In my opinion, I don't think this guitar is quite worthy of all of the rave reviews here, based on the thin sound. I bought this because my Zager needs to go in for new frets and I have to wait until May to get it worked on, and wanted to get something inexpensive to use in the meantime. This is a beautiful instrument, no doubt. The finish is stunning, it's very nicely made and ready to play out of the box, so on that level I would give it 5 stars. But soundwise, for me I'd say 2 and half stars. The bottom end is nowhere to be found. I tried to switch to the same strings I am using on my other guitar and it's no different. This guitar has about the same dimensions as my Zager, but nowhere near the same bass response. It'll do fine as

These guys are great! I took my Martin in for a refret, and it might have been the cleanest I have ever seen it done. Played better than it did when I got it. So after that show of quality work I took... my old Guild to them. It had developed a little belly bulge and warped top. Mark got that thing sounding and playing like brand new. They are priced honest and fair, and do work in a very timely manner. I am done looking for my guitar shop. I highly recommend these gentlemen. See More
The construction of an instrument is naturally a fundamental characteristic that pertains not only to playability, but the ultimate sound of the instrument as well. Durability will be affected by this as well. Guitar construction varies from brand to brand and model to model; instrument makers utilize a wide variety of materials to build the guitar body. Wood is the most common material associated with guitars, but plastic and metal are used as well. Construction should also be given extra consideration with electric guitars, as the electrical components serve as a secondary construction within the instrument.
All of the hardware is gold on this model, and while it’s stock Epiphone stuff rather than licensed equipment, it’s of good quality, and we don’t expect it to be difficult to keep in tune. The eSonic preamp and NanoFlex pickup system are both excellent and really help the guitar to come alive. In terms of looks, there are no particularly notable features, but the combo of gold hardware and florentine cutaway make for an attractive design.

Jimmie Vaughan: based on Jimmie’s own ’57 Stratocaster, the Jimmie Vaughan Tex-Mex Strat reflects his deep roots, traditional style, and preferred Strat features. Noteable for it’s alder body, 3 Fender Tex-Mex single-coil pickups, an extra-hot bridge pickup, a special tinted maple 1957-type V-shaped neck with maple fretboard and medium-jumbo frets, vintage machine heads, original Fender synchronized tremolo, and custom tone control wiring. Tone, tone and more tone.
To be able to buy a name brand guitar like this at such a great price was a real steal. One of my sons is a beginner learning to play, so it was great for me being able to purchase a guitar like this that would carry him from beginner into an intermediate player in later years. It is a well-made and beautiful guitar, and it produces a wonderful sound that you would expect from a name like Fender. Plus, with my son being left-handed, I thought it would be difficult to find a good affordable left-handed guitar for him. Not only was able to find this high quality one, but the price couldn't be beat.

The blues was my inspiration-specifically, the late-'40s solo recordings of John Lee Hooker. "Hobo Blues" is an excellent example of early Hooker on which his violent string slapping-clearly audible in a blend of amp sound, haunting vocals, and trademark foot stomping-creates an indelible realism and engaging intimacy. My recording of Paris Slim's "The Day I Met The Boogie Man" (see the sidebar "Selected Discography") was one of my early experiments with this technique. Since that time, I have used a discrete "air-guitar" mic whenever I have had an available track for it. Guitarists may initially be skeptical of such unusual miking, but it's always a treat to watch their faces light up as they listen to the monitors deliver the bright, transient sounds that they have been accustomed to hearing during their years of practicing their instruments.
If you're new to distortion and overdrive pedals, you might be wondering what the difference is between them. For the most part, they do the same thing and are both often referred to as gain pedals. How they differ is that distortion pedals usually provide a harsher, grittier tone with increased sustain. When it comes to distortion, think of genres like grunge and death metal. On the other hand, overdrive pedals are designed to emulate the sound of a tube amp when you increase their volume. The result is a warm yet crunchy sound that's ideal for playing blues and classic rock. Of course, one is not better than the other, and the right distortion or overdrive pedal for you will be a matter of personal preference.
With all of the guitarists gracing our list having been connected to the world of music for several years if not decades, we are quite confident that these successful musicians are in fact deeply rooted to the music, in spite of their obvious fame. Even if you are doing a job simply to please people and to make money, it can be hard to keep up the pretense for thirty odd years, with cameras following you around 24/7!
Pedalboards are just plain fun. You can mix and match any number of little boxes and really personalize your tone. We are living in the golden age of guitar pedals right now with such a huge variety of effects out there. The majority of effects fit into one of the following categories: gain (overdrive, fuzz, distortion, compression, clean boosts), filter (wahs, auto-wahs, envelope followers), and time-based (delay, reverb, chorus, flange, phase).
Very cheap acoustics are usually not such a great idea. Often their sound quality is poor and they are hard to play. I often see students selling them after a six-month struggle (if they managed to stick with it that long!). So if your budget is very tight, I would not get an acoustic. You may think you save a little money because you don't need to buy an amplifier as well, but as I said before you don't have to use an amplifier to practice anyway.
Wah and EQ manipulators work best before distortion and overdrive devices, near the start of the signal chain. The one exception is the Fuzz Face or any vintage-style fuzz, which needs to be slotted in before the wah. Try it – put your wah before and after your distortion and listen to how different it sounds. Also, compressors tend to work best when placed before drive effects.
Thanks to its small size and slim neck, you get to play this guitar and improve your skills with ease. The cutaway design also gives you easier access to the higher frets for tapping or other more advanced techniques. This guitar has a spruce top that improves the sound quality as it ages, meranti back and sides, and rosewood bridge and fingerboard.
An amazing electric guitar player pack that is suitable for use by beginners. It has a mahogany body, with its fret board having been made from rosewood. The neck is also made from mahogany. Most interestingly, it comes with passive fienzo pickups, and an exclusive guitar player pack with gig bags, strap, cord, tuner, and an instructional DVD. It is well design to assist the beginner to better access the frets and practice through to perfection. Prices range from INR 12,650. Find it on the link below:
While continuing to keep the E string depressed at the first fret, move up the neck from the 12th fret to the end of the fretboard, continuing to depress the string at each of the successive frets. As you move up the fretboard, watch if and how much the distance between the bottom of the string and the top of the frets in the 6-7th fret range changes, if at all. The less the gap rises, the flatter, overall, the neck is. Using this method you may discern that there is more curve in one area than another, and not necessarily centering on the 6-7th fret area. In some cases this curve will be resolved by changing the tension on the truss rod. In other cases, adjusting the truss rod tension will not resolve them, and fret leveling, refretting, or heat bending the neck(rarely) may be necessary.
The Vintage Modified Jazzmaster has the tried-and-tested dual circuitry of the original models from the ’60s. The “Rhythm” circuit activates only the neck pickup, while the “Lead” circuit lets you pick between neck, bridge and both at the same time. Each circuit has its own dedicated master volume and tone knobs. (In comparison, the Fender American Professional Jazzmasters don’t have this circuitry.)
Some bass amps may have additional controls for onboard effects such as bass chorus or a knob for controlling a multi-effects unit (which might include a suboctave generator, chorus, reverb, fuzz bass etc.). Some 2000s-era amps may have a knob to control digital amp or speaker emulation settings (e.g., emulating the tone of a huge 8x10" speaker stack or a vintage tube amp by famous makers, such as the Ampeg SVT).
I play a Breedlove and it compares very favorably with Martin, Taylor, and Gibson while I prefer it to Fender acoustic guitars (I think Fender electrics are much better). Beautiful tone, and in one place where I play I'm not allowed to plug in. At that place, my Breedlove is the only one of my guitars I can get sufficient volume from. My other guitars are a Martin, an Ibanez, and a Schechter. Breedlove should be in the top ten.
Not everyone has the luxury of drum booths and separate rooms, but isolation boxes are great for isolating guitars during a rhythm track recording. They are also ideal for home recording, allowing a good  volume level without disturbing neighbours. Isolation boxes are commercially available, but can be expensive; try making your own from wood and foam.
Some resonator guitars possess metal bodies and these are called steel guitars. This can lead to some confusion with the Hawaiian guitar of the same name. They are two distinct instruments. The Hawaiian steel guitar takes its name from the steel bar used to create the glissandi and the Resonator steel guitar refers to the material used for the construction of the body.

Power chords are one of the staples of rock music and one of the most important guitar chord types you need to have in your toolbox. They are important to learn for a few reasons: They’re easy to play They’re used a TON in many popular songs and are very versatile. They’ll help broaden your repertoire of guitar sounds / styles. This post will walk you through step-by-step what a power chord is, how to play them and what songs you can learn to start practicing them. What are Power Chords? Whether you play an acoustic or electric guitar, you are going
The National String Instrument Corporation for manufacturing these louder guitars was founded probably in 1927, in Los Angeles, by John Dopyera, George Beauchamp, Ted Kleinmeyer and Paul Barth, when production and advertising began. The company was officially certified as a California corporation in 1928. For a detailed accounting of those early years, I recommend Brozman’s book, The History and Artistry of National Resonator Instruments (Centerstream Publishing, Fullerton, California, 1993). This is a horribly confusing relationship, so stick with me; we’ll try to put it right.
Bracing affects the way the guitar sounds because it changes the pitch or tune that the guitar produces out of the sound hole. Personally I think X bracing is the b est because it produces a more even and better more balance for mids and high notes and just enough bass on the E and A strings that gives a brighter more even tone. Blinded or pessed bracing gives a much deeper sound than x bracing which =less versatility but if you bought a pressed dread knot or anything else you'll still be okay just remember strings make a huge difference and running your guitar to the right amount of tone for any song will work it's just that Taylor produces the best over all guitar itself by better quality woods and they go through ver strict and rigorous testing and inspections before they are sold to retailers and customers. Higher grade parts attention to detail and style of music versatility is why one guitar can cost 3 times as much. Most companies like Taylor is know give warranties or $ back
The guitarist and composer Francisco Tárrega (b. Vilareal, Spain in November 29, 1852-d. December 15, 1909) was one of the great guitar virtuosos and teachers and is considered the father of modern classical guitar playing. As professor of guitar at the conservatories of Madrid and Barcelona, he defined many elements of the modern classical technique and elevated the importance of the guitar in the classical music tradition.
I am writing this due to the mixed reviews that I read before buying this. This is a really powerful device. I have had a POD 2.0 for years. This is just as good and is also small, portable, and inexpensive. Most of the criticism that I read is that it is not well made and durable. It is well made, but I don't think it is designed for gigging. It is perfect for practicing or interfacing with a home studio. If this is your application, then you will be very satisfied. One other thing that I found true of this and similar devices that I own is that the quality of the headphones makes a big difference. If you use studio quality headphones it will sound great, if you use music player headphones it will just sound good. I haven't ... full review
A Wiki is a web page that anyone can make changes to. The job of maintaining accurate information is far too monumental for one person, but a community of enthusiasts can maintain many thousands of pages quite easily, each person adding a bit at a time. That's the idea behind iGuide?s "What's It Worth Wiki". The most famous example of a Knowledge Wiki is Wikipedia, of course. But, our vision is that someday iGuide?will become the Wikipedia of Art, Antiques, Collectibles, Memorabilia....and Guitars.
• Sound Judgment: Consider the sonic characteristics of the various materials used in making electric strings. Stainless steel strings are the least glamorous, but offer plenty of bright bite and sustain. Pure nickel has a warm old-school sound, for vintage tones. And nickel-plated steel is a bit brighter than classic nickel and responds more adroitly to picking attack. Chrome guitar strings are typically the province of jazz players or blues artists who are looking for the kind of warm retro tones chiseled into history by the likes of Charlie Christian or swinging Gibson ES-250, ES-5 and ES-335 bluesman Aaron “T-Bone” Walker. And then there are coated strings – the most expensive and theoretically the longest lasting. They are, however, not really the best, sonically speaking. Coated strings tend to have less sustain. Also, their Teflon exterior surfaces are slippery, which might take some getting used to for particularly aggressive electric guitar players. And when the coatings wear off, they rust like any other string.



We noticed in our last article, 10 best Acoustic Guitars Under $500, some readers mentioned the Luna series of guitars. Thank you all for pointing these out! What a truly beautiful line of acoustic and electrics. The Luna Ash, an acoustic electric hybrid is a sleek, responsive guitar ready for any setting: playing live, recording, or jamming with friends. With a mahogany body and rosewood fretboard, this visually stunning guitar is just one in the line of Luna guitars that provides ridiculous eye candy and amazing sound quality and playability. The Ash goes for around $499, and that’s a steal! 



By the time this Blink-182 hit was recorded, the majority of Enema of the State had already been written. Tom DeLonge wanted to add one more song to the album that was simple, and radio friendly so he got to work. The lyric “She left me roses by the stairs” came about when DeLonge’s girlfriend at the time left him roses on the stairs, and the singer found them late one night after recording. The “na na na” section was also inspired by the next band.
The guitar offers a beginner some great features in sound and playability. For starters, it is technically a Les Paul (giving you a great “cool factor,” which is important when you’re first starting out). It cuts a couple corners that a Standard or Special Les Paul won’t, like the fact that it’s a bolt-on neck, and there are proprietary single coil pickups (as opposed to the standard humbuckers you’ll usually find in a Les Paul).
The interface does get the job done well, it’s just that I’ve seen better looking free VSTs. But for me, this is completely fine because while flashy interfaces are nice, problems like software issues and hard to see text occur.  None of that is here, and within a few hours, most users will feel fairly comfortable creating moderately difficult, but realistic sounding guitar parts.
The PRS McCarty 594 features a double cutaway body style. It has an African mahogany body with a figured maple 10-Top and gloss nitrocellulose finish. The neck is mahogany and is topped with a bound dark rosewood fretboard with a 10-inch radius and iconic bird inlays. The neck sports a new Pattern Vintage neck shape, which is as wide as the standard Pattern neck profile but with just a little extra thickness and a slightly asymmetric carve.
UPDATE 10/21: The good news first - I'm still absolutely loving the game and steadily improving. I'm only able to play about one to two hours a day, but even though that's all the time I'm able to put in, I'm already to the point of being able to play along with a song. But (here comes the downside), with my improvement audio lag has become a real issue. Before I was so horrible that I couldn't hit the right notes at all, let alone on time, so it didn't make much difference. But now that I've improved, it's a problem. To be fair, they warn you about this in the form of a pamphlet inside the game box, so it wasn't out of nowhere. I was just hoping that since I wasn't using HDMI, the lag wouldn't be too horrible. Wrong.
Actually, company founder Leo Fender's first business was repairing tube circuitry equipment including radios, phonograph players, and home music amplifiers. He noticed the growing popularity of amplifiers for home music systems and branched out into selling music records and renting out PA systems he had designed from his repair shop. Then he got even more involved in music by making and selling Hawaiian lap steel guitars containing a proprietary pickup system which he bundled with his own newly designed amplifiers in 1945. The following year he changed the company name from Fender’s Repair Service to Fender Electric Instruments Company.
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The main purpose of the bridge on a classical guitar is to transfer the vibration from the strings to the soundboard, which vibrates the air inside of the guitar, thereby amplifying the sound produced by the strings. The bridge holds the strings in place on the body. Also, the position of the saddle, usually a strip of bone or plastic that supports the strings off the bridge, determines the distance to the nut (at the top of the fingerboard).
This guitar follows traditional Martin specs with a 25.4" scale length and a 1.75" nut width, and they also gave the neck and ebony fretboard a worn-in feel that makes the guitar play extremely well right out of the case that it comes with. On top of its true to form vintage sound, playability and looks, the OM-28 E Retro is equipped with the extremely versatile Fishman F1 Aura Plus, which offers three acoustic voicings modeled from actual Martin Museum guitars. If you play various musical styles and you're looking for a be-all and end-all acoustic guitar, you will be blown away by the OM-28 E Retro.
The guitar this model is probably closest to, in spirit and purpose, is not the Gibson Les Pauls but, rather, to the old Gibson Melody Maker guitars from the 60s. That said, this is a hell of lot more guitar for the money than any Melody Maker ever was, and adjusted for inflation, relative to what a Melody Maker would have cost you in 1968, for example, it is almost like Epiphone paying you to play it.
Kramer served a prison sentence on drug-related charges after the MC5 split up. When he got out, he teamed up with Johnny Thunders to form Gang War and later re-emerged as a solo artist on L.A. punk label Epitaph. Smith went on to lead the punishingly loud Sonic Rendezvous Band and married New York punk rock poet, artist, singer and originator Patti Smith. He passed away in 1994. But from the Clash to Fugazi, Crass and Green Day, the politicized wing of punk rock continues to fly the banner first raised by the Motor City 5.
The Effect: Even though acoustic electric guitars are generally not associated with various guitar effects, using some can be very beneficial to your tone. Naturally, the types of effects you are going to use will differ from those used with electric guitars quite a bit. The most common accessory in an average acoustic electric signal chain is a preamp pedal. Something like LR Baggs Venue DI is a perfect example. This preamp allows you to boost the signal being fed into the amp or PA, but more importantly, shape it in a way that enhances your tone. Aside from preamps, many guitar players like to use various modulation effects, delays, reverbs and similar. General consensus is that overdrives and distortions are not something you would want to hook up to your signal chain. If you are frequently performing on stage, having even a simple effects chain can be a real game changer.
The Vintage El Dorado Leather Guitar Strap is meticulously hand-tooled in traditional Western motifs by leather artisans with decades of experience. Each strap is an individual and unique work of craftsmanship that you'll be proud to display on your guitar. The designs date back to late 19th century Western leatherwork, used extensively in the decoration of saddles, saddlebags, belts and holsters.

