Guitar-Sunbeam : Precisely transmits the eternal electric guitar, ideally suited for modern production. It combines an extensive library of strum patterns, brute force, arpeggios and real riffs with real-time performance monitoring. An innovative playback engine allows you to create an almost infinite number of variations of chords and you get convincing, musical results.
Maton Guitars - Australia's leading manufacturer of Acoustic and Acoustic / Electric Guitars. Until the late 1930's the Australian guitar manufacturing industry was virtually non existent and good quality guitars were hard to find. The best guitars, it was well understood, came from the U.S.A. Bill May, a Melbourne born jazz musician, woodwork teacher, and luthier, decided to change all that.
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Hello. I am trying to find out more about my Hohner electric guitar. I've been trying to research it online but cannot find ANY information or reference to this particular model. Some people have told me that it may have been a prototype sample that never went into production. The only reference number I can find on the guitar is a label that says Sample by Nanyo CG300G and Made in Japan. I bought this guitar around 1980-1982 when I was 13-15 years old and it is still in mint condition. I would really love to know more about it's origin.
In the ever-changing world of jazz music, you shouldn’t be surprised to hear of some big changes to the jazz guitar market either! To reflect this we’ve tweaked our chart, removing a couple of models such as the Ibanez AF95FB and the D’Angelico EXL101, and adding five new six-strings. These comprise the faithfully reproduced Epiphone Masterbilt Zenith Classic and the thinbody LH-302T from The Loar. In the semi-hollow section, we added the Ibanez AM93AYS Artcore Expressionist and the beautiful Hagstrom Tremar Viking Deluxe, while the solid-body section saw the arrival of Fender’s Classic Player Jazzmaster Special.
For a guitar that sits comfortably in the mid-range segment of the market, Yamaha RevStar RS420 packs a decent punch. Body shape is more reminiscent of a PRS than anything else, but Yamaha definitely infused it with their unique details. The sound is tight, very flexible, and I had no issues dialing in the type of tone I was looking for. A well rounded model, that’s for sure.
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Before diving in, it’s also worth mentioning the “crap in, crap out” rule, which dictates that any recorded track is only going to sound as good as the guitar and amp that it captures, however good your mic or skilled your engineering. You can’t expect elevated studio technique to convert junk tone or a mediocre performance to stellar sounds in the mix; the best you can hope for is to accurately capture the sound being made by your amp, and to do so with optimum depth, dynamics, and fidelity. Of course, it’s possible that the crappy, low-grade junk tone you capture from a scuzzball rig is exactly what the recording demanded (Jack White or Dan Auerbach, anyone?), but it will usually benefit the tune to capture it as powerfully as you can!
Kent made a lot of "student model" instruments in the 1960's. I have always found most of the guitars to be quite playable but overall, the general guitar public in my area seemed to have a low opinion of them. I recently bought a solid body one pick-up, with case, that I practise on a lot. In fact, at a recording session I was using my Gibson Lespaul and the producer was complaining about the sound of it, so the next day I brought in my Kent and he loved it, it's on two songs on the CD we were working on!
Hey dan, others: My first guitar was a Palmer, my parents purchased it for me from our small town's jewelry store. That was like 1968. The guitar was an electric with two pick-ups and "wabble-stick" (tremelo). It was a beautiful natural wood tone sunburst. Jewelry stores have not been known to carry the best in guitars; but I had a lot of fun learning to play that thing. I still have it; can't bring myself to part with it, though I now have three acoustics (Yamaha, Alvarez (12 string), and a Fender (DGS21, a Peavey bass and Lyon series Washburn. I'd say, for your money, your better off with a washbun. The neck action on them is very impressive. My Palmer is now in disrepair. I need to resolder the pick-ups. The key-board was quite nice; some bridge problems, however, a bit of a rattle. Maybe the nut needs to be reset. I don't know where to find them now, but I understand that they're still out there somewhere.
There's more to being a musician than what you do on the stage: while that's the perfect place to turn it up loud with a standard guitar amplifier, sometimes you don't want anybody but yourself to be listening in on the tunes. That's when headphone guitar amps come in handy. There's a solid variety of these little amps to choose from, so you can get yours with as few or as many features as you like. Then, all you need is your favorite set of 'phones and you're ready to rock. 

