Originally started as a replacement parts shop in Japan, ESP Guitars – which stands for Electric Sound Products – got their guitar manufacturing business off to a rocky start here in the United States. They were taken to court by Gibson guitars for producing instruments that too closely resembled the American brand’s guitars. But, they settled out of court in 1978 and ESP’s reputation eventually grew, thanks in part to George Lynch, the guitarist for the 80s metal band Dokken, and his signature axe pictured here – The Kamikaze Model 1. Now, ESP guitars are wildly popular amongst metal and hard rock clientele and you can hear their instruments on the records of some of the brand’s loyal artists – including the likes of James Hetfield and Kirk Hammett of Metallica, Page Hamilton of Helmet, and the guys in Children of Bodom.
Ovations reached the height of their popularity in the 1980s, where they were often seen during live performances by touring artists. Ovation guitars’ synthetic bowl-shaped back and early use (1971) of pre-amplifiers, onboard equalization and piezo pickups were particularly attractive to live acoustic musicians who constantly battled feedback problems from the high volumes needed in live venues.[citation needed]
Recently while cruising around EBay I was able to find pretty strong evidence that the 700 and 800-series Kents were made by Kawai. Or maybe... the necks of the 700 and 800-series Kents and the Kawais were made by the same manufacturer. I don’t know if Kawai kept the factory that made Teisco operating after it was acquired. It appears that Kawai had more experience building hollow-bodied guitars than Teisco. So I call the 700 and 800-series Kents Made by Kawai. You can call them Made by Teisco if you want. Of course, the possibility exists that they were both made by an entirely different company. Who knows? The 1960’s were like a ‘wild west’ period of Japanese guitar making.
Most lo-fi amplifiers in the 40s and 50s produced unexpected distortion or overdrive tones at higher volumes. Guitarists quickly discovered that the Fender Tweed Champ (originally marketed to beginners as the Champion 800 in 1948) produced a distorted sound at high-volume levels thanks to the Champ’s low power output and simple circuitry. Many of the classic guitar solos in the 1950s were recorded through a Champ, which resembled a wide-panel TV cabinet covered in tweed cloth. Leo Fender even went so far as to manufacture the first 100-watt amplifiers for surf guitar pioneer Dick Dale, who had blown hundreds of Fender amps and speakers from regularly turning up the volume.

The LP-100 is among the most affordable, but also the most popular Epiphone models. It is the quintessential beginner guitar. Epiphone Les Paul-100 brings you that classic aesthetic in a package that is affordable and capable of sounding rather great. While it’s not something you’d want to do a world tour with, this Epiphone is perfect for beginners and intermediate players.
The same no-compromise attitude that gives the Newporter Player its uniquely killer vibe extends to every aspect of its construction. It features optimized bracing for reduced mass and superior resonance, a Graph Tech - NuBone nut and saddle for greater sustain and a Fishman preamp system that makes it easy to plug in without sacrificing the guitar's natural sound. Its lightweight mahogany neck features a comfortable, easy-to-play, slim-taper "C"-shaped profile suitable for any playing style, and its walnut fingerboard and bridge further augment this instrument's vibrant tone.
The very first production electric guitar was the Stromberg Electro, developed by Hank Kuhrmeyer and introduced in 1928. It was pretty much a kludge. It was an acoustic guitar with a magnetic pickup fitted to the soundboard... Stromberg/Kay Instruments made a resonator version of this, too. The weight of the pickup, though, destroyed the guitar's soundboard over time.

