However, amplifiers can also be quite loud. Maybe you’ve got a fancy one, big enough to make everyone in a bar cover their ears. Or maybe you don’t have one at all, and have been playing on acoustic guitar. Either way, you may not have known that you can simulate the trademark sounds of famous amplifiers using something you probably already have: a computer. Using your computer as an amp isn’t too complicated, and it opens up a world of possibilities that the analog audio world can’t deliver on a budget. Some newer practice amplifiers have headphone jacks so you can play without making a racket, but those are only starting to become widespread and the majority of hobbyist electric guitar players would rather spend big money on a good stage-ready amplifier than a mediocre one to accompany their practice amp. If you’re an electric guitar player looking for a way to practice quietly or with headphones, this is the tutorial for you. You will need: An electric guitar A computer running Windows XP or better (Windows 7 or newer preferred) An instrument cable (both sides quarter-inch and mono, same cable used to plug guitars into amps) A ¼-inch to ⅛-inch mono adapter

Tony Visconti is also into using ambient mics: "I'm very much a fan of the room sound, too. I always record it if it's a real heavy rock guitar with power chords and crunches and all. I'll go around the room and clap my hands and I say, 'Put the mics there, that's it.' Quite often, I'll turn the room mic towards the studio window, and you'll get a reflection of the guitar sound — not directly facing it, because you're looking for reflections." Although he states in the same interview that he'll try to use a pair of U87s for ambience if possible, he's also mentioned elsewhere using PZM mics as an alternative.
Signature guitars in India provide a convenient way to cherish the same guitar experience, reminds you of your favorite artist. These are specified guitar models named after the top guitar players, and designed with their instructions to make them a real emblem of their signature music. In fact, some signature guitar brands are directly created by your favorite artists to ensure precision.

Vintage Guitars has been around since 1985. We know what professional guitar players want. Our authentic guitars combine the classic design of vintage guitars with the modern playability of newer ones. The retro look is combined with patented new hardware that gives you the best of both new and old worlds. Whether your preferred genre is rock, country or jazz, we have vintage guitars for every working professional musician. If you’re looking for great features and old-school style, you’ve come to the right place. Check out all of our electric, acoustic and bass guitars!
Volume pots don’t attenuate all frequencies consistently. Treble gets attenuated faster which results in treble loss when volume is rolled down. Treble bleed circuits (or bright caps) are there to compensate for treble loss and make guitar sound at lower volume as close as possible to sound with volume maxed. There are several different treble bleed circuits used or recommended by guitar/pickup manufacturers. What’s common between them is that they are installed across guitar volume pot (input and output lug).
Guitar effects and the boxes that generate them have married theory and practice, history and material, content and form. Such strange logics, inherent to all of these simple devices, radiate sincerity in their transgressive sounds. Or put differently, those “unmistakable sounds,” which can enchant an entire generation, are not entirely intentional, but are born from the accidental collisions between transistors, tubes, wiring, and luck.

This comprehensive set contains the most detailed version of the Yamaha C5 Grand plus a full compliment of performance sounds to cover all your needs from pads, strings, EPs, orchestra, synth, organs, guitars and many other instruments. At 971mb in size (with 592mb dedicated to one outstanding piano with five brightness levels to choose from)  it is designed for the fussy pianist who also wants a full bank of sounds at their fingertips.


The neck is also made of mahogany and is hand set into the body. Looking at the fretboard, we see a standard rosewood design with white binding and classic trapezoid inlays. Epiphone went with a set of Alnico Classic humbucker pickups. These are very close to what the original Gibson solution had to offer. Classic rock and blues just flow out of these, although you are more than free to crank up the gain and blast some heavy riffs.
I picked up a Lyle 630L recently for $100. Best playing acoustic I've ever played and sounds awesome, but it has a few issues. First being the fact that it's been played long and hard, with at least 3 frets showing hard wear. I had to tweak the torsion rod and raise the adjustable bridge some to stop a few frets from buzzing, but one is still a stickler. Bridge has cracked between the peg holes but the pegs still stay secure. My thought is to use good epoxy to stabilize it. Any thoughts? Also, leaving the strings taught over the years seems to have warped the body some, but there are no cracks or finish peeling from it. One tuner has been replaced with another style tuner, (looks like crap from the back) and I'd love to replace it.

Relatively new to the amplifier world, Paul Reed Smith is building some of the most interest amps out there. After tapping legendary amp builder Doug Sewell to head design, the company has produced a range of boutique-quality amps for a fraction of the price. The Sonzera 20 is a reliable amp that is incredibly versatile, with a full tube sound similar to American amps from the ’60s.