Okay, getting down to brass tax - how do the effects and amp models sound? In a word, great! It’s not secret that Boss makes some fantastic pedals, many that have reached legendary status over the years. It’s nice knowing that you’re getting a multi-effects pedal from a brand that has really dominated the guitar and bass effects field. Boss uses some technology terms like COSM modeling and MDP (Multi-Dimensional Processing) which sound fancy but might not mean much to many guitarists. Truth is, given that this is a digital unit, some things sound really great, and some sound not so great. The overdrives are hit and miss. This user review hits the nail on the head:
As for Acoustic guitars go, you are somewhat limited by the make and model of the guitar. You can make differences in tone by the type of picks you use and also the thickness of your strings. Actually the string factor goes for both electric and acoustic. The thicker the strings the fuller the tone. Its kinda whatever you can stand on your fingers. I like to use 11’s. Stevie Ray Vaughan used crazy thick gauges of strings and had an incredible tone. Bottom line…you have to try different things and experiment to find the right tone!
Paul Gray (b. 1972 d. 2010) swapped his longtime association with Warwick basses for a customized version of the ATK bass series, the PGB1. He was impressed with the ATK bass after he bought one from a pawn shop and told Ibanez that he would endorse them if they put the ATK series back into production. He switched to his signature model shortly before recording of the Slipknot album All Hope Is Gone and used them until his death in 2010.

Reviews of the Boss Katana Head are generally positive, with many users pointing to its versatility as its main selling point. One user described it as a Swiss Army amplifier, which encapsulates what even experts are saying. Art Thompson of Guitar Player had this to say: "I found the quality of the amp and effects sounds to be quite satisfying. There’s good touch responsiveness on the higher gain tones, and these 100-watters are definitely capable of holding their own in a band." The inclusion of a built-in speaker got a lot of thumbs up from users who are happy that they don't have to use a different amp for practice.


The JEM70V is a Steve Vai signature model based on early JEMs he helped create. It comes with 3 different DiMarzio Evolution pickups that were handpicked by Steve Vai himself to give him the various tones that he needs for his expressive solo work, and intricate rhythm textures. The body is crafted from basswood, while the low profile 5-pc Maple/Walnut and 24-fret, 25.5" scale length rosewood fingerboard provide the fast playability expected of the brand. Other features include the Edge tremolo, 1.69" nut width, tree of life inlay, and it comes wrapped in Seafoam green finish.
But this was different. This was build quality, and it completely wrecked the sound, feel and playability of the guitar. A competent pre-shipment QC inspection should have caught this and sent it back to be fixed at the factory, and they didn't. No serious guitarist would stand for ANY guitar made this way, at ANY price point. Yet there it was, on display on a guitar positioned as the flagship model of the brand, occupying the most expensive price point in the market.
Squier Affinity Stratocaster has all the same features of the Fender Stratocaster guitar at a highly affordable price. It has a maple neck and an alder body which gives it a snappy Strat tone. It also has three single-coil pickups that can be manipulated by a 5-way switch. A vintage style tremolo system makes it a great choice for those who like that system.
With a history dating back to 1833, Martin acoustics rank as the most historic and iconic guitars ever made. From the small-bodied parlor guitars of the 19th-century to the landmark dreadnoughts of the 1930s and beyond, Martins have and continue to define the form and sound of the instrument. Take a look here for examples every type of vintage Martin acoustic including icons like the D-28, D-35, 000-18 and many more.
A list that's bound to be disagreed with, and I do. Although I love Hendrix, Clapton, etc. I'm still most impressed with Mississippi Fred McDowell. Bass line, rhythm, lead slide, and singing simultaneously and effortlessly. Several video performance on DVD are available, in case you listen to just an audio recording and wondered "who are the other guitarists playing, they're really good together?" nope, just Fred.
At some point in this period, the pickups were changed to humbuckers with metal side covers and a see-through grey insert on top. I’ve estimated this changeover took place in about 1973 or ’74, but this is uncertain. Certainly it had been accomplished by ’76, when the next reference appears, so it could have been later (at the time of the Merson/Univox split in ’75?).
Interestingly, the neck is crafted from maple, topped by a 20-fret walnut fingerboard which complements the back and sides nicely. Following the specs of older Gibson guitars, the scale length is shorter at 24.75", while the nut width is 1.725", which gives the instrument a comfortable playing feel. Adding to the already good vale of this guitar is the built-in LR Baggs Element electronics for stage performance, with discrete soundhole mounted volume control. If you are looking for a handcrafted workhorse acoustic guitar that will not break the bank, then check this out.
I bought this Fender acoustic/electric guitar about 9 months ago. It has a wonderful rich tone, is easy to play and is beautiful. The grain on the mahogany is dark and beautiful. It lives up to its dreadnought name and can fill a large living room with its sound. The tone is deep, rich and mellow. Strings are separated enough for easy picking. Tuning pegs are of decent quality and once strings are broken in it stays pretty much in tune. Other than putting on some bronze phosphor strings I did not need to set the guitar up. I really haven't played it much with an amplifier so can't comment on the electronics, other than the built in tuner works well. The hardside guitar case is well padded and looks professional. I was a little concerned about buying a guitar over the
I bought mine used in 1989 in a mom and pop music store in the North GA mountains in Cumming GA and have loved it everysence I Know very little about it except that I would not trade it for a new one. The sustain in the body of the overtone note is fantastic and rare to find.I use d'Addario phosphorus bronze strings 11 - 52 and would not change anything about this guitar,fantastic!!! Thanks Victor
Anyway, here’s how you adjust the truss rod. This must be done with the strings tuned to whatever pitch you usually use. If your neck is too bowed (the gap you just measured is too big), you tighten the truss rod by turning the socket clockwise. It is recommended that you only turn the tool a quarter turn at a time (or even one eighth) and then give the neck some time to settle. You will also need to make sure the strings are still properly tuned after each adjustment.
The Model EP-17-T was a regular-sized thinline with a single round cutaway, bolt-on neck, non-dipped three-and-three head, dots, three pickups, adjustable bridge, plain trapeze tail, elevated guard, three rocker switches plate-mounted on the upper shoulder, and controls on a rectangular strip on the lower bout. All three were offered in shaded mahogany finish.
The Yeah Yeah Yeahs’ theatrically coiffed guitarist has several grueling jobs, among them holding down the trio’s entire melodic structure and holding his own against one of the most dynamic frontwomen of our time. His signature see-saw call-and-response lines leave plenty of room for tension and release, war cries, and tears, and the kind of grand, clanging chords that’ll turpentine your ears clean.
Reliability is one of these. There are many different parts to an electric guitar. In addition to the body and neck being put together solidly, there are the components to consider. The pickups, controls, circuitry and output jack all need to be well made and connected securely, while the bridge and tuners should function correctly, with nothing too loose or too stiff.
When the Fender company was bought from CBS by a group of investors and employees headed by Bill Schultz in 1985, manufacturing resumed its former high quality and Fender was able to regain market share and brand reputation. This sparked a rise in mainstream popularity for vintage (and vintage-style) instruments. Dan Smith, with the help of John Page, proceeded to work on a reissue of the most popular guitars of Leo Fender’s era. They decided to manufacture two Vintage reissue Stratocaster models, a maple-fretboard 1957 and a rosewood-fretboard 1962 along with the maple-fretboard 1952 Telecaster, the maple-fretboard 1957 and rosewood-fretboard 1962 Precision Basses, as well as the rosewood-fretboard “stacked knob” 1962 Jazz Bass. This project was very important and critical to the company’s survival. These first few years (1982–1984) of reissues, known as American Vintage Reissues, are now high-priced collector’s items and considered as some of the finest to ever leave Fender’s Fullerton plant, which closed its doors in late 1984.

I ordered this item from their ebay store, roughly the same price with shipping, very easy to read point to point instructions, this was my first diy pedal, I've fooled around with a soldering iron but not enough to speak of. I bought it because I was not pleased with my Peavey Valveking 112's boost sound, it not only boosts the signal, it changes the tone, from the reviews I watched on youtube, it sounded like this pedal would do the trick, for the price, and the fun of a first time build, I love it, it boosts the signal with no change in tone, I'm not super impressed with the pedal's distortion tone, but I am spoiled with that saturated tube tone, there is some extra hum when I turn on the pedal, I don't know if this is my fault from the build, or what, but I would ... full review
The tone selector on an electric guitar controls the capacitor, which basically filters out high frequencies. The same way a high-cut filter (or low-pass-filter if you prefer) works on a standard equalizer. By dialing down the tone, you remove brightness and treble. The pickup selector does just what it's called.. Selecting which pickups being used to capture the vibration of the strings, and translates the energy into electric current, though the configuration and number of "presets" can vary from guitar to guitar, depending on how many pickups it has etc. If you're a handyman you can even configure this yourself.
SOLD OUT; Here we have another great vintage Takamine this one is a timeless classic recreation of the trusty and also great sounding Martin D-17 , this fine Takamine F349 example was well crafted in Japan nearly 24 years ago. This guitar is a very good++ vintage Japanese guitar and has been well maintained and plays amazingly with great low action still to this day all these years later. Its made of all Mahogany( other than rosewood fingerboard & bridge ) that is a high grade solid Mahogany neck it really has a nice substantial feel to its medium profile with a 1-11/16ths width at the nut, The sound box is also ALL Mahogany and it offers a nice rich vintage tone one might expect from the company Takamine has copied in this case the Martin D-17 directly, This example’s cosmetic integrity its fit and finish to this day is still pretty nice not exactly like new vintage but is JVG rated at very good with NO major cracks at all and NO finish checking = none – . she did have some small paint chips here and there that we easily matched with clear mahogany stain lacquer applied with a brush tip to the spots only and one spot on the lower treble bout where 3 discolor spots were ( cold be from factory ) it looked original anyway I touched that up a bit as well later I buffed the touch ups back she looks much better now and this will also help to preserve its original finish integrity as well as keeping up her beauty. Great low and playing action on this one it really plays with ease Take a good look she still shines like glass and her sound is clear and the volume is very good, and tone is vintage sweet from its well Good and well aged tone woods attribute to making this guitar sound as good as she does. This F349 model is a full size Dreadnought as and she is faithful in its shape & size of the vintage Martin D-17 it copies other than its original design Takamine headstock shape… a very cool D-17 guitar, its 23+ years it’s obviously not new or mint but is surely vintage beautiful with its age and genuine warmth & patina and yes a few minor doinks but nothing to detract from its overall appeal. Please look her over well feel free to ask any questions. This is a nice players guitar and is sure to please. It is JVG Rated 8.5/10 very good+ Vintage used condition. WYSIWYG .
This book comes from the former editor of Guitar One magazine who has been playing since he was 14 years old, so he has a reputation of knowing a his way around a guitar neck AND knowing how to write. Let’s face it, when you are trying to learn guitar through reading a book, the author's ability to write and communicate is crucial. Anyway, this book delivers a “workout program” for your fingers, giving you a technique driven approach to learning the guitar and actually improving in record time. The exercises are designed to help with dexterity and accuracy.
Lastly try a fuzz pedal like a Fuzz Face or Big Muff. Fuzz pedals offer huge amounts of drive and low end but are generally used for single notes and power chords. Regular chords can sound pretty nasty with fuzz and it’s probably a bit wild for acoustic guitars. Although if it works with your style and draws the congregation into worship, then why not? The important thing is to be tasteful and selective in how, when and how much you use effects. Follow the golden rule; a little ‘salt’ can bring out flavour but too much kills the dish altogether.

Immediately you can see that this unit is on the larger side, measuring 25 inches (63.5 cm) across, and weighing about 11 lbs (5 kg). If you’re concerned about portability, we noticed one of the most purchased items together with the HD500X is this case, which comes highly recommended and will keep your multi-effects pedal safe during transit and storage. The Line 6 POD HD500X itself has superb build quality. It has a very nice metal chassis, and heavy duty construction. The build quality probably doesn't get much better than this in a multi-fx unit (we say it is a step above the Zoom G3X). We won’t spend a ton of time talking about the inputs/outputs and controls available on the Line 6 POD HD500X, since you can very easily discern that from photos of it. We will say that of all the multi-effects pedals on our top 5 list, this is the most robust. The inputs/outputs cover above and beyond what you probably need. You’ve got your basic inputs and outputs, USB 2.0 so you can use it as a USB interface and for DAW integration, MIDI in/out/thru, FX send and return, AUX input, balanced XLR outputs, integrated mic preamp, and more. In short, however you want to integrate the HD500X into your bedroom, music studio, or live setup, there’s a very good chance you’re covered.

As to the “where,” positioning your mic an inch or less from the grillecloth and aiming it straight at the center of the speaker cone – pointing at the dust cap, in other words – yields a bright, punchy, detailed sound that suits many requirements, but can be too harsh. At the other extreme, aiming the mic at the edge of the cone, where the cone meets the suspension (the area just inside the speaker cutout in the cab’s mounting baffle) usually results in a looser, warmer, more raw and edgy tone. Between these two positions, there’s a wealth of voices to explore, and every inch of real estate that the mic covers between dust cap and cone edge will bring a noticeable sonic shift, without touching the amp’s controls. Also, aiming the mic straight at the speaker, in other words, mounted at 90 degrees to the flat plane of the front of the amp, and aiming it off axis, at a slight angle to the speaker, will illicit different sounds, too. With an assistant helping, or the guitarist playing if that’s not you, try moving the mic around the surface of the speaker while listening for the changes in tone through monitors or headphones, or if you don’t have enough isolation between live amp and monitors, record a little in each of several positions to listen back to. Pick the position you like for the track, and go with it.
Smaller players, musicians who travel frequently, and parents shopping for children, may also want to consider travel and mini-acoustic guitars. These guitars were designed for the comfort of smaller players, and for convenience when traveling, but many guitar manufacturers have invested significant time and resources into creating smaller-scale acoustic guitars that don't compromise quality or sound.

If you are a first time builder or an experienced professional you know the value of building your instrument on a solid foundation. The Custom Shop Jag body is beautiful, high quality and made to spec. The Allparts neck is manufactured under license by Fender. The materials and quality level meet the standards set by Fender. Using these high quality materials will give you the sweet tone and sustain you are looking for.
Some more advanced models, like the Wampler Latitude Tremolo Deluxe, bring a much more complex set of features, which include choosing the waveform and more. Whether you are looking for a good way to spice up your tone without impacting the nature of your signal, or you are just in need of a great vintage style effect, tremolo is the one to go for.
A Chorus effect can help you achieve lush, warm, and rich tones that work well during busier parts of a song. The effect attempts to simulate the sound of multiple performers playing the same part of a song at once. It works similarly to a flanger effect, where a sound is duplicated and slightly delayed. Choruses often use a longer delay than a flanger, and the delay time is also modulated with an oscillator to simulate the natural variations in time and pitch that will occur between several different performers.

Wah – This type of pedal was a Jimi Hendrix favorite, and you’ve probably heard the original “Cry Baby” in a lot of music. It was the first wah pedal to find success, and paved the way for others to follow. The Cry Baby is an example of manual wah, controlled by a rocker pedal that adjusts the level of treble response dynamically as you move it. Some modern wah pedals, by contrast, are “auto-wah effects,” which do the same thing but use presets for control instead of live input from your foot.