I have $100 guitars that play and sound great. I have $15,000 guitars that play and sound great. That said, a great middle of the road guitar that won't break the bank is an Epiphone Masterbilt. I find them to sound remarkable AND play great, ESPECIALLY for the money. I like buying guitars used and save about half from the retailers. A good used Masterbilt will cost about $300 on Ebay or Craigslist.
I was buying my first acoustic guitar ever in my life, and I'm happy to say I picked this store. When you walk in you pretty much feel that you're in another world filled with music and color in contrast with the cloudy days of Seattle. I researched a little on their website before coming in to see what guitars were within my price range, what type of finish and strings. I said to the guy who greeted me at the door: "I'm looking to my buy very first acoustic guitar." And felt a little nervous not knowing anything about playing. Handed him my note card of guitars and he led me into a practice room where he brought the guitars I was interested in and played them for me (since I had zerrrrrooo experience) so I could hear the tone of the guitars. He was very professional, and also took his time making sure that I picked a guitar that I liked. Even gave me a little history about where they are made and how the company sources their wood, etc. Very nice! I forgot his name, but he had curly blonde hair. (If you read this, Hi! And thank you). In addition, an instructor, Ted, who works there also offered me a free first lesson and have been taking lessons since then. The people there are all welcoming and have a real passion for what they do. It's always fun going by their store. Check it out! Please respect their bag policy if you are asked to leave it with them while you are in the store... if you don't feel comfortable, then leave your guitar at home. Easy.
If you choose, every hole is drilled for each component, including neck, bridge, pickguard and strap button mounting holes. If you choose the optional snap together wiring, then no soldering is required; all electronics connect together with easy to attach connectors. We have done most of the hard work for you! The body needs finish sanding only but should require no filling.
Eddie Kramer has a slightly different approach, working from a familiar setup of favourite close and ambient mics (including the Beyerdynamic M160 ribbon mic) and then mixing them together to taste. "I use a three-mic technique: an SM57, an MD421 and an M160, all in a very tight pattern. Then I can pick and choose the tone quality, because each mic is totally different. I combine these together, and then I put a U67 away from the amp to get the ambience."
At the current time, the questions who really invented the electric guitar and why can’t be answered straightforwardly, as there is no clear answer to them. On the one hand, some people argue that the electric guitar was invented in 1931 by George Beauchamp with the help of Paul Barth and Harry Watson. At the time of the invention, Beauchamp was the general manager of the famous National Guitar Corporation.
Since 1971 Hoffman Guitars has provided a full range of services to guitar players nationwide.   We have always worked to provide the finest in instrument repair services and handcrafted guitars.  We provide a full range of repair services, including factory authorized warranty service for C.F. Martin, Gibson, Guild, Fender, Taylor, Jim Olson and others.  I (Charlie Hoffman) have built over 600 individually handcrafted guitars, which are (or have been) played by such players as Leo Kottke, Tim Sparks,  Dakota Dave Hull, Ann Reed, Jerry Rau, Charlie Maguire and others.  In addition, we carry a fairly complete range of accessories for guitar players (strings, picks, capos, pickups, cases, etc, etc.).  In this day and age it may seem a bit anachronistic but we really believe in customer service and strive to provide the very best.
One question I get asked incredibly often, specially from beginner guitarists is: “What are the best guitar brands.” It’s a pretty valid question given that in just about every industry there are brands that are known to be the most desirable and most reliable (not always at the same time) and therefore, the best. However, it works a little bit differently in the guitar industry. Sound quality often goes on par with price. Reliability is measured a little differently than say, cars, as most guitar companies easily make very reliable instruments. Finally, desirability is usually based on price, looks, artist endorsement and more importantly again, sound-quality.

