass guitar, piano.
The Martin F Series bit the dust in mid-’65, to be supplanted by the somewhat updated, nattier GT Series of bound archtop hollowbody electrics. The first few prototypes were dubbed the XTE Series and produced in 1965. The guitars were renamed the GT Series and swung into production in the beginning of 1966. The GT Series consisted basically of two models, the GT-70 and GT-75. These were thinlines with two f-holes, a 15th fret neck joint (actually more frets were clear of the body), bound 22-fret rosewood fingerboards, dot inlays, and new, bound, wide-flared three-and-three headstocks with a concave curve in the pointed crown.
Considering a brand is only really important to a certain extent. Generally, certain top brands will have a reputation for being better at things than others, but given that most guitar brands now have a very wide offering, it’s really best to consider individual models. It’s worth doing a little extra research in some areas though, because there are interesting brand relationships that mean some more budget guitar brands have actually been designed by premium ones. Epiphone and Squier for instance are more affordable sub-brands of Gibson and Fender respectively, which means that you can often get a very high quality product that’s been made in Taiwan rather than the USA for instance. The Dove Pro is a good example of this.

I agree with play with effects if you want to, they're a lot of fun. I do think playing with distortion and practicing with it on is a good idea. I don't think it's a good idea to practice with distortion all the time. It will mask a lot of mistakes and imperfections in your technique. If you can play something in a clean tone perfectly, it will sound that much better when you add effects. – Tony May 3 '13 at 20:09


This is one of the coolest guitars to come out of the Gibson Custom Shop: 2018 Gibson Custom Shop Explorer, Extra/Elbow Cut, with a heavy aged relicing, Faded Cherry Finish, Gold plated Nickel hardware. This model is patterned after the 1958 Explorer owned by Eric Clapton. It is brand new with OHSC, COA, and all paperwork/tags. The weight is light at only 7 lbs, 12 oz. This is only one of a limited run of 5 in the Faded Cherry.
Boost is an effect which boosts the volume of an input signal, in order to assure that the amplifier is driven beyond its regular dynamic range and thus will produce clipping and thereby distortion. Boosts are very useful for tube amp players who wish to increase the gain on their amplifier without having to modify the tone the way a traditional overdrive or fuzz pedal would. A boost is often measured by how transparent it is--although there are some on the market (such as the Katana by Keeley and the EarthTone by NOC3) that employ JFET designs to produce additional "dirt" when engaged to add a subtle fattening effect to the boost.
Schooled in flamenco and jazz, Robby Krieger pushed beyond rock at a time when most players were still bound to the blues. In the Doors, he had the improvisatory flair to follow Jim Morrison's wildest journeys, wrote some of their biggest hits ("Light My Fire"), and picked up the slack in their keyboard-drums-guitar lineup. "Not having a bass player… made me play more bass notes to fill out the bottom," he said. "Not having a rhythm player also made me play differently, to fill out the sound. I always felt like three players simultaneously."
"Like any music technology, it's just a tool to help someone express their creativity. The gear never makes the player, but there's a purpose to it in certain playing situations and that's all good. As long as some guys are not hiding the truth of their playing behind it. A good player's a good player, and they usually sound good on an acoustic guitar simply because because they can actually play the damn thing.
Gibson produced only hollow body electrics until 1952, when the first Les Paul solid bodies hit the market. But that still left a gap. Certain players wanted a guitar with the versatility of a Les Paul, but the warmer, mellow tone of a hollow body — albeit one that could be played at high volume. A solid wood block runs through the center of the guitar’s body, allowing greater sustain and less feedback at high volumes than hollow bodies, while the winged side of these guitars’ bodies still provide for a mellow tone thanks to their acoustic resonance.
“The tremolo tail assembly was engineered specifically for the Spectrum ‘5.’ The bridge is an integral part of the whole assembly and is, of course, universally adjustable. The marvel of it all, however, is that the tremolo does not exert any friction (hence no wear and tear) on the strings. The tremolo action causes the whole bridge assembly to move smoothly back and forth.

A right handed 6 strings, electric guitar that mostly comes in black. The body is made from mahogany, while the fret board is made up of rosewood. The fret board is composed of up to 22 frets of 2.7 mm in size. It additionally has beautiful electric features such as a 3 way toggle and a push and pulls volume and tone. Price ranges from INR 21,400-21,541. Click below to get more product details.


Guitarists don’t have to just look on in envy as pianists lead the holiday sing-a-longs this Christmas. Our selection of holiday Guitar Tabs include traditional classics we all love like “O Holy Night” and “Carol of the Bells” and the pop favorites that just wouldn’t be the same without a guitar, like “Jingle Bell Rock” and “Happy Xmas (War is Over)” by John Lennon. But if you just can’t get enough of those traditional Christmas classics, you can pick up our collection of ’Christmas Favorites for Guitar.’
This package features an iconic electric guitar—The Les Paul— paired with a great little practice amplifier, the Electar-10, and quality accessories. The Epiphone Les Paul Special II is a versatile guitar that feels comfortable covering most any major style, including rock, blues, punk, classic rock and more. The guitar features a dual humbucker pickup configuration. The package also includes a tuner (very important), guitar picks and free online lessons to get you playing right away. A cable, strap and gig bag complete the package.
Tube enthusiasts believe that tube amps produce a "warmer" sound and a more natural "overdrive" sound. Typically, tube amps use one or more dual triodes in the preamplifier section to provide sufficient voltage gain to offset tone control losses and drive the power amplifier section. While tube technology is, in many ways, outdated, tube amps remain popular since many guitarists prefer their sound.[15]
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Best brand in price/quality relation. I have 4 guitars, an epiphone explorer goth made on korea, and Jackson KV2 made on usa and 2 ibanez. RG320PG P2 and a RGT6EX, both made on indonesia. The first one is the cheaper, but the sustaine, action a comfort is very nice for a bugget guitar. I've played bugget guitars of other brands, and ibanez is far superior. In fact, my RG320 P2 is nice as some others guitars that cost twice of it price. Mi RGT6EX is excellent, to me must worth $1000 USD but the real price is close $800 USD or less.
According to Wikipedia, a grimoire is a magical text that instructs the user “…how to perform magical spells, charms and divination, and how to invoke supernatural entities…” In order to summon your own supernatural creations, this guitar-focused text compiles a vast selection of exercises that will help you connect patterns across the entire guitar neck.

If you want to get really technical, the electronics “on board” a basic non-battery-powered guitar form an “RLC” circuit, the letters standing for resistance (R), inductance (L, since I is used for current) and capacitance (C), three key values in an AC circuit that determine the relative “impedance” of various frequencies. The inductor is the magnetic pickup (which “induces” voltage/current based on the vibrating metal string), the resistor is the tone knob (a potentiometer or variable resistor), and the capacitor is a tone cap, in this example 0.05 uF (about right for a humbucking pickup like in a Gibson Les Paul).
From the standpoint of theoretical perfection, the Baxendall tone control is the opposite of the Fender tone stack. With bass and treble variations that are mostly independent, the frequency response is quite flat when both controls are set to the middle of their range using linear pots. Using the opamp/feedback form of the controls means that there is no signal loss that needs be made up elsewhere. This is virtually the standard for hi-fi tone controls. However, there are some guitar amps which use this form of control, tweaked a bit to match the guitar frequencies.
Tube amps use the height of the 1940s electronic technology to give out what is widely considered the best sound quality to date. Since some people tend to be confused by this, it’s important to note that only their sound rendering circuitry is based on vacuum tubes (or lamps) while the equalizers and assorted bits employ transistors like any other piece of modern electronics, with no bearing whatsoever on how the sound will come out.
In a nutshell: Lowell Kiesel is the name of the guy who founded Carvin. He originally sold guitars under his own name, but later changed the company name to Carvin, a melding of the first names of his two sons. So, when Carvin changed the name on their guitars to Kiesel, they were actually reverting back to their roots. Kiesel is Carvin, and Carvin has always been Kiesel.
If you want to access some resources that will help dealing with a specific tonal pursuit, piece of gear or other questions related to your rig, I’d recommend giving Guitar Tricks 14-day free trial a test run - there’s no obligations and you’ve got nothing to lose - except two free weeks of one of the most comprehensive and thorough guitar education websites in existence.

Audiffex Guitar Pedals was one of the first professional guitar software packages, with its original version released more than a decade ago. It has since been upgraded but continues its legacy of providing stompbox effects in software form. The latest version is an all in one guitar effects software package - which includes 36 plug-ins that also works for bass, vocals and other instruments. Features include consistent interface with all effects having similar controls, modular plug-in configuration for easier and flexible routing and intuitive preset management. Current retail price: $49
The National STEM Guitar Project, in partnership with NSF Advanced Technological Education (ATE) Centers with funding provided through a grant from The National Science Foundation (#1700531, #1304405, & #0903336), hosts innovative Guitar Building Institutes throughout the US. Five-day institutes, combined with additional instructional activities comprising 80 hours, provide middle, high school, and postsecondary faculty training on science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) applications as they relate to the guitar. The institutes present and teach participants hands-on, applied learning techniques to help engage students and spark excitement for learning STEM subject matter.
Glen Campbell; DJ Ashba, Melissa Etheridge, Nikki Sixx, Mick Thomson; Kaki King, Steve Lukather; Marcel Dadi, Ray Davies,[30] Roy Harper,[31] James Hetfield, Josh Homme, Cyndi Lauper, John Lennon, Country Joe McDonald,John McLaughlin, Yngwie Malmsteen, Bob Marley, Ziggy Marley, Stephen Marley, Roman Miroshnichenko, Maury Muehleisen, Dave Mustaine, Vince Neil, Jimmy Page, Richard Daniel Roman, Shania Twain, Boz Scaggs, Luis Alberto Spinetta, Statler Brothers, Cat Stevens, and Aaron Tippin;[30]
Contrary to popular belief, magnetic pickups are used on both acoustic guitars and electric guitars. These pickups sit in the sound hole of a guitar, so they don’t require any drilling or permanent modification. They’re also commonly an aftermarket addition (the John Lennon signature guitar is the only exception to this trend that springs to mind).
I think it's unreasonable at best, and more likely impossible, to say with any confidence "Model X guitar will be eaisest for everyone", because everyone's hands are different sizes, everyone's fingers are different lengths and thicknesses, some people prefer smaller or larger frets, everyone has different preferences with regard to neck profile shape, neck width, neck length, body shape, body weight, bridge design (floating vs fixed, TOM vs hardtail, etc.), not to mention pickup types (single coil vs humbucker vs P90, active vs passive) and control layouts (multiple volume/tone controls vs single master volume/tone controls, blade vs toggle pickup selectors).

One of the biggest hits of all-time, this song incorporates everything that is 80’s pop and is performed in the key of F# major, in 4/4 time. Lauper originally didn’t want to sing it since the original version was written by Robert Hazard, who wrote it from the perspective of a man. Eventually, the singer released her version of the song and the rest is history. 

So, which are the best budget electrics guitars available today? We've gathered a selection of the electric guitars that we reckon offer the best bang for the buck in the sub-$/£500 market. You may recognise some of the perennial budget classics (hello - again - to the trusty Yamaha Pacifica), but there's a raft of high-scoring options out there for the more adventurous.

I just read all of the comments and couldn't believe how long it too for someone (John Corcoran) to mention Les Paul. As for the 'tard who "knows" better players than Robert Johnson, just remember that Johnson INVENTED the sound and everyone else is just copying him or building upon his foundation. This list might work better split up by genre. Segovia may be one of the best guitarists ever, but he doesn't work with the others on the list. Stanley Jordan is incredible, but he'd be out of place on this list. What about Charo – yes, the Coochie Coochie girl from Hollywood Squares plays a mean classical and flamenco guitar! TopTenzMaster – let's see a bunch of subcategory lists…
Unlike acoustic guitars, solid-body electric guitars have no vibrating soundboard to amplify string vibration. Instead, solid-body instruments depend on electric pickups and an amplifier (or amp) and speaker. The solid body ensures that the amplified sound reproduces the string vibration alone, thus avoiding the wolf tones and unwanted feedback associated with amplified acoustic guitars. These guitars are generally made of hardwood covered with a hard polymer finish, often polyester or lacquer. In large production facilities, the wood is stored for three to six months in a wood-drying kiln before being cut to shape. Premium custom-built guitars are frequently made with much older, hand-selected wood.
Reverb is one of the most popular guitar effects in use. It’s so subtle, natural and valuable that it can easily turn a mediocre track into something more profound. The pedals we have listed above are by far some of the best you can get at the moment. They are not all the same, and each offers its own take on reverb in general. However, all of them will serve you more than well in your search for that tasty reverberation. Lastly, we hope that this guide has helped to clear up some misconceptions about reverbs you might have had.

Interestingly, the neck is crafted from maple, topped by a 20-fret walnut fingerboard which complements the back and sides nicely. Following the specs of older Gibson guitars, the scale length is shorter at 24.75", while the nut width is 1.725", which gives the instrument a comfortable playing feel. Adding to the already good vale of this guitar is the built-in LR Baggs Element electronics for stage performance, with discrete soundhole mounted volume control. If you are looking for a handcrafted workhorse acoustic guitar that will not break the bank, then check this out.