Equalizer or EQ pedals have traditionally been used to boost audio signals for solos. If you want to boost the middle frequencies, the EQ will do the trick and provide a tight tone. Some musicians don’t find boosters and EQ pedals to be necessary in a chain, so make sure you do some research to figure out if this type will really benefit your sound

That said, unless the beginner had a specific focus, I never have a problem recommending Line6 spider amps. Lots of options built right in (so you save a fortune on effects you may want to experiment with), and they don’t sound bad at all. I played one a few years back in a rock band and got compliments on my sound all the time, and I put nothing else in the signal path, I played straight in using one of their floor controllers at a gig. I think the whole setup (and this was the 120 watt one) cost me something like $350 bucks.

After the wah or EQ, try throwing in your phasers, flangers, chorus or vibrato effects. Because they’re following overdrive/distortion, wah and EQ, you will find that modulation effects gain a richer and more complex sound than they would have on their own or toward the front of your chain. But annoyingly, putting them right at the end of your chain can also be somewhat limiting because these types of effects tend to overpower others that go before it. Modulation effects work best right in the middle of the effects sequence.


Need an affordable luthier who is easily approachable with a cool little shop that rivals Pinocchio's gepetto? Then Steve Morrill in Boston is the place to take your beloved stringed contraption. I took my stratocaster here a few months back for a basic setup( innotation, neck/pots cleaning, truss rod adjustment, etc.) He did it all in less than a week's time and at a very good price--just $65 for everything including new string setup. I was able to play a few notes on his fender amp when I picked it up and was immediately pleased. The aura and smell in the little shop is enough to guarantee Mr. Morrill will do your guitar right. Also doesn't hurt to help out a small business as opposed to going to guitar center, there's much more thought and time out into the work here.
While a high school degree is not necessarily required, it does provide an edge for graduates who wish to become guitar technicians. Students should concentrate on classes such as music, band, English, shop class and mathematics. A major part of any education should include guitar lessons. Techs often need to be able to play by ear and must be able to pick up on any nuances in an instrument's sound and tuning.
Minor chords arise as the tonic notes of minor keys that share the same key signature with major keys. From the major key's I-ii-iii-IV-V-vi-viio progression, the "secondary" (minor) triads ii-iii-vi appear in the relative minor key's corresponding chord progression as i-iv-v (or i-iv-V or i-iv-V7): For example, from C's vi-ii-iii progression Am-Dm-Em, the chord Em is often played as E or E7 in a minor chord progression.[24] Among basic chords, the minor chords (D,E,A) are the tonic chords of the relative minors of the three major-keys (F,G,C):

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Chet was THE best guitarist to ever reach popular standings. That doesn’t include the classical guitarists and jazz guitarists who could play him under the table though. Which gets me thinking, this list would be a lot different if it included people that were in the background, but were easily better than anyone popular. For me chet would still make top 100 even on that list though. That’s gotta mean something…