In 1928, the Stromberg-Voisinet firm was the first company to sell an electric stringed instrument and amplifier package. However, musicians found that the amps had an "unsatisfactory tone and volume, [and] dependability problems", so the product did not sell well. Even though the Stromberg-Voisinet amp did not sell well, it still launched a new idea: a portable electric instrument amp with a speaker, all in an easily transported wooden cabinet. In 1929, Vega electrics launched a portable banjo amplifier. In 1932, Electro String Instruments and amplifier (this is not the same company as Stromberg Electro Instruments) introduced a guitar amp with "high output" and a "string driven magnetic pickup". Electro set out the standard template for combo amps: a wooden cabinet with the electronic amplifier mounted inside, and a convenient carrying handle to facilitate transporting the cabinet. In 1933, Vivi-Tone amp set-ups were used for live performances and radio shows. In 1934, Rickenbacker launched a similar combo amp that added metal corner protectors to keep the corners in good condition during transportation.[1]
If you have an envelope follower, envelope filter, auto-wah or other dynamic touch-sensitive effect, this should go at the very front in most cases, as these effects are almost exclusively dependent upon the dynamics of your playing. Placing most other types of effects in front of them will compress the signal, thereby reducing dynamics and minimizing their performance.
Always use more than one mic, and when possible, double down on the amp as well. This will give you additional options in the mixing phase. You can split the signal to the amp by employing a stereo FX pedal or a DI. The second mic doesn’t necessarily have to be close to the cabinet and can be placed as far as 3 ft away to give you more tonal range.   
This guitar follows after the tried and tested formula of old Stratocaster design, from the double cutaway alder body to the bolt-on maple neck, down to its triple single coil pickup configuration. The scale length follows after traditional builds at 25.5", while the neck profile (modern C) and narrower nut width of 1.65" makes this guitar viable for modern players. While it doesn't have vintage voiced pickups, the default pickups are not so bad either, and will give you the distinctive Strat tone that almost everybody loves.
First the lower line models were built for steel strings first. Like the style 17 in 1922, and the style 18 in 1924. Pretty much all models were built for steel by 1927-1929. But unfortunately there was no definative serial number or time line for any 1920s Martin style. This makes it difficult to determine if any particular 1920s Martin guitar is really built for steel strings. Martin didn't just implement steel string design at any one definative point. It was a transition, and apparently a very slow transition. And special orders for gut or steel complicated things.
Why We Liked It - Guitarists often have a love hate relationship with signature models, but we really think that the SE Angelus is a worthy addition to our rundown of the ten best electric acoustics you can buy right now. It’s a good price, offers some great design and hardware, and of course comes with the seal of approval from one of rock’s most accomplished guitarists.
Bracing affects the way the guitar sounds because it changes the pitch or tune that the guitar produces out of the sound hole. Personally I think X bracing is the b est because it produces a more even and better more balance for mids and high notes and just enough bass on the E and A strings that gives a brighter more even tone. Blinded or pessed bracing gives a much deeper sound than x bracing which =less versatility but if you bought a pressed dread knot or anything else you'll still be okay just remember strings make a huge difference and running your guitar to the right amount of tone for any song will work it's just that Taylor produces the best over all guitar itself by better quality woods and they go through ver strict and rigorous testing and inspections before they are sold to retailers and customers. Higher grade parts attention to detail and style of music versatility is why one guitar can cost 3 times as much. Most companies like Taylor is know give warranties or $ back
The Dean Vendetta pack offers a sharp looking metallic red super Stratocaster style guitar with dual humbuckers, a tremolo bridge for fun dive tricks, and a 24 fret neck. This is perfect for players that want to start learning lead guitar as soon as possible. The neck is quite fast for a guitar in its price range. Also included with the purchase is a 10-watt practice amp, gig bag, instrument cable, picks, a tuner, and a fairly comfortable strap.
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You don’t have to be a pro player to strut your stuff on an acoustic electric git. Beginners will enjoy the medium-low action the hybrid offers, the on-board tuner (on some guitars), and the convenience of not having to remain static on stage due to the limitations of a mic. With all that said, it’s time for you to narrow down your options with the customized lists you’ll find below!


I am a guitar player, teacher and composer. I started playing piano at the age of seven. Five years later I had my first guitar performance with a local band. My style was inspired by guitarists like Nuno Bettencourt, Joe Satriani, Jerry Cantrell, Marty Friedman, Zakk Wylde, Steve Vai and Dimebag Darrell. During my career I had many bands and music project, going through different styles of original music and sometimes cover bands. In 2012 co-founded the band Vulgar Bulgar (Pantera tribute band). In 2013 started teaching guitar at Rockschool.bg. Currently freelance guitar teacher, session musician and solo performing artist.
Vacuum tube or "valve" distortion is achieved by "overdriving" the valves in an amplifier.[40] In layperson's terms, overdriving is pushing the tubes beyond their normal rated maximum. Valve amplifiers—particularly those using class-A triodes—tend to produce asymmetric soft clipping that creates both even and odd harmonics. The increase in even harmonics is considered to create "warm"-sounding overdrive effects.[37][41]
One app I can recommend for playing these SoundFonts on smartphones or tablets is bs-16i from bismark.  Large SoundFount files like Nice-Keys-* listed at the top of this page have been tested and run perfectly on newer iPads with 3gb of Ram or more. For iPads with 2gb (Air2) it is best to limit the SoundFont size to around 600mb. For older devices try SoundFonts around 300mb.
This is an absolutely stunning OM acoustic in MINT/As New Condition. This has been in my personal collection for a few years. In the words of Bill Kraus, the builder: An OM model in my favorite combination of woods: Red spruce top, Honduran rosewood back and sides, curly Koa bindings. I first heard about Bill Kraus from my good friend, Scott Freilich of Top Shelf Music in Buffalo, NY. Scott has been a factory authorized Martin repair center since 1979 and has seen the finest 6 figure pre-war Martins. Scott was raving about Bill Kraus, his knowledge of tonewoods, and the insane quality of his guitars. I also learned that Stan Jay of Mandolin Bros. was equally impressed with Kraus Guitars and had started carrying Bill’s guitars in his store. Every Kraus guitar at Mandolin Bros. has sold!

Manufacturing techniques can alter the impact of the variability of other factors. A .strandberg* guitar is made from lightweight but stiff materials. The neck is reinforced with carbon fiber. Each string rests on its own bridge that does not transfer vibrations to the other strings in the same way as a conventional guitar bridge. The bridges themselves are made from light and stiff aircraft aluminium instead of brass or steel as is commonplace. Each component is tightly coupled to the next with no room to vibrate. Regardless of tonewood, your .strandberg* will sound clear, airy, organic, dynamic, and respond quickly to the plucking of strings with a great dynamic range – as a result of the construction itself. The characteristics of different woods and pickups are transferred more effectively than might otherwise be the case. Is this better? Again, it depends on what the musician is after… I’ve come across for example ES-335 players that are intimidated by the responsiveness and dynamics and who become inhibited and self conscious when picking up a .strandberg*. But for most, it’s a pleasant experience that liberates their tone.