George Beauchamp was a vaudeville performer, violinist, and steel guitarist who, like most of his fellow acoustic guitarists in the pre-electric-guitar days of the 1920s, was searching for a way to make his instrument cut through an orchestra. He first conceived of a guitar fitted with a phonograph-like amplifying horn, and approached inventor and violin-maker John Dopyera to create a prototype which proved to be, by all accounts, a failure. Their next collaboration involved experiments with mounting three conical-shaped aluminum resonators into the body of the guitar beneath the bridge. These efforts produced an instrument which so pleased Beauchamp that he told Dopyera that they should go into business to manufacture them. After further refinements, Dopyera applied for a patent on the so-called tri-cone guitar on April 9, 1927. Thereafter, Dopyera and his brothers began to make the tri-cone guitars in their Los Angeles shop, calling the new guitars “Nationals”. On January 26, 1928, the National String Instrument Corporation was certified and, with its new factory located near a metal-stamping shop owned by Adolph Rickenbacher and staffed by some of the most experienced and competent craftsmen available, began to produce Spanish and Hawaiian style tri-cone guitars as well as four-string tenor guitars,mandolins and ukuleles.[3]

Created four identical test rigs out of scrap wood from my workshop. They are all 725 x 35 x 47 mm in size, and weigh 651 grams (Alder), 618 g (Koa), 537 g (Swamp Ash), and 818 g (Zebrano). They obviously don’t exactly mimic a guitar, but should for the sake of the test resemble the type of tensions and forces that a guitar body with a neck is subjected to.
Listing the initial six harmonics of the G note, this open-G tuning was used by Joni Mitchell for "Electricity", "For the Roses", and "Hunter (The Good Samaritan)".[9] It was also used by Mick Ralphs for "Hey Hey" on Bad Company's debut album.[5] and on the Meowtain song "Alleyway" Stone Gossard also used this tuning in the song "Daughter" by Pearl Jam.

The gray area between different types of phasers and chorus pedals—and phaser-style chorus pedals versus delay-based chorus pedals—arises probably because designers and manufacturers really have followed two distinct paths in this field. Some phasers have sought to approximate the Uni-Vibe’s approximation of a Leslie cab, and some so-called choruses have done much the same. Other phasers have been designed from the ground up more purely from the perspective of the principles of phase shifting in itself, rather than in an effort to sound like a whirling speaker or any other electromechanical device that has come before. The result means the field is broad and varied, and different phasers (or their related effects) can often have different voices with characteristics more distinct than, say, two delays from different makers.
Note that the competition for our pick in this “simple beginner’s amp” category was much more hotly contested than our other picks in this guide. The Crush 12 just barely edged out two other amps that our panelists liked. One is the Stage Right 611800, a very loud, 40-watt amp with built-in reverb that’s a great choice for those who need a powerful amp on the cheap (although that person probably isn’t a beginner). The other is the Vox Pathfinder 10, an amp with a simple control setup that our panelists loved, but a rather bright and blaring sound that some liked and some didn’t. Both are mentioned in the competition section below.
You think those guys are good? They are, but you should hear my uncle- Chris Lambert- and my cousin -Brent Lambert-. My uncle works at the Shadow Box in Columbus (or is it Cincinnati?) Ohio. He plays in a whole bunch of the music shows as a guitarist, and he rocks. Sometimes my cousin works there, too. Brent is just as good as my uncle, and they're both as good as the people you put on here.
In 1995, an effort was made to re-introduce Rickenbacker acoustics, with factory production beginning in their Santa Ana manufacturing facility in 1996. Four models of flat top acoustic Rickenbackers were depicted in factory literature (maple or rosewood back & sides, jumbo or dreadnaught shape). Each of these four models was also available in both six- and twelve-string configurations, yielding a range of eight distinct instruments.[11] (The 760J “Jazzbo,” an archtop model, was only built as a prototype, with three examples known to exist.) It is estimated that fewer than 500 Rickenbacker acoustic guitars were built before the factory shut down the acoustic department in mid-2006.
Also new in ’66 was the SM series, a variation on the E-100 and ET-100 introduced in the previous year, very similar to the Ks except the cutaway horns were flared outward in the classic Teisco “tulip” shape which would dominate later in the decade. These had fairly flat rectangular chrome-covered pickups, with a rectangular indentation stamped in the center and six flat round poles, plus to long half-slots along both outer edges. The SM-2L (Teisco Del Rey ET-210) had the hooked headstock, small striped metal pickguard along the lower body, two on/off sliders, volume, tone, roller bridge and Bigsby-style vibrato. The SM-2L retained the German carve relief of the K series. A plain-Jane SM-2 (Teisco Del Rey ET-200) followed, sans German carve, and with a bridge/tailpiece assembly. The SM-1 (Teisco Del Rey ET-110) had just a neck pickup with volume and tone controls, bridge/tailpiece assembly, no German carve or striped metal pickguard, and the Strat-style head of the previous ET-100.
Yes...I've seen a VST guitar plugin (can't remember the name) where you play chords on the keyboard with the left hand and the software converts them into guitar chord voicings, then you "strum" with the right hand by hitting different keys....and each key does something different...up-strum, down-strum, rake, mute, etc. I actually thought it sounded pretty damn good considering. Definitely close enough for background rhythm guitar work.
Reverb is one of the most popular guitar effects in use. It’s so subtle, natural and valuable that it can easily turn a mediocre track into something more profound. The pedals we have listed above are by far some of the best you can get at the moment. They are not all the same, and each offers its own take on reverb in general. However, all of them will serve you more than well in your search for that tasty reverberation. Lastly, we hope that this guide has helped to clear up some misconceptions about reverbs you might have had.

Johnny Thunders’ snot-nosed New York take on Keith Richards’ cool is one of the pillars on which punk rock was built. An Italian-American guy (birth name John Anthony Genzale Jr.) from Queens, he was born a little too late to be part of the Sixties rock explosion. But the bands of that era were his influences, and he put his own spin on them in the early Seventies as the New York Dolls came together with Thunders on lead guitar.

This is not a cheap Chinese manufactured kit of questionable quality where the parts simply don’t work together (like most of the other kits that you will find on Ebay, Etsy and Amazon). We proudly manufacture these kits in our shop in Portland, Oregon. We are a family-owned company building products and traditions that we expect to last for a long, long time. We produce instrument kits with exacting specifications, high quality production, and domestic, sustainably-cultivated sources of materials whenever possible.

Phasers work in a way similar to flangers, but this time the copy of the signal is filtered to bring it slightly out of phase. This creates a sweeping, futuristic sound at cranked-up settings, but dialed down will get a chewy, textured tone that’s even suitable for rhythm playing. Eddie Van Halen is one guitarist well-known for his application of the phaser. Today he employs his own signature effects pedal, but his classic MXR Phase 90 is legendary among guitar tone nerds.
The classic setup of three Standard Single-Coil Strat pickups and a five-way pickup selector provide the tonal versatility you’d expect from a Fender guitar, while a ’70s-style headstock and body design look the part. It’s true that the American series is the more “genuine” model, but you won’t be able to tell much difference when compared to the Standard.
I though this list was BEST techniques, not hardest or most impressive. Vibratos bring music to life. You can create incredible solos without sweeping or tapping, but you’d be hard-pressed to find something that doesn’t use any kind of vibratos or string bending and still manages to sound good or “alive”. Of all techniques, vibrato is easily the most important to sounding good. Listen to the solo from “Tornado of Souls” by Megadeth. Proof that vibratos make music much better.
The earliest documented performance with an electric guitar was in 1932, by guitarist and bandleader Gage Brewer. The Kansas-based musician had obtained two instruments from George Beauchamp of Los Angeles, California, and he publicized his new instruments in an article in the Wichita Beacon, October 2, 1932 and through a performance later that month.

To set up guitar pedals, use a short patch cable to connect your guitar directly into the tuner pedal if you’re using one. If you’re using filter effects pedals, like auto-wahs and envelope filters, connect them next. Plug in your compressor pedal after the filter pedals, followed by pitch-shifting, overdrive, and distortion pedals. Set up your modulation pedals, like chorus, flanger, tremolo, or phaser pedals, near the end of the chain so they’ll have a richer sound.

I have a almost identical one in front of me, but mine has 3 pickups. It has the same color white guard and sunburst pattern. The back of the guitar has the redish sunburst pattern on the neck like yours but also has the red on the main body, unlike yours that has a colored neck and solid color back. I can’t find a picture of a 3 pickup that is like this. Any info would be nice to know.
I ordered this for my 6 year old nephew for Christmas. He wanted one because I had just recently bought my 3rd. I thought a smaller one would be nice for him to start learning. Just opened the box and the amp doesn’t work! At all! Light turns on but nothing else happens! Hooked guitar up to my own amp and it sounds nice so it’d definitely not the guitar or cords fault. Trying to get a replacement but no luck.
The kind of interface that you want should connect to your PC and the DAW (digital audio workstation) software installed on it so that you can record your playing. The Guitarport didn’t allow for recording without buying additional software that cost as much as the device; the device is essentially obsolete now but still supported. Years later I upgraded to their Toneport UX2, meant for recording and DAW compatibility. The accompanying Podfarm 2 software is quite good. The UX1 costs half as much with the same software if you don’t want or need 2 inputs (microphone or instrument). Presonus sells an interface that is quite popular, for less than $99
Tremolo is the gentle art of making your signal subtly cut in and out of volume. Think of all those old surf records. Phase and flange are quite similar in essence; phase emulates the sweeping of the frequency band, alternating between cutting the bass and treble frequencies, while flange does a similar thing but with a slightly more extreme sound. Wah is perhaps more well known; the Jim Dunlop Cry Baby wah pedal has been used for decades by players of all genres. Adding a highly distinctive wah-wah sound can elevate a solo into something infinitely more interesting. Or it can add a bit of that classic wakka-wakka sound you hear on classic funk records.
The phrase “guitar amplifier” in itself is almost a bit misleading. Sure, it “amplifies” your guitar — but guitar amps really do so much more. Arguably, even as much as your choice of guitar, your amplifier will have an immeasurable influence on your sound. Beyond the basics of volume, bass, midrange and treble, your amp can provide warmth or bite to your sound, or anything from a sparkling clean tone to a blazing distortion. Amplifiers are constructed utilizing different size (or even multiple) speakers and can derive their tone from tubes, transistors, or even digital modeling. They can be very basic with just one volume knob; or they can offer a variety of gain and EQ options along with built-in effects.
These two are definitely the most similar sounding of the bunch and this poses a slight problem. While Steel String has more resonance in the low-end and covers fingerpicking, Songwriter is a little warmer/duller sounding but has twice the samples and round robins.  For me, this makes it hard to pick between the two, and while the tones are different, perhaps not quite enough.

I started out doing pretty much what I do now on an acoustic and transferred it to electric when I was able to get a paper route and buy a crappy red electric guitar. I knew the value of working stripped down and I still do, although in this day and age I've made a lot of records with different sounds. I must say I really love what technology can afford you.

Playing the guitar is no joke. To be honest, not all who bought a guitar end up playing. Maybe it’s just hype from friends and family or along the way found something else more interested on. You have to remember that you will spend countless hours practicing and the time you spent to it is impossible for you to get it back. This is not meant to discourage but to challenge you to succeed.

I string up the guitar and tune it to standard pitch. Put the guitar in playing position and capo the first fret. I hold the 6th string down at the last fret as that is where the neck joins the body. Then I turn truss rod right (clockwise) until there is no relief hardly if any bounce at the 7th and 9th frets using the 6th string as straight edge, don't go too far just maybe a slight tiny bounce because you don't want to backbow the neck. Then I simply turn the truss rod left counterclockwise 1/4 of a turn for relief and that's it. Take capo off and set action at 12th fret with 6th string 5/64 and 1st string 3/64.
A bit underrated and under the radar, Blackstar makes some superb amplifiers at a fraction of the cost you’ll find from bigger name brands. And while it’s a shame they don’t get more recognition, it’s good news for you, the user. This particular amp might just be the best option for apartment living – due to its small stature and low-level volume paired with the fact that it is still a tube amp. But don’t let the fact that it’s only 1-watt fool you – thanks to the simple truth that it uses tube amplification, it can still get plenty loud. Of course, if you’re overly concerned about noise, this option also comes with a headphone jack, and it’s one of the few tube amps to even offer that convenience.
Having spent years developing the JDX 48 and Headload, it only made sense that Radial would develop a solution for guitarists who didn’t want to use an amp at all; hence, the JDX Direct-Drive™ was born! The Direct-Drive lets guitarists choose between three different amp voicings: “Combo”, “Stack” and “JDX 4×12”, with further controls to adjust the brightness of the amp. The guitarist simply plugs in their guitar through their pedals, into the JDX Direct-Drive and out to the board with an XLR cable. There are additional outputs for attaching to onstage amps or speakers as well for guitarists who are more comfortable having volume with them on stage. The engineer can then mic the amp and mix the two signals together to get the best tone out of the PA system.
Guitars are constructed from different wood types—from mahogany to rosewood, basswood to maple, and more—all of which changes with temperature and humidity, affecting the sound quality thereof. Although guitars original setups are likely to change as they move a long distance from the producer to the Sellers’s point of contact, electric guitars are the highly adjustable piece of types of equipment, and a setup can make a whole difference.