Jump up ^ DeCurtis, Anthony (1992). Present Tense: Rock & Roll and Culture (4. print. ed.). Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press. ISBN 0822312654. His first venture, the Phillips label, issued only one known release, and it was one of the loudest, most overdriven, and distorted guitar stomps ever recorded, "Boogie in the Park" by Memphis one-man-band Joe Hill Louis, who cranked his guitar while sitting and banging at a rudimentary drum kit.
In the earlier days of My Chemical Romance, Iero mainly used Gibson SG's & Epiphone Les Paul guitars (most notably his white Les Paul nicknamed 'Pansy' which proved popular amongst his fans but has since been broken while onstage) and Marshall amps. He has since switched to using Gibson Les Pauls (with the Neck Pick-up removed) and occasionally uses a Gibson SG. He also used a Fender Stratocaster in the Desolation Row video. He has recently collaborated with Epiphone to design the Wilshire Phant-O-Matic guitar which he used onstage for the My Chemical Romance 'World Contamination' Tour, the Honda Civic Tour and for the Reading and Leeds festivals.
The combination of Slash’s rough-edged pyrotechnic solos and Izzy’s raw power chords and off-kilter rhythms resulted in an unusual mish-mash with massive crossover appeal that metalheads, punks, glam poseurs, pop fans and classic rockers loved alike. Slash and Izzy also made vintage guitars cool again, strapping on Gibson Les Pauls, Telecasters and ES-175 hollowbodies when most guitarists were playing DayGlo superstrats, pointy metal weapons or minimalist headstock-less Stein-bortions.
The #1 cause of fret wear is the fretting hand pressure exerted by the player.  I have some clients that grip very tightly and wear frets quickly (Rob Fahey), and some that grip very lightly and take forever to exhibit significant wear (Jasan Stepp, Dog Fashion Disco/PolkaDot Cadaver).  Fret material hardness, string hardness and frequency of use all contribute to wear as well, but hand pressure is still the leading cause since frets do not wear themselves out.  Technique is different for every player, unique and personal and habits can be hard to change.  Just like brakes in a car, how hard and how much something is driven directly impacts wear and longevity.  Please see the refrets page for further thoughts on this topic.
When you dream of playing guitar, how does it all happen in your mind’s eye? Perhaps using a guitar app like Uberchord (click to download) to learn? Or are you shredding an awesome heavy metal guitar solo, sliding on your knees across a vast stage in front of thousands of adoring fans? Do you imagine a more intimate setting, jazzing up a storm in some exclusive New York nightclub? Is it amazing the crowd with your brilliant finger-picking at the Newport Folk Festival?
Not everyone has the luxury of drum booths and separate rooms, but isolation boxes are great for isolating guitars during a rhythm track recording. They are also ideal for home recording, allowing a good  volume level without disturbing neighbours. Isolation boxes are commercially available, but can be expensive; try making your own from wood and foam.
There are a lot of choices out there for the prospective buyer of a fine guitar. It's no secret; a handmade instrument can cost a lot. For that matter, any of the better guitars purchased from a quality manufacturer is going to command what most people would consider to be a lot of money. Are there compelling reasons to spend your money on a handmade guitar from a custom builder rather than from a brand name factory or custom shop? There certainly are! … [Read More...]
For example, in the guitar (like other stringed instruments but unlike the piano), open-string notes are not fretted and so require less hand-motion. Thus chords that contain open notes are more easily played and hence more frequently played in popular music, such as folk music. Many of the most popular tunings—standard tuning, open tunings, and new standard tuning—are rich in the open notes used by popular chords. Open tunings allow major triads to be played by barring one fret with only one finger, using the finger like a capo. On guitars without a zeroth fret (after the nut), the intonation of an open note may differ from then note when fretted on other strings; consequently, on some guitars, the sound of an open note may be inferior to that of a fretted note.[37]

12. Once your wiring loom is complete, install it in the guitar, and reattach the pickup and ground wires. Test the guitar through your amp and make sure everything is working. If it is, congratulate yourself on a job well done. If it’s not, check that you’ve wired everything together properly. Also, check your solder joints and redo any that aren’t shiny or look a little iffy.
A great app for playing and basic editing of general midi files is Sweet Midi Player which includes a lyric viewer for midis with lyrics/chords. You can load one of the General Midi SoundFonts above to greatly improve the sound quality. For Windows PC use the free program Coolsoft VirtualMIDISynth to install a new GM SoundFont (Get the latest version 2.1.0 for Windows 10).
The electric guitar setup routine is as important to your sound as any component on your instrument. In addition, if you learn how to setup your guitar correctly you can save some money by not running down to the local guitar shop, and paying them to do it. I want to preface that I am not an expert on the building of guitars. I did not go to the "Fender/Gibson school of Luthier excellence". I am however someone that's built a dozen electric guitars, and have setup everyone of them. Additionally I've setup probably fifty more guitars, including acoustics, for friends, and friends of friends, who found out I've got some practical experience in the matter.