If you're in the Boston area and need a repair on your stringed instrument look no further!  I've… If you're in the Boston area and need a repair on your stringed instrument look no further!  I've had Steve repair numerous guitars (4 acoustic, 1 electric) and have had each one repaired better than I could have imagined. Rest assure...if you choose Steve, it is in good hands. His prices are very fair especially for the time and care he puts into his work. As long as he's open for business-go with Steve for all repairs please!!  Great guy, great service!! Read more
The sound quality is pretty excellent. Relative to the Zoom, Line 6, and Boss multi-effect pedals, the distortion on the DigiTech is surprisingly nice. The reverbs are absolutely gorgeous, which is no surprise given they are Lexicon algorithms. Chorus and delay also sounds great, and the effects’ parameters are easy to set up and adjust using the row of knobs below the display. We also find the noise gate works extremely well at taming any unruly noise issues caused by dirt effects. Overall, we’re impressed at how the RP500 replicates a lot of the “classics.” A quick note on the presets - they are less than stellar, so don’t judge this pedal by them. You’ll have to play with them a little bit to arrive at better, more usable sounds.
Like the others, you also have a doubled signal path and like the flanger, you have a short delay. This time you have a bit of a longer delay which causes a more subtle effect. As its name suggests it offers a choir-like effect that adds a certain level of depth to your tone. It also gives it a unique wavering quality that suits a lot of different styles of music.
And that’s exactly what reverb effects are trying to emulate: the way a single instrument sounds different in different spaces and reflecting off of different materials. Many common environments that reverb units try to emulate are halls, churches, and chambers. There are some pretty unique reverbs like a particle reverb that adds special effects to make things sound more spacey, and there’s even one that attempts to emulate what we imagine a black hole to sound like.
As cool as these little amps are, they only have a fraction of the features you’ll find in their larger, more powerful big brothers. But, they are more than enough for a newbie to get started on, and they meet and exceed the criteria I outlined in the beginning as what to look for in a good starter amp: They sound good, they are flexible with good overdrive, multiple channels, solid EQ sections and some even have built-in effects.
I started playing harmonica when I was a little boy. I used to get pushed out to entertain adults at two o'clock in the morning. I also had a kind of obsession about the guitar. The first actual toy that I had that I loved was a little wooden guitar that my folks brought me from a shop that sold brooms and buckets and stuff like that. I used to carry that guitar around like my friends would carry a football. I took this thing with me everywhere.
One of the best and most affordable gigging amps I have ever played. Blackstar accommodates all styles and budgets and should be in place of line 6. Too many people want traditional tone, but Blackstar brings a new edge to the table and builds extremely reliable tough as nails amps with new ideas like the ID series amps, I own an ht40 and am extremely impressed. Get one.
On the other hand, if you know that you have spent a decent amount of money on something, you’re more likely to keep using it, so that you didn’t pay that much in vain. Getting a proper guitar from the start also means that you don’t have to get another one as soon as you get a little bit better and start to notice that maybe your $50 guitar wasn’t that amazing after all.
Nice ible. I JUST got a Squier Tele Custom ii (2) in the mail Friday after selling a keytar on ebay for $355. I bought it because it got great reviews for having 2 Duncan (designed, made in asia?) P90's and the price was right for a 1st guitar. the only thing i do not like is the ugly tele headstock. I bought a '68 Harmony Marquis last year for my 1st 1st guitar, not really knowing at the time how unrewarding/difficult it would be to learn on a P.O.S like that. So, even tho the pups are probably the last thing I would replace on it, it was cool to read a bit by someone else with a "less expensive" tele. Look up the Custom ii online, it has a great looking pickguard and the pup selector is up on the top horn like a les paul. Thanks for the tips!
I thank Roger Evans “How to play guitar” for his easy & intuitive written method, a good reason why he is a bestseller & outselling your hard-pushed videos. I can assure you, you will be a better teacher if you buy his book, and you will a top teacher if you read his other books such as “How to Read Music”, “How to play piano”, & ” How to play keyboards”. You will thank me for this advise and you will be a better asset to your potential students.
The EM-18 came with either a pair of Mighty Mite humbuckers or a pair of DiMarzios. It was otherwise the same as the E-18 with the addition of a three-way mini-toggle coil selector switch which allowed a choice of both or either coil on the lead pickup. This arrangement allowed for a rather remarkable variety of tones, by the way. EM-18 production began in 1979 and some 1,375 were made until the guitar ended in February 1982.
Volume pots don’t attenuate all frequencies consistently. Treble gets attenuated faster which results in treble loss when volume is rolled down. Treble bleed circuits (or bright caps) are there to compensate for treble loss and make guitar sound at lower volume as close as possible to sound with volume maxed. There are several different treble bleed circuits used or recommended by guitar/pickup manufacturers. What’s common between them is that they are installed across guitar volume pot (input and output lug).
Congratulations on buying yourself a top-notch axe — but you’re not ready to shred just yet. A good guitar also requires the right amp to achieve the right sound. Amps can be a daunting purchase (you certainly won’t be starved for choices on the beginner and enthusiast side of the price spectrum) and there are a lot of qualities that need to be taken into account. Want a low-cost amp that’s durable? Shoot for a solid-state amp. Want better sound? We suggest an all-tube amp instead. Want the most tonal variety on a budget? A modeling amp will get you all kinds of sounds without requiring a fleshed-out pedal board. But at any rate, no matter what you’re looking for in an amplifier, these 10 picks cover all the fundamental bases. So purchase, plug in and let’s rip.