When Levon Helm of The Band sang "I pulled into Nazareth, was feelin' about half past dead" in "The Weight," he wasn’t alluding to a weary pilgrim’s desire for salvation. Rather, he was singing about a mythological trip to Nazareth, Pennsylvania, home of C. F. Martin & Co., makers of Martin flat top acoustic guitars. Founded in 1833 by a German immigrant named Christian Friedrich Martin, whose father was also an instrument maker, Martin...Continue Reading


Ovation, Roundback, Adamas, Legend, Custom Legend, Elite, Applause, Celebrity, Balladeer, Ultra, Thunderbolt and Lyrachord , The Roundback body shape, Roundback design and Roundback Technology, Guitar Bowl Shape, Fingerboard Inlay Design, Sound hole Rosette Design, Adamas Peghead Shape, Bridge Design, Epaulet Design, Soundboard and Sound hole designs, Guitar Tuning Head are protected by one or more US and Foreign Trademarks and Patents.
4) SPAM AND SELF-ADVERTISING ARE NOT ALLOWED. NO ADVERTISING YOUR NEW SUB. NO LINKS TO SOCIAL MEDIA, BLOGS, OR OTHER PERSONAL SITES. This includes the comment area of youtube videos as well as anything that's embedded into the video itself. Your content will be removed!!! NO ADVERTISING EVEN BY PROXY Ask yourself if you're here to post a video of yourself playing guitar or to gain subscribers/fans. If it's the later, you are in the wrong place. We are not here to make you more popular. This means no linking to anything that is commerce related, your blog, web site, bandcamp, facebook, instagram, snapchat, twitter, etc. You can link to your youtube channel, but do NOT have channel plugs/ads in your video, subscription requests, or links to any of the aforementioned, unless you are on our whitelist. If you would like to be considered for our whitelist, message the mods!
A fuzz pedal is essentially an extreme distortion effect. Because fuzz so radically alters the signal, it is often used sparingly for contrast, rather than as a meat-and-potatoes sound. Since it thickens up the tone so dramatically, fuzz can be fun for intros and solo guitar parts when no other instruments are playing. Jimi Hendrix playing "The Star Spangled Banner" is a classic example of fuzz-infused guitar.
This doesn’t mean that our reviews are of no use to you, because there are so many electric guitars out there, and if you know what to look for when you get to the music shop and have a few models in mind, then that makes it a lot easier. And of course, if you don’t have a music shop nearby and need to order one online it’s always good to do your research. It’s a good thing we’ve already done that for you, then!
An "effects chain" or "signal chain" is formed by connecting two or more stompboxes. Effect chains are typically created between the guitar and the amp or between the preamplifier ("preamp") and the power amp. When a pedal is off or inactive, the electric audio signal coming into the pedal diverts onto a bypass, an unaltered "dry" signal that continues on to other effects down the chain. In this way, a musician can combine effects within a chain in a variety of ways without having to reconnect boxes during a performance.[10] A "controller" or "effects management system" lets the musician create multiple effect chains, so they can select one or several chains by tapping a single switch. The switches are usually organized in a row or a simple grid.[11]

The Uni-Vibe was released in 1968 and became an immediate favorite of Jimi Hendrix, David Gilmour, and Robin Trower. It is actually a phase shifting effect, but what makes it groundbreaking is its use of an LFO (low frequency oscillator) to create the sweeping effect. It also uses a photocell to control the speed of the sweeping effect. That is basically a little light bulb inside the unit that will pulse at whatever speed the rate knob is set to. Also the brighter the pulse of the bulb the more dramatic the effect.


At least one company, Audiovox, built and may have offered an electric solid-body as early as 1932. Audiovox electric guitars were built by Paul Tutmarc[1] who is also credited as the co-inventor of the magnetic pickup along with Art Stimpson, and the fretted electric bass guitar. Bob Wisner worked for Paul converting tube radio amplifiers into guitar amplifiers and eventually developing his own amplifier circuits so Paul's instruments could be sold along with their own amplifiers. Paul was unsuccessful at obtaining a patent for his magnetic pickup as it was too similar to the telephone microphone coil sensor device. Audiovox production was handed over to Paul's son, Bud Tutmarc, who continued building these instruments under the brand, "Bud-Electro" until the early 1950s. Bud Tutmarc had been delegated by the senior Tutmarc the task of winding the pickup coils used on his father's and he continued producing them for his own guitars. He used horseshoe magnets in a single-coil and later a hum cancelling dual coil configuration. Bob Wisner was hired by Rickenbacher, later spelled Rickenbacker and may have passed on Tutmarc's magnetic pickup technology and helped them develop the more familiar bar magnet and pole-piece pickup construction still widely used today for their cast aluminum electric guitar, nicknamed The Frying Pan or The Pancake Guitar, beginning in 1933.

Another clarification about brand names is in order. Teisco guitars can be found mainly bearing at least eight brand names: Teisco, Teisco Del Rey, Kingston, World Teisco, Silvertone, Kent, Kimberly and Heit Deluxe. Teisco was the name used mainly in Japan but also on a few occasions here in the United States. Most Teisco guitars were imported into the United States by Chicago’s W.M.I. Corporation � originally owned by guitar importing pioneer Jack Westheimer � bearing both the Teisco Del Rey and Kingston brand names. By the mid-’60s W.M.I. was providing Teiscos to Sears and Roebuck carrying the Silvertone moniker. I’m not sure the World Teisco brand ever got to the U.S.; my guess is that it was an export designation that went to other markets. Some of the early Kent guitars imported by New York’s Bugeleisen and Jacobson were purchased from Teisco. The distributors responsible for either the Kimberly or Heit Deluxe brand names remain a mystery at this time. It is possible that you may encounter other brand names on Teisco-made guitars sold through other distributors, but these will be in a minority. If you know of any other names, please let us know.
The Epiphone Dove Pro is such a good guitar that it’s going to be a contender for a top pick in pretty much any list, but in this one we’ve given it the title of best value electric acoustic. You can spend a lot more money and not get much more guitar, and you can even spend more money and not get a guitar as good. The Dove Pro is that accomplished.
If you’re trying to find one of the affordable acoustic electric guitars from Ibanez, then the PF15 is just what you’re looking for. This guitar has a dreadnought full-size body, a stylish cutaway design, as well as other features which will allow you to enjoy every minute of playing. You also get an attractive Transparent Blue Burst finish to impress your audience.
Up for sale is an Ibanez RGA7QM guitar equipped with EMG 707/81-7 pickups and Sperzel locking tuners. This guitar is in great condition, has never been gigged and has been kept in my smoke free music studio. Guitar Specs: Mahogany body with quilted maple top 5-Piece maple/walnut Wizard II-7 neck Bound rosewood fretboard with 24 jumbo frets Gibraltar Standard 7 bridge Pearl dot inlay
The new HT Club 40 looks familiar, but practically every detail has been worked on and sweated over. The control panel has separate channels for clean and overdrive, with two footswitchable voices on each channel. There’s also a new, low-power option, which reduces output from around 40 watts down to just four watts. Global controls include a master volume and level control for the Club’s built-in digital reverb. On the rear panel, you’ll find extension speaker outlets and an effects loop, with new features including a USB recording output together with speaker-emulated line outs on jack and XLR. The MkII’s clean channel has a completely reworked architecture with two tightly defined voices, best described as classic American and classic British, which can be pre-set on the control panel or footswitched. Although only one button is pressed, lots of changes happen inside, including preamp voicing, EQ and valve gain structure, as well as the power amplifier damping.  A similar thing happens on the overdrive channel, with a choice of two voices called ‘classic crunch’ and ‘super- saturated lead’, which can be infinitely tweaked between Brit and USA response using Blackstar’s patented ISF control. Like the clean channel, these voices have been reworked to be richer and more responsive. In use, the HT Club 40 MkII is jaw-droppingly good - while the MkI version was efficient if a little bland sometimes, the MkII is full of character and attitude, with astonishing tonal depth and response that will have many top-dollar boutique amps struggling to keep up.
At the onset, we decided to stick to DIY electric guitar kits that can be bought from online retailers in the mainland US, to ensure that the ones we list are accessible. We then took note of popular and highly rated kits, which for this updated required us to gather around 700 relevant user and expert reviews and ratings. All these data are then fed into the Gearank algorithm, which gave us the scores that allowed us to narrow down the list to just the top 6 kits. For more information about this process see How Gearank Works.
Very cheap acoustics are usually not such a great idea. Often their sound quality is poor and they are hard to play. I often see students selling them after a six-month struggle (if they managed to stick with it that long!). So if your budget is very tight, I would not get an acoustic. You may think you save a little money because you don't need to buy an amplifier as well, but as I said before you don't have to use an amplifier to practice anyway.
Since they entered the electric market, it didn't take long before Ibanez became the patron saint of those who appreciate a heavier sound. Their RG series won the hearts and minds of budget crowds all around the world, mainly due to its great tone and overall performance. Today we are looking at an Ibanez RG421, which follows this core policy precisely.
Solid Body Guitars: For those looking for a more versatile array of tones blended with the deepest number of volume options and full-blooded sustain, the electric solid body is the right machine. The differences between various types of solid body models are vast — even between an SG, the most popular model Gibson makes, and a Les Paul, Gibson’s six-string flagship. A wide variety of tone woods, including mahogany, maple, alder, spruce, maple and, commonly for the fretboard, rosewood and baked maple, are employed. They are extremely versatile instruments and have been spotted in the hands of players as wide-ranging as Les Paul and Zakk Wylde.
If any item fails to meet your expectations at any time, please return it for a refund or exchange. From tuners to endpins, everything we sell at Stewart-MacDonald is backed by our rock-solid guarantee of satisfaction. This is how we do business, ever since selling our first 5-Star Banjo Head in 1968. We proudly continue this tradition by offering quality products and standing behind them.

Copyright © 2016 Sonoma Wire Works. All rights reserved. RiffWorks and the RW Logo, RiffWorld, RiffCaster, RiffLink, RiffRumble, InstantDrummer, StudioTrack and the StudioTrack iPad App Logo, the FourTrack iPhone App Logo, GuitarTone and the GuitarTone Logo, GuitarJack and the GuitarJack logo, DrummerPack, KitPack and Discrete Drums are trademarks of Sonoma Wire Works. DrumCore and KitCore are registered trademarks of Sonoma Wire Works. iPod, iPhone and iPad are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Android is a trademark of Google Inc. ReWire and REX2 are technologies licensed from Propellerhead Software. VST is a trademark of Steinberg Media Technologies GmbH. All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.


Leaving aside guitarists whose relative fame is debatable (such as Steve Hillage or Terje Rypdal), how can you have a wannabe like John Mayer on your list, but not Dr. Brian May, Jerry Garcia or Jeff Beck? And I’d have also swapped out Tom Morello in favor of Adrian Belew. Belew was making his guitar sound like “everything but a guitar” more than a decade before anyone had heard of Morello. Adrian played with Talking Heads, Joan Armatrading, David Bowie (that’s him playing the crazy solos on DJ and Boys Keep Swinging), and King Crimson back in thee late 70’s and early 80’s. And his song Oooh Daddy at least grants him one hit wonder status, as far as “fame” goes.
Pre-delay: No pre-delay? No problem! Some reverb plug-ins, from freeware favourites to tasty convolution types, don't offer pre-delay — a user-configurable gap before the onset of a reverb's early reflections and tail. It's useful to have, though, as it can contribute to the clarity and separation of individual voices and instruments in a mix when large amounts of reverb are used. Using most software DAWs it's straightforward to rig up a pre-delay for a reverb (or any other effect) that doesn't have one. All you do is set up your reverb on an aux track or channel, but place a simple delay plug-in in a slot above it. Set both plug-ins' wet/dry mix parameters to 100 percent wet, and feed them some audio using an aux send on your normal audio tracks. Now the delay plug-in operates as a pre-delay for the reverb: easy! This kind of 'modular' pre-delay actually opens up some interesting possibilities. By using a multi-tap delay, or a simple delay with some feedback, your dry signal can be fed to the reverb several times, making for longer, more complex — or plain weird — reverb tails. Robin Bigwood
[Attention Korg Pa3x /Pa4x owners and Korg Pa700/1000 owners- I have a special version of this 6-velocity layer piano in .set format that will load to your Korg in compressed format at 116mb (equivalent to 232mb) - This set sounds wonderful on the Korg and uses 22 oscillators for outstanding realism including resonance, key-off and pedal effects. Send me an email (see bottom right) and I can provide a download link or go to the demo on SoundCloud here Korg Pa Yamaha C5 and follow the download link]
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There are tons of new tidbits of FU-Tone.com news! First off we would like to welcome Stephen “Stef” Carpenter of DEFTONES to the FU family! Recently I started working closely with Rem Massingill (Stef’s Tech) on this monster project. It started as most of these projects do – with lots of conversations and planning before turning the first screw. I work with dozens of techs in this business and I can tell you that Rem is “one of those guys”. He really knows his stuff, is a stickler for details and most importantly he knows TONE! Little did I know what I was getting into and the first two guitars on the slab were ESP 8 String models! This was out of the normal scope of my 6 and 7 string clients… I consider the guitar and guitar tone a never-ending learning process. I am constantly looking to learn from anyone that I can on my journey. Anyone who presents themselves as a know-it-all is full of shit or trying to sell you something (usually both!). After lots of twisting, tweaking and testing we got this off the ground and I am here to tell you that the tone was massive and bone crushing all while having an insane amount of note separation and clarity! Not to mention sustain for days that would make Nigel Tufnell jealous… As I stood on stage with Stef and Rem at sound check in New York while he put the 8 String ESP through its paces, I was pleasantly surprised to hear how brutal the tone was. All of the power and growl of a monster truck with the precision and control of a Ferrari. The smile on Stef’s and Rem’s faces said it all! This was just the first hoop that we jumped through together with a bunch of stuff in the hopper for these guys. If you have not been to a Deftones show on this tour, I highly suggest going out to catch them!
The Ibanez Artcore line is a beautiful example of modern guitar manufacturing. Normally, hollow-body guitars, even those from Epiphone, provide interesting challenges to companies trying to produce axes on a mass scale, and thus they have to charge a higher dollar. The Artcore series provides buyers with an option to shell out a fraction of the price for a really impressive guitar. The AF55 is a fully hollow option that will make you think you should have paid double for it.