The steel-string and electric guitars characteristic to the rise of rock and roll in the post-WWII era became more widely played in North America and the English speaking world. Barrios composed many works and brought into the mainstream the characteristics of Latin American music, as did the Brazilian composer Heitor Villa-Lobos. Andrés Segovia commissioned works from Spanish composers such as Federico Moreno Torroba and Joaquín Rodrigo, Italians such as Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco and Latin American composers such as Manuel Ponce of Mexico. Other prominent Latin American composers are Leo Brouwer of Cuba, Antonio Lauro of Venezuela and Enrique Solares of Guatemala. Julian Bream of Britain managed to get nearly every British composer from William Walton to Benjamin Britten to Peter Maxwell Davies to write significant works for guitar. Bream's collaborations with tenor Peter Pears also resulted in song cycles by Britten, Lennox Berkeley and others. There are significant works by composers such as Hans Werner Henze of Germany, Gilbert Biberian of England and Roland Chadwick of Australia.
The EC-1000ET is an all-mahogany single-cut loaded with an set of EMG 81 and 60 active humbuckers, a comfortably modern neck and a high level of construction quality. Its key selling point, however, is a fitted EverTune bridge -  unlike other tuning systems, it doesn't tune your guitar for you or offer altered tunings. Instead, once set and tuned, it simply aims to stay there, thanks to a series of tension-calibrated springs and levers. We tried everything we could to knock it out of whack: huge, three-step bends, wildly exaggerated string stretching... we even put the guitar into a freezer. It came back perfectly in tune every single time.  What's more, a guitar that's perfectly tuned and intonated up and down the neck seems to play much more musically. We're not aware of any tone compromises, either. The EC sounds as full and aggressive as ever, with the more mellow tones of the neck EMG being pleasantly rounded, and all bereft of any metallic spring clank. If never going out of tune is important to you, this is one of the best electric guitars going.
There are a few ways to save some money on your electric guitar (click for modal analysis). One way is to order online, for example from Amazon, which is usually cheaper than buying from a physical shop. Make sure that you know what the usual price for the guitar you want is, so that you can compare different sites, and in the best of worlds, use a discount code or wait until there’s a sale.
These guitars also appeal to adults who played in their youth and would like to pick up the instrument again. Fortunately, they’ll find that high-efficiency, low-cost overseas manufacturing has created a new generation of inexpensive guitars that play and sound very much like more expensive models—something that wasn’t true 20 years ago, when few cheap guitars were worth playing. We also discovered in our Best Electric Guitar Amp for Beginners article that there are several very nice amps available for less than $100, so an adult can get back into the game for well under $300.
On the forum there are thousands of people at all stages of playing that can offer advice on new beginner guitars. I have to admit that I play pretty much only top-end gear and don't know the latest on all the new budget guitars, but on the community forum there are people learning that can all give you advice based on personal experience, and there's no substitute for that!
Epiphone's passion has always been about more than just making guitars. It has been about making music. It has been about understanding what is inside every musican that makes them want to, have to, express themselves. And understanding the myriad musical styles, where they are going and how they might develop. For over one hundred and twenty-five years they have continually looked for new and better ways to help players take their music farther.

...Wow! I JUST bought this electric guitar from a pawn shop for 37 dollars. I could instantly tell it was a 60's guitar, so I had to have a closer look. Mine has the tailpiece clam, but it was missing the whammy bar, so my dad built me one. It didn't even work, at all. A good cleaning fixed that though, it now works perfectly. Now it's fun little piece of history.
PRS McCarty 594 Electric Guitar The PRS McCarty 594 is a vintage-inspired electric guitar with plenty of premium appointments such as a . It’s part of the Core Electric Series, the company’s lineup of high-end guitars. This means that the McCarty 594 has all the bells and whistles you can expect from a premium instrument. For pro musicians, this is an investment worth every penny.
Tokai was founded in 1947 and is based in Hamamatsu, Japan. Tokai began production of acoustic guitars in 1965 and by 1968 was producing electric guitars for the American market. Tokai still exists as guitar manufacturer. Tokai made guitars for Fernandes, Mosrite and Fender Japan. Tokai badged guitars included the house brand Tokai as well as Cat's Eyes, Conrad, Drifter, Hondo, Love Rock, Mosrite, Sigma and Silver Star. Possible badges include Artist Ltd., Gaban, Gallan, Gession and Robin. It's suggested that Tokai made Hummingbird acoustics as well, but if these were related to those made by Humming Bird I haven't quite sorted out yet.
The separation between Briefel and Unicord must not have been entirely unamicable, probably more a matter of direction than anything else. In any case, in 1978, following the demise of the Univox brand (when the Westbury brand was debuted) three Westbury Baroque acoustics were offered, all made by Giannini. These included one “folk” dreadnought with a tapered Westbury head, the stylized “W” Westbury logo, block inlays and a very Martin-esque pickguard. The “classic” was our old friend, the CraViola, with a new head shape. The 12-string was another CraViola. These probably only lasted a year or so; in any case, the Westbury name was dead by 1981.