Three acoustic guitars were offered in 1971. These were glued-neck models with roughly Martin-shaped heads and pickguards slightly larger and squarer than a Martin. All had spruce tops (presumably plywood), mahogany bodies and necks, rosewood fingerboards and dot inlays. These appear to be Japanese, not Brazilian Gianninis. The bridges are glued on, with screw-adjustable saddles and pins. The U3012 Auditorium was a Spanish-shaped steel-string and cost $89.50 plus the cost of a case. The U3013 Grand Auditorium was a dreadnought costing $105. The U3014 Twelve String cost $120.


Epiphone introduces the Les Paul Special VE (Vintage Edition) electric guitar featuring the classic Les Paul profile with a lightweight Poplar body. The Les Paul Special VE is powered by Epiphone Open Coil humbuckers and is available in beautiful “Vintage Worn” color finishes.For decades, the Les Paul Special has been one of Epiphone’s best se...  Click To Read More About This Product
The four-string guitar is better known as the tenor guitar. One of its best-known players was Tiny Grimes, who played on 52nd Street with the beboppers and played a major role in the Prestige Blues Swingers. Multi-instrumentalist Warren Ellis (musician) of Dirty Three and Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds is a contemporary player who includes a tenor guitar in his repertoire.
Organ tones are sounded in one of three ways; in 'normal' mode, by pressing any string onto a fret; in 'percussion' mode, by fretting any string and touching the included brass plectrum (connected to a short wire plugged into a socket on the scratchplate) onto any metal part of the guitar; or by pressing one of the six 'open string' buttons. There is an option to silence the lowest two strings, and the organ section, as a whole, can also be switched off. There is a four-position octave selector, a six-position effect selector, a four-way selector for the percussion and a flute selector.
^ Jump up to: a b Peterson (2002, pp. 36–37):Peterson, Jonathon (2002). "Tuning in thirds: A new approach to playing leads to a new kind of guitar". American Lutherie: The Quarterly Journal of the Guild of American Luthiers. 8222 South Park Avenue, Tacoma WA 98408: USA: The Guild of American Luthiers. Number 72 (Winter): 36–43. ISSN 1041-7176. Archived from the original on 21 October 2011.
Guitar effects pedals are a great way to get started with electronics. The simplest ones only require some basic skills to assemble. The few parts can be easily obtained, and the minimum of tools required can be purchased quite cheaply. Better still is the gratification from plugging it in for the first time and being able to incorporate a pedal that you made yourself into your music. With the skills you acquire, you can graduate from simple to more complex projects; maybe build an entire pedal board of your own effects. Your friends might ask you to build pedals for them too. What you learn can also be put to use with commercial pedals, as you will better understand how they work, and will be able to repair and hot rod old pedals. If you are interested in working at a repair shop, as a guitar tech, or for an electronics company in the future, your portfolio of home built pedals will be a great advertisement for your skills.
It is typically not possible to combine high efficiency (especially at low frequencies) with compact enclosure size and adequate low frequency response. Bass cabinet designers can, for the most part, choose only two of the three parameters when designing a speaker system. So, for example, if extended low-frequency performance and small cabinet size are important, one must accept low efficiency.[24] This rule of thumb is sometimes called Hofmann's Iron Law (after J.A. Hofmann, the "H" in KLH).[25][26] Bass cabinet designers must work within these trade-offs. In general, to get extended low-frequency performance, a larger cabinet size is needed. Most bass cabinets are made from wood such as plywood. Gallien-Kruger makes a small extension cab made of aluminum.
As has already become apparent, the resonator instruments which made both the National and Dobro names in the late ’20s and ’30s were not the only effort underway to increase the volume of the guitar. The ampliphonics found immediate acceptance among Hawaiian players, notably Sol Hoopii, the very first to record with them when he used a prototype in his first session for Columbia on October 18, 1926. This was used on “Farewell Blues.” But they still didn’t satisfy the desire of orchestra guitarists to get out of the rhythm section. In addition to metal resonator cones, electricity was waiting in the wings, and National, Dobro and National Dobro would play a significant role, both directly and indirectly, in that ultimately triumphant development.
Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic - Body Size: Grand Concert - Top Wood: Solid Sitka Spruce - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Nut Width: 44.5mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 26" (66cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Bracing: X-Type - Hardware: Chrome, Grover Tuners - String Instrument Finish: Light Violin High Gloss Sunburst, Dark Violin High Gloss Sunburst
I don’t think beginners should spend a ton of money on their very first electric guitar. However, around the $300 mark you have a lot of options for really great entry level electrics. So, if you’re a beginner with a little more cash available, I say skip the “starter packs” and buy some good, solid gear to begin your journey. Choose from this list and you won’t need to upgrade for many years.
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The Effect: Even though acoustic electric guitars are generally not associated with various guitar effects, using some can be very beneficial to your tone. Naturally, the types of effects you are going to use will differ from those used with electric guitars quite a bit. The most common accessory in an average acoustic electric signal chain is a preamp pedal. Something like LR Baggs Venue DI is a perfect example. This preamp allows you to boost the signal being fed into the amp or PA, but more importantly, shape it in a way that enhances your tone. Aside from preamps, many guitar players like to use various modulation effects, delays, reverbs and similar. General consensus is that overdrives and distortions are not something you would want to hook up to your signal chain. If you are frequently performing on stage, having even a simple effects chain can be a real game changer.