With Dave Matthews playing an electric guitar in place of his usual acoustic, the band delivered a performance of “Samurai Cop (Oh Joy Begin)”, the lead single from Come Tomorrow, their record-breaking seventh-straight album to debut at #1 on the Billboard charts dating back to 1998’s Before These Crowded Streets. You can watch Dave Matthews Band’s performance on Ellen below:
Another Martin creation, the 000 shape guitar is almost the perfect halfway house between a dreadnought and a parlour. Its classic hourglass figure meant it sat comfortably on the knee, endearing it to players of folk and other fingerpicking-heavy styles of music. The shape ensured it had the perfect balance between playing and comfort, and was often seen on the lap of no less a player than Eric Clapton. However it wasn’t averse to a bit of heavy strumming when the occasion called, and it’s large bottom end ensured it could keep pace when playing with others.
While many individuals who want to become guitar technicians dream of working with big-name bands, it is more realistic to work with smaller bands first to gain experience. Local bands often need extra help with many of the technical aspects of show production. Techs may be asked to perform other tasks besides guitar maintenance, such as stage set-up and breakdown, driving the tour bus and selling merchandise. All of these activities can provide techs with invaluable knowledge regarding staging live performances.
Electric guitars are solid-bodied guitars that are designed to be plugged into an amplifier. The electric guitar when amplified produces a sound that is metallic with a lengthy decay. The shape of an electric guitar is not determined by the need for a deep resonating body and this had led to the development of contoured and thin bodied electric guitars. The two most popular designs are the Fender Stratocaster and the Gibson Les Paul.
Stewart MacDonnald has a great finishing schedule that I would recomend reading before you start the painting process. You shouldn't need to fill any pores on the neck because necks are usualy made from maple which is a tight grain wood. All that's need for it is a sanding with 220 grit paper unless you want to leave the neck natural and unfinished. I recomend using at least a few coats of sanding sealer of clear gloss laquer to protect the wood fromdirt and grime that comes from playing.

Guitars with better-quality electronics can avoid these traits to an extent, but as you can see when you turn the tone pot all the way to zero, the dynamics of the RLC circuit that the pickup and tone circuit create result in a “hump” in the upper bass/low-midrange frequencies, roughly centered (in this example) around 300 Hz. This happens because the low resistance, coupled with the high “capacitive reactance” of the capacitor and the “inductive reactance” of the pickup’s inductor, creates what’s known as a “band-pass filter”, where a specific frequency range in between very low and very high frequencies has the lowest total impedance and thus becomes the most present in the tone.
For those players who prefer the good old valve sound and searching for one on a reasonable price, the VOX AC10 can be that great choice of an amplifier for the job. This 10 watts amp with 1×10” inch celestion speaker has a 2x12AX7 tube preamp section and 2xEL84 valve reactor power section housed in a closed back cabinet and its trademark grill cloth to deliver a genuine VOX brown sound. 

HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. (JANUARY 25, 2018)—Fender Musical Instruments Corporation (FMIC) today announced the all-new California Series acoustic guitars, celebrating the lifestyle and culture associated with the region and the brands Southern California roots. Energetic and independent, this family of guitars defies acoustic guitar conventions with a visible look and feel of Fender’s famous electric guitars – from the Stratocaster® headstocks and vibrant colors, to the distinctive Fender body shapes that mark players as visionary artists. Lively-sounding – California Series acoustic guitars capture the laid back, yet energetic California lifestyle – from the beach to the festival stage.


So essentially if you are looking for a thicker, higher output sound a humbucker will be a better fit for you. If however, you prefer a brighter, twangier tone a single coil will be best. If in doubt consider the guitar tones and styles of music you prefer e.g. Fender or Gibson and go with a similar style of guitar kit or even better grab yourself one of each.

We're just over the £300 price tag here, but for the shredders and jazz fans out there, the Schecter C-6 Plus in Electric Magenta is a great option, whether you’re a beginner or pro player. It’s one of our favourite cheap electric guitars, and one hell of a performer, featuring professional level appointments inspired by Schecter's  Diamond Series guitars  – this is a monster of tone, and well worth the extra investment.

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It’s also worth noting that Fender guitars are typically available with a few different pickup combinations. I’d especially recommend checking out a HSS Stratocaster for rock music. The humbucker in the bridge position gives you a thicker, hotter sound, but you still have all that great Strat tone in the from the neck and middle pickups. I’ve played a Standard HSS Strat for over a decade and it’s one of my favorite guitars.

There are a couple of tips that can help you out, however. First – as a new learner – you don’t need a stage-ready amplifier or even a high-end boutique amp, as they are both far too powerful and pricey for someone just picking up the hobby. Second, you should look into amplifier versatility. As a new player, it’s likely that you’re still figuring out your own style – and being able to change up your sound without the need for a bunch of extra peripherals is incredibly valuable in figuring that out.


When consulting our buying guide, the first thing you need to think about is your budget. How much can you afford to spend? Generally speaking, musical instruments tend to get better the more expensive they get, although this is of course not always the case. And even if you would buy a really expensive guitar you might not be experienced enough to notice how good it is.
In the past, buying an electric guitar wasn’t always as satisfying as it should be. In the days before the internet, you had to rely on the wisdom of your local guitar store, a couple of magazines, and your gut instinct. You may have ended up with something half decent – if you were lucky – but rarely would you have found your ‘dream guitar’. In fact, without the internet, you probably weren’t aware it even existed!
Introduced in 1987 and discontinued in 1994, the Ibanez RG550 remains the childhood sweetheart of many players. Designed as a mass-appeal version of Steve Vai’s famous JEM777 model, it had character in abundance. For this reboot, Ibanez has skilfully managed to extract the very essence of what was so popular about the original RG550 and piece it back together in a way that enhances its legacy. The Japanese-made 2018 vintage is, essentially, a masterclass in everything that is good about shred and metal guitars. The neck feels lithe - your hand glides, rather than simply moving - while the Edge vibrato is rock-solid and the overall craftsmanship is exemplary. Tonally, the RG550 covers a lot of bases. It always did, despite its pointy appearance, meaning you could comfortably stray into all kinds of genres without too much fuss. The US-designed V7 bridge humbucker delivers the razor-sharp riff platform you’d hope it would, while the V8 neck ’pup offers a hint of compression at higher gain settings, which levels lead lines nicely. It is, in the best way possible, everything you remembered from the original, and that makes it one of the best shred guitars available today.
Hey dan, others: My first guitar was a Palmer, my parents purchased it for me from our small town's jewelry store. That was like 1968. The guitar was an electric with two pick-ups and "wabble-stick" (tremelo). It was a beautiful natural wood tone sunburst. Jewelry stores have not been known to carry the best in guitars; but I had a lot of fun learning to play that thing. I still have it; can't bring myself to part with it, though I now have three acoustics (Yamaha, Alvarez (12 string), and a Fender (DGS21, a Peavey bass and Lyon series Washburn. I'd say, for your money, your better off with a washbun. The neck action on them is very impressive. My Palmer is now in disrepair. I need to resolder the pick-ups. The key-board was quite nice; some bridge problems, however, a bit of a rattle. Maybe the nut needs to be reset. I don't know where to find them now, but I understand that they're still out there somewhere.
In typical pedal effect chains you will most likely be running cable lengths that are much longer than 5.5 meters. The ME-80 allows you to keep your tone pure when running lots of effects. You can run a cable up to 5.5 metres into the input of the ME-80. The multi effects engine processes up to 8 effects in its internal signal chain. Then the ME-80 outputs your guitar signal as a 2,000 Ohm low impedance signal allowing you to run a much longer cable to the amplifier.
The only guitar instrument I can think of that is NOT sampler-based and that actually sounds decent would be RealGuitar. It's not the most realistic (IMO) and it's $160+. But if you ask most people for recommendations on realistic guitar instruments, you will hear stuff like Shreddage, Electri6ity, ProminyLPC, Lyrical Distortion, Strawberry Electric Guitar from Orange Tree... all Kontakt libraries, and all undoubtedly better than the 3 products you listed in your initial post, two of which are simply synths and not at all meant for realistic playing!

The GE-7 Graphic Equalizer is good to have after the overdrive in case you want to use it to scoop mids or bump certain frequencies for solos. (To show that these are not hard rules, it also works pretty well if the EQ is after the compressor but before the overdrive. But this changes how the EQ sounds, since you would be distorting it with the overdrive, so try it in the suggested position first.) Also, it’s good to have the EQ before the noise suppressor, since EQs can add noise as they boost tone at various points in the frequency spectrum, including any noise that is already there.
Been in my attic for 20 years...kinda dirty...Rare Vintage Electric Guitar that i have never found an exact pic of on the web...seems like a Teisco Del Rey,but looks earlier than the 60's models ive seen...obviously needs cleaning an repair...but man this thing is cool...a great restoration project...the only marking is the patent number 31-4127 on the truss rod cover...or a Norma or Guyatone version...or just hang it on your wall as a great conversation piece
A little lighter than the On-stage but equally sturdy is the Gator GFW, at only 8 lb of weight. This doesn’t mean it won’t be able to offer proper support to the heftiest amplifiers, however, since it is rated to hold as much as 176 lb before showing any signs of stress. At this capacity, most people would be able to use it as a chair without any worries.
I have inherited a heater "H300N" acoustic guitar but I can't find any info on it. The most I could find is that it was from the L. D. Heater Music Company that was based out of Beaverton, Oregon. They were best known for being a distributer of Lyle Guitars. Can anyone else offer additional information or where to find it? It's a bueatiful guitar and I want to know more info before I give it to my nephew or sell it.

Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black
Jump up ^ "Now the Gibson Guitar Raids Make Sense". www.investors.com. Investors' Business Daily. May 23, 2013. Retrieved July 14, 2018. According to C.F. Martin's catalog, several of their guitars contain 'East Indian Rosewood,' which is the exact same wood in at least 10 of Gibson's guitars. So why were they not raided and their inventory of foreign wood seized? Grossly underreported at the time was the fact that Gibson's chief executive, Henry Juszkiewicz, contributed to Republican politicians...By contrast, Chris Martin IV, the Martin & Co. CEO, is a long-time Democratic supporter.
And that’s about that. After ’93 Martin Stingers, like their previous Martin-brand cousins, started drifting off into solidbody byways of guitar history. The Stinger ST-2, basic fulcrum-vibrato Strats with pickguards and three single-coils, in black, red, and white, and the now ubiquitous droopy pointy headstock, was still listed in the 1996 Martin catalog, but these were pale reflections of the peak years.
My first Custom was a Charvel/Jackson Star body with a custom white paint with bullet holes and dripping blood from the holes ! My friend and Guitar teacher Randy Rhoads helped me get started on the right track in 1980 ,before I was playing in clubs and headlining shows later in the 80s and 90s,I was set with the perfect guitar! Gibson is just a brand name,Epiphones are better then Gibsons ,your just paying for a name,same with Fender! Remember,one of the greatest guitars was made for less then $300,so you should never really spend more then that unless it is a custom ,then you can do what you have to!
I thin Yamaha LL16 is one of the best acoustic guitar on the market . Yamaha is known for making affordable, quality guitars, and this is one is no different. It features a solid spruce top, solid rosewood back and sides, and an ebony fretboard. It is smaller than the dreadnought guitars – a fact that is neither good nor bad but that does affect the way the instrument sounds and feels.
Modulation stompboxes like our BF-3 Flanger should be after the tone-producing effects like distortion, wah, etc. so they can process and modify the tone built by the pedals before it. If you put it before the distortion, then you are distorting the sound of the flanger. Maybe that’s what you’re after, but in general, put the BF-3 and other modulation effects after the tone-shaping (and noise–producing) pedals. And then there are the ambience effects: delay and reverb. As we discussed earlier, reverb—and sometimes delay, depending on the space—is the last thing that happens before the sound reaches your ears in a physical space, so these go last. Delaying reverb can sound muddy, so it’s usually better to have the reverb after the delay.

Increasing the bass and treble while reducing or eliminating the centre midrange (750 Hz) results in what is popularly known as a "scooped" sound (since the midrange frequencies are "scooped" out). Conversely, decreasing the bass while increasing the midrange and treble creates a punchy, harsher sound. Rolling off all of the treble produces a dark, heavy sound.

Each option has a unique tonal quality, some may not seem all that useful in some situations.  2 adjacent pickups that are out of phase, can sound very tinny and weak but often cut through better in the mix as they occupy a different placement in the spectrum.  Consider Brian May's (Queen) tone as some of his selections rely on 2 single coil pickups being out of phase


Welcome to KayBassGuitar.com.  We're a the online Kay Vintage Reissue web site of Rock N Roll Vintage Inc., a Chicago based internationally known vintage guitar dealer.  Kay currently offers the "Street Series" and a "USA Recording Studio" lines.  Kay plans to offer reissues of 12 popular models including the Barney Kessel and the Jazz guitar and bass lines.   The Street Series are authentic reproductions of Classic Kay guitars and basses.   The Recording studio series will offer models with exceptional hand built custom shop quality.  We offer the complete line of Kay Vintage Reissue Basses and Guitars.   These Kay reissue guitars and basses look amazing and play even better.  Currently the Kay K161V Thin Twin and K775V Jazz II guitars and K162V Pro and K5970V Jazz Special basses are available.
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We used to see and hear Al Di Meola performing his big instrumental hit "Mediterranean Sun Dance" either with unforgatable Paco de Lucia or with his band's members. This time he performed it in duet with Antonio Sánchez, young flamenco guitarist born in Madrid, nephew of Paco de Lucia and Ramón de Algeciras and cousin of J.M. Bandera, who spent four years touring the world...
Harmoniser – a frequency-based effect that sounds like a second guitarist is playing in harmony with the original guitar signal. The effect is created by doubling the guitar input signal and then shifting the pitch of the double up or down at a certain interval (usually a 3rd, 5th or octave). The harmony effect is often used in the metal and hard rock genre to play solos.
If you're looking for a one-stop music shop with an amazing selection of guitars, drums, keyboards, recording, live sound, DJ equipment and more, Guitar Center Twin Cities is it. Whether you're a beginner or a gigging pro, our team members have the expertise and musical talent to get on your level and help you make great choices. Located adjacent to the Rosedale Shopping Center by the Best Buy in Roseville.First and foremost at Guitar Center Kansas City, we strive to give you the experience that Guitar Center is known for nationwide: big-store selection and prices with small-shop expertise and personality. From sales and repairs to lessons and rentals, our staff in every department is well-trained to cater to Midwest music-lovers. Our store and lessons studio are open every day of the week, so there's always a right time to visit even if you're on a busy schedule.
Epiphone began in Manhattan in 1903 when Anastasios Stathopoulo set up shop (not as Epiphone). When Anastasios died of cancer in 1915 his son Epaminondas (Epi) took over the business. Epiphone and Gibson had an on-going rivalry first in banjos and then in archtop guitars. Gibson finally acquired Epiphone in 1957. Although Epiphone guitars continued to be made in America for a time after the acquisition (often in the same factory, side-by-side with similar Gibson models), Epiphone is now a Gibson brand for overseas, imported lower cost guitars, though many are based on Gibson designs.

