The best course of action is to set a budget that is reasonable - right at the get go - while also considering the cost for other important gear like accessories, cables, amplifiers and effects, should you need them. A good rule of thumb to follow is that entry-level to mid-tier instruments are great for beginners, while more experienced players will want mid-tier to premium guitars.
The fit and finish are as amazing as one would expect, and the general aesthetics of the guitars are just awesome to look at. They aren't gaudy or try-hard, but refined and subtle in their expression. Strumming a single cord will tell you all you need to know about the tone quality of this guitar, which is what really matters. It has that Martin twang and a lot of it.
Three and one half steps down from Drop D. Used by Darkest Hour on the song "Wasteland", Attack Attack!, Baroness (on their first two EPs), The Acacia Strain (on some songs), Dead by April (on some songs) and In Flames (on the song "Transparent" from Reroute to Remain). Chelsea Grin also used this tuning on their album Ashes to Ashes. Also Pantera and Whitechapel recorded Sandblasted Skin in G-g-C-F-A-D, Drop G variation with D standard.
It’s apparent right away that Acousticsamples knows how to sample a guitar, regardless if it’s acoustic or electric. All frets on all the string have, of course, been meticulously sampled and taken through a round of guitar techniques: slides, mutes, hammer-ons, pull-offs, staccatos, fret noises, and a plethora of other articulations — 53 different samples per fret/string.

An electric guitar can last many lifetimes; however, they have a variety of electrical parts and connections that, over time, can wear out. When that happens, you need to know how to fix or replace those electronics. The following are the parts that are most likely to wear out or break and need replacing. You can perform any of these fixes yourself without doing damage to the electric guitar — even if you screw up.
Super nice !.... Beautiful Patina exceptional Booming sound much like the old Martin 000 or old Gibson for that matter for a fraction $ and this ONE is a really good one folks. These are a well kept secret sort of ... known for their GREAT rich mature sound. This example is in fine all-round Original condition without any of the over 60 group problematic issues- none found anywhere upon close examination, no NONE nada -- neck issues -frets ARE good - tuners ARE good - bridge IS good - Solid Top is without a crack it s wood is FREE of cracks, Back is OK no buckle rash , no buldge to its Spruce top, The bridge is tight and NEW MARTIN STRINGS and just JVGuitars Set up this baby plays and sounds amazing at this price point unbelievable! Made in Japan quality with a beautifully grained high grade Mahogany medium soft V NECK feels like an old Martin too ....looks at the neck grain they used a beautiful Honduran mahogany not African or other this one is cool See the Pics of that ...its original Tortious pickguard is nice too..... nearly 40 years old its amazing but she's not new or mint of course she has a few minor doinks and plenty of that natural vintage patina and such but overall she's JVG condition rated at vintage excellent used condition rated. She Plays with easily and will bring a warm smile to your face when playing GREAT TONE fingerpicking rich and punchy its a very fun guitar to play... she's over 45 years old and in this kind of condition..... you better snap this gem up before she's gone or I change my mine and keep her for myself...haha this is my business I need to sell but you get my point its a good one folks. This is one amongst several of the FG150's Red Label Nippon Gakki's we have and I call it ( # 3 ) Contact Joe by email to BUY it: JVGuitars@gmail.com.
There’s a lot of knowledge here to digest, so the best advice anyone can give you is not to sweat it too much. You aren’t going to become a pedal encyclopedia overnight, and even if you could, you’d be missing out on the fun experience of trial and error that comes with figuring out your first pedals. The truth is that some of the most distinctive guitar and bass effects ever recorded have been the result of artists experimenting with effects units they’d never used before – especially in the 1960s, when pedals were brand-new to everyone.
Wonderful and excellent nicely summarize how the market feels about the Washburn WL012SE. Many are impressed by its solid build, while others are into it for the aesthetics. It also gets plenty of love for its build and sound quality. Even experts like Ed Mitchell of Music Radar have mostly good things to say, he concludes his review with this statement: "The WLO12SE is a beautifully realized reminder that you should take the time to narrow your search and find a playing experience and tone that suits your needs perfectly."
Another option would be to instead buy a mobile guitar interface and download one of the many guitar apps available, but I typically don’t recommend this for beginners. These apps are very robust, and can be a little overwhelming for someone just starting out. First learn how the controls on a real amp affect your tone. Once you’ve grasped these basics (and acquired some basic guitar skills), you can think about buying some fancy apps and effects.
Introduced around the same time as the White Falcon, the Duo-Jet (6128) became another hit for Gretsch, especially after a young George Harrison played one with The Beatles in the early sixties. While finding an original Gretsch is very expensive, the brand still makes faithful reproductions of most of its historic models and are popular with guitarists with a penchant for vintage.
The EB-28 bass was very similar to the guitar in appointments and controls. It had a 22-fret ebony fingerboard, 33.825″ scale, a DiMarzio P-style neck pickup and a DiMarzio J-style pickup at the bridge. It, too, carried a Schaller bridge and Schaller M-4 tuners. Around 4,854 each of these 28 Series guitars and basses were built between January 1981 and February 1982.
So, I've done what any self-respecting woman with a rather obsessive personality could do and trawled YouTube for all the best videos of Swift performing stripped down versions of her songs where it's just her singing against a minimal melody. I'm sure you'll agree that as much fun as queen of the squad, awkward dancing hero era Swift is, that these videos are all the proof you need that she doesn't need dance moves or supermodel friends on stage in order to rule.
Electro-acoustic guitars are commonly referred to as semi-acoustic guitars. Electro-acoustic guitars have pickups that are specifically designed to reproduce the subtle nuances of the acoustic guitar timbre. Electro-acoustic pickups are designed to sound neutral with little alteration to the acoustic tone. The Ovation range of Electro-acoustic guitars have under-the-saddle piezo pickups and a synthetic bowl-back design. The synthetic bowl-back ensures a tough construction that stands up to the rigours of the road while offering less feedback at high volumes. Ovation were the first company to provide on-board Equalization and this is now a standard feature. The Taylor Electro-acoustic range uses the traditional all-wood construction and the necks of these guitars have a reputation for superb action and playability. Yamaha, Maton and many other companies manufacture Electro-acoustic guitars and the buyer is advised to test as many models and makes as they can while taking note of the unplugged and amplified sound.