I ordered this for my 6 year old nephew for Christmas. He wanted one because I had just recently bought my 3rd. I thought a smaller one would be nice for him to start learning. Just opened the box and the amp doesn’t work! At all! Light turns on but nothing else happens! Hooked guitar up to my own amp and it sounds nice so it’d definitely not the guitar or cords fault. Trying to get a replacement but no luck.
One of these was the 14-fret neck, which allowed easier access to higher notes. Martin intended it to appeal to plectrum banjo players interested in switching to guitar for increased work opportunities[citation needed]. Martin altered the shape of its 0-size guitar body to allow a 14-frets-clear tenor neck. This was in response to specific requests from tenor players including Al Esposito, the manager of the Carl Fischer store in New York City. The “Carl Fischer Model” tenors were soon renamed 0-18T[citation needed]. This was the first time Martin altered one of their original body shapes to accommodate a longer neck with more frets clear of the body. A 1955 version of the 0-15 is the favorite guitar of artist Leroy Powell. He tells American Songwriter “It’s my main axe that I play with around the house…I even took it out when I toured with Kid Rock … it’s held up pretty good for how old it is.”[4]
On this clip you can hear more things. First of all, the size is defined by the separate recordings of the original riff and the delayed riff, thanks to some reamping! This allowed me to spread them across the stereo field so the sound develops across the horizontal axis, rather than the depth. I was also able to adjust the delay time so that it isn't behind the beat. Finally, I decreased the feedback level and I had always control over the dry/wet balance via the volume fader of the delayed signal track. Isn't that nice? And the cherry on the cake is that with this sort of manipulation you have much more flexibility! Listen to this example:
1928 to 1967: Tortoise grain celluloid pickguards glued directly to the top, clear finish then applied over top and pickguard. Due to extreme shrinkage of celluloid and lacquer, this often causes a "pickguard crack" in the top. Pickguards became "standard" in 1931 on most models, but some martin guitars had them as early as 1928. The OM series was the first model to consistently have a pickguard in 1930.
Hoshino Gakki also had semi acoustic, nylon and steel stringed acoustic guitars manufactured under the Ibanez name. Most Ibanez guitars were made for Hoshino Gakki by the FujiGen guitar factory in Japan up until the mid to late 1980s and from then on Ibanez guitars have also been made in other Asian countries such as Korea, China and Indonesia. During the early 1980s the FujiGen guitar factory also produced most of the Roland guitar synthesizers, including the Stratocaster-style Roland G-505, the twin-humbucker Roland G-202 and the Ibanez X-ING IMG-2010.

But when combined with those Dean humbuckers, this thing full-on rocks! It’s full of gain, fuzz, buzz, but still articulate enough thanks to the strong middle frequencies, reeling in that Dime sound to cut any mix and in style. Additionally, the price is lower than many of the models on the rundown, making this puppy a safe choice for cheap good guitars.
By the early 1980s, the radical experiments of early 1970s-era fusion gave way to a more radio-friendly sounds of smooth jazz. Guitarist Pat Metheny mixed the sounds of blues, country, and “world” music, along with rock and jazz, playing both a flat-top acoustic guitar and an electric guitar with a softer, more mellow tone which was sweetened with a shimmering effect known as “chorusing". During the 1980s, a neo-traditional school of jazz sought to reconnect with the past. In keeping with such an aesthetic, young guitarists of this era sought a clean and round tone, and they often played traditional hollow-body arch-top guitars without electronic effects, frequently through vacuum tube amplifiers.