“I like it because it’s light and simple,” Alana said, reflecting on its 5.1-pound weight. “It’s easier to get my hand around the neck on this one,” Charles noted. Both found the Les Paul Express’s rounded top shoulder to be more comfortable than the horn-shaped cutaways on most of the other short-scale models, and they felt the smooth finish on the back of the neck made it easier to play. The adults agreed. “I’m surprised—for a small guitar, it’s fun to play,” Ken Rosser said.
The gray area between different types of phasers and chorus pedals—and phaser-style chorus pedals versus delay-based chorus pedals—arises probably because designers and manufacturers really have followed two distinct paths in this field. Some phasers have sought to approximate the Uni-Vibe’s approximation of a Leslie cab, and some so-called choruses have done much the same. Other phasers have been designed from the ground up more purely from the perspective of the principles of phase shifting in itself, rather than in an effort to sound like a whirling speaker or any other electromechanical device that has come before. The result means the field is broad and varied, and different phasers (or their related effects) can often have different voices with characteristics more distinct than, say, two delays from different makers.
Pickup selectors can wear out over time. The lugs and the rotating switch can loose their tight connect with years of use. Also, many inexpensive guitars made today use cheap electronic parts. You may just want to upgrade your switch for more control and better selections. It is fairly easy to install a new pickup selector. Here are a few simple steps to replacing your pickup selector.
Charles Kaman put a team of employees to work on inventing a new guitar in 1964.[2][7] For the project, Charlie chose a small team of aerospace engineers and technicians, several of whom were woodworking hobbyists as well. One of these was Charles McDonough, who created the Ovation Adamas model.[8]Kaman founded Ovation Instruments, and in 1965 its engineers and luthiers(guitar makers) worked to improve acoustic guitars by changing their conventional materials. The R&D team spent months building and testing prototype instruments. Their first prototype had a conventional“dreadnought” body, with parallel front and back perpendicular to the sides. The innovation was the use of a thinner, synthetic back, because of its foreseen acoustic properties. Unfortunately, the seam joining the sides to the thin back was prone to breakage. To avoid the problem of a structurally unstable seam, the engineers proposed a synthetic back with a parabolic shape. By mid-1966, they realized that the parabolic shape produced a desirable tone with greater volume than the conventional dreadnought.[9]
Straight out of the box you have over 68 on-board digital effects, 75 custom designed factory patches for iconic sounds, 5 amp emulations and 5 cabinet emulators, so you’re not going to run out of choices on stage or in the studio. In addition, you have access to the Guitar Lab software app that allows you to download new stomp boxes and patches regularly.
If you’re a guitarist, chances are you’ve either owned or at least played on a Zoom multi-effects pedal. It’s basically an unwritten law! They have always and continue to make some of the best multi effects pedals known to the musical world, so naturally we had to include the Zoom G3n Multi-Effects Processor (as well as a handful of other Zoom models) in this list.

A younger, but very high-quality brand that's also a favorite among country artists, Taylor manufactures some truly investment-worthy acoustic guitars—with a sound that only improves over time. Its creator, Bob Taylor, tested the use of exotic tonewoods in excellent guitars, so he used oak recovered from pallet wood to craft the back, sides, and neck of the Pallet Guitar, an important model originally made in 1995. Taylor's roster of tonewoods also includes Indian Rosewood, African Ebony, Blackheart Sassafras, Blackwood, Cocobolo, Figured Walnut, Granadillo, Hawaiian Koa, Maple, Ovangkol, Sapele, Tropical Mahogany, and several others.
"It's a labor of love," says Youngman, a guitar master who's been handling guitars since the '50s and '60s when rock 'n' roll was still in its infancy. But he's not just a surgeon; he's a neck specialist. "If the neck doesn't feel right, you're not going to play." He's always been good at setting guitars up, and today he works mostly from home, although he also does repair work at Guitarasaur in Watuga. "It's always nice to make someone happy. It makes me feel like I'm doing something right."
Modelling effect – Many BOSS modelling effects use COSM or Composite Object Sound Modelling, which uses computer-processing power to digitally precisely model the electronic, mechanical, and magnetic characteristics inherent to an instrument, amplifier, or speaker, and also to create completely new sounds. Modelling effects can be dynamic or time-based – it can even make your guitar or amp sound like a completely different type of guitar or amp.
Repair body wings. These wings form the main body shape and may have been broken by dropping the guitar or other damaging methods. If you do not properly glue in the wings you will need to use extra caution as to not break the bond. Repairing wings or any body wood is rarely necessary, especially on a thick guitar body such as a Les Paul Standard. It may be needed on a smaller bodied guitar much like a Les Paul Junior.

If you’ve decided to make the neck from scratch, rather than purchasing it, you will want to cut that at this point. Make sure you are following specifications for how it will need to connect to the body. It’s best to cut the basic shape first and then refine.  You also need to hollow out space for the truss rod. Finally, for a rosewood fretboard, you will need to laminate the board to the neck.


When playing the electric guitar, you’ll have to simultaneously use both hands. One hand will be responsible for fretting and the other hand will be responsible for strumming or plucking. Depending on which is your more comfortable side and whether the electric guitar is designed more for one side than the other, it will impact your play style and music quality.
The questions I get asked in response to people reading my stuff on guitar wiring often relate to the 5-way pickup selector switch so I thought I’d write a brief explanation of how it works. Understanding how the 5-way switch on your guitar works is key to successful guitar wiring. Knowing what goes on inside the switch may sound like a simple, maybe trivial, detail but it’s something we all need to understand and it’s not as easy as it first seems.

But having at least a very basic foundation to build upon - such as learning some basic chords, will allow you to learn more songs faster. My best advice is to abandoned any idea of instant gratification and commit to the idea that learning guitar is a slow process in the beginning. It gets exponentially easier to improve your skills after you get past the huge hurdles you encounter in the beginning.
I am a fan of inexpensive guitars. Why but something so valuable you can’t take it out or afraid it will get damaged. Get an inexpensive guitar that is closest to the expensive ones you desire. Basically the construction and woods are the same just made inexpensively to sell to the masses. Watch who plays the secondary brands and get full cred. I have a squire cabronita, squire telecaster with upgraded coil tapped humbucker/single coil pickups, gretch electromatic single cutaway soildbody, and 2 Harley Benton les pau l type guitars with p90s and coil tapped tumblers for less than 175.00 each. Every guitar is a beauty and a joy to own.
Usual general wear. Some noticeable impression marks on face. Piece of decorative trim missing from headstock. Plays but Action is high. Neck truss needs adjusting. There is a slight buzz with action as it is (sounds like it's from bridge area). Frets look good. Not perfect but a classic in good condition in need of a little tune up. SOLD AS IS. Ships wrapped and secured inside a Road Runner hard shell case which itself will be plastic wrapped. Ships Priority from Alaska.


We’re bookending this article with two Epiphone guitars. Why? Because Les Paul was the man. And G-400 Pro was actually a successor Les Paul model from ’61 to ’68, making this guitar a true icon of rock, power, and endless sustain. With a mahogany neck and rosewood fretboard, this guitar has the looks and, with Alnico Classic Pro humbucking pickups, the tonal quality is excellent. 


It seems like Taylor have been around forever, but compared to most big name acoustic guitar brands, Taylor are a relative newcomer on the scene having been founded by Bob Taylor and Kurt Listug in 1974. They started out as an acoustic guitar company and that is their primary focus to this day and are now renowned the world over for the tone and quality of their instruments..
The American Deluxe Telecaster (introduced in 1998; upgraded in 2004, 2008, and 2010) features a pair of Samarium Cobalt Noiseless pickups and the S-1 switching system. Models made prior to 2004 featured two Fender Vintage Noiseless Tele single-coils, Fender/Fishman Powerbridge piezo system and 4-bolt neck fixing. Other refinements include a bound contoured alder or ash body and an abalone dot-inlaid maple neck with rosewood or maple fingerboard, 22 medium-jumbo frets, rolled fingerboard edges, and highly detailed nut and fret work. The HH model sported an ebony fingerboard, quilted or flamed maple top and a pair of Enforcer humbuckers with S-1 switching (discontinued as of 2008). As of March 23, 2010, Fender updated the American Deluxe Telecaster with a compound radius maple neck, N3 Noiseless Tele pickups and a reconfigured S-1 switching system for wider sonic possibilities. The new model now sports staggered, locking tuning machines, which provide better break angle over the nut for increased sustain and improved tuning stability.
Shure SM57.Sennheiser MD421.For a rock sound, many (though not all!) engineers will use a dynamic mic placed close to the speaker (sometimes on its own, sometimes in combination with other mics) like this Electrovoice RE20.Why such a strong preference? These days, force of habit has got to be part of the answer, but there is also a lot about the microphone's frequency response which suits guitar recording. For a start, the sub-200Hz response roll-off reduces low-end cabinet 'thumps', which might otherwise conflict with the kick drum and bass in the mix. This also compensates for proximity boost when the mic is used very close to the speaker cone. However, there's also a slight 'suckout' at 300-500Hz, an area where muddiness can easily occur, and a broad 2-12kHz presence peak, which adds bite and helps the guitars cut through the rest of the track.
We’ll round this list off with a slightly different proposition, particularly with jazz in mind. The Fender Classic Series ’72 Telecaster Thinline is a semi-hollow guitar in the guise of a traditional solid body. It features the same body shape and size of a standard Telecaster but has its horizon’s broadened thanks to the internal routing of the wood and attractive ‘f’ hole on the guitar’s top. Two humbuckers – again, not traditional on a Tele – provide exceptional warmth and versatility. Combined with its high levels of construction and craftsmanship this a guitar which will last a lifetime.
Of course, we’ve already mentioned the cool offset Jaguar shape of the body, which will turn plenty of heads whenever this budding bassist hits the stage. But with an active bass boost circuit, you also have the option to bump the sound of this way up past what’s normally afforded in a passive bass. Not to mention, the chrome hardware and the curved vintage logo print on the head really put this bass guitar over the edge visually.
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The PRS McCarty 594 features a double cutaway body style. It has an African mahogany body with a figured maple 10-Top and gloss nitrocellulose finish. The neck is mahogany and is topped with a bound dark rosewood fretboard with a 10-inch radius and iconic bird inlays. The neck sports a new Pattern Vintage neck shape, which is as wide as the standard Pattern neck profile but with just a little extra thickness and a slightly asymmetric carve.

There have been plenty of attempts at different types of semi-hollow guitars from nearly every guitar manufacturer, and some are more successful than others. In my experience, even though Gibson does offer a fairly consistent output, there is still a fair amount of discrepancy from one instrument to the next, and as always I recommend playing a guitar before passing any judgement on it. But try and be discerning in your assessment of the guitar — versatility is king, only capable of being knocked off the throne by an absolutely golden, irreplaceable tone. Trust your ears!


Guitars with better-quality electronics can avoid these traits to an extent, but as you can see when you turn the tone pot all the way to zero, the dynamics of the RLC circuit that the pickup and tone circuit create result in a “hump” in the upper bass/low-midrange frequencies, roughly centered (in this example) around 300 Hz. This happens because the low resistance, coupled with the high “capacitive reactance” of the capacitor and the “inductive reactance” of the pickup’s inductor, creates what’s known as a “band-pass filter”, where a specific frequency range in between very low and very high frequencies has the lowest total impedance and thus becomes the most present in the tone.

4-conductor humbuckers are fun to wire because they offer many combinations to play with. Some pickups have another bare wire which is there for shielding and should always be grounded. Manufacturers have their own color code, so make sure you find the right color code before connecting anything. Below is color code diagram for common pickup manufacturers.
Today’s beginner guitars are far superior to the hunk of wood with strings I started with, and now there is a huge array of instruments to choose from. In fact, I’d go so far as to say if you only intend to play guitar for fun you’ll never need to spend another dime on gear beyond your starter setup, if you don’t want to. (Except for things like strings and picks, of course.) That definitely wasn’t true thirty years ago.
An electric guitar works on the principle of electromagnetic induction. This means that an electric guitar has electromagnets in its system which generate magnetic fields. Apart from this, an electric guitar has an amplification system which amplifies the sound waves generated by the guitar’s string. It is this combination of electromagnetic induction and amplification system that makes an electric guitar run.
The SG retains a similar dual-humbucker configuration as the Les Paul Standard but it truly has a life and style all its own. Due in part to its aggressive style, impressive mid-range bite and thunderous output, the SG has become synonymous with rock ’n’ roll. The Gibson SG is one of only a handful of models that has never been out of production since its introduction in the early ’60s.
There is one musical virtuoso whom I would added to this list, if for no other reason then the fact that the 2nd guitarist on the list thru his comment, seemed to hand the title as “greatest guitatist on earth” to this guy. This same individual has often been compared to the one who holds the crown- Jimi. And yet, arguably should not be in this list due to the fact that he was much more than a Master of the guitar, he mastered vurtually over 30 other instruments he played, sold almost Every concert he performed world wide, and… Read more »

Power valves (tubes) can be overdriven in the same way that pre-amplifier valves can, but because these valves are designed to output more power, the distortion and character they add to the guitar's tone is unique. During the 1960s to early 1970s, distortion was primarily created by overdriving the power valves. Because they have become accustomed to this sound[dubious – discuss], many guitar players[who?] favour this type of distortion, and thus set their amps to maximum levels in order to drive the power section hard. Many valve-based amplifiers in common use have a push-pull output configuration in their power section, with matched pairs of tubes driving the output transformer. Power amplifier distortion is normally entirely symmetric, generating predominantly odd-order harmonics.
Better known simply as an acoustic guitar, the “steel” strings (they come in all kinds of construction, not just steel) are louder and brighter, and a much more versatile instrument to play. Folk, rock, jazz — acoustic guitars have it all covered. Those steel strings also chew the ends off your fingers until eventually you develop hard calluses on the tips — very handy for plucking boiled eggs out of the saucepan.

Adjusting saddle height couldn’t be easier on a Les Paul. Since the bridge can only be adjusted at each end, there is no need to adjust each saddle individually. Firstly check and, if necessary, adjust the low (thick) E string height. Do this by adjusting the height of the bridge at the thick E string end. This is done by rotating the thumbwheel anti-clockwise (counter-clockwise) to raise the bridge or clockwise to lower it. You might be able to do this with just your fingers, but chances are you will need to use pliers. Be careful if you use a tool as it is easy to slip and damage the finish on your guitar. Alternatively you can slacken all of the strings and use your fingers, although this is a very time-consuming process. Finger method
I know that you are used to seeing things like “the number 1, the number 2” etc. When it comes to stomp boxes I believe that I do not have to be that strict. If I am recommending 8 different pedals to you, then there is no 1st and 8th position. All of the pedals that we will review are worth checking out. If it is bad, we will just skip it. Never forget that you can combine your pedal with a good guitar amp with some built-in effects. Also if you do not see a specific model or brand, it does not necessarily mean it is bad, the market is just huge and very competitive, updating will take time!
While there are cheaper Strats under the Squier sub brand, the Standard Stratocaster is the way to go if you want a budget friendly one with with the Fender logo. This guitar is fondly called an MIM (Made in Mexico) Strat to differentiate it from the American made version. While some elitists will tell you that the difference is noticeable, many others attest that it's hard to spot the difference in an actual blind test - making this a true to form Standard Stratocaster, only this one is not made in the USA.

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First, you have 11 different modes, including the TonePrint option, just like the Flashback delay. Then you have a true bypass circuit with an analog dry-through signal, which perfectly preserves the natural tone and EQ of your acoustic guitar (again, similar to the Flashback's setup). When you're using the effect, we would advise tinkering with the mix to get about 35-50 percent of your dry signal coming through.
Before we get into the details, it should probably be noted that building a solidbody electric guitar is a much less challenging project than building a semi- or fully hollowbody guitar. Building the latter types from scratch involves sophisticated woodworking skills and tools that will be beyond the reach of all but the most ambitious beginners. And as we note below, designs with bolt-on necks versus set necks are more beginner-friendly.
A multi-effects device (also called a "multi-FX" device) is a single electronics effects pedal or rackmount device that contains many different electronic effects. Multi-FX devices allow users to "preset" combinations of different effects, allowing musicians quick on-stage access to different effects combinations.[16] Multi-effects units typically have a range of distortion, chorus, flanger, phaser and reverb effects. The most expensive multi-effects units may also have looper functions. Pedal-style multieffects range from fairly inexpensive stompboxes that contain two pedals and a few knobs to control the effects to large, expensive floor units with many pedals and knobs. Rackmounted multieffects units are typically mounted in a rack. Guitarists and bassists may mount their rackmounted multieffects unit in the same rack with their preamplifier and power amplifier.