Here we have another very Beautiful and rare "The Aria Model" Vintage Japanese F style Mandolin with such amazing tone!!! nearing 40 years old these are AMAZING! This is the rare " The Aria" Model M700 as seen on the Classic inlay in the headstocks Gorgeous Brazilian Rosewood veneer is a super beautiful Japanese example of the highly revered F style mandolin made famous by Gibson. These older models were put out during the 1970s this example was 1973. These premium examples have become so popular with Players & Collectors over the past several years now. The inlays on the neck and headstock and the classic violin sunburst on this model are simply gorgeous! The top is solid tight grained old growth Sitka spruce and the back & sides are premium AAA figured & flamed maple, the neck is Mahogany This particular M 700 is in very good condition with some minimal wear from playing please refer to the pics for those details. The original case and pick guard are also still present and do come with this fine instrument the guard is simply off for now. With the resurgence in popularity of Bluegrass and other music styles utilizing the wonderful Mandolin sound in recordings and live performances these rare Gibson Replicas vintage mandolins have been steadily increasing in popularity and in value because players are catching onto the great old high end vintage Japanese instruments now so the demand has risen accordingly. If you're looking for a great Vintage Mandolin that is extremely well made with top craftsmanship utilizing top the grade AAA woods that have now aged and have a wonderful vintage patina to them these are the affordable Japanese vintage F Mandolin alternative choice to a $5000.00 - $10,000 vintage Gibson F-5 ..thats why many Pros today are seeking the best vintage for a great deal. This Old Aria M700 is simply a great one!.
Replacing switch and jack covers. These are the plastic or metal covers that hold the jack and tells you witch switch is treble or rhythm. The switch cannot be repaired and will need to be replaced, however, a metal jack plate can never break and only will need to be cleaned. A plastic plate will need to be replaced or the screw holes need to be resized, do so properly and make sure every fastener is snug including screws and nuts.
MMh, for years I had a tone control in my Framus ES copy that followed a similar combo idea. I got it from the Rockinger.de site and it might have had a Bill Lawrence conncetion. (Have you tried his q-filter?) It replaced the cap with an inductor AND had the other end of the sweep connected to a regular, but smaller, cap. So you could go either thick tone or thin, but you could not bypass it all. That would have required an extra switch.
If you’re a player performing live or in a studio, all of this is just the opening pre-credits sequence to your signal then being captured via a microphone, which then sends current through another cable to a mixing board, which then has its own preamplification, equalization and filtering, which either goes to the power amplifiers of a public address system or to some kind of recording device, which then involves…aw, I’m getting tired, and I think we’re getting the point: how can anyone call *any* of this “natural”? Does *any* of this occur in nature? Does any of this sound like we’re carving a flute from driftwood or clapping a couple empty coconut shells together?
Leo Fender started Fender Guitars in 1946, and his first innovation was the production of solid body guitars. Up until then, electric guitars were made with hollow bodies, meaning that they were somewhat fragile and somewhat complicated in design. Leo Fender’s guitars offered a more straightforward design; the were bodies made from one solid block of wood and the bridges were simply attached to the body, removing the need for extra calibration of elevated bridges.
Over the years, Muddy has famously criticized EM, but around the time of its release, he seemed to have a different attitude. Blues fans claim he always hated it but the following proves otherwise. Six months after EM, the same line-up reassembled and recorded a sequel called After The Rain (1969) that still has distortion on it but isn't as overtly psychedelic. If Muddy hadn't liked EM, he would have had enough say at Chess to dismiss a follow-up, but instead he went along with it. In fact, Pete Cosey says "I'll never forget as soon as I walked into the studio for the follow-up and Muddy saw me he threw his arms around me and said ‘Hey, how you doing, boy, play some of that stuff you played on the last album." After The Rain's songs alternate between Chicago blues and distorted guitar tracks. There's a marked difference on After The Rain with Paul Oscher (harmonica) and Otis Spann (piano) from Muddy's old band joining in and Muddy playing lead guitar on several tracks. On the Chicago blues tracks, more prominent bass and drums put the music into a rock setting, but it's Muddy's slide guitar playing that highlights them. Muddy really let's loose with some striking, tenseful slide work on tracks like "Honey Bee," "Rollin and Tumblin" and "Blues and Trouble" that just send a chill through your bones. On the other side of the album, the guitar on "Ramblin Mind" lashes and cries out in dense fuzz while on "Bottom of the Sea," the fuzzy leads seem to hang in the air along with an innovative bowed bass and harmonious organ in the background (the bowed bass is also used on the record on "I am The Blues").
Since it was originally introduced in 1975, the Destroyer has become an icon of that era's chapter in rock n' roll history. Over the years it has undergone many incarnations and the perennial classic returns once again. The body and neck of both guitars are made of a tight Mahogany for maximum resonance. The bound rosewood fingerboard is adorned with Jumbo frets. The Destroyer also features Sure Grip III control knobs for no-slip control. It's not called the Destroyer for nothing.
I have an acoustic that I bought from a lady I know who said she has had it since the early 70's. It says 'Maya' on the headstock and the reinforcement rod cover is stamped with 'Takamine'. The sticker inside the sound hole says 'Maya', "We made this guitar for the people who love guitar music", Made by Takamine, Model No. TF1o1S, Japan. On the inside of the sound hole at the top, the wood block there is stamped with 46.6.3. The guitar is only about 3 1/4 inches deep and approx. 15 inches wide at its widest spot. Small guitar with a big beautiful sound.
If you’re looking to get this pedal as a first in your arsenal, then don’t worry at all, you can keep it simple with the offered Reverb dial as it offers high-quality effects which you can tune to your liking. This astonishing “stomp-box” by TC covers guitarist’s needs who possess different ranges of experience, all available at a fantastic startup price.
Building a rare 4005 Rickenbacker takes the hands of a master. And this master has not only built one but also created the "Jazzblaster" line of custom guitars with bodies that resemble Rickenbacker and necks inspired by Leo Fender. He also builds custom basses. "I like building beautiful things," he says. A few of his custom guitars were recently picked up to be shown to rock star royalty like Tom Petty, Lindsay Buckingham and Joe Walsh. He's played and repaired guitars. Steve Stevens, Green River Ordinance, Rocky Athans and Eric Clapton have sought out his services. He's even touched one of Jimi Hendrix's legendary axes.