The diagram on the left shows you the fretboard on the guitar, with the thickest string on the left, and the E high string on the right. The numbers over the frets tell you where to press the string. At the top of the chart, you see an X or a 0 in near the strings. The X tells you to mute the string (not play it at all), the 0 tells you to play it open, without pressing any frets. So, in order to play the A chord as shown in the diagram, you should:
• How fanned frets work: You’ve likely seen players like the jazz virtuoso Charlie Hunter picking instruments that have frets fanned out at an angle along the fingerboard. The aim of fanned fret placement is to give the lower strings more length and the higher strings less length, thereby providing more accurate tuning and deep bass sounds. Fanned frets may seem like an innovation, but they first appeared in the 16th century.
Most 700 and 800 models, except for bass and probably 12-strings, were equipped with a vibrato bar. After 45 years or so the bar has gone missing on many of them. Some model 820s were equipped with a genuine Bigsby vibrato. The advertisement at left features the Bigsby-equipped Model 820. The advertisement on the right is identical except that it showed the stock Kent vibrato tailpiece. According to the catalogue of the time, the Bigsby was only available on the sunburst model 820.
Learning guitar with no source material to work with will require many different resources, overlapped to fill the blindspots of each. Most people take lessons, but you’ll be at the mercy and pace of your teacher, with little room for your own interpretation. These days, there are apps and online lessons which have their advantages, certainly. They also come with monthly fees, though these will likely be cheaper than a live local instructor.
Unfortunately there are a few who are not too happy with with some of the default patches, they caution that the PODHD500X is not a plug-and-play unit. While you can get good tones with a bit of tweaking, you can get even better tones with more experience, so the learning curve can be a bit steep for some. For best results, you ought to research the actual gear that your favorite musicians use, along with their settings and use them as your starting points to creating your own tones. Thankfully, there are user made presets that you can also use as base for your own virtual signal chain.
The No. 140 Supro Capitan was a handsome f-holed archtop, which was Regal-made. It sported an arched spruce top with a maple body. The hardwood neck had an ebonized fingerboard with pearl position dot and jumbo frets. An oval Supro logo plate sat on the faceplate. A single rectangular metal-covered pickup (with holes exposing the poles) sat just to the bridge side of the middle position. This pickup had six separate coils! It had a “crystaline pick guard,” probably tortoise, and adjustable compensated bridge, National-stamped trapeze tailpiece, and one volume and one tone control situated just behind the �guard. It came with a grey Servitex tweed case, and in ’42 cost $71.50.
Lastly, if what you're really asking is "Can I play my electric guitar without making any noise that would bother my neighbors/housemates?" Many amps and all direct in setups will allow you play with headphones. I plug headphones in a small tube amp. The sound is quite nice. I find this setup allows me to experiment even more than usual since I am not self conscious about anyone hearing what I am playing. I've seen little tube amps for as little as about $125 that have headphone jacks. At that price don't expect Fender, Dr Z, Vox, Marshall or Mesa Boogie quality sound, but they get the job done of basic tube drive and bypass the loudspeaker by driving the headphones.

Thanks to its small size and slim neck, you get to play this guitar and improve your skills with ease. The cutaway design also gives you easier access to the higher frets for tapping or other more advanced techniques. This guitar has a spruce top that improves the sound quality as it ages, meranti back and sides, and rosewood bridge and fingerboard.

Ten is not enough. If you are not here for the first time and you already checked our article on the top acoustic guitars and the recommended electric guitars you know how we roll.And if we are going to review a lot more than just 10, why not split them into proper categories that will help you choose what is working best for you. As it will take a lot of time to write all these for you, please be easy on us. For the people that do not want to waste that much time thought and just want a quick list with some great effects we prepared the comparison charted listed below:


Over the years, authentic 1950s Les Pauls have become some of the most desirable and expensive electric guitars in the world. Only 1700 were made between 1958 and 1960[citation needed]. Today, a 1959 Les Paul Standard in good condition can be easily priced between $US200,000 and $US750,000, making it the most valuable production model electric guitar ever built (however, Gibson Custom Shop reissue versions of the 1950s and 1960 Les Paul can be purchased for less, between $US3,000-$US6,000 – certain artist signature model versions of the guitars are considerably more expensive). Jimmy Page has been offered 1 million pounds (1.6 million USD) for his “number 1” 1959 Les Paul should he ever decide to sell it.[22]


Solid body guitars were the next step in guitar development, with Leo Fender creating a modest instrument called the Broadcaster, which was then rebranded as the Telecaster. The Stratocaster came later and, in addition to the changes in the pickups, included contours in the body that made the guitar more streamlined and easier to play while standing up. Today, the Stratocaster is still the most iconic electric guitar shape; it’s associated with guitar wizard Jimi Hendrix, and many beginners end up with a Stratocaster-style guitar. Gibson introduced their own line of solid body guitars, the considerably swankier Les Paul.
1Note that no signal processing is instantaneous, so every effect adds some small delay. For digital effects, this is the measurable and sometimes notable latency of something millisecond-ish (hopefully not more than a few ms). In simple analogue effects like distortion it's at most in the nanosecond range and basically neglectable. Any equaliser/filter component also introduce phase delay, which can be interpreted as delaying various frequencies by different amounts; but this too is normally not noticeable and works quite differently from a digital delay.
The effect also took Nashville by storm in the 70’s as well and was a favorite of Waylon Jennings’ music and others. What the effect does is mix the guitars signal with a slightly delayed reproduction of the signal. This delay shifts the waveform a few milliseconds thus producing the out of phase sound. It then uses a LFO (low frequency oscillator) to control the sweeping effect of the phaser. This pedal is key to the classic VH guitar sound!
But not everyone hated the album. Pete Cosey was later told by Hendrix's valet that before he would perform live, he'd listen to "Herbert Harper" for inspiration. In the '70's, when Marshall Chess went to visit the Rolling Stones rehearsal space, he saw a poster on the wall for the Electric Mud album. Led Zeppelin's bassist John Paul Jones cites Electric Mud as the inspiration for the basic riff behind "Black Dog." Marshall Chess also notes "the English accepted it; they are more eccentric." Strangely enough, rapper Chuck D of Public Enemy has emerged over the years as the biggest supporter of the record, stating "To me, it's a brilliant record. I've played it a thousand times." Chuck D also explained part of the intent of the record saying "It took me a while to warm up to traditional blues, but what struck me right away was the Electric Mud thing." Based on the success of Electric Mud, another blues musician on Chess, Howlin Wolf, was forced into recording a psych record. This Is Howlin Wolf's New Album (subtitled And He Doesn't Like It) (1969) isn't as good as Electric Mud although it did yield a minor hit with a psyched out version of "Evil." Chubby Checker even released a psych record (Chequered (1971)) that sounds better than you'd expect, though it only came out in England.
Ibanez Mikro GIO Electric Guitar in Black w/ Bag. The guitar is in good working condition does have few marks and one nick. Does not include stand just used to take pictures. Includes guitar strap and Ibanez bag. Please contact me if you have any problems with your purchased item and I would be Happy work with you to help make your Transaction a Pleasant Experience.           Please check photos carefully and use the enlarging tool. Some photos are taken with a flash and may cause the image to appear darker in some areas. Photos are an important part of the description and the condition of each item.Thanks for Looking!!           Also please verify the correct shipping address before bidding. Payment is expected within 48 hours.    

One trait of most ribbon mics is the figure-of-eight polar response, and this is often exceptionally consistent across the frequency range. This polar pattern means, of course, that ribbons tend to pick up a little more room ambience than cardioids, given that the polar pattern is as sensitive behind the diaphragm as it is in front. Ribbon mics are also often characterised as sounding 'smoother' compared with typical condenser microphones, partly because their construction avoids the high-frequency diaphragm resonances normally inherent in condenser designs.
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Since it was originally introduced in 1975, the Destroyer has become an icon of that era's chapter in rock n' roll history. Over the years it has undergone many incarnations and the perennial classic returns once again. The body and neck of both guitars are made of a tight Mahogany for maximum resonance. The bound rosewood fingerboard is adorned with Jumbo frets. The Destroyer also features Sure Grip III control knobs for no-slip control. It's not called the Destroyer for nothing.", "value":"447.99", "priceMin":"447.99", "priceMax":"699.99", "priceSavingsMaxPrice":"0.00", "priceSavingsMaxPercent":"0", "inventory":"0", "brand":"Ibanez", "reviewStarImageUrl": "https://static.musiciansfriend.com/img/brand/mf/cmn/Sprit-Sm-Stars.png", "reviewStarRating":"5.0", "reviewStarRatingInteger":"10", "reviewHowManyReviews":"3", "usedOrNew":"new", "discontinued":"1", "onOrder":"0", "clearance":"0", "canBeSold":"0", "accessoryCategories":"site1LFMIC,site1HBA,site1LAAA", "stickerText": "", "checksum":"", "priceVisibility": "1"}

Bold and brash, the chest-thumping sound of Fender's big-bodied California Series Redondo Player acoustic-electric was designed to inspire you from the moment you pick it up. The exclusive slope-shouldered Redondo body shape has a rich, commanding voice that fills any room. The gloss metallic top, back and sides, as well as a matching painted 6-in-...  Click To Read More About This Product

This thing is awesome! For its price you can't find any other processor that can plug into your computer and easily navigate the pedals. To connect to your computer or laptop you will need a standard printer cable (I would pick up one of the amazon basic cables for cheap.) I bought a 10 foot one which is plenty to run from the pedal to my music stand. Also once you are connected to your laptop via the USBcable, all sounds from your laptop will run through your amp/headphones. That confused me the first time when my computer speakers sounded better, haha. If you are curious, It comes with a power supply.
In terms of the electronics, Yamaha went with a System 66 piezoelectric platform. The preamp packs a standard three-band EQ couple with a built-in tuner and a flexible mid-range control. Needless to say, it gives you more than enough room to dial in a decent tone. Quality-wise, this might be the best acoustic electric you can get in this price range, period.
mid-1939 Popscicle bracing on D body sizes. See the above picture for what the popsicle or T-6 or upper transverse graft brace is. The popsicle brace was added to the underside of the top of the guitar, below the fingerboard. The brace was added to help prevent top cracks alongside the fingerboard. Since the first D body size was made in about 1934, problems obviously came about and Martin added the brace by 1939. The brace does not appear in pre-1939 Martin D-sizes, but transitioned in around 1939, and is present in all 1940 and later D models. Without the popsicle brace, the top is attached only by the strength of the spruce fibers and a 1/2" x 2" glue area where the top overlays the soundhole #1 brace. With the popsicle brace there is an additional 1" x 2" glue surface directly under the fingerboard. Unfortunately the popsicle brace can deaden the sound of the upper bout area of the soundboard, and the popsicle brace doesn't always prevent the top from cracking along the fingerboard either. As people search for why the old Martins sound so good, they examine every aspect of them and the popsicle brace usually enters the conversation. Here's some data on popsicle braces:
1947: Open back Grover Sta-tites on 0, 00, 000 models style 21 and lower. These post-WW2 open back Grovers have thin seamed buttons and the pointed baseplates which were never used on the pre-war open back Grovers. Also all the pre-war thin seamed button tuners were 6:1 ratio. The post-war tuners (and the thick-button open Grovers after 1937) were 12:1 ratio This makes post-war open back Grovers more easily identifible. Otherwise the post-war Grovers are direct drop-in replacements for the pre-war versions.
This list kind of blows. There are no greatest guitarists. And I hate how people think guitar is sickly limited to rock guys who in the whole scheme of things are pretty amateur. How about Eric clapton? Heck if Charlie Christian or django rhinehardt had never started playing solos guitar would still be a strict rhythm instrument playing crotchets to emphasise the beat. He had 2 fingers and did more for the guitar than anyone on this list? Especially Tom Morello? How about pat methany, wes Montgomery, pat martino, tal farlow, JOHN MCLAUGHLIN, george benson? Listen to any of those guys and it will completely redefine your thoughts on the guitar. It can so easily be intelligent and soulful simultaneously…
Rock ’n’ roll is an industry that’s continually pushing musical, social, and cultural boundaries, and the electric guitar is its iconic instrument. The acoustic version has been around since at least the 16th century. So when I first started working with co-curator Gary Sturm on an exhibition about the invention of the electric guitar at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, our driving question was: Why electrify this centuries-old instrument? The simplest answer: Guitarists wanted more volume.
Ibanez is a Japanese guitar manufacturing company, which is famous for being the first to mass-produce the seven-string and eight-string variants of guitars. The perfect size, great projection and beautiful tone offered by AEL, PF and EWP series of Acoustic guitars are remarkable. RGX and the GRX series of electric guitars come with the Ibanez brand at an affordable price. The mid-range GRG series include offers greater precision, high performance and playability.