Along with repairing instruments, we do complete restorations. Restorations often come in the way of family heirlooms and antique finds. After acquiring these instruments, you may think of them as only keepsakes, or something to put a shelf. We want to take these old instruments and restore them to their full use. There's nothing like playing on a violin or guitar that's been in the family for generations, and we want you to experience that.
The PRS S2 Custom 24 is a stripped down version of the expensive yet sought after PRS Custom 24 guitar, and because of its accessibility, it helped put the Custom 24 design into the hands of more players. What's impressive about the S2 Custom 24 is how it retains the same attention to detail and quality as PRS' more expensive guitars, making it a viable instrument even for those who can afford more expensive alternatives.
If ever there was a candidate for compression, bass is it. This instrument has a wide dynamic range (even more so when slap techniques are employed), but it usually needs to sit at a very steady level in the mix. But should compression be applied during recording, to control the levels going down, or later, during the mix, to insure the best blend in the track? Well, the answer is probably both, but with potentially different approaches to squashing the signal. During recording, a Limiter might be the ticket, to control transient peaks that might overload ADCs, producing pops and spikes that can ruin a take. A classic fast VCA compressor/limiter (like the dbx 160) could be employed to handle peaks, without really reducing the player’s dynamics at this early stage. Then when mixdown rolls around, more gentle compression can be introduced (like the smooth squash of an optical compressor like the LA-2A), to tighten up the dynamics, as needed for that particular mix. Applying the right kind, and amount, of compression/limiting at all stages will assure you get nice clean recordings, that can be properly squeezed into the mix when the time comes. 
After the Beatles 1965 summer tour, Paul McCartney frequently used a left-handed 1964 4001S FG Rickenbacker bass, as its tone was better suited to recording than the lightweight Höfner basses he had used previously. The instrument became popular with other bassists influenced by his highly melodic style, as it produces a clear tone even when played high up the neck, its deep cutaways allowing easy access to the higher frets.

The Epiphone Broadway is a hollow body archtop guitar that has been in the Epiphone guitar lineup since 1931. The Broadway was initially an acoustic archtop, but after Gibson took over Epiphone in 1957 the “Broadway” designation was given to a new electric archtop. The electric model was reissued in 1997 and continues to be in production, and we’ve selected it for this list of best electric guitars.
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We are here today to help you break free.  It's time to understand the difference between the types of guitar strings.  We can have higher value from our brand of choice or any other by understanding which product serves our personal preferences and instruments the best.  Let’s dive in and learn about the many variables that makes certain strings better or worse for each individual player.

The only known American distributor of Lyle guitars is the L.D. Heater Music Company. A small warehouse based in Beaverton, Oregon, L.D. Heater was owned by Norlin, the parent company of Gibson, and known more for their exclusive production rights to Alembic instruments. As protection from potential lawsuits, Lyle guitars were part of the contract that stated under which brand names Gibson-licensed guitars could be produced and distributed.
The Boss Katana KTN-HEAD Amp Head has become one of the most talked about amplifiers as it features the coveted Waza technology found in the beautiful BOSS Waza Craft Pedals. The same care and attention that goes into these pedals has gone into the BOSS Katana head to produce a versatile and highly  aerticulate amplifier. Packed with Five unique amp characters: Clean, Crunch, Lead, Brown (derived from the Waza amp), and Acoustic (for acoustic-electric guitars), the Katana head ensures you have enough sonic diversity for all genres. You can choose from 55 BOSS effects and load 15 on to the amp via BOSS Tone Studio editor software and you can actually use it without a cab thanks to the monitor speaker - making it a great practice amp that you can use to get your sound and hook up to a cab later on at your gigs.
The steel guitar is unusual in that it is played horizontally across the player's lap. The steel guitar originates from Hawaii where local musicians, newly introduced to the European guitar, developed a style of playing involving alternative tunings and the use of a slide. The Hawaiian guitarists found that by laying the guitar flat across the lap they could better control the slide. In response to this new playing style some Hawaiian steel guitars were constructed with a small rectangular body which made them more suitable for laying across the lap.There are two types of steel guitar played with a steel, the solid metal bar from which the guitar takes its name, namely the lap steel guitar and the pedal steel guitar with its extra necks. The pedal steel guitar comes on its own stand with a mechanical approach similar to the harp. Pedals and knee-levers are used to alter the pitch of the strings whilst playing thereby extending the fluency of the glissandi technique.
Specs for combos were as follows: Checkmate 10 (6 watts, 6″ speaker, two inputs, striped grillcloth); Checkmate 12 (9 watts, 8″ speaker, three inputs); Checkmate 14 (14 watts, 8″ speaker, three inputs, tremolo); Checkmate 17 (20 watts, 10″ speaker, tremolo, reverb); Checkmate 16 bass amp (20 watts, 10″ speaker, volume, tone); Checkmate 17 (20 watts, 10″ speaker, reverb, tremolo); Checkmate 18 (30 watts, two 10″ speakers, reverb, tremolo); and Checkmate 20 (40 watts, 12″ speaker, reverb, tremolo). Piggyback amps included the Checkmate 25 (50 watts, 15″ speaker, reverb, tremolo); Checkmate 50 (two-channels, 100 watts, two 15″ speakers, reverb, tremolo, “E tuner”); Checkmate 100C (two channels, voice input, 200 watts, two 15″ speakers, reverb, tremolo); and the big hugger-mugger Checkmate Infinite (200 watts, two 15″ speakers, stereo/mono preamp section, reverb, tremolo and a bunch of other switches). The one shown in the catalog actually has a block Teisco logo and carried the Japanese-marketed name – King – in the lower corner.
Consider the MusicMan SR5 20th Anniversary basses, with a "mahogany tone block" channeled into an ash body, running from the neck, through the pickups, to the bridge. I've played several of these basses, and the best two of them were really outstanding (I own one of those). Could be any number of reasons they sound as good as they do, but there you have it.
I've had an Ovation Celebrity for over 5 years. Great action, wonderful sound with or without an amp. Stays in tune. Play anything from classical to rock. The Ovation can do it. The sound is unique, so making it your only guitar may not work if your in a band. If you're a beginner, the string tension is really low so it's easy on your fingers. It is a hollow body accoustic, but it plays like an electric. I've owned and still own several guitars. This is the one I reach for the most.
That's a bit if an exaggeration but you're allowed. I would venture to claim that the snobs are those who proselytize Fender and Gibson as being the best (especially Gibson). It's been demonstrated a million times over that they are not. Which does not mean they don't make guitars many people want and like. Especially Fender (I have a GREAT Highway One Strat) who have managed to reach a wider audience with the pricing structure of the Fender brand than Gibson has with the Gibson name. The reason we see so many of them in the hands of pros (and their sheepish followers) is that these companies can afford to buy "stage presence". I would put PRS in that group too; however PRS makes better production guitars than both the above. And I'm not being a snob since I can't afford a PRS.
That said, unless the beginner had a specific focus, I never have a problem recommending Line6 spider amps. Lots of options built right in (so you save a fortune on effects you may want to experiment with), and they don’t sound bad at all. I played one a few years back in a rock band and got compliments on my sound all the time, and I put nothing else in the signal path, I played straight in using one of their floor controllers at a gig. I think the whole setup (and this was the 120 watt one) cost me something like $350 bucks.
Pacifica series of Yamaha electric guitars are the ones you have probably heard of once, mistaken for a Strat a couple of times, but never really considered. Needless to say, that was a mistake. One quick look at Yamaha Pacifica PAC510V OVS reveals why. Before even getting into details it doesn't take much to recognize the apparent quality all around.
The Jameson Left-Handed Black is an acoustic-electric guitar that comes with a slick appearance, a smooth body, and an impressive sound. With its thinline frame and cutaway design, this model is good for both amateurs and seasoned guitar players. You get a guitar that sounds just as awesome regardless if you’re playing it unplugged or through an amp.
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FRET LEVELING ("Filing", "Dressing"...) $150.00 and up. Worn or uneven frets can he filed level in many cases, if there will remain enough height on the fret to suit the customer. Frets must be lowered to the height of the lowest pit that can be found. Sometimes, replacing the most worn frets is appropriate. Includes "set up" adjustments.Add $25.00 for finished maple fretboards.
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The Fuzz-Tone connection hints that we need to look further back, and across the pond, for earlier examples of recorded guitar distortion. Gibson, and hence Maestro, was given the circuit that became the Fuzz-Tone by studio engineer Glen Snotty. Snotty, in turn, had devised the transistorized fuzz-generating design to replicate the sound that occurred when a tube preamp in the channel of a mixer he was using to record Grady Martin’s short-scale bass solo for the 1961 Mary Robbins hit record ‘Don’t Worry’ started to fail and yield a distorted tone. Whoever decided to stick with the track rather than re-record it through a properly functional channel was on to something; the result was Nashville’s first recorded fuzz guitar (a Danelectro bass, in fact). Courtesy of Maestro, Snotty’s fuzz circuit soon made the trendy new sound available to the world.