I picked up a Lyle 630L recently for $100. Best playing acoustic I've ever played and sounds awesome, but it has a few issues. First being the fact that it's been played long and hard, with at least 3 frets showing hard wear. I had to tweak the torsion rod and raise the adjustable bridge some to stop a few frets from buzzing, but one is still a stickler. Bridge has cracked between the peg holes but the pegs still stay secure. My thought is to use good epoxy to stabilize it. Any thoughts? Also, leaving the strings taught over the years seems to have warped the body some, but there are no cracks or finish peeling from it. One tuner has been replaced with another style tuner, (looks like crap from the back) and I'd love to replace it.

6. Bugera V5 Infinium 5-watt 1x8 ($199.99): This little amp delivers pure all-tube tone at a fraction of the size of its larger counterparts. Bugera has utilized the Infinium Tube Life Multiplier technology to make sure your tubes stay healthy over the lifetime of the amp. If you want to get into the world of tube amplifiers but don’t care about a lot of bells and whistles, this little amp is a great option.
Looking for a super-hot, aggressive metal tone? You need a dedicated high-output humbucker that will crush any amp. Whether passive or active, it’s humbuckers that dominate the heavy rock and metal genres, offering huge power, mix-cutting melodic lead tone, and noise-cancelling abilities – just what’s need when the volume and gain increase. For gigging metal guitarists, humbuckers are pretty much essential. This genre has some great affordable options that will turn any axe into a tone monster, as well as some high-end signature pickup sets from legends such as Dimebag Darrell and Mick Thomson, while the premium James Hetfield Humbucker Set from EMG is one of the best purchases a gigging metal guitarist can buy!
Here’s an interesting (they’re all interesting to me!!!) guitar that shows the evolution of Matsumoku made guitars.  Even the earliest solid body electrics that came out of the Matsumoku plant were made of solid wood and displayed really good wood craftsmanship!  Lots of start up companies went to Matsumoku in the early days because the plant had proper wood drying facilities (if the wood wasn’t dried properly, the guitars often became seriously messed up during the import trip across the ocean).
1960's Harmony H-54 Rocket 2 Redburst- Here's a excellent example of rock-n-roll to jazz all rolled up in one. For not much coin the Harmony Rocket was a great choice of hundreds of thousands from music stores to Sear Catalogs. This guitar is in very near mint condition as you can see. We repaired a slight crack at input jack common area. Yes, someone years ago stepped on the cord. We professional glued it from the inside and it's stronger than new. All that shows is a slight line about 1 1/2" long on bottom edge. Anyway, the Rocket 2 is getting harder and harder to find. Two DeArmond Gold Foil Pickups power this baby. It's all original, except for the pick guard, which no one can detect. Condition other than slight repair is a 9 3/4 for this great 50 year old beauty. Guitar comes with period clip board case. SOLD
If you choose, every hole is drilled for each component, including neck, bridge, pickguard and strap button mounting holes. If you choose the optional snap together wiring, then no soldering is required; all electronics connect together with easy to attach connectors. We have done most of the hard work for you! The body needs finish sanding only but should require no filling.
Guitar chords and signatures. Find and save list of chords. Basic guitar chords A sheet of the most used rock chords. Suitable for beginners. Empty chord sheet An empty sheet of chords templates to print out and use. Basic guitar chords Em, C, G, D, Am, E, and A Free lesson on the basic guitar chords Em, C, G, D, Am, E, and A. The following chords are 7 of the most basic open position chords. An open position chord is one that contains at least o
You'll then learn G major and the variation you can play of this chord, where you hold the B string at the third fret, or just leave it open. The final chord you'll learn is F major. This one is tricky because its a barre chord, but there is a way of making these types of chords a little easier to learn, as shown in the video. You will also be shown the partial barre chord shape of F major, and will see how moving this shape around gives you any major chord you want to play.
Be careful. Don't be rash. With the quality of Gibson's 2016 guitars, you should never have too many problems but... if in doubt with an older guitar, take it to a guitar repair pro. You won't need to do it often at all. And it's best to book-in your guitar with an explanation of what you think is wrong. Basic premise: T.L.C. for your guitar, and you'll feel the love back. Oh, and keep your guitar clean!
Two and one half steps down from Drop D. This tuning is most often used by death metal or deathcore musicians, such as Suicide Silence or Whitechapel (both use seven-string guitars and tune down the seventh string a full step). Utilized by bands like Nile, Motograter, Thrice, Filter (on the songs "Columind" and "The Missing" from The Amalgamut and "Drug Boy" and "The Trouble with Angels" from the album of the same name), Dead by April, RED, Ill Niño (on Dead New World) and occasionally Slipknot, Crowbar, Amon Amarth, Five Finger Death Punch, and Parkway Drive. Trapt uses this tuning on their songs "Hollow Man" and "Waiting".
It’s quite interesting to look into the psychology behind our behavior when it comes to how much we pay for things in connection with how good we think they are. In one experiment, restaurant guests got served the same dish. Some of them payed a high price for their dish and some a normal lunch price. Did the guests think that their food tasted differently? Yes, they did. The guests who payed the high price thought that their food was much better than the people who got it for cheap.
Originally the Stratocaster was offered in a 2-color sunburst finish on a solid, deeply contoured ash body, a 21-fret one-piece maple neck with black dot inlays and Kluson tuning heads. In 1956 Fender began issuing solid Stratocasters with alder bodies.[4] In 1960 the available custom colors were standardized, many of which were automobile lacquer colors from DuPont available at an additional 5% cost. The unique single-ply, 8-screw hole white pickguard held all electronic components except the recessed jack plate—facilitating easy assembly. Despite many subsequent Stratocaster models (including copies and the Superstrat), vintage Fender models are highly valued by collectors for their investment potential and players who prefer the timbre of older models.
This is a beautiful example of a 34 year old Japanese crafted Ibanez acoustic guitar that has the tone and the beauty, Love the Sunburst finish on this guitar that did a beautiful job with the thin Poly finish it stands up to the test of time and still shines like glass today just have a good look. It has a Spruce top… cant tell because of the sunburst if its solid or not but will assume its laminated…. Back – Sides & neck are all very nice grade Mahogany. Fit & finish as good as a $2000 guitar of today but this beauty has well aged woods now being well over 33 years old you could spend 3 x times the money and not get a better vintage guitar . The tone is surprisingly rich and with good volume it makes an excellent strumming or fingerpicking guitar. Its playing string action is very good making it a breeze to play and fun. The neck is real nice substantial and a medium profile with a soft V it feels like a vintage Guild from the 1960's ... nice job Ibanez!...Its in very good vintage condition too with several minor doinks to its top and a couple minor on the back and so on but overall its in very good condition both structurally & cosmetically and looks very good overall. The neck's frets are still good and fingerboard and frets have been lightly polished as has the entir guitar cleaned hydrated and polished and just look at the results, a new Martin bone nut has just been fit & installed as well as new Martin Marquis 80/20 Bronze light gauge strings, nicely setup to play very well like a much more expensive guitar now. Original tuners are doing a great job to this day some 34+ years later... Here is a very good Japanese Vintage Guitar of quality for a very good price too, She is not new or mint of course it has doinks and just a couple of fine hairline checks in its top I did not see at first its very hard to see but they are not wood cracks just fine hairlines to the finish and of no structural consequence what so ever. This guitar Plays and sounds very well and will make someone very happy its condition is JVG rated at easily 8.5/10 very good vintage, neck is straight without cracks fit and finish and workmanship are all in the excellent range. Great Japanese guitar for a great price… The 1980 Ibanez V300 TV, crafted in Japan over 33 years ago. This guitar plays GREAT! .
A modern popular rock artist known for use of the Super Beatle is Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, although in the April 2008 issue of Premier Guitar, lead guitarist Mike Campbell revealed that the Super Beatle backline was, on their thirtieth anniversary tour at least, primarily used only as a stage prop, though Petty used his "on a couple of songs." In the group's early days, the Vox equipment was chosen because it was relatively inexpensive in 1976, yet had a handsome appearance. A photograph included in the article showed Campbell's guitar sound was coming from other amplifiers hidden behind the large Super Beatles, which Campbell stated were "a tweed Fender Deluxe and a blackface Fender Princeton together behind the Super Beatle, and an isolated Vox AC30 that I have backstage in a box."
“The bottom line is you get a better dynamic response from the coil. Most people who play a hand-wound pickup say it sounds more ‘open’. It’s easy to make a pickup sound brighter but to have a truly open voice it’s got to be dynamically responsive – and that’s what scatter-winding [intentionally irregular hand-winding of a pickup coil] does. Also, compared to a machine-wound coil, the frequency response is slightly extended. So the sound is bigger and you hear more not just in the high frequencies but also in the depths of the frequency response.”

Sound quality-wise, it’s too close to call. All modern Zoom, Line 6, Boss, and DigiTech multi-effects units sound excellent. Distortion sounds a bit better on the DigiTech, and if reverb is your thing it doesn’t get much better than the Lexicon verbs. The other multi-effects units might be better if you’re looking for more experimental sounds and textures. The DigiTech RP500 tends to be more conservative, and focuses on nailing the classics.
A better way to get distortion, of course, is to use guitar effect pedals. Got your hands on some pedals and starting to play around with the sounds you can make? Well, you can still use these tips to further enhance your distorted tone, since the same theory applies. Most distortion pedals have a volume, gain, and distortion knob in addition to whatever additional controls they give you. If you're simply not satisfied with your pedal's guitar distortion, you can turn the gain up and adjust the other settings, just like you'd do on your amp.
From the low-string riff for “What Difference Does It Make?” to the deep tremolo textures and swooning string bends of “How Soon Is Now,” Marr always seemed to have the notes and the tone to suit the moment perfectly. Marr’s work has been profoundly influential to guitarists of the Nineties and beyond. Noel Gallagher of Oasis dubbed Marr “a fucking wizard,” and Radiohead guitarist Ed O’Brien has cited Marr as the reason he picked up a guitar. In essence, Marr is a classicist, drawing much of his approach from the guitar sounds of the Sixties British Invasion, yet deftly adapting those influences to rock and roll modernity.
A variation of the wah pedal is the auto wah. Not to be confused with a city in Canada, auto-wah effects do the same things a wah does, but without the foot treadle. Usually, you can adjust the attack time (how fast the tone shifts toward the treble) and the depth of the cycle. Some auto-wahs also let you set a constant up and down motion that's not triggered by the note. You’ll find auto-wahs included in many multi-effects processors. One of the newer developments in this area is the Talking Pedal from Electro-Harmonix. While eliminating the moving parts of traditional wahs, it produces amazing male-vocal and vowel-sound effects that harmonize with your guitar’s notes. A fuzz circuit lets you dial in more growl and grit.
Explore the myriad wood combinations in the Gibson lineup and see what’s right for you. Trying to finetune your tone without regard to what your wood is kicking out in the first place can be a frustrating venture, but learn to work with the organic template of each specific model, and you’re already swimming with the tide. Be at one with the heart of the wood, tune in to the voice that resonates deep within even the unplugged electric guitar, and you will go a long way toward understanding, and crafting, your own unique tone.
Oh and you play really great sounding exercises in blues, rock and country that encourage you to noodle around and find your own riffs and leads to play over the tracks which is something that I had never really been inspired to do before with any other book. The author doesn't just throw a bunch of tired, boring, public domain yankee doodles and scarborough fairs because he is too cheap to pay royalties or some crappy tunes that a kindergardener could write but actual original pro sounding tunes and riffs. Yes, I HAVE been around my fair share of crappy guitar lesson books, thanks for asking!
What about the TAB and lyrics on this site? According to U.S. Copyright laws, there are allowable uses of copyright materials, such as extractions for educational purposes. Any TAB, or lyrics, shown on this site are specifically for teaching, using the reader's knowledge of the tempo and sound of a song to facilitate the written material. In addition, I show only excepts from familiar songs, not the entire song. I also encourage readers to obtain full versions of the sheet music from an MPA recognized site. The only exception to this approach is for songs no longer covered by copyright law (songs now in the Public Domain).
You may also be looking to get into individual guitar effects pedals right away, and maybe you’re wondering what are some of the popular overdrive, dynamic, or modulation pedals. If that’s the case, please stay tuned for our upcoming series of articles where we explore individual categories of pedals. In those articles, we will discuss price ranges, popular pedals, and the pedals that your favorite artists use.
"Of course using effects pedals isn't cheating. I personally would define cheating as using corrective technology of some sort to falsify an artist's performance/musical ability, and I don't think that's what using pedals do. They're used for creative purposes, to manipulate sounds for artistic effect and suit personal tastes/whatever suits the mood of a song. They expand the range of timbres you can get from only using one instrument.
It is possible to perform a setup at home, but it can easily become a laborious and time-consuming process. You can instead bring your instrument to a local store or other professional. Guitar setup cost is usually a large value in comparison to the work it would take to do the job at home. You should consider that the cost of a guitar setup includes the addition of new strings but may not cover the actual cost of them. Whether or not strings are included in the price is something that should be investigated prior to having an instrument professionally setup. Guitar setup cost may also increase if the tuning keys need adjustment, or if you have a complicated bridge system (like a Floyd Rose) that requires extra knowledge and skill to be properly fine-tuned.
For notation and composition work, some of the common choices are Avid Sibelius 7, Makemusic Finale and PG Music Band-in-a-Box. Or, for DJ-ing and remixing, check out the Native Instruments Traktor series, Avid Torq or the software packages from Venue Magic. There truly are dozens of options available for you to take advantage of the benefits digital editing has to offer. Whether you're an independent artist mixing tracks on your own laptop or a professional sound editor working on a major TV series or indie film, the right music software is here to handle your needs.

Best brand in price/quality relation. I have 4 guitars, an epiphone explorer goth made on korea, and Jackson KV2 made on usa and 2 ibanez. RG320PG P2 and a RGT6EX, both made on indonesia. The first one is the cheaper, but the sustaine, action a comfort is very nice for a bugget guitar. I've played bugget guitars of other brands, and ibanez is far superior. In fact, my RG320 P2 is nice as some others guitars that cost twice of it price. Mi RGT6EX is excellent, to me must worth $1000 USD but the real price is close $800 USD or less.