The McCarty Model - named after Theodore 'Ted' McCarty, Gibson's president during its 1950s to 1960s heyday and, much later, 'mentor' to Paul Reed Smith - originally appeared in the early 1990s and was the company's first attempt at a more vintage-informed guitar. It takes its name, primarily, from its scale length of 24.594 inches. However, the focus of the 594 is not just that scale length but a desire to recreate, as closely as possible, the 'holy grail' of vintage Gibson tone - a 1959 Sunburst, but in a modern double-cut guitar. A change comes with the pickups, which are PRS's latest date-series 58/15 humbuckers but with an 'LT' (Low Turns) suffix, which on a meter shows the bridge unit to have a lower DC resistance than the standard McCarty's 58/15, although the neck pickup seems virtually identical. The four-control layout (the first PRS double-cut guitar to use it) possesses the classic LP setup and feels immediately comfortable to any player used to the much-copied Gibson layout.  Full humbucking, or with the partial coil splits engaged, full volume, half volume, tones rolled off - not to mention the shades with both pickups on - there's not a duff sound that we can find. Dynamic, expressive - it purrs, it roars, it's one of the best electric guitars.


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Necks are described as bolt-on, set-in, or neck-through, depending on how they attach to the body. Set-in necks are glued to the body in the factory. They are said to have a warmer tone and greater sustain.[citation needed] This is the traditional type of joint. Leo Fender pioneered bolt-on necks on electric guitars to facilitate easy adjustment and replacement. Neck-through instruments extend the neck the length of the instrument, so that it forms the center of the body, and are known for long sustain and for being particularly sturdy.[citation needed] While a set-in neck can be carefully unglued by a skilled luthier, and a bolt-on neck can simply be unscrewed, a neck-through design is difficult or even impossible to repair, depending on the damage. Historically, the bolt-on style has been more popular for ease of installation and adjustment. Since bolt-on necks can be easily removed, there is an after-market in replacement bolt-on necks from companies such as Warmoth and Mighty Mite. Some instruments—notably most Gibson models—continue to use set-in glued necks. Neck-through bodies are somewhat more common in bass guitars.
Martin's OM, or "Orchestra Model", available from 1929 to 1933, has a rare combination of features. The joining of a long-scale (25.4") neck with a small body makes it an extremely responsive and playable guitar. In many ways the OM models were the first truly modern flattop guitars. They were the first Martins to have necks with 14 frets clear of the body. The OM has a wide neck (1 3/4" as opposed to the dreadnought's 1 11/16") which appeals to fingerstyle players. The string spacing is slightly greater at the bridge than on other models too, although not as wide as a classical guitars. The neck shape of old OMs is a bit unique too, although this is variable since each neck was handmade. OMs have a wide but thin backshaped V-shape which is very comfortable. Finally, the OM's smaller body size makes the guitar easy to hold, especially in the seated position. Compared this to the D dreadnought which is larger both in body depth and width (dreadnought players seem to use straps and stand up so the guitar's size is less of a factor).
The BOSS ME-80 multi effects pedal is an excellent entry point into effects as it contains just about every type of effect you can think of. The ME-80 allows you to chain eight effect groups together in one patch with 36 preset patches allowing you to seamlessly switch from rock to funk to jazz at the push of a footswitch. There are also 36 user patches so you can create your own tone.
I should also add that I said I expect the Authentics to come in the medium string height range, because they are trying to replicate the kind of vintage Martins coveted by Bluegrass musicians, who are either used to or seek out slightly higher action compared to modern guitars. There are exceptions of course since Tony Rice and Robert Shafer both prefer action so low it is practically resting on the frets.
4) SPAM AND SELF-ADVERTISING ARE NOT ALLOWED. NO ADVERTISING YOUR NEW SUB. NO LINKS TO SOCIAL MEDIA, BLOGS, OR OTHER PERSONAL SITES. This includes the comment area of youtube videos as well as anything that's embedded into the video itself. Your content will be removed!!! NO ADVERTISING EVEN BY PROXY Ask yourself if you're here to post a video of yourself playing guitar or to gain subscribers/fans. If it's the later, you are in the wrong place. We are not here to make you more popular. This means no linking to anything that is commerce related, your blog, web site, bandcamp, facebook, instagram, snapchat, twitter, etc. You can link to your youtube channel, but do NOT have channel plugs/ads in your video, subscription requests, or links to any of the aforementioned, unless you are on our whitelist. If you would like to be considered for our whitelist, message the mods!
What if you don’t have a music shop nearby and need to order a guitar online? Our recommendation is that when you have read through our list of the best guitars, select a few that you’re interested in, and look them up on YouTube. There you can watch (and listen to!) great reviews where you can hear the guitar be played and get someone else’s opinion on it. Try listening to the different guitars directly after each other so you can determine which one sounds the best.