Their first flat-top acoustic guitar was produced some time shortly before 1910, but at that time their flat-tops were still a long way behind Martin in terms of popularity. It wasn't until 1923 that they began to seriously break into the flat-top acoustic guitar market with their signature Nick Lucas Special model and began to give Martin a run for their money.
Unlike the 60's and 70's, it is almost impossible to buy a poor quality guitar today. There are many hundreds of "brand" name guitars being produced in dozens of factories throughout the world, with these same factories producing instruments for the world's best known brands - and nearly all of these instruments are well made and perfectly playable. Don't worry about the name on the headstock. If you are buying the guitar as a gift, have a guitarist-friend advise you on the suitability of the instrument for the intended recipient. Even the world's best known and respected guitar manufacturers market instruments in a variety of price markets, and while there are differences in materials and tonal qualities, these are usually well beyond the beginner's ability to discern. All are playable; it is up to the player to make them sound good.
Most delay pedals have controls for the number of repeats (called “feedback”), the volume of the repeats and the time between each repeat. Some pedals have what’s called “tap tempo”, where you can tap your foot on the pedal and the delay unit will match the speed of the effect to your foot, allowing you to match the delay time to the tempo of a song. Delay pedals are often used to thicken up heavy lead guitar sounds, or to subtly add more to a simple rhythm guitar part.
Clipping is a non-linear process that produces frequencies not originally present in the audio signal. These frequencies can be harmonic overtones, meaning they are whole number multiples of one of the signal's original frequencies, or "inharmonic", resulting from general intermodulation distortion.[34][35][36] The same nonlinear device will produce both types of distortion, depending on the input signal. Intermodulation occurs whenever the input frequencies are not already harmonically related. For instance, playing a power chord through distortion results in intermodulation that produces new subharmonics.
The Effect: When it comes to effects pedals, those which offer more than one type of effect are usually seen as the best cost effective solution out there. Although many still prefer that standard, standalone configuration, multi-effects pedals have a lot to offer. Take Carl Martin Multi Effects Pedal as an example. This thing is packed to the brim with boutique level effects. Easy to use, a board such as this one can substitute a whole pedalboard depending on the variety of effects you use. One of the other great features of this design is the fact that multi-effect pedals come in both digital and analog form. They have transcended that artificial sounding performance that plagued effects processors some 10 years ago. Today, a multi-effects pedal is every bit as capable as its standalone counterparts. While this design is aimed at everyone, budget oriented users stand to gain the most from it.
I have been playing guitar, banjo, and harmonica for 60 years. I started when I was ten-years-old. I have taught guitar and banjo for a number of years. My guitar of choice is a Martin D-41, an affordable guitar that is much like the D-45. The woods and construction are famous. There are other makes but none surpass Martin. My harmonicas are Hohners given to me by my father when he passed-on. Anyone can learn. I learned the fiddle after I reached my 70's. Just listen, play, and learn. Don't give-up. There are many good guitars, and banjos. Martin makes the best, and Stelling makes the best banjos. I started-out with a japanese banjo in the 1970's. A white Eagle, distributed by Alvarez.

This is one of several Squier models available that offer a pretty good product for a reasonably low price. The pickups and hardware are sometimes suspect, and the workmanship varies from instrument to instrument, but for the price, these are a very good beginner guitar choice. Squier Fat Strats are similar in appearance to the much more expensive Fender Stratocasters, so the look of the instrument is appealing. 


Compared to the previously mentioned good guitar brands, ESP (Electric Sound Products) guitars are relative newcomers to the scene. The Japanese company was founded in the mid 1970’s, and they produce mostly electric guitars and basses. The company became very popular among metal guitar players, however they are versatile enough to be used for any style.
But a lot of bands also go in to a pro studio for the shared experience… add to that the expertise offered by a producer and engineer. In this scenario, you might have a hard sell but I’ve had a lot of producers and engineers call me to order an Axe-Fx after hearing one in this context. Nick Raskulinecz, Richard Chycki, Jack Douglas to name a few. In some case  guitar tones are prepared in advance on the Axe-Fx and then the “team” works together to decide what the album is going to sound like. I’ve also done consulting where the Axe-Fx was used to Tone Match the sound of stems from “the last album” or an old masterpiece. I also just saw a video where a band kept fooling this superstar producer by switching to the Axe-Fx and telling him it was the real amp he had set up in the live room. In all of these cases, you’re basically also dealing with many of the same things from the “top ten” list above. I also think it can save time and money. Just think about how easy it makes re-amping and how important that can be to notching things up a level… re-crafting guitar tones around a new mix idea. By the way, these things are all equally true for established artists as well; doing your first album is not really all that different in this regard.

Whether your style is searing rock or acoustic folk, the right guitar will help you sound and feel like a superstar. From acoustic guitars to electric hybrids to bass guitars, there’s a guitar designed exactly for the way you play. You’ll be rocking out in no time when you choose a guitar from Best Buy’s selection of top brands like Fender, Yamaha, Squier, Schecter, Mahalo, Dean Guitars and more.
1967-1969: about the coolest guitar Danelectro ever produced. Has 13 drone strings that move from the vibration of the usual 6 strings. Three pickups, 2 for the 6 stings and 1 for the drone strings. Crinkle burgundy finish, 3 point body shape. Has a "buzz" bridge which similate the sitar sound. The resonation from the buzz bridge vibrates the top of the body and the drone strings. Clear pickguards protecting the drone strings and Vinnie's name on the lower 6 string clear pickguard. Body is made entirely from Poplar, with a semi-hollow construction.

A classic Western guitar from the Far East, this Vintage Global guitar was made in Japan sometime in the 1960s and imported for Sears and Montgomery Ward department stores. It's got a swell pick guard with a honeysuckle blossom and a hummingbird and an ominously undecorated fretboard that has absolutely no dots or markings whatsoever. Other features of the Vintage Global guitar include a snazzy sunburst finish, classic imitation wood inlay decorative sound hole decal, and cheap white plastic tuning knobs. This classical acoustic guitar has absolutely nothing in the way of "warm tones" or any other term typically used to describe finely crafted stringed instruments. Instead, it has a distinctive sharp and rumbly quality that is great for recording or live applications where a "lo-fi" sound is desired. This Global guitar has decent action and is easy to play. Speaking from experience, it really cuts through the other tracks in recording and adds a humble trashy sound while staying in tune and functioning like a normal, decent quality guitar. The Vintage Global guitar showed signs of moderate use and had a number of nicks and scratches around the edges. The hummingbird pick guard had some scratches / wear in the black glossy surface near the very top corner, but otherwise was in excellent condition. The neck was straight and the guitar had no cracks or other serious bodily damage. Body measures 17 /2 inches x 14 inches x 3 1/2 inches. Neck measures 16 1/4 inches in length from nut to end (minus headstock) and is 2 3/8 inches at widest point. This Global Hummingbird Guitar sold and is probably making beautiful music on the other side of the country, but lots or really cool-looking vintage Global guitars can be found on eBay.
I don't need freaky pointy demon guitar graphics or anything like that.....this $249 Agile makes my mouth water. For the price of two cheap pedals or one great pedal it's a guitar that you could work with. Ibanez makes the stylish P90 Jet King for about $375...If I were on a tight budget I'd rather have the basic Agile. Yes I'm aging! Get off my lawn you Jet King kids!!
This is why I’m nervous when I see a free guitar plugin that actually wants to replace a guitar, which Cute Emily Guitar attempts to do. Now, Cute Emily is the most guitar-sounding of the bunch, but it also has the least amount of controls. This gives you a relatively singular sound and while I commend Big Cat efforts, I stopped using this free electric guitar plugin faster than I did the others.
From rock to jazz or folk to metal, what separates the great guitarists from the rest is their mastery of the skills taught in this program. From basics like chords and scales to nuances like improvisation techniques, form, control, and inflexion, this certificate program will take your guitar playing to the next level. Few accomplished guitarists have reached their peak alone, and Berklee’s faculty is unparalleled when it comes to delivering the personalized instruction and feedback that will help you turn the fretboard into a playground packed with unlimited possibilities.
Other handheld guitar and bass resonators on the market, manufactured under the tradename SRG, produced by Aescher Europa, in Germany, are available in both monophonic (one note at a time) and polyphonic (multiple notes at once) models, which include multiple onboard trigger switch effects, such as HPF (high pass filter) for enhancing harmonics and producing feedback effects, and LPF (low pass filter), producing a bass boost with a cello sound on heavy gauge strings. Later EBow models, such as the plus Ebow, contain a mode slide switch on the back, which allows the player to either produce just sustain or overtone feedback in addition to sustain.[69]
In 1956, Albert King (real name Albert Nelson) had moved to St Louis Missouri and his soulful blues performances were becoming very popular in their own right. He changed his surname to King on account of B.B King’s success with “Three O’Clock Blues‘. By 1967, the title track of his album ‘Born Under a Bad Sign‘ became his most popular and influential release.
New in ’64 were the TG-64 (named for the year) and a matching series of solid basses. The TG-64 was essentially a Fender Jazzmaster shape with a slightly extended bass horn, the new, hooked four-and-two headstock (usually with a metal plate on the front), and best of all, our old friend the “monkey grip” handle in the lower bass bout, handed down from the old T-60. The pickguard was two-part, with one large piece under the strings and a little extension on the lower bout for knobs and jack. These had three single-coil pickups, usually the chunky, metal-covered kind with a black insert and exposed poles, although some have smaller oval metal covers with exposed poles, all controlled by three on/off rocker switches above the strings. A small sliding switch served as a rhythm mute, or lead boost, depending on your point of view.
Fender are perhaps the world’s most famous electric guitar brand. Founded by Leo Fender in California in 1946, they are famed for producing the first ever mass-produced solid-body electric guitar. Since then, Fenders have been used by some of the biggest names in music, from Jimi Hendrix and Buddy Holly, to Paul McCartney and Eric Clapton. These days the company’s headquarters are in Scottsdale, Arizona, and they still produce two of the most iconic models of all time – the Stratocaster and the Telecaster.
First, Steel String sounds heavenly, and I always love it when my mouth drops the first time I hear a hyper-realistic sounding VST. Steel String has done this completely, in fact, the only time I was ever pulled out from its hyper-realism was on the fret noise that recreates the articulation of finger sliding across the strings when changing positions.
Founded in 1902, Gibson began life producing mandolins and other instruments, before making hollow-body electric guitars in the thirties. Their first solid-body guitar came in 1952 – the Les Paul, which remains one of the most iconic guitars in the world. They are also well known for pioneering some classic guitar shapes such as the SG, the Explorer, and the Flying V. Used by everyone from James Hetfield to B.B. King, Gibson’s are manufactured in three American factories – two in Tennessee and one in Montana.
EQ or equalization effects work by boosting or cutting specified frequency bands within the sound signal. From treble or high-end sounds such as the sizzling sounds of a riveted cymbal to low-end sources such as the thump of a bass drum or bass guitar, EQ effects don't change the pitch but rather alter the timbre or quality of the sound. Depending on the application, EQ control can be quite precise or very simple.