In 1967 Lipsky introduced a line proto-copies carrying the Domino brand name. Most were inspired by European models such as the EKO Violin guitar. Among the offerings were two models sporting a California cache, the #502 Californian, an asymmetrical copy of a Vox Phantom, and the #CE82 Californian Rebel (wouldn’t California Rebel have made more sense?) shown here.

One of modern metal's key figures, Dimebag Darrell founded Pantera with his brother, drummer Vinnie Paul Abbott – forging a style that combined brutally precise, punk-honed grooves with splatter-paint melodic runs. After he was tragically shot by a deranged fan during a show with his band Damageplan in 2004 – on the anniversary of John Lennon's death, freakishly enough – the tributes rolled in from fans, peers and forerunners. "One of the greatest musicians to grace our world," Black Sabbath's Geezer Butler said simply. "Rest in peace."


Harmony was the largest US guitar manufacturer between the 1930s and late 1960s. At the height of the guitar boom in the mid-1960s, Harmony was building more than 1000 instruments per day. Not only were they producing Harmony-branded guitars, there was a time when the Chicago-based factory was making guitars for 57 different brand names and trademarks. At one point, Harmony was selling 40 percent of their guitars through Sears & Roebuck under the Silvertone brand.

Imagine someone telling you about an old-time music store that had a huge stash of unsold guitars from the 1960s, plus some guitar effects from the ‘70s lying around in its upper floors in Newark, NJ. Well, you can bet it didn’t take long for me to beat a path to the door of Newark Music City (calm down; this was a long time ago and, while the company still exists, it’s long gone from Newark). Even though I was late in the game, there were still unmined treasures to be had. A real Temple of Doom!
Fall 1954: both models have 2 volume and tone knobs, $39.95 and $59.95 respectively. The single cutaway bodies were made of solid Poplar wood, and are known as the "peanut" body shape at 11.25" wide. Then used a solid aluminum bar running from the peghead to the bridge for strength. "Coke bottle" pegheads are used that are 5/8" wider across the two "E" tuners than the later "Coke bottle" peghead shape. This model was also available under the Silvertone brand name with the "lightening bolt" peghead.
While audio feedback in general is undesirable due to the high frequency overtone, when controlled properly, it can provide true sustain of the sound (instead of using a distortion/compressor to make quiet notes louder, or a feedback of a signal in a circuit as in a delay unit). Several approaches have been used to produce guitar feedback effects, which sustain the sound from the guitar:

Firstly, they are cheaper than their tube counterparts, which is why most beginners will end up starting on a solid-state amp. They are also much more efficient, easier to maintain (no need to change tubes), lighter to carry, and less fragile. While the tone of modern-day solid-state amps can be incredible, they don’t tend to be as fluid or responsive as tube amps. For more on solid-state amps, check out our dedicated solid-state amp page.


Bottom Line: The biggest downside of the Line 6 M5 is that you can’t use more than one effect at the same time, and that it’s missing a looper function. But then again, you’re asking it to be more than what it’s trying to be. This is a Swiss Army Knife of a pedal that can morph and change shapes to whatever effect you need (we should also mention it’s true bypass when switched off). Sure, the drives/distortions are a weak area, but most effects are nearly indistinguishable from the classic pedals they are trying to emulate. We love this quote from a user:
Built-in mics aren’t necessarily the budget option as they can be seen on some high-end guitars. They’re extremely helpful when you need volume but not so much where the acoustics of your setting, say in a concert hall, carries sound projection for you. However, the internal mic can raise problems for the performer as they’re prone to producing unwanted feedback. Multi-blend pickup and preamp systems allow you the flexibility to switching out from the mic when it proves to be problematic. However, if you’re going to install one yourself, look for one with a high feedback resistance of exceptional quality.
The output jack is where you plug in your guitar lead. These are generally 1/4″ and transfer the signal created by your pickups to your guitar amp. They are usually connected from a ground wire and input wire. When the lead is plugged into the output jack the signal can be transferred. These can often be a source of trouble and need to be kept tight to reduce noise.
With a 25.5” scale length, the 314ce features a Grand Auditorium body shape with a playability-enhancing Venetian cutaway, allowing good access to the highest of the 20 frets. The top of the body is made from solid Sitka spruce, along with solid sapele back and sides, leading to a beautifully rich and powerful tone that’s well balanced between warm and bright.
While tone and volume should be your foremost considerations, you should also determine what extra features you really need. Built-in effects are great if you want a no-hassle, all-in-one package, but they may not be as flexible as external effects pedals and processors. An effect loop is useful for effects like digital reverb and delay, but it’s not essential if your effects consists of a few stomp boxes. Line outputs with speaker emulation are helpful for home recording, and external speaker outputs are great for expanding your live rig.

if you wish to use your computer as an "effects pedal", I recommend IK Multimedia's Amplitube 3 - it has an extensive array of effects and amplifiers with all kinds of crazy and fun tones to mess around with. Theres a ton of effects, so I recommend you check it out. It is a bit pricey though ($199 for the standard edition). If I were you, I would download the Amplitube CustomShop, which is basically a free demo version of the full software.