The problem that had led to Martin and the idea of making guitars in the first place also led Kaman to the idea of using synthetic materials in guitars. He realized he could use a composite fiberglass to “improve” two aspects of guitar construction. He could solve the problem of cracking due to wood shrinkage caused by changes in heat and humidity, and he could improve vibration transmission from the back because fiberglass actually resonates at frequencies similar to many woods, but is more efficient (wood actually absorbs some of the instrument’s vibrations).
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Splitting the humbucker #1: by grounding the coil-tap and connecting the hot lead to output we’re rendering the coil closer to ground useless because both of it’s leads are grounded. What we’re left with is the coil closer to the hot lead. Since we only have one coil, it will not be hum-cancelling on it’s own. It’s common to split a humbucker, so it can be wired with another coil in parallel, making the noiseless combination, especially on H-S-H guitars.
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Considering that all of the other small-sized guitars we tested were much flashier, I was shocked when our teenage testers, Alana and Charles, both picked the Epiphone Les Paul Express as their favorite short-scale model. It turns out our younger panelists didn’t care at all about the style of the guitars, they cared about comfort—and for them, the Les Paul Express was as comfortable as an old sweatshirt.
As I tried to point out, what is high action is based on personal taste for the most part. Also, Martins traditionally have higher action than many other manufacturers. But unless it is a true defect in the particular guitar, from wood swelling or shrinking, etc. action is easily adjustable, but it is recommended that you have a certified Martin warranty repair person do that, unless you are comfortable with such adjustments.
During Michael Laskow's 20-year tenure as an engineer/producer, he worked with Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young, Eric Clapton, Cheap Trick and countless others. He continues to write articles for magazines like Recording and Electronic Musician. He's also the founder of TAXI, an independent A&R company that links record labels with unsigned artists and songwriters.
Other Ovation innovations include composite tops and multiple offset sound holes on guitar tops, pioneered in the Adamas model in 1977. Kaman Music has also sold budget guitars—and even mandolins and ukuleles—based on similar design principles to the Ovation such as the Korean-built Celebrity series and the Korean or Chinese-built Applause brand.[citation needed]

The difference extends far past just the look and feel.  Roundwound strings have a shorter life, create more string noise, and wear on your frets more, but feature a brighter tone, longer sustain, and lower tension.  You'll also hear more harmonics and be able to grip them better for bending and finger picking.  Flatwounds last longer and have a warmer sound... pretty much the opposite of what we listed for roundwound's.
Whether he was playing as a Muscle Shoals studio musician or as one of the lead guitarists in The Allman Brothers Band, Duane Allman was brilliant. Both his standard playing and slide playing were some of the smoothest and most adventurous the world has ever seen. To hear Allman at the height of his guitar playing prowess, give a listen to “The Allman Brothers Live at The Fillmore East.”
As the market for iOS devices and apps has grown, so has the availability of affordable stompboxes and processors that can store downloaded effects. Being able to sample, purchase, and download effects through an iOS app or digital download gives you access to a whole new palette of sounds. Though relatively new, in years to come this may well become the way in which most players will assemble their effects libraries.
Altium is known for it’s high end PCB development application called Altium Designer which starts at around $7000 and there’s a yearly subscription fee too. Gulp! Altium Designer is used by many industry professionals for product development. Altium just recently released Circuit Maker, which has many of the features of Designer and is, Gasp!…. Completely free!  The trade off at this point seems to be that it’s designed around a community and apart from a couple of private slots, you have to share your work, so it’s not very useful for completely proprietary projects.
Is there any particular reason you're opposed to Kontakt libraries? All of the plugins you mentioned are sample-based themselves, with the notable weakness that you would not be able to change the mapping, grouping, programming (etc), unlike with Kontakt. As someone who uses a lot of virtual instruments, I'd say it's always preferable to have a sample-based instrument in an open sampler plugin since you can see what's going on under the hood and change things like envelopes as needed.

In 1941, CMI became the national distributor for National Dobro products. In ’42, Victor Smith, Al Frost and Louis Dopyera purchased controlling interest in the company. By this time, however, the world was at war and almost all instrument manufacturing ground to a halt as all segments of industry converted to production of materials to support the war effort. In October of 1943, with builders in wartime hiatus, the new owners changed the company name to Valco Manufacturing, incorporating the first initial of each partner’s given name (V-A-L-Co).

Amongst the best guitar brands in India for acoustic guitars, Martin is one that stands out. Martin is one of the best known brands for its steel-string guitars. It is a leading manufacturer of flat top guitars which produce top notch sound quality. However, the company is best known for their signature dreadnought acoustic guitar with X-bracing. It is truly one of the best guitar brands for some of the best quality guitars in the market.


The DI approach most likely to capture the spirit of the original sound is to take a DI feed from the speaker output of a conventional guitar amplifier and feed this into the type of speaker simulator that also includes a dummy load to keep the amplifier happy (valve amplifiers can be damaged by running them into an open circuit). Emulators with a built-in load are generally very much larger than the regular DI box-size emulator-only products. Some of the emulator-only devices can be run from a speaker output, but you still need to plug in either a separate dummy load (usually an 8Ω resistor rated at over 100 Watts on a heat sink) or the original speaker to protect the amplifier from possible damage. Apart from the dummy load, which is passive, the circuitry may either be passive or active.
When sliding or rolling your amplifier into the boot of your transporting vehicle, ensure that the controls are not damaged. When transporting your combo amp or cabinet, make sure that the face is downward so that the controls are not put under stress. If you cannot transport these face down, it is better to place the combo on its side and not on the castors. If you are a frequent traveler, you might want to invest in a flight case for better protection.

Started shopping here when I was just getting my feet wet with the music career, bought a Mexican Humbucker strat and went on from there. Over the next 3 years, after many pedals, amps, and other major gears, I've become a solid local musician. This place has the best service hands down to take care of your gear needs in your career, they find out what you need, let you demo the gear for as long as you want, and never forces you to make a purchase decision. I'm glad I can go to this place for all my gear needs and support, so I can spend most of my time on actual music. The employees are super chill, and you eventually get to know them and the bands they play in after a while. It's a really supportive community for local musicians.
My first guitar, bought out of an advert in Kerrang over 20 years ago. I think it was branded "Axe" and it had absolutely nothing good about it. Some sort of MDF body, horribly bowed neck (couldn't be adjusted as the truss rod was broken), high frets everywhere (you could pull them out with your fingernails, fortunately), slipping tuners, hopeless bridge, hopeless nut, everything. Nearly put me off playing before I'd got started.
We carry many new and ‘lightly’ used instruments. So called “low mileage” instruments, in near mint condition, are our specialty. Currently in house: Santa Cruz, Bourgeois, Eastman, Fender, Larrivee, Martin, Epiphone, Gibson, Gretsch, Guild, Giebitz, Huss & Dalton, Sobell, New World Classical Guitars, Cordoba Classical Guitars, Loar, Recording King, G&L, LsL, Breedlove. Amps from Magnatone, […]
I've got a vox white shadow too though its a crimson/red colour with 2 chrome plated humbuckers, it has one volume pot, two tone pots, 1 toggle switch aswell as 2 further switches to change between pick-ups. It has stamped on the back neck plate "made in japan" I can't seem to locate the serial number though. Would love to know more about this guitar.
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Here is one electric guitar that has all the incredible features expected from an electric guitar. In terms of vibe and clarity of sound, this guitar is a jewel to have. The Gretsch G5422TDCG Electromatic Hollow Body Electric Guitar is a snow crest white guitar which features a laminated top, including at the neck, back and sides of the instrument.
The ’37 Hawaiian Guitar in both the Sorkin and Grossman books was basically the same squarish, pear-shaped guitar as in ’36, sans pickguard. It had a polished Ebonoid fingerboard with new parallelogram position markers replacing the old dots. Also, the large, two-part rectangular pickup cover/tail assembly was replaced with a more conventional, modern design. The pickup cover was the new rectangular type with the two pole extensions exposed. Off to the side of its surround was a little square plate on the treble side containing the volume control. The strings attached to a small piece of slotted metal hidden under a rectangular cover or “handrest.” Gone were the control wings. The microphone attachment stuck out the bass side of the guitar. The cost was $35, plus $6 for a case.
I recognize that these lists are really the preference of the writer and that in itself makes the list valid. However……Robert Johnson at #1? I realize that many people studied him and he was a great guitarist for his era, but he wasn’t even the best guitarist of his era. That title goes to Son House, who taught Robert Johnson. The fact is that you could have had a Clapton without a Robert Johnson. Johnson wasn’t the only player whom Clapton was inspired by.
An effect made popular by guitarists like Hendrix, Jerry Cantrell, Slash and many more, the Wah-Wah effect is a pedal-controlled Q filter. The ultra-recognisable vocal-like effect is obtained by having a Q parameter going back and forth, thus “opening” your guitar voice or narrowing it down removing treble frequencies. Words cannot really describe it, and since its inception the Wah was featured on countless records. The Dunlop Crybaby is by far the most popular wah pedal, built with trusty analog circuitry. Despite Dunlop’s fame, many other manufacturers built beautiful pedals that have left their mark in music history due to their slightly different sound, such as the VOX 84x series, the Fulltone, and the super modern optical Morley Wah.
What’s more, musicians will (or at least modern musicians have the opportunity to) learn about their niche area through metadata analysis and find out what makes the fans tick, so that they can pick up on this connection between music maker and listener. As such, how can you really be sure that the person playing the drums, strumming on the guitar or singing the song on your favourite album is actually feeling the music in the magical way we’d like to think they are?

Secondly, I have an Epi Les Paul 1960 Tribute that i had PLEKD, which made a big difference to how it plays. However; i have an ongoing issue with it since, the G string always plays muted - i have changed the strings several times since but to no avail, other than that it plays really well in my opinion albeit i am only a learner with little experience. I have gone through the steps in your article but again all to no avail - have you any ideas as to what may be causing the muted tone (that's how i'd describe it anyway) and any thoughts on a possible solution you may have would be welcomed.


ESP is notable for using active pickups — as opposed to the nearly universal use of passive pickups. Active pickups make use of internal amplification inside the guitar, so that the pickups produce a hotter, louder, and richer sound. The concept is very effective, however it requires the incorporation of a 9V power supply inside the guitar. This can be a great inconvenience if the battery dies and the guitar is not playable.
Power chords are one of the staples of rock music and one of the most important guitar chord types you need to have in your toolbox. They are important to learn for a few reasons: They’re easy to play They’re used a TON in many popular songs and are very versatile. They’ll help broaden your repertoire of guitar sounds / styles. This post will walk you through step-by-step what a power chord is, how to play them and what songs you can learn to start practicing them. What are Power Chords? Whether you play an acoustic or electric guitar, you are going
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Finally, their taper. Taper refers to the gradual increase or decrease of the pots ohm as you adjust it. There are two types of pot taper, Logarithmic (Audio) and Linear (Lin). The human ear hears in a logarithmic manner, so in a gradual increase or decrease, whereas linear, to our ear sounds almost more like an on/off. Which you use is completely up to you, many players prefer a linear volume pot for example, but I find that a quality logarithmic pot in both volume and tone positions offers more scope for adjustment, if using a quality pot that is! Low quality audio taper pots, in my experience, offer unreliable tapers, often not providing a even, gradual adjustment as you roll off or on. A guitar's volume and tone pot can bring out so many great sounds from your rig, it offers versatility to your sound, and I love pushing an amp hard and finding those sweet spots on the guitar's controls to really capture a great tone. So I feel that's why a quality logarithmic pot with a perfectly gradual taper is an incredibly important component in the electric guitar. 
George Delmetia Beauchamp is just as important as Leo Fender and Les Paul. His name may not ring a bell, but Beauchamp designed the first fully functional guitar pickup and secured a US patent for the electric guitar in 1937. The pickup, which converts string vibrations into amplifiable electrical signals, makes an electric guitar what it is; without one, there is no electric guitar. Beauchamp was also a founder of the popular Rickenbacker guitar brand alongside his friend and business partner Adolph Rickenbacker. Rickenbackers were often seen in use by both John Lennon and Paul McCartney in the era of the Beatles, also a go-to guitar for the classic rock sound of bands including the Who, the Eagles and Steppenwolf.
Modulating Offset: The output of solid-state amplifiers is directly connected to 2 DC power supplies through the output transistors. The instantaneous non-symmetry within the music waveform (particularly from the bass notes) is averaged as a modulating DC offset. This modulating offset is small, but it varies the efficiency of the speaker, introducing inter-modulation distortion, amplitude modulating the music. This problem is mostly eliminated by the trend to use an active sub-bass. In valve amplifiers the output transformer isolates the speaker from the amplifier electronics. No modulating offset can be produced.
Softer Delays: I'll usually have at least a couple of delays as auxiliary effects in a rock or pop mix, but I often find that bringing the general level of the delay as high as I want it makes any transients stand out too much. When I'm sending single notes on a clean electric guitar to a delay line, say, I tend to want to hear a wash of sound, not the rhythmic 'CHA-Cha-cha-cha-cha' of a repeated note attack. For this reason, I'll often put a gate or expander before a delay, with an attack time set to 10ms or so. This is enough to 'chop off' any abrupt transients, and makes the delay sound much smoother. Sam Inglis

Whether you’re in the market for an acoustic or an electric guitar will likely impact which brand you may want to purchase from. While lines like Fender and Yamaha offer both acoustic and electric instruments, a guitarist who plays strictly one or the other may prefer to stick to a brand that specializes in that category. A classical guitarist who strictly plays acoustic might gravitate Taylor or Fender for their world class offerings, while a member from a rock band might seek out Epiphone or Gibson’s time tested tone. Most brands will offer instruments in either option, but it's best to know beforehand which ones cater to your needs.
In 2003,[73] Gibson debuted its Ethernet-based[74] audio protocol, MaGIC, which it developed in partnership with 3COM, Advanced Micro Devices, and Xilinx.[73] Replacing traditional analog hook-ups with a digital connection that would, "...satisfy the unique requirements of live audio performances," may have been the goal of this project.[74] This system may require a special pickup,[73] but cabling is provided by a standard Cat-5 ethernet cable.[73][74]
Tremolo is a regular and repetitive variation in gain for the duration of a single note, which works like an auto-volume knob; this results in a swelling or fluttering sound. This effect is very popular in psychedelic and trip-hop music. The speed and depth of the flutter are usually user-controlled.This is a volume-related effects pedal. This effect is based on one of the earliest effects that were built into guitar amplifiers. Examples include:
Peterson, Jonathon (2002). "Tuning in thirds: A new approach to playing leads to a new kind of guitar". American Lutherie: The Quarterly Journal of the Guild of American Luthiers. 8222 South Park Avenue, Tacoma WA 98408: USA.: The Guild of American Luthiers. 72 (Winter): 36–43. ISSN 1041-7176. Archived from the original on 21 October 2011. Retrieved 9 October 2012.
Barely used in my home, NUX Cerberus multi pedal. Not a modeler, it has true bypass distortion, overdrive, modulations(chorus,flange, phase, univibe and trem) as well as delay and reverb- all completely programmable and can be used as a pedal board or as presets. Built in tuner and cab simulator- great multi pedal can be used as a fly rig or in front of an amp- Comes in the original packaging with power supply. US buyers ONLY- I will not ship internationally- No returns accepted
ESP LTD is a big name when it comes to the production of electric guitars and has been making quality instruments for over 40 years. The ESP LTD EC-256 Intermediate Electric Guitar is just another example of the genius of ESP LTD. The body of the guitar is mahogany and the neck and fretboard are made out of rosewood. There is also a TOM bridge and a tailpiece attached to this guitar. The pickups of this guitar are the ESP designed LH-150 set. It comes in two color options, black and metallic gold.
A tung oil-finished rock maple neck, and a slightly more curved fretboard radius of 13.75 inches are the other small modifications to the ‘speed’ features on the MD200. However, it has a thinner bolt-on neck as compared to the MD400’s wider mahogany set neck. That said, both neck profiles remain a shallow “C” shape, and the guitars’ dramatically beveled cutaways give you ample room to reach the high notes.

Little-known manufacturer from Osaka, Japan, this company is responsible for the oddly named John Bennet badge. Nakai has been mentioned as a possible Matusmoto Musical Instruments Association member in the past. The company still exists and is producing musical instruments, quite a feat in light of so many manufacturers who faded after the golden electric guitar age.


List of bass guitar brands that include the most popular and reliable models available. There is a lot to consider when looking for the perfect bass guitar for you. The body style, neck, scale length, tuning machines, intonation, fingerboard, number of frets, pickups and type of wood all make a difference in how your bass guitar sounds and feels in your hand. The most popular bass guitars include those from major manufacturers of musical instruments, including Fender, Yamaha, Warwick and more. Use this comparison of bass guitar brands as a guide when researching the best bass makers.
In 2017, Slash was named Gibson Brands' first Global Brand Ambassador. And to celebrate, Slash has designed his first Signature Firebird for Epiphone! Slash’s Limited Edition Firebird features the classic Firebird profile that has gone virtually unchanged since its debut in 1963 and is made with a AAA Flame Maple top and a 3-piece Mahogany body in a Translucent Black finish chosen by Slash. The traditional Firebird style pickguard is layered white and black and has Slash’s “Skull & Top Hat” log in red. The Mahogany neck is glued to the body with a deep-set neck tenon and has a standard 24.75" scale and a rounded custom "Slash" profile. The Pau Ferro fingerboard has single-ply cream binding with Pearl trapezoid inlays, a nylon nut, and 22 medium jumbo frets along with a 2-way adjustable truss rod. The back of the Firebird's traditional reverse headstock has Slash’s Snakepit logo in gold.
But in general, there's nothing wrong with Decca electric guitars, especially for indie musicians today who are looking for a vintage guitar with some character to it. Since most vintage guitar fans have seen every model that Gibson, Fender, et al, have ever made, many of the Japanese guitars of the '60s have a fresh look that stands out from the crowds. In 20 years, the M-i-J electric guitars of the '60s are going to be worth 4 or 5 times what they sell for now, and smart collectors who either can't afford Fenders, Gibsons and their ilk from that period, or who are interested in something more unusual, are already snapping them up.
Here’s the thing about acoustic guitars: those that use solid wood command a higher price than those that use laminates for their soundboard. Acoustic guitars that have a solid top are more sturdy and sound better as the wood matures. This is why solid wood models are usually more expensive, and also why they come highly recommended if you want to make a really good investment.