Every decision, action, employee hiring, design of new models, etc.-comes from the C.E.O.-Henry J. He dictates every single decision that happens within the company. His power and control over the company is unimaginable. Nothing will change until he leaves or sells the company. First of all the C.E.O. hires every worker- (which is why you wait an eternity to get hired). He doesn't delegate hiring to other departments like other "normal" companies do. That is why you apply, take tons of tests, wait 3 to 5 months (not weeks!), take a drug screen test, if you pass that, then you are finally hired- for a factory job- not a job at the White house! Managers demean workers- most managers don't even have a high school level of education- while most of the workers have some college experience or a 4 yr. degree (including me). Why do the young (20 to 40 yrs. old) educated guys take the job? (1st)- it looks good on the resume, (2nd)- you get to work on guitars, which seems cool at first, until you realize it's a place you do not want to be -most guys leave after a year on average. There is no chance for advancement or a raise. The attitude from Mngt. is intimidation- to rule by fear. They actually get a thrill from firing people, they actually want you to fail, I have never seen anything like it. Everything is about hitting your daily numbers at any cost. Pay raises have been non-existent for years without explanation of why. H.R. is the worst I have ever seen. The women in H.R. dress extremely inappropriate and unprofessional. When you go to H.R. to ask questions, they literally sigh and roll their eyes like you are bothering them -instead of them actually doing their jobs. Nobody knows anything-when you ask for help, you get annoyed responses because they just want to hit their personal number to get out and go home. Managers do as little as possible to not get noticed, but do just enough to keep their jobs- while the workers do all the work to make them look good. Turnover is constant. Stress levels are off the charts. 2012 was my 1st yr. of 2 yrs. working there. We were doing from 650 to 800 guitars a day- (Massman Dr. plant). In comparison the Custom Shop makes about 50 a day. The Memphis Plant- 50 a day. The Montana plant- 50 a day- us =650 to 800 a day! We made the most guitars in 2012 ever -but for the first time nobody received a yearly bonus?!? Which makes no sense -until you figure out everything is about cutting costs-all ordered from the C.E.O. People will skip all their breaks and even lunch to hit their number to get out on time. Countless times we had no lacquer because Mngt. hadn't ordered on time?!? We would have no parts for the guitars (bridges, tuners, etc.)-because they forgot to order on time?!? Yet no one from Mngt. would take accountability for it. One day, 5 people in my dept. (20-30 in the whole plant overall) were fired with no warning (one lady had been there 18 yrs., one guy-8 yrs., etc.)-yet Gibson's attendance policy in their own handbook states you have to be given a oral warning, then a 1st written warning, then a 2nd written warning- yet all the workers were not given any warning. And the reason why is that it had been a slow Christmas season in sales, so they were all let go (ordered by Henry J. -the dictator) to cut payroll-but didn't follow their very own attendance policy-because they don't have to. There is no union, no protection for your job. They tell you you are fired, and to just deal with it, while the powers-that-be don't have to be accountable for anything. It is a dictatorship. A guy I worked there with has been there 20 yrs. And one day he counted up all the workers he remembered being fired or had quit in the 20 yrs. he had been there - it was 350 to 400! If you fail a drug test, you can keep your job?!? So you take 2 weeks off and go to drug rehab- but if you break the attendance policy - you are gone?!?- It's because the company doesn't have to pay you for 2 weeks, and it's something of a tax write off as well (that's what I was told). So basically you can break the law and do drugs- and still have a job. All in the name of saving money. The back break room refrigerator has not been cleaned in 2 yrs! No clock in the main break room for over 5 yrs. and counting! Gibson charged their own employees and their children to attend the company's (workers!) halloween party!?!? Gibson owns Tobias basses-made them 2 yrs. then stopped. Owns Slingerland drums, but hasn't made them in over 12 yrs (pics of them on the website are from late 1990's)! Baldwin pianos (makes on a on-order basis only, and only in Japan, not America anymore). Valley Arts guitars-stopped making them in 2002-12 yrs. ago. Etc,etc.etc! The point being is they buy up all these brand names- and have them on their website as if they are still being sold - but they are not! But they don't say that on their website. The C.E.O. has them to just build value for the Gibson/Epiphone name - to make it more valuable- to sell the company one day at maximum profit. I know this because managers told me this who had first hand knowledge. Guys have been punched in the face during arguments. One guy took a screwdriver and smashed it through the top of a hollow body guitar out of frustration! Arguments are a daily occurrence. My friend would come into work to start his shift, and be so nervous, he would throw up in the bathroom- because of the stress levels and negative atmosphere. Every day literally felt like you were going to prison! I really wanted to make this job work out for me. I am a musician (as are many who work there, many of us play gigs on weekends or nights). My long-term plan was to use my degree, and move up to a corporate position-until I found out what a nightmare the company is. I found out through everyone that I asked that corporate is run the same way! Many might be surprised by this review, because Gibson guitars are really revered by musicians. And outwardly the company has a reputation of the highest quality. But working there was the exact opposite, you would almost rather dig ditches! I have pretty much done it all- I owned my own business, waited tables, worked out in the heat-landscaping, worked in sales, marketing, management, etc. And I have never had such a negative work experience- ever! It affected my health mentally and physically (standing everyday for 10 hrs. or more). And let me tell you for those of you reading this -no job is worth that!
We saved the most affordable amplifier for the last. This Donner electric guitar amp might have only 10-watts, but it does not lack other features. The controls include Gain, boost Select Switch, Volume, Treble, Middle, Bass and are pretty intuitive. The tone is clean and damn big for such a small model. Other than that this model also has 3-Band EQ, 1/8″ Auxiliary Input Jack for Jam-Along with Media Player and, of course, the handy-dandy Headphone Output Jack for Silent Practice (unless you want to be evicted from your apartment for practicing days on end). Best practice amps are not best just because you can practice in your basement and never move the thing. They are pretty functional and easy to carry around. That’s why Donner put durable, hard material on the edges of the amp and a pad of rubber makes it more sturdy. With that your amp will be pretty much indestructible.
With 20 watts of rated power and an 8-inch speaker, the Champion 20’s sound output capability is a little above average for this class of amplifier. Those who like the features but need more power can check out the 40-watt version with a 12-inch speaker, the Champion 40, which costs twice as much but should be powerful enough for most jam sessions and gigs. The Champion 20 also includes a 3.5 mm line input for connecting a smartphone (good when you want to play along with recorded music or a music instruction app) and a 3.5 mm headphone output.

Perhaps our favorite feature is a far more subtle aspect of this pedal's interior, which is a circuit design that runs your dry signal through an analog path, before reuniting it with the wet reverb signal, which is produced by a digital processor. This means your guitar's signal coming into the pedal is unimpaired by the digital components, giving you a far more pure and organic-sounding output. 


The standard practice for many distributors was to offer a line of guitars based on popular American designs like Les Pauls and Strats, for example, along with a few original designs. And all were offered at a bargain price or were at least inexpensive enough to compete with the American manufacturers. While the majority of imported Asian-built copies from the era aren’t considered to be of very good quality, the Lotus brand was an exception, mainly because of the factories they were built in.
This is a Supro Supreme Hawaiian Guitar Model 1400 from somewhere around 1945. I've seen an identical one that was purchased new by the original owner during that year exactly. That date appeals to my love of WWII history, of course, because it was the last year of the war. I found this one languishing in the back of a vintage guitar store in Williamsburg, Virginia, while my wife and I were on our 30th anniversary holiday trip. The guitar is covered in lovely reddish-brown "mother of toilet seat" and has a non-slip back.
A different take on the standard tone control is the Varitone circuit sometimes used on Gibson guitars (such as the Blueshawk). The Varitone is actually a variable notch filter consisting of one of several capacitors (selected with a rotary switch) in series with an inductor, forming an LC circuit.[15] When placed between the signal and ground, this circuit starts to attenuate frequencies around its resonant frequency, as determined by the following formula:
Unlike a piano or the voices of a choir, the guitar (in standard tuning) has difficulty playing the chords as stacks of thirds, which would require the left hand to span too many frets,[40] particularly for dominant seventh chords, as explained below. If in a particular tuning chords cannot be played in closed position, then they often can be played in open position; similarly, if in a particular tuning chords cannot be played in root position, they can often be played in inverted positions. A chord is inverted when the bass note is not the root note. Additional chords can be generated with drop-2 (or drop-3) voicing, which are discussed for standard tuning's implementation of dominant seventh chords (below).
Guitar-Sunbeam : Precisely transmits the eternal electric guitar, ideally suited for modern production. It combines an extensive library of strum patterns, brute force, arpeggios and real riffs with real-time performance monitoring. An innovative playback engine allows you to create an almost infinite number of variations of chords and you get convincing, musical results.

Sweet and tasty Smooth Jazz track. Featured electric and acoustic pianos, electric organ with synth. Rhythm electric guitar playing chords and another creamy electric guitar playing solo. Also, this track has warm and wide bass guitar with drums and percussion. This track is great for presentations, advertising, real estate background, Youtube and other videos.


Instead of thinking about the different woods (mahogany, maple, rosewood, etc), all the different pickups, necks, scale lengths, bridges, body types… all you have to worry about is getting the STYLE right. 95% of the time, that will get you the SOUND you want as well. Of course, that being said, get the highest quality wood you can. For example, most players agree that a “solid sitka spruce top” is probably the highest quality wood you can get for a “beginner” level acoustic guitar, without compromising tone.
Our private lessons in guitar, bass, keyboards, and drums are available in 30 and 60-minute sessions with flexible scheduling, so you can progress at your own pace. Maybe you'd rather be the instrument - in that case, come learn more about our singing lessons. And those are only scratching the surface of the unique services at Guitar Center Lessons in Roseville, which also include jam sessions, recording lessons, group lessons and more. Want to know what it's like to be in a band? Ask us about our Rock Show program, which connects you with other musicians at your skill level to get the full experience.

Another popular modification is to reverse the electric polarity of one of the pickups (or one coil of a dual-coil pickup). When two pickups are selected, this produces a very thin and weak sound, due to phase cancellation between the pickups.[21] The closer the pickups are to each other, the greater the cancellation and thus the weaker and thinner the resulting sound. In case of a humbucker this results in a sound that is so weak as to be almost unusable, as well as the loss of the pickup's hum-cancelling properties (due to the coils being magnetically out-of-phase, but electrically in-phase with each other).[22]
Companion to the TG-64 was the TB-64 bass. This was virtually identical to the guitar – including the three pickups and monkey grip – except it was a bass, so it had no vibrato. Two other basses debuted in ’64, the NB-1 and NB-4. These were basically the same guitar as the TB-64 except they did not have the handle cutout in the body. The NB-1 had a single pickup and the NB-4 had two.

I am leaning toward Justin and keep watching Marty I jumped way ahead into intervals and in the middle of the presentation it clicked. He knows his stuff. As a newcomer I want to see a bit of the whole picture as I learn basics. PS senior .Found this review very good of top sites and subscribers. AndyGuitar claims on Amazon to be the number one you tube guitar teacher. Not college educated like Justin, J Kehew or Marty Swartz . I will check these others out. Thanks for the review. I would have missed some. So many flooding You Tube


With Dave Matthews playing an electric guitar in place of his usual acoustic, the band delivered a performance of “Samurai Cop (Oh Joy Begin)”, the lead single from Come Tomorrow, their record-breaking seventh-straight album to debut at #1 on the Billboard charts dating back to 1998’s Before These Crowded Streets. You can watch Dave Matthews Band’s performance on Ellen below:
Guitar Center added a replica of the “Black Beauty” Les Paul Custom, with three pickups, that Peter Frampton used as his main guitar from his days in Humble Pie through his early solo career, photographed playing the instrument on the front jackets of his albums Frampton and Frampton Comes Alive. It has all the same qualities such as the three uncovered humbucking pickups and missing pickguard. The Black Beauty was not issued until 1957; however, the one given to Frampton by a fan named Mark Mariana was a 1954 model that had been routed out for a middle pickup.
The body and neck are also slimmer than other Spanish guitar models, as well, so if you’re used to a steel-string, but gearing up to try a classical guitar, the Kremona Sofia is one to put on your list to try. The strings are Royal Classic Sonata strings, made in Spain, so add this to the guitar body’s manufacturing origins, and you will have a sound that is worthy of a professional, but affordable for just about everyone.
Frets & Necks did an AMAZING job on my RG7421. They installed my BKP Black Hawk p/u's and new tone/volume pots. Frets & Necks service was above and beyond, fast and super knowledgeable. I am very pick...y about who works on my guitars, I am beyond pleased that I chose Frets& Necks to work on my RG. I will be bringing my RG7421 back to Frets & Necks for future upgrades very soon. Be good to yourself and treat your guitar, give Frets & Necks a try. You won't be disappointed. Thank you F&N. See More

You wont be sorry with this harness, full size volume pot , push pull tone pot/switch both with good throw torque, great solder connects and a quality, all hardware was intact , just remove replace, I did have to carefully bend the lugs on the input switch to get it to seat properly in my Epiphone but other than that minor obstacle all went well, no hum or noise and the toggle feels solid, man Epiphone put some straight up junk electronics in my guitar so this was a great upgrade, thanks Kmise you got a new customer..will order another for my Jackson Kelly..
And again. the no-brainer: your guitar just plain sucks.  If your bought your guitar at Wall-Mart for $19.99, PLEASE don't put my pickups in it!!!  Here is EXACTLY what you should do with it: keep it around until you are playing your first big club gig and you need to do something extraordinary to get the crowds attention.  As you thrash away on the final chord of the last song pick up THIS guitar, douse it heavily with lighter-fluid and light that puppy up!  Now that's getting more that 20-bucks worth of wow-factor out of that pile of Chinese dog-dung!
In the years since, Novak has built the instruments of choice for the likes of musicians like Charlie Hunter, Phillip De Gruy, Joe Louis Walker, and Henry Kaiser, to name a few. As time passed, he experimented with a variety of design ideas involving the use of non-traditional woods. At times, he was viewed as downright crazy from many a purist's standpoint. But he turned the other cheek, seeking the solutions that would satisfy his own personal playing requirements. 

This is another incredible right handed electric guitar from Cort guitars. It mostly comes in red color and has 6 strings. It has its body made of agathis and fret board from rosewood. The fret board is composed of up to 24 jumbo size frets. It is a sassy looking guitar that is quite affordable, with prices ranging from INR 9,999 to INR 10,050. Click below to get more information on the product.
MAKE YOUR OWN BODY BLANK Another neat trick to create your own body blank for $10 is to get a 3/4" thick peice of Birch Plywood that comes cut into a 4' by 2' board. Simply cut out two rectangular sections of the board that will accomodate your desing and wood glue them together. Be generous with the glue to make sure there aren't any spaces between the boards when you press the two together, clamp and stack weights on top of it so the two peices are joined firmly and let dry overnight. This gives you a a 1 1/2" thick body blank that is rigid and works great for electric guitars. You will have to go with a solid color paint when you finish it but you won't be able to tell the difference between it and the solid wood blank. Plus you'll save a good chunk of change that you can use towards good pickups and hardware. If you want to make the body a little thicker, you can get a 1/4" peice of birch and glue it between the two thicker peices. It's also a good idea to prerout any wire cavities in that 1/4" peice before you glue them together. That way you don't have to worry about drilling them later and ruining the top of your guitar body with the drill.
Theory - These sessions will be devoted to investigating how the fretboard works, how strings and notes relate to each other, what chords are made up of etc. A lot of theory time will be spent reading and analysing diagrams and your guitar's fretboard. This aspect is for understanding how music works on the guitar, to map out the fretboard in your mind so you can later apply the physical techniques with confidence. If you're serious about getting good on guitar, you need time devoted to theory.
I have been using it since 3 years. It is not even costly. Its good looking and I think its even better than gibson. It even very easy to tune for it has a very good sound quality. More over it has a beautiful look like a guitar. Even a beginner should be advised to buy this guitar for it cost a minimum of 3000 rs. So as it is less costly and more quality it's the best for me. I even like lakewood but its cost is just my dream.
In around 1988 Martin introduced a line of Stinger amps and effects pedals. Amps included the FX-1 (10 watts, 8″ speaker, “Tube Synth” distortion circuit, $152), the FX-1R (15 watts, 8″ speaker, Tube Synth, spring reverb, $220), FX-3B (15 watts, 10″ speaker, compression, separate pre-amp and master volume controls, 3-band EQ, $189), FX-3C (30 watts, 12″ speaker, Tube Synth, chorus, $299), and the FX-3RC (65 watts, 12″ speaker, Tube Synth, chorus, reverb, effects loop, $379).