Better known simply as an acoustic guitar, the “steel” strings (they come in all kinds of construction, not just steel) are louder and brighter, and a much more versatile instrument to play. Folk, rock, jazz — acoustic guitars have it all covered. Those steel strings also chew the ends off your fingers until eventually you develop hard calluses on the tips — very handy for plucking boiled eggs out of the saucepan.
My first electric was a Decca, and a friend had one too. Mine was the one pickup style and his had two pickups. This was back in 1972. These were cheap but played very well and I wish I still had mine. There's one on Ebay right now that's just like the one I had, only ten bucks so far. I remember the great sustain and feedback I could get through it playing Hendrix songs!
Finally, according to Longworth, the earliest examples of these instruments had laminated bodies made of maple, rosewood and mahogany. A second series was made with a combination of maple and rosewood. A third series was made with maple and walnut. The #1034 EM-18 shown here appears to be very early yet has maple and rosewood, so it’s not clear if materials are indicators of chronology or simply the vicissitudes of fate (or the woodshop, as the case may be).
Artists have been converging on this sound for more than a decade before Davies used it. In 1951, “Rocket 88” by Ike Turner and the Kings of Rhythm took advantage of a distorted amplifier that had been damaged in transport. The same thing happened to the Johnny Burnette Trio in 1956, when Paul Burlison pulled out a vacuum tube from his amplifier after it fell off the top of the band’s car. He loved the sound so much he used it to record “The Train Kept a-rollin,” which inspired a whole raft of British musicians:
The guitar’s ‘shoulders’ – where the body meets the neck joint – will usually be slightly more sloped than you’d see in a classic dreadnought acoustic, while the base of the body will also be narrower than larger sized guitars. All of which makes for a more comfortable and less physically intrusive playing experience. Another obvious benefit of this is the portability of parlour guitars. Their relatively smaller form factor means they lend themselves well to being slung in a case and carted off to gigs with less hassle than, for example, a jumbo-sized acoustic.
No matter how good a tech may be, his preferences are going to be different than yours on string height, etc. And he is never going to use the exact same amount of pressure fretting a note as you do (affects intonation adjustments). So, the best you can hope for is finding a good tech with good comunication skills, willing to listen to what you want. I'll admit I've never tried to find one, but that sounds more difficult than learning to do the setups yourself, which is what I did.

It's a basic rule of physics (called Faraday's law) that a changing magnetic field produces electricity. So a guitar string will produce electricity only for as long as the magnetic field is changing—in other words, for only as long as the metal string is moving. Once the string stops vibrating, the sound stops. In that respect, an electric guitar is just like an acoustic one.

If you're in a small, unsigned band, it's very important to choose an amp that's loud enough - as not every venue will mic your amp. Ironically, bigger artists don't need to worry about this, since they are safe in the knowledge they'll always have a good sound and their amps will always be mic'ed. That's why Seasick Steve plays a small Roland Cube amp, but it's not necessarily a great choice if you're in a band who plays live.


An overdrive is almost always at its best played through a tube amp set at medium to upper-medium volume, since the amp itself is doing a major part of the job, the pedal just being the boot that kicks its butt into juicy break-up a little quicker. Conversely, demo one DI’d into a mixing desk or portastudio as described earlier, and in most cases the breed sounds absolutely awful: harsh, raspy, cold, and artificial. It can be a shocking look at the evil side of that $350 vintage Tube Screamer you just bagged from eBay. Now stop crying, and plug it back into your AC30.
You can get an entirely new perspective of the fretboard by starting from the C-A-G-E and D chords. This book can help create a roadmap for the guitar, where you'll be able to know each fret's note name - one of the most important things to learn when playing. If you're unsure about learning this system, do a search for the CAGED system on YouTube and see if it's something you'd be interested in.
Jump up ^ "New Sales Avenue Opened with Tone Amplifier for Stringed Instruments". The Music Trades. October 20, 1928. This tone amplifier is electrically operated either by alternating or direct currents. It consists of two major units -- an electro-magnetic pick-up and amplifying unit. The electro-magnetic pick-up is built within the instrument and is attached to its sounding board. The unit is connected with the amplifier, which produces the tone and volume required of the instrument.
The Epiphone Dove Pro continues to work its old school magic into the hearts of guitarists, new and experienced alike. Its classic styling seems to be a major part of its appeal, as most reviewers attest to. Value for money comes in as close second, with many satisfied that they are getting a great looking solid guitar at a very justifiable price point. It is used in many different musical styles, including country, folk and even rock.