By 1968 (and probably with the union of Unicord), Merson and Gulf + Western, Univox amps had begun to employ a Japanese-made chassis in Westbury-made cabinets, still with the high-quality Jensen speakers. These combined tube output with transistorized components. They were covered with a black Rhinohide vinyl and sported a silver plastic logo with stylized block letters – initial cap with a little tail off the left followed by lower case letters – typical of the earliest imported Univox guitars, on the black grillcloth.

Many pedal builders will order their resistors, capacitors, IC, and other components in bulk online. Most of the time, this is a much cheaper method than buying single components – plus it gives you an enormous variety of components to use. It may also be wise to check out the circuit boards inside of any old electronics, or broken guitar pedals you no longer use. You’d be surprised what you may find.

they're both excellent guitars, and for jazz-only, and a little more money, the eastman was a little better. it had a bit more acoustic volume and sounded really killer plugged in. but, the godin is the one i ended up keeping. really, really versatile guitar. the tone knob has a wide range of usable tones. really a very articulate sounding guitar plugged in, especially with the tone a little more open. i play a lot of straight ahead jazz on it, and am very happy with the sound. i have always played it with 12 gague strings on it. again, it's not terribly loud unplugged, but the sound is great, and this is designed primarily to be used plugged in.


Featuring a comfortable neck and solid spruce top, the Epiphone Dove Pro Acoustic-Electric Guitar rings out with full, rich sound. Based on a design going back to 1962, the Dove Pro is equipped with a Fishman Sonicore pickup system that accurately reproduces its acoustic tone when you plug the guitar into an amplifier or PA system to play with amplified instruments. A terrific value.
I have a Les Paul Gold Top copy I bought new in the mid 70's. It has no brand name anywhere on it. I have done all the research I can and have found no conclusive results.I'm at a loss. It plays great! I do have pics. if that will help. Thanks for any help' It was bought in Montgomery Al. Clarence Carter's guitar player bought one while I was in the store so I figured ...must be a okay guitar. So I bought it. On the little square plate on the back it is hand engraved #0059. Thanks
One question I get asked incredibly often, specially from beginner guitarists is: “What are the best guitar brands.” It’s a pretty valid question given that in just about every industry there are brands that are known to be the most desirable and most reliable (not always at the same time) and therefore, the best. However, it works a little bit differently in the guitar industry. Sound quality often goes on par with price. Reliability is measured a little differently than say, cars, as most guitar companies easily make very reliable instruments. Finally, desirability is usually based on price, looks, artist endorsement and more importantly again, sound-quality.
While Line 6 is probably the best known high-volume preset modeling amp brand, Peavey isn’t far behind – and truly rivals the offerings of Line 6, both in quality and quantity. What’s especially intriguing about this particular amp is that it allows you to choose not just the amp models and a wealth of applicable effects, but that it gives you the power to choose the type of instrument you’re plugging into it – thusly shaping the rest of the options accordingly. Whether you play guitar, acoustic guitar, or bass, this amp can change it sound to suit the instrument. And that’s a lot more than other competitors’ amps have to offer. It also features a tap tempo, USB connectivity, a headphone jack, and more.
The Orange Crush PiX CR12L is still a relatively inexpensive option for a beginner amp. In terms of the basic features, it isn’t quite the best value on the market. However, it delivers a better made, better designed beginner amp at a very reasonable price. Beginners that can afford to spend a bit more, but want a standard beginner amp might find the extra cost worth it for the extra quality of the Orange Crush PiX CR12L.
Having a tuner on your pedal board is useful but these days I more often use a clip-on tuner, specifically the TC Electronic Polytune Clip (Buy at Amazon UK, Amazon US). I don't like the main signal to run through the tuner all the time if I can help it (I use the GigRig G2 switching system) but if you don't have that luxury, then look for a tuner with True Bypass like the TC Electronic Polytune 2 (Buy at Amazon UK, Amazon US) or use a Volume pedal that has a Tuner Output (many do these days!).
i think i have the exact same guitar as you do daniel. it's the same red into black faded with one pickup and no serial number tho. i'm looking everywhere for the exact model info etc. but i can't seem to find it either. i got it free froma guy i know and i had to replace the tuning heads, the strings and some of the ground wiring but now it's doing great. i love it. it has a really good sound for being so old!

At the higher end of the market, you will definitely want to consider theGibson Memphis ES Les Paul Studio. A stunning marriage of the ES hollowbody and Les Paul solidbody shapes, this is a model that combines playability, power, sustain and tonal warmth to perfection. Equipped with ’57 Classic and Super ’57 Classic pickups and boasting solid construction throughout, the ES-Les Paul Studio is perfect for anything and everything you could imagine. Each model is supplied with a Gibson Memphis hardshell case to get you out and about in style.


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“The tone thing is amazing because you can have one rig, have three different guitar players, and each guy can play the same exact thing and it’s going to sound different,” says L.A. Guns guitarist Stacey Blades. “It’s all in the hands.” Waara from Line 6 agrees. “Any guitar player will tell you, at the end of the day, it’s in your hands and you will sound like you will sound,” he says. The percentage of influence the hands wield is shockingly high.

When Jimi Hendrix came on the scene in the late 1960s, he was like nothing anyone had ever seen before. His ability to use volume, feedback, wah pedals, and other sonic devices to their maximum effect was awe-inspiring. Eric ‘God’ Clapton saw Hendrix for the first time and thought he would be the end to his career. There may be more technically impressive guitar players, but it’s hard to find anyone who played with more adventure or spirit than James Marshall Hendrix.
It’s ironic that Leo Fender, the creator of the most influential instrument in rock music, wasn’t actually a fan of rock ’n’ roll; he preferred country and western. But it goes to show you that once something new is out there, you can’t stop makers and players from reinventing it, adapting it for new purposes, taking it apart and putting it back together in new ways. The electric guitar is a prime example of unintended consequences. Initially, it just wanted to be a bit louder, but it ended up taking over and reinventing popular music and culture. Will we even recognize the sound of the electric guitar 10 or 20 years from now? I, for one, hope not.
Dexter Holland (b. 1965) is the rhythm guitarist of punk rock band The Offspring and has played Ibanez guitars for most of the band's existence. He currently uses a custom diamond plate RG with a custom Jägermeister logo on the twelfth fret, as well as DiMarzio Super Distortion pickups, though he used to use a brown and green custom RG and has been seen with a custom Purple RG.
I'm going to break the electric guitar setup guide into five parts, which are all in the links below. It's important to note that the five parts be done in the order in which they're presented. If you have a truss rod that's out of whack, it makes no sense to move on and adjust the bridge. I realize this may be painfully obvious, but for the one person who may not get it, I'm talking to you. Good luck
Classic 000 Martin copy by the great Yamaha Nippon Gakki factory in Japan, Here is a fine example , no structural issues no cracks and neck is excellent and plays with ease because it has great action, intonation is 100%, beautiful patina of a true vintage 40+ year old with great workmanship and materials this example has stood the test of time like few have its not new or mint of course it has been played but not abused and taken care of and maintained and sounds better than new with its well aged TONE WOODS these are 40+ years old but when made the woods were known to have been aged over 20 years then so this doesn't compare to a new Yamaha all of those factors make this a rare survivor. Fun to play because it sounds so good and is easy to play. Pics soon to come. Questions for Joe or ready to buy email me at: jvguitars@gmail.com .
Often, multi-effects pedals and processors can be more cost-effective than purchasing multiple stompboxes. They also avoid the potential noise and tone-degrading impact of chaining numerous individual pedals together. That said, many guitarists prefer the way certain dedicated pedals sound or operate, and will collect many single-effect stompboxes along the way. If you are looking at purchasing multiple effect units but don’t have any favorites, purchasing a multi-effects processor can be a money-saving alternative.
This company really does nothing for me. Hideous designs, cumbersome shaped guitars and the fact that they keep milking dime bags name just makes me feel like they don't have much else. There are definitely worse brands out there like first act and daisy rock (shudders) but I've always thought dean just always sucked as a metal guitar company and b.c. rich isn't to far behind them in my opinion.
If you do record the bass both via a DI and a miked-up cab, and combine them later, as suggested above, you’ll want to pay attention to the relative phase of the two tracks. Even if the mic is placed very close (an inch or so) to the amp’s speaker, that track will still be slightly delayed (on the order of milliseconds), due to that small distance, relative to the DI track. Small delays like this can cause comb-filtering when the tracks are combined (at close to equal levels), which produces cancellations and reinforcements in the frequency spectrum that can impart a nasal, hollow, or slightly “flangey” sound, weakening the tone. You can see the time difference if you line up the waves in the DAW and zoom way in. You can either advance the amp track (via editing) or delay the DI track (via editing or a plug-in) until the two line up—the resulting tone should be fuller, and ultimately sit better, with a more solid low end, in the mix.
He was no virtuoso, and that's the whole point: By snatching electric guitar from note-shredding technicians and giving it back to artists, freaks and poets, Kurt Cobain became one of the most important players ever. Cobain didn't invent alt-rock. But with his love of Cheap Trick, the Melvins and Kiss, he gave it the metallic power necessary to conquer the world. His playing wasn't all untutored squall, either: See the unconventional chord progression and mastery of quiet-loud-quiet dynamics on "Lithium" – and pretty much every other Nirvana song.
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Dissatisfaction with vintage units of this type usually centers around their limited gain, and their inability to sound truly fierce with Drive cranked up to full. The more exemplary users of this type of pedal, however—such as Stevie Ray Vaughan or Eric Johnson, who were both masters of early Tube Screamers—usually kept the Drive control in the lower part of its range, where the sound remains more natural and, yet again, serves as an excellent pre-boost to drive a good tube amp into distortion when the Level control is set high enough. Some players also find older pedals built to this design to have a distinct midrange hump, a slightly wooly tonality, and/or a lack of low end (as ever, depending upon the ears of the player you talk to). Consequently, a lot of newer makers have accounted for these in their redesigns. Visual Sound’s Route 66 pedal has a Bass Boost switch, Ibanez’s own recent-era TS9DX Turbo Tube Screamer has a Mode control that takes you from classic sounds to settings with more distortion and more low end, and plenty of other makers address both in their variations on the circuit.
While this isn't an exhaustive list, I think it covers the main pedals. Although others may disagree, beginners are unlikely to need to know about the others. We've tried to stock some of the most popular pedals in our store. So if you're still not completely sure what to buy, why not try one of those out? The pedals we sell are inexpensive but great sounding alternatives to those mentioned above.
Semi-hollow guitars can be seen in the hands of many guitarists who have especially signature sounds. For example, John Scofield has been playing the same Ibanez AS-200 since 1981! Larry Carlton helped define the sound of the ’70s as one of the top call session guitarists of all time, and did it with his Gibson ES-335 (in fact, Carlton is known as Mr. 335). John Lennon, Gary Clark Jr., Jack White, Dave Grohl — guitar titans past and present use semi-hollow guitars.
Both Kirk and James have a long and fruitful relationship with ESP. KH-2 is just one of many Kirk Hammett signature models which are available. It is also one of the most refined. The guitar is a beast, to put it simply. It has the range, the output and the finesse to push just about any playing style. Although I only briefly played it, the guitar left me in awe. Everything was smooth, easy to reach and just comfortable.
000-15: Base model of the upper end Martin Guitar line. All mahogany orsapele construction. ‘A Frame’ “X” top bracing, 14 frets clear, Optional model 000-15S 12 frets clear. All -16 and -16 series 000 instruments have long scales (25.4″) and 1-11/16″ nut widths, in contrast to the -18, -28, and -45 series, which have the ‘traditional’ 24.9″ 000 scale, retaining the 1-11/16″ nut width.
Ten is not enough. If you are not here for the first time and you already checked our article on the top acoustic guitars and the recommended electric guitars you know how we roll.And if we are going to review a lot more than just 10, why not split them into proper categories that will help you choose what is working best for you. As it will take a lot of time to write all these for you, please be easy on us. For the people that do not want to waste that much time thought and just want a quick list with some great effects we prepared the comparison charted listed below:
Beside learning the basics, avoiding modeling amps and multi-effect pedals in the beginning will allow you to focus on the few basic effects every guitarist needs along the way – Reverb, Chorus, Delay and Compressor. Reverb is a must, and most amps have onboard reverb effects. Once you begin to get the hang of playing guitar and wrap your head around those basic effects you can branch out to other effects and modeling amps.
Now, instead of just containing part of the sound completely, the tone knob is hooked up to a capacitor. The capacitor doesn't let everything through. Basically, it starts with the highest frequencies, letting them through to be contained rather than go to the amplifier. The more of the signal you send to the capacitor, though, the more of the spectrum it is forced to let through, meaning that more and more of the high end of the continuum is let through - the rest of the current is sent back and is let out through the line to the amp.
Finally, their taper. Taper refers to the gradual increase or decrease of the pots ohm as you adjust it. There are two types of pot taper, Logarithmic (Audio) and Linear (Lin). The human ear hears in a logarithmic manner, so in a gradual increase or decrease, whereas linear, to our ear sounds almost more like an on/off. Which you use is completely up to you, many players prefer a linear volume pot for example, but I find that a quality logarithmic pot in both volume and tone positions offers more scope for adjustment, if using a quality pot that is! Low quality audio taper pots, in my experience, offer unreliable tapers, often not providing a even, gradual adjustment as you roll off or on. A guitar's volume and tone pot can bring out so many great sounds from your rig, it offers versatility to your sound, and I love pushing an amp hard and finding those sweet spots on the guitar's controls to really capture a great tone. So I feel that's why a quality logarithmic pot with a perfectly gradual taper is an incredibly important component in the electric guitar. 

WOW! This thing is incredible. One of the nicest instruments we have ever played and we've had, played and sold a few hundred over the past 20 years! Can't say enough about this bass. It's a pre-owned Zon Legacy Elite series 5-string model featuring a beautiful book-matched solid Bubinga wood top over a solid Mahogany wood body. A solid graphite neck / fingerboard utilizing a sculpted body neck joint finishes off the basic construction of the instrument. Huge tone is delivered via 2 active Bartolini pickups that feature controls for volume, bass, midrange, treble and balance. This bass has had the electronics modified by Zon to move the midrange control from the access hole in the back cover to a matching pot located in the control section on the front of the bass. While at Zon to get the custom electronics installed,  the original owner had new frets and a new finish coat added. Figured as long as it was there "what the heck". Tuning is accomplished via the 5 German made Schaller tuning machines in the same gold plate finish as the solid cast bridge. The solid graphite neck features a full 2 octave neck with 24 frets and a 34" long scale. This bass is a dream to play! Just about as good as it gets. There's not a mark on it anywhere. It looks brand new! Rock solid and stays in tune. Set up perfectly! Includes original Zon Soft exterior hard shell case on black Cordura.
SOLD OUT: Here we had a beautiful vintage 1972 Harmony Monterey Mandolin it's an A style and is totally near mint! Beautiful classic Teaburst sunburst on a AA figured solid spruce TOP its in top condition and has really great vintage patina look to it. It's burst color is perfect match to a 60s Gibson it's very Cool US vintage It's Top is nicely figured and has lots of 3-D Birdseye figured back sides & neck all it's bindings are clean with patina and it plays perfectly and has excellent volume and a nice woodsy tone everything is like new includes a hard shell case it's just $449.00 this is a real bargain for US vintage piece of history and is in such all round fantastic shape. It Plays as beautifully as she looks! ,,, Let me know if you may have an interest in it it's super nice..
Bottom Line: The Line 6 HD500X is incredibly in-depth in the amount of options and editability it gives you. Doing all of it from the small screen on the actual unit is headache-inducing, but if you have a computer you can hook it up via USB and edit your sounds from there much more easily. There’s more of a learning curve with the HD500X than there is with the Zoom G3X, but the presets are decent enough and allow you to audition it if you’re the impatient type. Where the HD500X lacks is that it’s less of an immediate-gratification pedal, and it’s hard to tweak on-the-fly and come up with potentially inspirational sounds. Because of how the interface is, this is definitely more of a “sit down with headphones and tinker with it to get your perfect sound” type unit. If the effects quality of the Zoom G3X is a 7/10, the Line 6 HD500X is an 8.5/10. This is the one to get if you’re the type that likes to dig in and have control over every little thing. The price tag is a little on the high side, but considering what a powerhouse this unit is, it’s definitely not unreasonable.
Featuring a small scale neck, the Squier by Fender Mini Strat Electric Guitar comes with three single-coil electronic pickups, with solid and intuitive master volume and tone control. The neck of the guitar is made of C-shape maple wood design, whiles the rosewood fretboard holding the strings and containing dot markings is designed in a manner that makes it easy to strum.
These are the most-used "building block" effects, and in combination, there are an infinite number of sounds you can make. The best thing to do is spend some time and analyze the sounds of your favorite songs and players. Once you have figured out that sound, head to your local store and give them a try. Then come back to Reverb to find a great deal! What were some first pedals that you found yourself loving when you got them?
In other words, it will slather the tone with raw dirt without affecting the core of the signal. A lot of people mistake fuzz pedals for distortions due to their more aggressive nature, but these beasts of old are definitely unique. One of the best examples of what a fuzz box sounds like is the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff Pi – a fuzz pedal whose circuitry gave birth to countless other models.