If you’re reading this guide, you probably need help purchasing a first acoustic guitar or electric guitar for yourself, a friend or a child. We're here to help you understand the key specifications and features to look out for. We'll explain the differences between acoustic, acoustic-electric and electric guitars. We'll also recommended six of our best beginner guitars and two beginner guitar value packs. 
Chords are the heart and soul of playing guitar. Many guitar players seldom do anything else, other than strumming chords. The chord is the basic building block of guitar music. A chord is simply a combination of two of more notes played simultaneously. Different combinations give you different chords. There are different classes of chords, such as Major Chords, Minor Chords, Triads, Suspended Chords, Diminished Chords, etc...
• Wrap around: On wrap around tailpieces, what’s wrapping around is the string. Strings are slid into the tailpiece from the front and then pass over the back and top of the bridge before making their journey up the neck. This system creates less string tension. Some players report tuning and intonation issues with these tailpieces. Others swear by them.
So, what string gauge is standard for electric guitars? Most new guitars come strung with super-light or light-gauge strings. For beginning guitarists, that’s probably a good place to start. As you develop fretting and picking skills and your fingers gain calluses and strength, you may want to gradually move up to heavier strings, depending on the music you play and the tone you seek. Many guitar manufacturers make specific recommendations about what strings to use. Some produce their own strings or have them custom-manufactured to their specifications.
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Leo Fender's work is timeless. This is easily deduced by simply looking at the popularity of both Stratocasters and Telecasters. With that said, Strats are arguably the favorite between the two. A top of the line American-made Stratocaster still costs a bit more than what our budget here is, however, there is an alternative. Fender's plant in Mexico builds great Stratocasters that aren't really behind their American counterparts. You essentially get a near identical performance at a more affordable price due to the stigma. The Fender Classic Series '70s Stratocaster is one such guitar.

As the title suggests, solid body electric guitars don't have a chamber or hole the way that an acoustic guitar does; instead, they're made of solid wood. These are the most common type of guitars that you’ll find in shops or online stores. They're perfect for a wide range of musical situations. These guitars rely on the wood quality and their components to output sound. Below we’ll highlight four famous types of solid body guitars.