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If you are not attracted to the way the guitar looks or feels in your hand, chances are you won't be too eager to pick it up every day. When you are just starting out, this is supremely important. Here's where a disclaimer needs to be placed. This isn't always the case, and often times people warm up to a guitar even if they didn't initially like it, but why chance it?
It is typically not possible to combine high efficiency (especially at low frequencies) with compact enclosure size and adequate low frequency response. Bass cabinet designers can, for the most part, choose only two of the three parameters when designing a speaker system. So, for example, if extended low-frequency performance and small cabinet size are important, one must accept low efficiency.[24] This rule of thumb is sometimes called Hofmann's Iron Law (after J.A. Hofmann, the "H" in KLH).[25][26] Bass cabinet designers must work within these trade-offs. In general, to get extended low-frequency performance, a larger cabinet size is needed. Most bass cabinets are made from wood such as plywood. Gallien-Kruger makes a small extension cab made of aluminum.
From the 1940s through 1990s, the company also manufactured various electric/electronic keyboards. Especially in the 1960s and 1990s, they manufactured a range of innovative and popular electromechanical keyboard instruments; the Cembalet, Pianet, Basset, Guitaret, and Clavinet. In the 1980s, several Casio synths were sold under the Hohner brand - for example, the Casio HT-3000/Hohner KS61midi and the VZ-1/HS-2).
I agree with Squank, and I appreciate the compliment! We live in a golden age of guitar gear and I’m in the lucky position of getting to play through quite a bit of it. It’s rare that I come across an amp, pedal, or other piece of guitar hardware I truly dislike, and I can usually get a decent, useable tone out of most modern equipment. This month, I’ll share some of my thoughts on dialing in great tone on amps, pedals, and guitars.
The key to getting that guitar tone you strive for comes down to an effects unit of some sort, especially if you’re going for the kind of sound The Edge (David Howell Evans, the guitar player from U2) has. Many worship-music guitarists also use several effects pedals to achieve their lush soundscapes. It’s amazing how these pedals can make a single instrument sound so full.
With that in mind, the quality of said effect is satisfactory, to say the least. You maybe won’t see the same level of refinement as you would in some stand-alone models, however its reverb comes across as fairly organic. On top of that, you are presented with several decent options. All of that aside, the real value of this Zoom comes from its ability to combine up to 6 effects at any given time.
Let’s get it straight. Froo – Shawn – Tey. If you don’t know him, he’s the lead guitarist of the Red Hot Chili Peppers. Frusciante is the author of the brilliant chord progression on Under the Bridge, the haunting intro to Californication and the simplistic solo and riff on Otherside. If you’re the casual listener of the Chili Peppers, then you may wonder why John has made it so far up this list. But a tad of a closer look will reveal that his simple catchy riffs are the tip of the ice berg. One can catch a glimpse at his technical skill in the Dani California solo. A bit deeper and you’ll run into Lyon 06.06.06 in one of the B Sides. John takes his influences (Page, Hendrix) and mixes his own nuances into a sound that’s pleasantly different, but melodically having the same effects on you. A track to look out for on his solo work – Ramparts – showcasing four or so guitars layered upon each other in an introspective orchestra.

One last time we must put aside our expensive tastes and put up with the “economy” version of a guitar that is actually much nicer. The full-scale rendition of Steve Vai’s guitar is, in my opinion, legitimately worth every one of the nearly 300,000 pennies it costs. Per the Ibanez web site, there are a lot of Vai Signature models you can pick from:
Tremolo is the gentle art of making your signal subtly cut in and out of volume. Think of all those old surf records. Phase and flange are quite similar in essence; phase emulates the sweeping of the frequency band, alternating between cutting the bass and treble frequencies, while flange does a similar thing but with a slightly more extreme sound. Wah is perhaps more well known; the Jim Dunlop Cry Baby wah pedal has been used for decades by players of all genres. Adding a highly distinctive wah-wah sound can elevate a solo into something infinitely more interesting. Or it can add a bit of that classic wakka-wakka sound you hear on classic funk records.
It usually has 8 terminals – two poles with 4 terminals each. Each pole has one common terminal and 3 switched. The first thing you want to figure out is which terminal is common. Note that terminal on the left is connected to the lever all the time – that’s our common terminal. The other three terminals are connected to the lever only in certain switch positions. Represented as a schematic, each pole would look like this.
This is definitely the coolest music store in the Pacific Northwest. If you are a high end guitar lover, you need to go. If you are a pedal nerd, you NEED to go. James, the owner, has relationships built with the coolest vendors in the country, and manages to collect the coolest gear. Earthquaker Devices makes a custom line of pedals just for this store, for christ's sake. I've never seen so many pedals in my life, and that's really neat because not many stores focus on that. The staff makes you feel right at home. They are so knowledgable and pleasant to be around. No highbrow guitar store attitude to be found here. So all in all, you need to go check it out. It's a super fun place to play some quality instruments. Plus, their logo is a monkey in a cowboy hat, named "Monk Williams". I'm not sure how it could get any better than that.
The National String Instrument Corporation for manufacturing these louder guitars was founded probably in 1927, in Los Angeles, by John Dopyera, George Beauchamp, Ted Kleinmeyer and Paul Barth, when production and advertising began. The company was officially certified as a California corporation in 1928. For a detailed accounting of those early years, I recommend Brozman’s book, The History and Artistry of National Resonator Instruments (Centerstream Publishing, Fullerton, California, 1993). This is a horribly confusing relationship, so stick with me; we’ll try to put it right.

Anyway, this little beast didn’t need much work. This is one of the pleasures of working on a Champ-style practice amp. They have so little in them, there’s simply not much to go wrong or fix. This one, it turned out, only needed a filter cap job, a new preamp tube and one coupling cap. Piece o’ cake. Twenty minutes of soldering and one $4.00 7F7 tube later, I had a monster little Champ-esque amplifier (actually it sounds a little more like the Gibson Skylark than a Champ, but that’s cool by me) for under $80.


Solid-body electric guitars are the most common style on the market today. The first widely-available solid-body electric was the Fender Broadcaster, which later evolved into the Telecaster. It was super simple compared to other electrified instruments that came before it, and the basic design premise continues on in every solid-body instrument to this day.


Fuzz boxes and other heavy distortions can produce unwanted dissonances when playing chords. To get around this, guitar players (and keyboard players) using these effects may restrict their playing to single notes and simple "power chords" (root, fifth, and octave). Indeed, with the most extreme fuzz pedals, players may choose to play mostly single notes, because the fuzz can make even single notes sound very thick and heavy. Heavy distortion also tends to limit the player's control of dynamics (loudness and softness) - similar to the limitations imposed on a Hammond organ player (Hammond organ does not produce louder or softer sounds depending on how hard or soft the performer plays the keys; however, the performer can still control the volume with drawbars and the expression pedal). Heavy metal music has evolved around these restrictions, using complex rhythms and timing for expression and excitement. Lighter distortions and overdrives can be used with triadic chords and seventh chords; as well, lighter overdrive allows more control of dynamics.[citation needed]
JHS distributes them and they get really over the top cheesy reviews in the free magazine "gear" which is really just a JHS catalogue. Their endorsers include lists of "has beens" and "up and coming next big things". Trev Wilkinson no doubt has some good designs but gets more credit than he deserves for some of these copies. I've seen a few in the shops, and they range from not bad looking to absoloubtly terrible. I think they're very inconsistant, some I've picked up had very sharp fret ends.
There are many answers to your question like Jakedog mentioned. As far as finding a neck that is easy to play on, you'd be wise to go to a guitar shop and grab several different models of various brands and find what fits in your hand, yet allows full control over the fretting with your fingers. Smaller hands seem to like soft v shaped necks, yet I know several people with stubby little claws who play only boat necks...meaning huge round chuncky necks. I'm referring to the back of the neck in this case.
Need an affordable luthier who is easily approachable with a cool little shop that rivals Pinocchio's gepetto? Then Steve Morrill in Boston is the place to take your beloved stringed contraption. I took my stratocaster here a few months back for a basic setup( innotation, neck/pots cleaning, truss rod adjustment, etc.) He did it all in less than a week's time and at a very good price--just $65 for everything including new string setup. I was able to play a few notes on his fender amp when I picked it up and was immediately pleased. The aura and smell in the little shop is enough to guarantee Mr. Morrill will do your guitar right. Also doesn't hurt to help out a small business as opposed to going to guitar center, there's much more thought and time out into the work here.
It was also during this time that Perry Bechtel, a well-known banjo player and guitar teacher from Cable Piano in Atlanta, requested that Martin build a guitar with a 15-fret neck-to-body join[citation needed]. Most guitars of the day, with the exception of Gibson’s L-5 archtop jazz guitars, had necks joined at the 12th fret, half the scale length of the string. In keeping with Bechtel’s request, Martin modified the shape of their 12-fret 000-size instrument, lowering the waist and giving the upper bout more acute curves to cause the neck joint to fall at the 14th fret rather than the 12th. Fourteen-fret guitars were designed to be played with a pick and replace banjos in jazz orchestras. Thus, Martin named its first 14-fret, 000-shape guitar the Orchestra Model (OM). Martin applied this term to all 14-fret instruments in its catalogs by the mid- to late-1930s.
I’m not a very good guitarist. In fact, some people would probably say I’m really awful. And that’s ok. But I’ve owned guitars. I can play a G chord. I can fumble my way through some 3-chord punk, alternative rock songs and a Beatles tune here and there. At the very least, I know a tiny bit about guitars and things. For example, I wouldn’t confuse a drum kit with a guitar, so score points for me there.
Hold on now, this is my story, right? Anyways, realizing that I don’t use multiple amps live, and that I tend to stick with 1 basic amp sound, this was going to be easier than I thought. The amp sound I use is more of a Fender Twin sound with a little more mids, but not as much as say, a Deluxe. The gain is something I get from my pedals (like an 805 Overdrive and a Vapor Trail Analog Delay).  I didn’t need a device for live playing that replicated dozens of amps, cabs, and microphones. My setup is simple: Good pedals plugged into a simple modeler like the Tech 21 Fly Rig 5.  It is a simple amp modeler with reverb that I can even use as a full pedalboard if mine goes down. Getting use to IEMs with a well-mixed band took a little bit of doing, but after a few gigs, I had adjusted just fine. You can change your own balance of the band in your own ears, but it is sort of like listening to a CD and playing along with it. It is not much different than what I do at home, anyway, so once I got over the ‘hangup’ of not carrying my amp (my back thanks me), and not seeing my amp behind me, it made a lot of sense. We take 50% less gear now to gigs, and the recordings (and reviews) are much, much better. My ears don’t ring for 2 days after. I can still get glorious feedback (from my pickups hearing the PA sound), and all of the little tricks I do on guitar remain in tact. The pickups on my guitar still deliver the same sound. To my ears, it is easier to mix out front, and much, much easier to balance all of the instruments without all of the stage volume. We also have a lot more room onstage to move around. 

In this section we look at the overall performance of the guitar. How does it feel to play and what does it sound like? The ultimate sound you achieve will largely depend on the amp you play through, but the guitar itself will play a huge part in sounding good. Do the pickups give enough clarity? How comfortable is the neck to get up and down? Is it built for speed? The more expensive a guitar, the better the performance should be, and this is taken into consideration when rating it.
In 1950 and 1951, electronics and instrument amplifier maker Leo Fender through his company, designed the first commercially successful solid-body electric guitar with a single magnetic pickup, which was initially named the "Esquire". The two-pickup version of the Esquire was called the "Broadcaster". The bolt-on neck was consistent with Leo Fender's belief that the instrument design should be modular to allow cost-effective and consistent manufacture and assembly, as well as simple repair or replacement. The Broadcaster name was changed to Telecaster because of a legal dispute over the name.

Compressor pedals add a softening effect too, by reducing the front edge of notes and amplifying their tails. This increases sustain by bumping up the signal as the note fades out. Most compressors allow you to control both the thresholds (upper and lower limits) and the knee (the speed with which the signal is raised or lowered). The big appeal for guitarists is the compressor's ability to simulate the natural compression that tube amps generate when driven at medium to high levels. A good compressor can help thicken up the sound of your guitar and add extra punch to your performance.
Over 20 years, Ovation produced some very interesting guitars. Not only do the American models feature innovative technology that alone makes them worth seeking out, they really handle nicely as players, despite their rejection at the time. Some were ahead of their time. Most were out of step with it, as well. After two decades of failed attempts to market solidbody (and some hollowbody) electrics, Ovation did what other companies who failed to successfully cross over from the genres that brought them their fame. In ’88, Ovation purchased Hamer guitars. Ah, but that’s another story…
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If you use amplifier overdrive, want to use delay and reverb but still crave simplicity—I’d suggest designing a “hybrid” pedalboard. Just run your gain and filter effects in front of the amp, and use a pedal like the TC Electronic Nova System in your amp effects loop for time-based effects. This will require more cabling between your pedalboard and amp, but will sound much better than running your delay and reverb effects into a distorted amp. Pedals like the Nova System or the Eventide units boast specs rivaling studio quality rack gear.
He was barely known for decades after his 1938 death. But the 29 songs Robert Johnson recorded in 1936 and 1937 became holy writ to rock guitarists from Clapton to Dylan. They were dazzled by the way he made a guitar sound like an ensemble – slide and rhythm parts yelping in dialogue, riffs emerging from the mist. Dylan remembered playing King of the Delta Blues Singers, the 1961 LP that rescued Johnson from obscurity: "The vibrations from the loudspeaker made my hair stand up. The stabbing sounds… could almost break a window."
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