The Ibanez RG series is basically synonymous with shreddable metal music. Inspired by the classic JEM series of the glammy 80s rock years, this GRGR120EX guitar is perfect for the guitar player who aspires to be a real metalhead. The body is made of solid alder and it comes with a slick black binding. There are two super-high-output, extra-snarly Infinity R pickups that will respond well to overdrive and distortion pedals. Moreover, a rosewood fingerboard with classic Ibanez sharktooth inlays and sharp black hardware make this guitar look like the real deal.
Epiphone is one of the oldest and one of the best American guitar companies. It was formed in 1873 and later acquired by Gibson Guitar Corporation, another leading guitar brand. Epiphone has something for every player in every genre. The company offers a wide range of Acoustic and Electric guitar models. The nylon-string Les Paul Ukulele acoustic guitar is of famous vintage and has been the industry leader over the years. It is a superb instrument for the money featuring a mahogany body and neck with rosewood fingerboard having dots inlays. Epiphone guitars have a great demand in the Indian market, which has set standards for the budget-conscious versions of guitars.
For those of you out there with a stereo or home theater system, you'll be fine as long as you run the audio directly from the xbox through that. But since I have neither, I was stuck. I ended up bringing down my old CD player from my bathroom, just to see if that would work. SO much better. But since I didn't want to leave that ugly thing sitting under my TV in my living room I went out and checked around for speaker prices. After the money spent on the game and the guitar, I didn't really want to put too much more money into this. I ended up with a Turtle Island headset for $40. It seems to be doing the trick. Just be prepared for this extra expenditure if you don't have an external speaker system in place.
There are only two Amazon reviews for this instrument, as it is at a higher price point than other guitars, but the reviews are very positive. The rich tone of the cedar as well as the ability to take this classical guitar into the world of electrical pickups makes this a fabulous option for the musician looking to upgrade to a more professional-sounding instrument.
You'd mentioned that the bridge pickup is substantially louder on Telecasters than the neck. I have an American Standard so the relationship between the two might not be identical but I was able to make the volume levels comparable by raising my neck pickup substantially so that only about a half inch of space remained between the string and the pickup. They're now about equal volume and if anything the front pickup sounds better and more defined as a result.
Launch price: $1,699 / £1,006 | Body: Laminated mahogany, semi-hollow | Neck: 3-piece mahogany/maple/mahogany | Scale: 24.75" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 2x LB-1 humbuckers | Controls: Bridge volume, bridge tone, neck volume, neck tone, 3-way selector | Hardware: Guild Tune-o-matic bridge with rosewood base, Guild vibrato, Grover Sta-Tite open-gear 14:1 tuners | Left-handed: No | Finish: Cherry Red, White, Black
Zen guitar is not about scales and memorizing chords. Instead, it is a masterpiece of why to play guitar, helping you get through the times where learning guitar gets frustrating, and believe me, it will at some point get frustrating. But if you can get through that and push on, you’ll be rewarded with mastery of an instrument that will give you personal fulfillment and a lifetime hobby that brings achievement and satisfaction.

After I published that blog post, a number of beginners wrote to tell me they had a higher budget and would actually like me to recommend some better beginner guitars than those you typically find in starter packs. When I dug deeper, most told me they had a max budget of about $300 for the guitar alone, and weren’t interested in all-in-one starter packs. They wanted a really great (but affordable) guitar and wanted to shop for amps and accessories separately. I further confirmed this with a little informal poll on Twitter:
If you’re one of those “I plug directly into the amp and don’t need no stinkin’ guitar effects pedals” kinda dude, then godspeed and thanks for stopping by. On the other hand, if you own a pedal board upon which you trip the light fantastic, stick around — this list of guitar effects pedals you must have will validate what you might know, illuminate what you don’t know, and quickly help you generate a massive and highly versatile sound palette.
The Seagull S6 is another very popular choice for those looking for an affordable but great sounding acoustic. Owners claim it sounds as good as guitars in the $800-$1500 range. The S6 has a cedar top with cherry back and sides. It features a wider nut, which means this guitar will be a great choice for those playing finger style or that have larger hands. Owners of this guitar are singing it’s praises, saying that they have no regrets. The sound of this guitar is big, yet soft. Described as being “alive” with tone. Seagull has been making quality guitars at an affordable price for many years, so the S6 will not disappoint. See more on this guitar here.
The Alvarez AG75CE is on the upper range of $500 acoustic guitars. This particular model is a cedar top with rosewood back and sides. It also features scalloped and forward shifted bracing which makes for a bigger sound. Owners of this guitar are posting rave reviews citing it’s quality of build and great tone. The cutaway is a nice feature for those that want to reach the upper register of the guitar, and it looks cool too! It is a grand auditorium body, which does not quite have the bass of a dreadnought but offers a more balanced sound. Great for singing along. This guitar is a great choice for intermediate players looking to not break the bank.Check it out here.
By the way, the Dobro Hawaiian lap steel shown in Gruhn/Carter, with volume and tone and the rectangular string attachment, is a slightly later version probably from early to late ’35. Volume controls were added to these electrics early on, but tone controls and adjustable height pickups weren’t introduced until early in ’35, although tone controls don’t appear on Supro guitars until ’38.
A very good option in the budget pedal market. Comes with a great number of effects to combine for solid sounds. Virtually all the factory pre-sets are worthless and are sort of demonstrations of what the pedal can do. But you have plenty of user saves and setting up good tones is straight forward and simple. The tuner in this and my handheld one never agree. Someone is lying!
They began as an independent musical instrument company in 1873, in part of the Ottoman Empire which is now part of modern day Turkey, making stringed instruments such as lutes and fiddles - they relocated to the United States in 1903.. The founder's eldest son, Epaminondas Stathopoulos took over the company after his father passed away and later renamed the business to Epiphone Banjo Company in 1928 to rebrand the company and emphasize the fact theat they had changed to making more popular stringed instruments - the same year they first began making guitars. The name comes from 'Epi' which was Epaminondas' nickname, and the Greek word 'phone' meaning sound.
Solid state systems grew in popularity in the 80s and 90s, as the digitization of audio signals posed a more reliable and less expensive alternative to tube amplification. In recent years, however, many guitarists have been willing to fork over a little extra scratch to get their hands and their ears on the sounds of the past, on the warm tones that the computers can't seem to capture.
One problem with adding a tweeter to a bass speaker cabinet is that the tweeter may be damaged by the overdriven amplifier tone that is popular in some musical genres, since overdriving the amplifier adds a great deal of high frequency information to the signal. Horns and speakers in the same cabinet are sometimes wired separately, so that they can be driven by separate amplifiers. Biamplified systems and separately-wired cabinets produced by manufacturers such as Gallien-Krueger and Carvin and other manufacturers allow bassists to send an overdriven low-pitched sound to the speaker, and a crisp, undistorted high-pitched sound to the horn, which prevents this problem. Since the 1960s, some bassists have obtained a similar result by plugging their bass into both an electric guitar guitar amp and a bass amp. This approach does not use a crossover, but since an electric guitar amp will only produce pitches down to about 80 Hz, the guitar amp reproduces the mid- to high frequencies and the bass amp reproduces the low frequencies. With this arrangement, distortion and other effects can be applied to the guitar amp without affecting the solidity of the bass amp tone.
Martin’s first era of flirtation with electrics ended with its GTs, and, in terms of American production, wouldn’t resume until a decade later. However, in 1970 Martin joined the growing list of American manufacturers to begin importing guitars made in Japan, introducing its Sigma series. In around 1973, Martin, like competitors Guild and Gibson, began importing a line of Sigma solidbody electrics made in Japan by Tokai.

While fan-braced modern classical Torres and post-Torres style instruments coexisted with traditional ladder-braced guitars at the beginning of the 20th century, the traditional forms eventually fell away. Some attribute this to the popularity of Segovia, considering him "the catalyst for change toward the Spanish design and the so-called 'modern' school in the 1920s and beyond."[5] The styles of music performed on ladder-braced guitars were becoming more and more unfashionable; and, e.g. in Germany, musicians were in part turning towards folk music (Schrammel-music and the Contraguitar), but this only remained localized in Germany and Austria and became unfashionable again. On the other hand, Segovia was playing in concerts around the world, popularizing his modern classical guitar, as well as a new style of music in the 1920s: Spanish romantic-modern style with guitar works by Moreno Torroba, de Falla, etc. Some people consider it to have been this influence of Segovia which led to the domination of the Torres instrument. Factories all over the world began producing them in large numbers.

The road toward becoming a better guitarist is paved in… books? It certainly can be, although there are plenty of routes that both beginners and professionals take to improve upon — and bone up on — their craft. The books on this list are about history and technique. They’re books that you’ll pull off the shelf for years to come to look up a vintage guitar you’re curious about or a chord progression or song you’ve been meaning to master. You may find additional inspiration reading the autobiographies of your favorite guitarists, but we decided to leave those off this particular list. If you’re in the market for a good guitar book, read on.


Each brand has its own distinctions, benefits, drawbacks, and niche which it appeals to. Most guitar players are loyal to one particular brand for one reason or another. Even the style and image associated with the instrument comes into play heavily, here. For example, consider the image cultivated by Jimi Hendrix and his Fender Stratocaster. Not only did he expand the realm of tones that everyone thought the guitar was capable of, he made this particular model his own. It’s an iconic guitar that will always be associated with Hendrix and the blues.
What makes it truly stand out is the infinite Reverb this pedal provides. If you’re looking to get an all-around “stomp-box” featuring everything you ever wanted with remarkable sound output, this work of art by EH is designed to make you never think about getting another Reverb pedal. It can fit in any form of setup, and it is destined to conquer your flavor.
In the early 1960s Rickenbacker history became forever wedded to one of the biggest music upheavals of the 20th century: the invasion of the mop-top Beatles from Liverpool, England. The Beatles used several Rickenbacker models in the early years. Before the group broke up, John Lennon would own at least four. This love affair began in Hamburg, Germany in 1960 when he bought a natural-blonde Model 325 with a Kauffman vibrato. Lennon played the original (which was eventually refinished black but still easily identified by its gold-backed lucite pickguard) on all Beatle recordings and in all concerts until early 1964.
*The expensive Fender USA hardware (supposedly genuine, purchased at Guitar Center San Marcos CA), which includes the 2-point delux strat tremolo, big-apple scratch plate, Sperzal USA tuners, Graphtech nut, and pickup selector. These items should all combine to sound awesome, and coming from a reputable supplier and for the price I paid I would expect to be identical to what is found on a USA standard or delux Fender.
As obvious as it sounds, a tuner (or tuning pedal) is fundamental for your rig. It can also act as a mute switch for changing guitars between songs. These days there are many smartphone apps for tuning your guitar – as well as clip-on tuners – but when you need precision and a clear visual indication of the pitch of your strings, nothing beats a good old tuning pedal. The Boss TU-3 is a classic tuning pedal with lots of useful settings – alternatively, you can check out the CPT-20 by Harley Benton which features true bypass connections and a super large LCD display. Need a smaller footprint? Try the Mooer Baby Tuner!
by pedalhaven Band board (2x THE VALUE) post from  @ahmcginnis  &  @rdmontgomery85 ! Don't forget to DM/Tag us to submit your photos! ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️  #pedalhaven   #pedalboard   #guitarpedals   #knowyourtone   #ambienttones   #pedalboards   #pedalnerds   #pedalporn   #guitar   #gearporn   #gearnerds   #pedalboardpeople   #shoegaze   #geartalk   #guitarsdaily   #gottone   #tonefordays   #guitargear   #reverb   #gearpost   #boardshot 
These soundfonts were started by converting some presets from the gig files using cdextract demo and then altered using Viena, Swami and SF2Comp. The gig files are better as they contain more samples and a better variety of presets that were not possible in the soundfont format. For instance, I could not include the Fender reverb samples as the release samples would all play at the same volume no matter where in the envolope the key was released. So, if you have a chance you would be better off to use the gigasamples. They can be used in LinuxSampler of which is free and runs on windows and linux. Some people need samples in sound font format though, so I have created these samples out of the same samples that I used for the giga samples. I also have an impulse response of the Fender Reverb that I made with voxengo for download on the Other Stuff page so you can use that if you want to get the reverb sound with the soundfonts. At the moment I use Freeverb3 for realtime impulse in windows and Jconv in linux.

If you do find yourself at a concert and there’s not a Fender onstage, there’s an exponential chance that there will be a Gibson – if not both. Getting their start as a small mandolin manufacturer in Kalamazoo, Michigan in 1902, the brand eventually went on to start building guitars, inventing the archtop style of guitar by using the same building techniques as violin manufacturers. In the 1930s, Gibson had made their first electric guitar, but it wouldn’t be until 1952 that the brand would unveil what is still their most popular and iconic guitar ever built: the Les Paul. Now based out of Nashville, Tennessee, Gibson’s storied history is littered with the presence of some of the greatest guitarists of all time, including B.B. King, Chuck Berry, Slash, Jimmy Page, Pete Townshend of the Who, and Angus Young of AC/DC.
After you have the hang of mono and stereo miking, room miking, and air guitar, you may be ready for the final frontier of El Gtr exploration. The time-consuming technique that I call "multisourcing" combines all the aforementioned methods, multiplied by the infinite possibilities created by splitting the guitar output and sending it simultaneously to different amps (using, for example, a Whirlwind Selector splitter box).
Last and not necessarily least, consider the ever-popular closet and sound blanket trick. This involves a speaker cabinet, a closet or large cupboard, and at least a pair of the thick, padded blankets normally used professionally for sound insulation or by moving companies (quilts and regular bedding blankets are ineffective). You'll lose some speaker "air" and room interaction, but you'll be able to crank the amp and avoid unwanted noise complaints. Assuming the blankets are properly placed, the volume level should seem no louder than that of a distant stereo system blaring at someone's party.

The company’s craftsmanship and innovation remain unmatched. Aside from their traditional ranges, Gibson also offers seriously high-tech instruments. This Mashable review of one of the brand's most revered models lauded not only its full-bodied tone but also Gibson’s penchant for taking risks. Its modern-take-on-an-old-icon kind of thinking allows it to constantly raise the bar—and the prices too, unfortunately.


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Jazz guitars are big bodied, often semi-acoustic, and designed to coax out some wonderfully rich, warm tones. Historically, jazz was played on acoustic guitars. However, in the days before amplification, the guitar often became lost in the mix of the big band sound. Until, that was, the introduction of arch top acoustics. Containing a magnetic pickup, arch tops ushered in a new era of guitar manufacturing. This meant that players could be heard in the way they wanted.


Sounds great. Compact and good looking. Easy to use. Extremely versatile! Make sure you read the instructions because there are so many things you can do with this. Only drawback is that if you plan to use it live, try not to have too many effects applied because it slows down the transition timing. However, best for recording if youre trying to produce specific sounds from your instrument.
The numbers listed here show the LAST serial number produced for that year. Martin produced all guitar serial number sequentially. These serial number apply to all Martin guitars, flat top and arch top. It does not apply to ukes (except for the first year, they do not have a serial number). Does not apply to Martin mandolins either (they have their own serial number system).