A guitar needs to receive regular maintenance if it is to keep its intended levels of playability and sound quality. Caring for a guitar involves a process known as a setup. This describes a group of fine-tuning procedures that work together to bring the instrument to its highest potential. The cost of a guitar setup is often well worth the value of the service. New strings will be added, their height adjusted, intonation will be set, and the neck may be adjusted to allow for the proper amount of relief in the wood. Most guitars need to be setup at least once a year to account for swelling of wood and shifting of parts that are caused by changes in humidity. Guitar setup cost is usually around $50, but can fluctuate wildly depending on what adjustments are needed for your specific instrument.
You can get an entirely new perspective of the fretboard by starting from the C-A-G-E and D chords. This book can help create a roadmap for the guitar, where you'll be able to know each fret's note name - one of the most important things to learn when playing. If you're unsure about learning this system, do a search for the CAGED system on YouTube and see if it's something you'd be interested in.
It is possible to perform a setup at home, but it can easily become a laborious and time-consuming process. You can instead bring your instrument to a local store or other professional. Guitar setup cost is usually a large value in comparison to the work it would take to do the job at home. You should consider that the cost of a guitar setup includes the addition of new strings but may not cover the actual cost of them. Whether or not strings are included in the price is something that should be investigated prior to having an instrument professionally setup. Guitar setup cost may also increase if the tuning keys need adjustment, or if you have a complicated bridge system (like a Floyd Rose) that requires extra knowledge and skill to be properly fine-tuned.
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Up for sale is an Ibanez RGA32 guitar equipped with Metal Works Brushed EMG 57/66 pickups and Sperzel locking tuners. This guitar is in great condition, has never been gigged and has been kept in my smoke free music studio. Guitar Specs: Mahogany body with quilted maple top 3-Piece maple Wizard II neck Bound rosewood fretboard with 24 jumbo frets Gibraltar Standard bridge Pearl dot inlay
There’s another wrinkle: vintage-style pickup magnets can weaken over time, resulting in a softer, smoother tone. Some pickups are designed to mimic this ageing process. Say you were looking for a vintage P.A.F.-style humbucker: You could choose between one of our models that that sounds like a pickup straight off the late-’50s production line (the Seth Lover humbucker), and another that mimics a similar pickup as it would sound and look today after decades of wear and tear (the Antiquity humbucker).
no. first of all a bass guitar has 4 strings and a guitar has 6 strings second, u couldn't tune the guitar open notes a whole octave down to create the bass notes as the strings would be too loose. although you can play bass songs on a guitar but it wouldn't be as deep a bass. Actually you can. depending on the kind of way your guitar is built you can remove your guitar strings and replace them with bass strings and finally adjust the setting on your amp so you can have a rich full tone. I have a Fender Squier and made it into a bass by replacing the strings and adjusting the settings on my amp. WARNING: you NEED to know if your bridge or the place where you put the bass strings through can hold the pressure the bass string apply.
Yamaha is considered as among largest music instruments selling company in India, which provides a wide variety of guitars. S series, Yamaha RGX, RGZ electronic series, SG series (SG 5,SG 7) etc are the best models of guitar. Now they become the world’s largest manufacturer of a full line of musical instruments. They earned good name by providing super quality guitar at an affordable price. Available price is Rs. 8,000/- onwards (approx).
The most musically satisfying types of distortion tend to be progressive, where the audio waveform becomes more 'squashed' as the level increases. Hard clipping, by contrast, tends to sound harsh. All these types of distortion introduce additional harmonics into the signal, but it is the level and proportion of the added harmonics that creates the character of the sound. Harmonically related distortion can be added at much higher levels than non-harmonically related distortion before the human hearing system recognises it as such, so there is no way to define a percentage of distortion below which audio is acceptable or above which it is unacceptable. The reason that digital distortion has its own character, which most people find less musically pleasant, is because it is not usually harmonically related to the input signal. For example, quantisation distortion, which results from sampling at too low a bit depth, sounds quite ugly, though many dance and industrial music producers have found a use for it, and some plug-ins deliberately introduce it.
@Ricardo – I recommend placing tuners as close to your original signal as possible at the beginning of your signal chain. An EQ pedal can be placed where you would like to filter your signal to the settings of the EQ which is technically at any point in your signal chain. Try the EQ in different locations and use the setting that works best for your.
Many web surfers contact me looking for a wiring diagram for an unusual / no name / import guitar after having no luck online. And sometimes you aren't going to find it, however, if you have an electric guitar that is similar to lets say a Strat ... it has 3 single coil pickups (and they are 2 wire pickups), one 5 way switch, 2 tone pots and 1 volume pot then you can simply use a Strat wiring diagram. It's often easiest to think of the instrument in terms of components not brand.
The shadows are his home and keeping Gotham's citizens safe is his sustenance. Darkness envelops his every move and his legend lives in the whispers of each passerby. Known by many names — the Caped Crusader, the Dark Knight, Batman — this man lives to protect. But by pitting himself against the criminals of a city, he has only made his laundry list of powerful enemies grow. One after another, a new and nefarious threat has risen up and one after another Batman succeeded in bringing them down. But what happens when those menacing masterminds join forces? Who will rescue Gotham when a deadly roster of depraved lunatics gangs up on the shadowed warrior? Who will save us all? The finale to the legendary Arkham series explodes onto your screen in the most adrenaline-pumping storyline yet. The Scarecrow has returned to Gotham City and he has united a terrifying team of super villains, including Penguin, Two-Face and Harley Quinn. For the first time in the franchise, you get to step behind the wheel of the iconic Batmobile as you harness the power of Batman and scramble to outwit the wicked gang after your blood. Tear through the streets and soar across the skyline in heart-pounding gameplay that will suck you in and force you to ask yourself if you have what it takes to save Gotham. Do you have it within you to be the hero the city needs? Or will the villains of Gotham overtake the Dark Knight once and for all?
The noise out of my chain drives me nuts. I want it when I want it, not when all is shut off. I am running a Clapton Signature Strat with humless pickups into my Blues Deluxe. No effects and it is quiet as the dead of night. Plug in the effects (All Boss BTW) and it just starts humming. I have been playing with it and cant seem to isolate the culprit (s)… Frustrating.