I am a giging, solo acoustic musician from Ohio, performing in Western NY, Buffalo. I only had Acoustic Electrics, 6 and 12 strings until I bought my first Godin A6 Ultra. (Acoustic and Electric Pick-ups). The A6 was impressive in it's own right, so I started looking at other Godin products, and ran into a 5th Ave Kingpin 1. Acoustically it was a 3 star, as I have a couple of Taylors and an Epiphone Masterbuilt that this guitar is no match for unplugged. HOWEVER !! This guitar was designed to be plugged in, and the Tone and ease of Play come shining through when the p90 is in the loop.
This project began as a quest to find a really good software piano. Not even the expensive commercial versions were satisfying to my ears.  Most had velocity switching problems and unpleasant tones. I came across the University of Iowa Steinway piano samples which were great but there was room for improvement in the way they were presented.  My goal was to have a selection of piano and other instruments that were pleasant to play and to keep them available for free. Using SoundFont editing programs Polyphone and Viena I have done some editing to allow for expression to give a more enjoyable and realistic playing experience where timbre changes gradually with velocity where possible and without that annoying jump that is commonly found. This was applied to many of the other instruments as well.
Guitar distortion is obtained and shaped at various points in the signal processing chain, including multiple stages of preamp distortion, power valve distortion, output and power transformer distortion, and guitar speaker distortion. Much of the distortion character or voicing is controlled by the frequency response before and after each distortion stage. This dependency of distortion voicing on frequency response can be heard in the effect that a wah pedal has on the subsequent distortion stage, or by using tone controls built into the guitar, the preamp or an EQ pedal to favor the bass or treble components of the guitar pickup signal prior to the first distortion stage. Some guitarists place an equalizer pedal after the distortion effect, to emphasize or de-emphasize different frequencies in the distorted signal.
Filters are also great for use on drum loops. One trick I like is to send the drums to a modulated resonant filter set up as a send effect, with a narrow band-pass EQ beforehand. This creates a rather bizarre metallic melody that accompanies your drums. It can get fatiguing if over-used, but brought in at a low level in some sections of a song, it can create plenty of interest, particularly if followed by a modulated delay. Matt Houghton
First of all, the staff are incredibly amazing, lovely, hilarious and helpful.  My bandmates and I are not the most knowledgable in terms of gear, and the first time we came in wanting to get our first our ever guitar petals, Blake actually drew a graph of sound to explain how guitar pedals worked. They are the absolute best. Helping us out and going above and beyond what staff should be expected to do.  Hands down my favorite guitar store in Seattle, great selection, prices and above all the attention to detail and friendly attitude of the staff.  Can't rave enough!  Definitely found my guitar store for life!  Would recommend for all your guitar needs :)
We all know the sound of this effect: It replicates varying degrees of the sound of playing your guitar in the gym showers, a cathedral, or Mammoth Cave, and it has proved itself one of the most atmospheric aural adulterations available. Since none of those locations is entirely gig friendly, however, our ever-handy techs have bottled the flavor in a reliable, portable form. This category covers both echo and reverb effects, since they are versions of the same thing. The term “echo” was used more often in the early days, and is sometimes used today to refer to the distinct and distant repeats of a signal, while “delay” refers to anything from the same, to the short repeats heard as reverb, to the complex, long, manipulated repeats of an intricate digital delay line. Either way, they are both really the same thing, just used differently.
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