This mod is a little different—and definitely not as affordable as the ones we’ve been talking about up to this point. When players think about modifications that involve tuning machines, the subject revolves around tuning stability. That’s all well and good, but I’ve rarely encountered a quality machine that slips—because the mechanical torque required to turn the tuner’s capstan is pretty stout. Problems of pitch are usually more related to capstan wobble or a bad nut-slotting job.
Great info. I found an interesting connection when researching a recently-acquired Intermark Cipher, as it's said here to be a Teisco, yet it bears a close resemblance to a model of Pleasant, which was credited to the obscure Shinko Musical Company. I wish i could post pics, but essentially, both have the Teisco-like headstock, identical pickups with off-white covers and square pegs, body shape is virtually identical except for the upper cutaway having a slightly different contour, the Pleasant having one more pickup and larger pickguard, both having switches above the pickups. I came upon a drowinginguitars video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8-vhvYBy6os) describing in the video description how Kawai (-Teisco?) bought the "Pleasant Guitar Co." (Shinko?). This video isn't the model I have, my Cipher resembles the Pleasant sel-220.
Launch price: $999 / £899 | Type: Amp modeller/multi-effects pedal | Amp models: 33 | Effects: 42 | Connections: Standard guitar input, minijack stereo aux input, standard main outputs (L/Mono, R), XLR main outputs (L/Mono, R), standard stereo phones output, standard Send (L/Mono, R), standard Return (L/Mono, R), MIDI in, MIDI out/thru, USB, expression pedal | Power requirements: Mains power (IEC lead)
Most 700 and 800 models, except for bass and probably 12-strings, were equipped with a vibrato bar. After 45 years or so the bar has gone missing on many of them. Some model 820s were equipped with a genuine Bigsby vibrato. The advertisement at left features the Bigsby-equipped Model 820. The advertisement on the right is identical except that it showed the stock Kent vibrato tailpiece. According to the catalogue of the time, the Bigsby was only available on the sunburst model 820.
Over 20 years, Ovation produced some very interesting guitars. Not only do the American models feature innovative technology that alone makes them worth seeking out, they really handle nicely as players, despite their rejection at the time. Some were ahead of their time. Most were out of step with it, as well. After two decades of failed attempts to market solidbody (and some hollowbody) electrics, Ovation did what other companies who failed to successfully cross over from the genres that brought them their fame. In ’88, Ovation purchased Hamer guitars. Ah, but that’s another story…
The overall design of the JS11 Dinky is a streamlined and straightforward, it is basically a less contoured version of the Dinky with cost-effective parts, assembled and built overseas. But don't count it out yet because many found it to exceed their expectations in terms of looks and tone. The 25.5" scale maple neck, flat 12" radius fingerboard and 1.6875" wide nut also makes it a pleasure to play, and have made life easier for both students and experienced players alike. The high output Jackson designed humbuckers are also good enough for high gain playing, although most got great results by switching them out.
The initial single-pickup production model appeared in 1950, and was called the Esquire. Fewer than fifty guitars were originally produced under that name, and most were replaced under warranty because of early manufacturing problems. In particular, the Esquire necks had notruss rod and many were replaced due to bent necks. Later in 1950, this single-pickup model was discontinued, and a two-pickup model was renamed the Broadcaster. From this point onwards all Fender necks incorporated truss rods. The Gretsch company, itself a manufacturer of hollowbody electric guitars (and now owned by Fender), claimed that “Broadcaster” violated the trademark for its Broadkaster line of drums, and as a newcomer to the industry, Fender decided to bend and changed the name to Telecaster, after the newly popular medium of television. (The guitars manufactured in the interim bore no name, and are now popularly called ‘Nocasters.’) The Esquire was reintroduced as a one-pickup Telecaster, at a lower price.
Neck Construction – The neck part of the guitar includes the fretboard and headstock. The tuners are mounted on this part of the guitar. The width and profile of the neck affects the playability of the guitar. Most necks are either “C” or “U” shaped. In most cases, the fretboard is made from a thin layer of rosewood or ebony, but some guitars have maple necks. Fretboard have position dots and other inlaid markers that assist the player. There are generally 3 types of necks – bolt on, set neck and neck through.
“I was getting really bored with this guitar sound—or lack of an interesting sound,” Davies remembers. “There was this little radio spares shop up the road, and they had a little green amplifier in there next to the radios. An Elpico. I twiddled around with it and didn’t know what to do. I tried taking the wires going to the speaker and putting a jack plug on there and plugging it straight into my AC30. It kind of made a weird noise, but it wasn’t what I was looking for.
Yet, there’s still a lot to like about the JS140. First, the use of solid basswood for the body of the guitar is a plus, despite the fact that basswood is plentiful and affordable. While it’s typically used in economy guitars (like this one) its tone is quite good, providing a thick low end with a punchy mid range. As tonewoods go, it’s a decent compromise.
Most people who use this alternate tuning method change the pitch of the sixth string only, the low E, from E to D. This is frequently used for Rock songs when you want a darker tone, such as with Heavy Metal. In addition, dropping the E string two steps to D means that you can play power chords with one finger. Some people also drop the first string (high e) down to D, resulting in D-A-D-G-B-D.
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Unlike distortion or overdrive, fuzz is meant to not sound like an amp at all. It is meant to add harmonic content and transistor-like goodness to your tone. Fuzz boxes were used extensively in the 1960s to create an over the top distortion sound. Many times fuzzes will completely change the sound of your amp, so be careful and really focus on buying one that has the sonic makeup you are looking for. Hendrix, Cream-era Clapton, and Dan Auerbach are well known fuzz users.
Anyways, it sucks to not have a camera to show stuff or even a way to measure stuff I'm describing. I'll have to obtain a few small things to set it up. like a saddle and an allen wrench that doesn't suck. Probably whatever caliper or shim they use to do real setups as well. Maybe latter frames just have tilted bridges after a while. I don't really know. The bridge is rather thick. If you lower the bridge, do you just sand it?
I have had some dog bad guitars! You and every one passes up Rickenbacker. I just dumped mine, I had two in my life they are bad out dated guitars. I saw people come in a store to buy one, they play one with a great Fender amp and walk out with some other brand. You do not see and of the greats play them. The sounds of the 60's is not a Ricky. Look for them and you will only see old photo of Lennon play one, no solos!

James Burton, another famous Twin user, put it best: “If you can plug your guitar into an amp and make it sound good, that’s what it’s all about. The amp I really enjoy playing, especially when I’m traveling, is the Fender ’65 Twin Reverb. It’s got everything you need for live playing and it has great tone. That amp just works for me and it’s real trustworthy. When I travel on the road, I do use a little digital delay and maybe a little chorus, but I just like the sound of the guitar and playing something that I think people will appreciate and understand.”
I too have a similar Alvarez made in Japan, 4 digit model no. etc. Mine is a 5059 autumn heringbone model and there is actually a production date on the tag in the sound hole of 1978. The tag is identical to yours as is the headstock logo inlay. Tuners are different however. Based on the similarities to yours I would date it around the same years, '77-'80. I know the model name due to an Alvarez advertisement clipping that depicts the model I have. I too am getting ready to do some much needed TLC to mine as it has been my most loved acoustic for 20 years now. It was a gift from my mother who used it in a country band way back when. These are great guitars that can be bought very cheaply when you can find them. Good luck with the search!

Born in Australia, Stephanie Jones is one of most promising guitarists of young generation. She started to learn guitar at Wembley Primary School in Perth when she was 11. In 2010 Stephanie started her studies at the Australian national University and she graduated with First Class Honours in 2014. After winning several guitar competition, Stephanie was awarded an Australian Music Foundation Scholarship, which included a performance at Wigmore Hall in London. She has performed extensively including two Australian tours, a New Zealand tour, and with the Weimar Guitar Quartet, a Germany tour. Currently Stephanie is studying a Masters in Classical Guitar Performance with Thomas Müller-Pering at the prestigious University of Music Franz Liszt.

Fender, or the Fender Electric Instrument Manufacturing Company, as it was properly known, was started in 1946, in Fullerton, California, by Leo Fender. The early designs effectively wrote the book on the solid body guitar manufacture; his approach of simple guitars using quality parts, easily assembled (most specifically the replaceable neck) proved an immediate sucess. Guitars like the Fender Stratocaster, Telecaster, Jaguar and Precision bass have barely changed since their very first inception; Fender simply got it right first time round.
In the guitar’s electronics, the potentiometer and capacitor form a path to ground. The capacitor presents lower impedance to higher frequencies, and vice-versa, so the tone control works by “throwing away” high frequencies. How much of the highs get thrown away is determined by the tone potentiometer, which presents an equal resistance to all frequencies. As you turn down the tone, you decrease the resistance presented by the pot. Low frequencies still find this path to ground to be a difficult one (high-impedance) because of the capacitor, but high frequencies see an easier path than the one into the amplifier (which traditionally has a fairly high impedance load in the transistors of the “pre-gain” stage, around 1Megaohm), and to they take the easier path, reducing the presence of high frequencies that are amplified and output as sound.
According to the Amazon page for this guitar, the item weight is 18 lbs, but that’s likely due to the inclusion of the case. There are no other reviews of this instrument, but just keep in mind that with a spruce top guitar, you’re going to have higher, clearer treble sounds than with a cedar top. Also, compared to higher-priced guitars from the Ramirez workshop, this particular model—considered an “entry” model—is a bit more affordable, which was Amalia Ramirez’s aim in reviving the 3N series.
The best ones are the ones that sound good to YOU and inspire YOU to play better, no matter how old they are, what’s in them or how many features they do or don't have. It follows that there are thousands of possible “best” amps from any number of brands, from old to brand new, that can fit this description. You just have to find the right one that fits your particular needs. Brand names don't matter so much as features here, so that’s why I'm not going to mention them specifically.

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To produce Music and create the melody man has invented some musical instruments. In this process he has created the Guitar. Guitar is the instrument in which by the vibrations of the strings we can amplify the music. It’s an instrument having “a long, fretted neck, flat wooden soundboard, ribs, and a flat back, most often with incurved sides”. The melody produced by Guitar is also depends on the better finishing of its parts and strong pickups. That’s why it’s a vital task to select the best quality of guitar.
Located in Kobe, Japan, this manufacturer made the famous Maya brand guitar. Maya guitars were in production from 1970-1980. It's been suggested that Maya may have been responsible for the Aztec badge. You'll notice that Maya has been attributed to a company known as Tahara. At this point I do not know if Maya assisted in production or if Tahara produced some Maya guitars as a subcontractor. Maya and El Maya badges have also been attributed to Chushin Gakki. More research is needed to clarify this point.
Hum in pedalboards is usually “ground loop hum.” You have two paths to ground, your audio ground and your power supply ground. You could use an expensive power supply with isolated grounds. But all you have to do is break one of the ground connections. You could disconnect the audio ground at one end of each of your patch cords. Or better, if you use one power supply, connect the hot and ground to only one of your pedals. Clip the ground wire on all the other pedal connections in your daisy chain. The power connections will then get their grounds through the audio grounds. No more hum

Great article. Thank you!However I've had a lot of experience with Squier guitars. They often come in at $200, sometimes on sale for $129 but I live in a college town and have had many Squiers. All have very sharp fret ends which discourage beginners not knowing they must be filed. IDK about any of the others but this is my only complaint. Squier quality and playability (after fretwork) is amazing at that price point.

This is the Autumn Brown El Dorado. The finish is outstanding, and it’s also very easy to handle at only 7 lbs. We used 24 extra fat frets. Dual humbuckers provide the sound, and it comes with a whammy bar. We used gold hardware to complement the nice finish. Like other Big Lou guitars, this one features our 1 7/8″ nut width and 8mm string spacing. The construction involves a “set” neck, so it can’t be swapped out, but the factory is ISO9001 certified, so this guitar is a very high quality instrument. Considering the price at $379, it’s a great value. I really tried to keep the cost down, but that arched top costs a small fortune to build. If you can make a statement by playing, that’s the best. But if your still in training, this guitar will make a statement just sitting there. I took the first one off the assembly line for myself. I had to have it.
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Regarding truss rods, all vintage Martin instruments post-1934 have *non-adustable* truss rods (T rod). This means the neck better be straight, otherwise an expensive repair will be in order. To check neck straightness on a guitar, first tune the guitar to pitch. Then hold the low-E string down at the 1st and 14th frets. Note the distance between the bottom of the low-E string, and the 7th fret. You should be able to put a medium guitar pick in this space. Any more, and the neck is "bowed". Any less, and the neck is "back bowed". Repeat this with the high-E string (the same results should be seen; if not, the neck has a "twist" to it).
• For the fifth insert (leave the fourth empty), go to Distortion/AmpSimulator and click on the plug‑in's edit button. For the Amplifier Model, select Crunch, and try the following parameter values: Drive at 8.7, Bass, Middle, and Treble all at 5.0, Presence at 6.2, and Volume set to 5.0. For the Cabinet, select Cabinet 2, with Lo Damping at 38 and Hi Damping at 35.
According to Michael Wright of Vintage Guitar magazine, Univox itself has a rather convoluted history. Though it was a part of the “lawsuit era” of the ‘70s, Univox wasn’t just another copy manufacturer out of Japan. It’s a bit more complicated than that. The firm was created from a joining of multiple companies that had a few other name brand guitars – Hagstrom, for one – under their corporate umbrellas.

Mic placement is pretty crucial. You can get a million different EQ responses depending on where you throw the mic in front of the cab. I personally have the best luck - or at least I think so - when I back the mic off a little bit. I know a lot of engineers throw it right on the grille to get the bass boost, the proximity effect and all that garbage, but I find that if I back it up about six inches, I get a more balanced EQ curve.
Note: All versions and platforms of Rocksmith are compatible with the Real Tone Cable. It is a required 1/4-inch audio jack cable necessary for Rocksmith to detect and respond to your guitar playing. All versions of Rocksmith include the Real Tone Cable in the box, except downloaded versions and the Rocksmith 2014 Edition "No Cable Included" Version.
The Fender Deluxe Players Stratocaster Electric Guitar gives you classic Strat sound and feel in a beautiful package. This luxurious model is upgraded with American-made Vintage Noiseless pickups, medium-jumbo frets, and a 12" neck radius. As a result, it sounds fantastic and plays easy. It also is equipped with a push-button pickup switch (in addition to the usual toggle) that gives you 7 pickup combinations. Other deluxe features include a vintage-style synchronized tremolo, vintage-style tuners and gold-plated hardware throughout.

The 2019 Gibson Les Paul Standard sports a mahogany back with an artisan-grade AAA figured maple top and a mahogany neck with Ultra-Modern weight relief. This chambering technique is provides a solid core through the center of the guitar, retaining the classic Les Paul sound and making the guitar less prone to feedback. The Ultra Modern weight-relieved body also makes playing long sets a breeze. The neck has an asymmetrical Slim Taper neck profile for increased playability and comfort.

Two and one half steps down from Drop D. This tuning is most often used by death metal or deathcore musicians, such as Suicide Silence or Whitechapel (both use seven-string guitars and tune down the seventh string a full step). Utilized by bands like Nile, Motograter, Thrice, Filter (on the songs "Columind" and "The Missing" from The Amalgamut and "Drug Boy" and "The Trouble with Angels" from the album of the same name), Dead by April, RED, Ill Niño (on Dead New World) and occasionally Slipknot, Crowbar, Amon Amarth, Five Finger Death Punch, and Parkway Drive. Trapt uses this tuning on their songs "Hollow Man" and "Waiting".
Catalan guitar is most well recognized as being extremely romantic, often with a slow tempo and careful attention paid to tone quality, note sustain, and voice leading. In contrast, Catalan guitar can also be brilliantly virtuosic, with tempi in excess of 160 beats per minute. Unlike flamenco's improvisational tradition, Catalan guitar music is composed and meticulously notated.

Semi-hollow designs are similar to hollow-body guitars, but typically feature a thinner body with a central wooden block inside. This helps to control feedback while giving the instrument some of the same tonal characteristics as a hollow-body. This type of guitar has been used successfully in just about every genre of music, with the exception of extreme metal.
For a relatively new band, Dream State have - in industry parlance - gained some serious frigging traction, playing Reading/Leeds last year, gobbling up streams in the millions and signing to hardcore label par excellence UNFD. Lead guitarist Aled does a deft line in a tapped arpeggio, while breakthrough single White Lies covers a hell of a lot of ground in its four minute runtime - combining Marmozets’ urgency in its opening and Deftones’ dynamics at the close. 
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