Automatic Track Creation & Loop Recording: A new layer (track) is created each time you start recording and each time a Riff loops. Stack layers on top of each other (bass, guitar, vocals) to create a Riff. Use looping to create multiple tracks, do multiple takes, etc. Each layer has controls for mixing and effects. (4 tracks with T4, 24 tracks with Standard)
The Legacy’s vintage-spec CLF-100 Alnico V pickups have that unmistakable chime and quack reminiscent of the best examples from the late ‘50s, thanks to the work of Paul Gagon, G&L VP Engineering. Gagon found his inspiration reviewing original prints stored in Leo’s private laboratory at G&L, but that was just the start. About 30 years ago, Gagon was an R&D engineer at another company when he was tasked with finding out what was so special about the early bolt-on guitars many players raved about. Gagon tirelessly analyzed many examples of what were considered holy grail guitars, spending time out on the shop floor talking to builders still working in the pickup department since the ‘50s, all on a quest to discover where the real mojo was – and wasn’t. What he learned from the builders matched his own engineering analysis. You see, back in the day, the actual spec of pickups coming that down that old production line varied considerably. That meant coming up with the right specs for the Legacy pickups was more challenging than simply following the prints. Gagon’s persistence paid off as the Legacy garnered rave reviews from both players and magazines like Guitar Player and Guitar World.

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Solid state systems grew in popularity in the 80s and 90s, as the digitization of audio signals posed a more reliable and less expensive alternative to tube amplification. In recent years, however, many guitarists have been willing to fork over a little extra scratch to get their hands and their ears on the sounds of the past, on the warm tones that the computers can't seem to capture.