There are only two Amazon reviews for this instrument, as it is at a higher price point than other guitars, but the reviews are very positive. The rich tone of the cedar as well as the ability to take this classical guitar into the world of electrical pickups makes this a fabulous option for the musician looking to upgrade to a more professional-sounding instrument.


B.C. Rich specializes in guitars for the heavy metal and hard rock crowd. They’ve produced some of the most legendary designs in the history of metal, including the Warlock, Bich, Virgin, and Mockingbird. Their instruments helped to mold the hard rock and thrash revolution of the 1980s and B.C. Rich is still a great choice for any guitarist looking for an instrument that looks and sounds as edgy as possible.
This is a musical problem rather than a technical one. Guitarists engage overdrive when they WANT to dominate. That's fine, but don't do it ALL the time! Not if there's an acoustic guitar in the band and you want to hear it! Everyone needs to listen, everyone has to be aware that another player may have something interesting to play, and therefore make space for it. Like turn down or - horror - even stop playing for a bit!
In the Beatles' early days, George Harrison briefly billed himself as Carl Harrison in honor of his quick-picking hero. Perkins' bright, trebly style – which the rockabilly king picked up from blues players in Tennessee – defined the singles he put out on Sun Records ("Blue Suede Shoes," "Glad All Over") and influenced scores of players from Eric Clapton to John Fogerty. "He took country picking into the rock world," Tom Petty has said. "If you want to play Fifties rock & roll, you can either play like Chuck Berry, or you can play like Carl Perkins."
When recording an electric guitar, the amp is the instrument as far as the mic is concerned, and mic position is important. While a lot of sound comes direct from the speakers as you'd expect, a significant level is also emitted from the back and sides of the box via panel vibrations. Also, an open-backed cabinet throws about as much sound out of the back of the box as it does out of the front. Choosing a mic for recording electric guitar isn't difficult, as virtually any decent mic of any type can be made to produce usable results. If I were to generalise, I'd say that British recording engineers tend to use cardioid, dynamic models while American engineers seem to prefer capacitor microphones. The dynamic mic produces a solid sound with a smooth high end, while the capacitor mic's increased definition produces a brighter, more open sound when used in the same way. However, the mic position has just as much bearing on the tone as the mic itself.
PRS really took off back in the ‘90s when it seemed just about everyone had swapped out their Les Paul for a PRS. Eventually they capitalized on this trend and made the PRS more accessible by introducing the SE line of lower-budget guitars. But these aren’t beginner’s guitars. Even though they cost less than a standard PRS, they’re still high-quality instruments.
Although much less common, the second trick I have in store for you shouldn't be taken lightly. The idea is to double a more or less distorted guitar part with an acoustic recording of the strings of your electric guitar recorded simultaneously as the distorted part. As preposterous as it sounds at first, considering that the sound of an electric guitar without an amp is certainly not the most pleasant one, the overall result can be truly amazing! Indeed, well managed, this screeching sound has the particularity of adding a bit more dynamic relief to "trashy" sounds, providing the performance a more "organic" aspect, especially due to the accents produced by the pick. But just like with the first trick, you need to sub-mix this take wisely so that the listener doesn't end up discovering the trick.
This guitar is based on Loar's U. S. Pat. 2,020,557 (filed 1934, awarded 1935), in which electric amplification is combined with an acoustic guitar body. The design offered a player the option of switching between electric and acoustic amplification, or combining both, with metal posts through the bridge that transfers vibrations from the strings to the bar-armature. With the posts raised, the bridge comes in contact with the soundboard for exclusively acoustic amplification; with the posts lowered to contact the metal bar-armature, both acoustic and electric amplification is engaged, and with the posts lowered completely, the bridge is lifted off of the soundboard and supported only by the bar-armature for exclusively electric amplification. The back of the guitar, made from arched spruce, with two f-shaped soundholes, incorporates another of Loar's ideas, covered more extensively in U. S. Pat. 2,046,331 (filed in 1934 but awarded in 1936), to use the back of the instrument as a second soundboard by transferring bridge pressure from the top.
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The E-18 and EM-18 were basically the same guitar differing only in electronics. The E-18 featured two DiMarzio humbucking pickups, a DiMarzio PAF at the neck and a DiMarzio Super Distortion at the bridge. In addition to the regular controls, the E-18 had mini-toggle phase switch. Production of the E-18 began in April of ’79 and about 5,307 (about 1,320 a year) were made until the guitar ended in early 1982.
Guitar Tuners lets you tune your guitar in seconds for free using a microphone so that you guarantee the perfect pitch of your instrument every time. Just play a note, and Guitar Tuners will display which note you''re playing, and how close you are to having that note in tune. The needle on this Guitar Tuner will turn blue you have an exact match. Just play each note on your guitar (E, A, D, G, B, E) or other musical instrument, and get in tune !

Students and expert alike describe this guitar as a fun instrument, and goes further by commenting that it has exceeded their expectations. From its fast action playability to the quality of the finish, the Epiphone SGSpecial continues to rake in compliments. Several people even said that it comes surprisingly close to the feel and sound of a Gibson SG.
With a history dating back to 1833, Martin acoustics rank as the most historic and iconic guitars ever made. From the small-bodied parlor guitars of the 19th-century to the landmark dreadnoughts of the 1930s and beyond, Martins have and continue to define the form and sound of the instrument. Take a look here for examples every type of vintage Martin acoustic including icons like the D-28, D-35, 000-18 and many more.
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