The AF75 also has an ART-1 bridge and a VT60 tailpiece for increased resonance, improved tuning stability, greater sustain and an enhanced tone. It is also equipped with Classic Elite humbucking pickups at the neck and bridge, producing a rich and nuanced tone with just the right low-end heft. Tone shaping is an easy affair with the Sure Grip III control knobs, which are designed for non-slip, precise control.
Carvin is well-known for their fantastic guitars and amazing amplifiers, but that’s not all. There is one aspect in particular that makes Carvin guitars just a little bit more unique. They only sell their instruments by special order. Going to a random guitar shop to try a Carvin is just plain impossible. The only way you can test one is by going to one of their few stores in California. The base models cover just about any style you can imagine. From acoustic guitars to electric basses, they’ll cover your needs. When it comes to styles, they have those heavy metal jagged edges to smooth curves. They are highly customizable and it’s a certainty that they’ll have what you want. If you’re extremely picky or just know exactly what you want, Carvin will help you get your dream guitar. You can choose the tonewood, materials, different colours and finishes, basically anything and everything is available.
Amazing guitars, specially the Custom Series full solids. You can choose from variety of tonewoods and soundboard combination and 4 different shapes. Offering almost every player's preference. You can also choose options such as soundport off-the-rack. Great craftsmanship, amazing tone, and superb playabality at an amazing price. Great guitar, and definitely not an OEM brand. They only make their own guitars.
Introduced around the same time as the White Falcon, the Duo-Jet (6128) became another hit for Gretsch, especially after a young George Harrison played one with The Beatles in the early sixties. While finding an original Gretsch is very expensive, the brand still makes faithful reproductions of most of its historic models and are popular with guitarists with a penchant for vintage.
The people at VOX know a thing or two about creating great sounding amps, after all the AC30 is probably one of the most famous amps of all time. The VOX Valvetronix VT40X modelling guitar amp actually recreates the sound of these great amplifiers and so many more. In fact, you have 11 famous amps to choose from which can expand to 20 when using the included Tone Room Editor as well as 13 effects built in. The hybrid digital/analog power amp provides you with all the warmth of a tube amp but with digital stability! If you want more power, you have the VOX VT100x or the smaller version – the VOX VT20X.
Modern electric guitars most commonly have two or three magnetic pickups. Identical pickups produce different tones depending on location between the neck and bridge. Bridge pickups produce a bright or trebly timbre, and neck pickups are warmer[when defined as?] or more bassy. The type of pickup also affects tone. Dual-coil pickups sound warm, thick, perhaps even muddy[citation needed]; single-coil pickups sound clear, bright, perhaps even biting[citation needed].
Here we have a wonderful made in Japan Takamine from a while back in 1990 this makes it officially a Vintage guitar next year but its tone sounds rich and vintage now! As you will see looking her over this F349 is GORGEOUS!.... better than average condition in all aspects... few only minor doinks here or there but NOTHING to detract from this Taks sound - playability or sheer playing enjoyment... Excellent ALL Mahogany build construction, high AA grade mahogany, masterfully built - fit and finish excellent, neck angle is excellent so action is very good so playing is a breeze and quite enjoyable not all can state this...its 1-11/16ths at the nut so its a nice feeling medium profile " C " shape, frets are very good - excellent can barely tell its been played in fact if you polish them they will be as new...beautiful quality rosewood fingerboard no dead spots or funny buzzes noted...This guitars wood still shines like glass and overall is an outstanding original example with an addition of the best sounding Piezo transducer cleanly installed if I didn't tell you -you may not have noticed but she is also fully electric and sounds amazing amplified I played her threw my Princeton Reverb amp and it truly sounds bold & rich and rings like a bell with the newish Martin strings I installed (I have played this guitar in my office for a short while ) so they should be done stretching and are clean and ready to perform. This guitar is nearing 25 years old so don't expect a brand new guitar this is a beautiful vintage guitar and has personality and patina of a well treated well loved professional grade instrument. Its in excellent vintage condition. JVG Rated 9/10. If you want a rich sounding great playing fun vintage Japanese Dreadnought guitar well this one should put a grin on your face when you open her up and see it. Enjoy! Let me know if interested thanks for looking. Joe contact us at: JVGuitars@gmail.com.
Besides instrument inputs and speaker outputs (typically via 1/4" jacks), an amp may have other inputs and outputs. These can include an auxiliary input jack (sometimes with its own level control, for a drum machine), "send" and "return" jacks to create an effects loop, a “line out” jack and an extension speaker jack. Practice amps sometimes have a 1/4" headphone jack, or stereo RCA or mini jacks for connecting a CD player, portable media player or other sound source. Some guitar amps have an XLR input so that a microphone can be plugged in for singing. Guitar amps that include a mic input are in effect small, portable PA systems. Some amps, typically bass amps, have an XLR connector to provide a balanced output from the preamp section to go into a PA system or recording input.