This Duo-Jet has the typical brown back and neck finish, original tuners, bone nut (which has never been off), ebony fingerboard and original frets, lefty thumbprint inlays, original Pat. Applied For Filter’Tron pickups with original wire harness including switches and capacitors. All solder joints are original. Original bar bridge. The lefty Bigsby tailpiece does not appear to be original to the instrument, and is probably a late 60s Bigsby, as there are screw-holes from another tail-piece on the bottom. The second to most recent owner acquired the guitar with its current tailpiece in 1971, and the only change he made to the Bigsby was in removing the black paint. The guitar was recently sent to Curt Wilson at Old School Guitar Repair(www.oldschoolguitar.net) at the recommendation of Gretsch guru, Edward Ball, where the front of the headstock was refinished to the correct black(previously Orange) and the center portion of the Bigsby was repainted black. Sadly, the previous owner removed and discarded the original lefty pickguard many years ago.
When jazz guitarists play chords underneath a song's melody or another musician's solo improvisations, it is called "comping", short for "accompanying" and for "complementing".[citation needed] The accompanying style in most jazz styles differs from the way chordal instruments accompany in many popular styles of music. In many popular styles of music, such as rock and pop, the rhythm guitarist usually performs the chords in rhythmic fashion which sets out the beat or groove of a tune. In contrast, in many modern jazz styles within smaller, the guitarist plays much more sparsely, intermingling periodic chords and delicate voicings into pauses in the melody or solo, and using periods of silence. Jazz guitarists commonly use a wide variety of inversions when comping, rather than only using standard voicings.[3]
My first guitar, bought out of an advert in Kerrang over 20 years ago. I think it was branded "Axe" and it had absolutely nothing good about it. Some sort of MDF body, horribly bowed neck (couldn't be adjusted as the truss rod was broken), high frets everywhere (you could pull them out with your fingernails, fortunately), slipping tuners, hopeless bridge, hopeless nut, everything. Nearly put me off playing before I'd got started.
1. striking the string creates the vibration and once it disrupts the magnetic field on the pickup that's it - how about when you don't strike the string at all, like when you tap on the body of the guitar? The vibrating wood imparts vibration on the strings, which in turn do their thing on the pickup. The body of the guitar, the nut, the bridge, every part of the guitar is now directly influencing the sound you hear out of the pickup. Remember, only the magnetic field disturbance is being amplified, and tapping the guitar has started the strings vibrating. How can that happen without the wood's tonal qualities affecting the waveform?

The offset waist guitar was a later development in guitar history.  Getting away from the straight-laced and semi-symmetrical “T” and “S,” the Jazz Style was a whole new animal. A complicated electrical circuit provides much more variance and tone that its straight-waisted brethren.  This style of guitar is one of the most unique and complex guitar designs out there and has graced the shoulders of artists such as Elvis Costello, J. Mascis, Thurston Moore, and many more.


The electronic transistor finally made it possible to cram the aural creativity[when defined as?] of the recording studio into small, highly portable stompbox units.[citation needed] Transistors replaced vacuum tubes, allowing for much more compact formats and greater stability.[citation needed] The first transistorized guitar effect was the 1962 Maestro Fuzz Tone pedal, which became a sensation after its use in the 1965 Rolling Stones hit "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction".[41][42]

In this article you will learn the basics of guitar effects pedals so you will be better prepared to choose the right analog stomp boxes and digital effects to complement your sound. I’m not going to spend too much time on the science of how effects boxes do what they do. But I will do my best to explain, in plain English, the basics of each effect.
During the 1930s and 1940s several companies tried to produce a solid-body electric but none of them were commercially successful. Then Leo Fender released his design in 1950 with a single pickup under the name Esquire, then added a second pickup and sold it under the name Broadcaster but soon had to change it due to a lawsuit from Gretsch who were already selling a drum kit using that name. Thus the "Tele" as we know it today was born.
Boost/volume pedal: A boost or "clean boost" pedal amplifies the volume of an instrument by increasing the amplitude of its audio signal. These units are generally used for "boosting" volume during solos and preventing signal loss in long "effects chains". A guitarist switching from rhythm guitar to lead guitar for a guitar solo may use a boost to increase the volume of his or her solo.[59]

Mijn first guitar was a Epiphone by gibson sg, it was all right, then I got my gibson sg special(Around 550e), really good guitar, huge difference with the Epiphone. My next was, believe it or not another Epiphone, a Casino limited edition with bigsby, best price/quiality guitar ever(I paid 430e), beautiful guitar, and next week I’m getting a Fender Telecaster American vintage 58′(1755e), I’m very excited about it. I also own a Fender jazz bass classic 70s, it’s a mexican which plays like an american, very proud of this bass. First rate guitars are normally the best, you pay for the quality of the materials and the workmanship and experience, but there are exceptions with second range guitars, you can get very good ones, just good models or plainly good guitars, it’s nice to own both kind of guitars.

The Boss Katana KTN-HEAD Amp Head has become one of the most talked about amplifiers as it features the coveted Waza technology found in the beautiful BOSS Waza Craft Pedals. The same care and attention that goes into these pedals has gone into the BOSS Katana head to produce a versatile and highly  aerticulate amplifier. Packed with Five unique amp characters: Clean, Crunch, Lead, Brown (derived from the Waza amp), and Acoustic (for acoustic-electric guitars), the Katana head ensures you have enough sonic diversity for all genres. You can choose from 55 BOSS effects and load 15 on to the amp via BOSS Tone Studio editor software and you can actually use it without a cab thanks to the monitor speaker - making it a great practice amp that you can use to get your sound and hook up to a cab later on at your gigs.
I just built this kit, which I ordered directly from Mod DIY. Its the first pedal kit that I have built, although I do have a fair amount of electronics experience. Overall, I was impressed with the kit. All the parts were included, and functioned just fine. The instructions were outstanding, particularly if you use the high-res picture of the inside of a finished model for reference. There was ONE step omitted in the direction, which was to solder a short wire between terminal 3 of the toggle switch to connection 12 on the junction rail. But that was easy to spot.
Loved this guitar a lot😘, been going back and forth to our nearest guitar center and to he honest with you, I tried the Taylor gs mini, MartIn Black electric acoustic, Breedlove electric acoustc, but man, when I tried and started playing this awesome Ibanez AW54CEOPN, I was blown away!!! The sound was loud and cleat the tone was awesome, the color was fantastic! For the price of $299.00 was very cheap for the quality and sound that this guitar can offer👍🏽👍🏽👍🏽
Recently picked myself up a second J28SCDL Jumbo, which was set up beautifully and I have to say it truly is an amazing guitar. It could give some of the higher priced guitars a run for its money. Lovely sound, creative design and clearly a lot of guitar for your money. I seriously encourage you not to over look Washburn when looking for a good guitar at an affordable price. Might end up your favorite guitar!
Getting the right amp for your acoustic electric guitar is definitely something you want to think about. You can have a guitar that sounds stunning when plugged in, but not so much when playing acoustically. Reversely, you can also have a guitar that sounds absolutely beautiful acoustically, but sounds like a tin can when plugged in. Sometimes, this is just due to plugging into the wrong amp.

The Roland Blues Cube Artist looks and sounds the part of a vintage tweed tube era amplifier, but the innards tell a different story, being a solid-state amp with Roland's Tube Logic technology. And for something with tube amp modeling and USB direct recording, the amp comes with a streamlined set of features, having just two channels, clean and crunch, both of which have boost switches. Interestingly, this more traditional setup helped the amp score high points from users who want a pedal friendly amp that has the feel of tube without its usual drawbacks. Giving it a bit of an edge over older amps, is its built-in power attenuator that lets you lower the power rating from 80W down to 0.5W. For a bit of tone experimentation, the amp comes with a "dual tone" switch for blending the two channels in a way that's musically pleasing. Roland also equipped this amp with tremolo and reverb that complements its simple setup. Finally, the Blues Cube Artist lets you expand your tonal palette via its swappable "tone capsule", which is an analog component that you actually switch out to give the amp a different sound. There are currently three available tone capsules, two of which are artist signatures from Eric Johnson and Robben Ford, and the third one being Roland's own rendition of the Blues sound.

I don't need freaky pointy demon guitar graphics or anything like that.....this $249 Agile makes my mouth water. For the price of two cheap pedals or one great pedal it's a guitar that you could work with. Ibanez makes the stylish P90 Jet King for about $375...If I were on a tight budget I'd rather have the basic Agile. Yes I'm aging! Get off my lawn you Jet King kids!!


The F-65 was the top of the line with two equal cutaways. Other than the bookmatched cutaways, this was the same as the two-pickup F-55, with the addition of a Bigsby-made Martin vibrato in which the stylized “M” had become a similar “V” shape. Probably the strangest feature of the F-65 was the fact that the heel of the neck did not change from the single-cutaway models, creating a sort of thick chunk of body extending up to the 14th fret. The first F-65 was #179834. 1,825 F-65s were made from 1962 to the summer of ’65.
“What’s the best multi-effects pedal?” is a question that comes up again and again in guitar and bass forums and discussions, and for good reason! There are a lot of multi-effect pedals out there, with prices and features varying drastically from model to model. With multi-effects pedals, it’s a little bit different than something like distortion pedals. With distortion, there might be 50 different manufacturers each making a single distortion pedal. With multi-effects, there are only around 5 major manufacturers (Zoom, Line 6, Boss, DigiTech, TC Electronic), but they each make 10 models of multi-effect pedals. This can make choosing the best one tough for beginners and advanced players alike. Luckily, we’re here to help, and after a ton of research and play testing, we’ll help you decide what the best multi-effects pedals on the market are, no matter your budget and needs.
The latest in a grand lineage of guitar-based Kings, Marcus [pictured, top] has - without exaggeration - the chops to bear that weighty association. Mentored by ‘Uncle’ Warren Haynes, he was personally tipped to us by Kenny Wayne Shepherd and leads a band of formidable players that seem able to turn on a dime from Miles Davis jazz jam to blues and searing Southern rock. 
When I first tried multisourcing, on a solo project by Club Foot Orchestra guitarist Steve Kirk, I used an air mic, a direct source (Manley tube DI box or speaker emulator output from Kirk's Marshall JMP-1 tube preamp), a close mic on a clean-sounding Fender Princeton amp, and close and distant mics on a cranked-up Marshall cabinet (see Fig. 2). And that was just for the first rhythm track! As you may imagine, mixing was a lot of fun, and after that day there's been no going back to the old SM57 shoved up against the grille cloth. If you dare, you can take it from there. The only limitations are your time, the guitarist's patience, and available tracks. Oh yes-and lots and lots of mics.
Before you start thinking your pickups can kill you, bear in mind this is a very small signal (2 volts) that requires amplification (this is where your aptly named guitar ‘amplifier’ comes into play). To put things in perspective, the little rectangle shaped batteries (D) found in distortion pedals are 9 volts…as mentioned it’s a very small signal.
Aside from tuning issues, new bass strings, especially roundwounds, can be very bright, and this may result in a lot of finger noise and fret buzz. If they’re changed a day or two before the session, and the bass is played a bit to break them in, there may be less likelihood of problematic noise. In fact, while many players think of them as old-school, flatwounds can sometimes be the best choice, when a fat deep bass sound is called for—it’s worth a thought.

As a result of the improvements to PA systems and monitor systems, bass players in the 2000s no longer need to have huge, powerful bass amplifier systems to play stadiums and arenas. Instead of playing with two 8x10" bass stacks and one or more huge, powerful bass heads, in the 2010s, many bass players perform at large live venues with relatively small and less powerful bass amplifiers. The reason they can do so is that most higher-priced 2010s-era bass amplifiers usually have DI output jacks that can be patched into the audio snake cable, and then plugged into the mainstage mixing board and amplified through the PA system or sound reinforcement system.
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