When I received this Epiphone LP Special II Les Paul Electric Guitar, Vintage Sunburst I discovered there are cracks in the wooden body, under the paint. I can tell that the wood was cracked before it was painted because the paint flows into the crack in one instance on the back, is visible up over the "shoulder" close to the strap peg and can be seen under the paint on the front. In another instance the paint bridges a crack on back below the cutout shoulder and can be seen under the paint in the right light front and back. Is this normal? (There was no sign of shipping damage on either the outer carton or on the inner product box). Regarding playing, the bass strings buzz on the frets when fretted (not my fingers) which probably can be corrected by adjusting the bridge. I was under the impression that Epiphone guitars were ready to use right out of the box. I have contacted Epiphone/Gibson company to advise on the cracks and the buzzing bass strings. I am concerned that the cracks may get worse, and if this is this normal for a guitar in this low price range made in china. I got a reply from Gibson Customer Service which said "We would need to see pictures, but it would be highly unusual if there actually were cracks in the wood. The set up on an instrument can shift during shipping and handling, so a new instrument may need to be set-up." I will probably return this instrument and buy one in person from a music store where I can see and try the product before buying it.


Get used to people staring when you bust out this guitar. Its thinner mahogany body with satin finish delivers killer sounds while also being ridiculously pleasing to the eye. When it comes to tonal diversity, this guitar hits it out of the park. With Super Rock II pickups, you’ll be able to shred crunchy riffs while also being able to switch the pickup to single-coil mode to get those beautiful, clear, resonant tones. To spare you some technical mumbo jumbo, Schecters have hardware that promises to keep your guitar in tune longer, which is always a plus! Grab a Schecter Stealth for just under $500. 

PLOTTING OUT THE PEICES Once you have drawn out the shape of the body you can then locate and draw the cavaties that the pickups and electronics will go and set you bridge placement. It is good to know wher the center of the guitars boy is so you can make sure that the pickups and bridge are in good alignment with the neck pocket. I like to take a piece of poster board and trace the fretboard of the neck on it and cut it out, that way I can properly place my bridge according to my scale length.
Telecaster is the original solid body guitar. Ever since this iconic model has only grown in popularity. This Tele we look it at here is a bit different. It comes packing an H/S/S pickup configuration, which you don’t see that often on these guitars. With that said, it feels and sounds awesome. I had it setup with a vintage Marshall Plexi and the sound was just impressive. There’s definitely more tonal range than you get in a standard Telecaster.
Washburn started in Chicago in 1883. They manufactured guitars and various other string instruments. Now they’re a division of the US Music Corp and owned by JAM Industries USA, but they continue to produce quality guitars. In the beginning, they mostly focused on banjos and mandolins. Starting in the 80s, they branched off into producing signature guitars. Now days they make a wide variety of instruments and are very beginner friendly. Washburns are made from fine-quality wood. This means they can get pricey. But the quality the solid wood offers is well worth the price increases. They’re a decent american company that make very consistent instruments. 
Though this decision can be based on preference, we think the best guitar for a beginner is the acoustic guitar. Classical guitars have a wider neck, which can be hard for younger students or physically smaller individuals to handle when learning guitar chords. Meanwhile, the electric guitar is designed to be played with an amplifier, which comes at an additional cost. Acoustic guitars are simple and require little to no additional equipment, making them ideal for beginner guitarists.
It is typically not possible to combine high efficiency (especially at low frequencies) with compact enclosure size and adequate low frequency response. Bass cabinet designers can, for the most part, choose only two of the three parameters when designing a speaker system. So, for example, if extended low-frequency performance and small cabinet size are important, one must accept low efficiency.[24] This rule of thumb is sometimes called Hofmann's Iron Law (after J.A. Hofmann, the "H" in KLH).[25][26] Bass cabinet designers must work within these trade-offs. In general, to get extended low-frequency performance, a larger cabinet size is needed. Most bass cabinets are made from wood such as plywood. Gallien-Kruger makes a small extension cab made of aluminum.
Silvertone starter pack is incredibly hard to beat. The candy blue finish gives the guitar a gorgeous aesthetic that looks fully professional. The pickup selector has 5 positions, and there are two tone knobs to give even more control over the sound. Stratocaster fans will love this guitar! Also included in the set is a gig bag, small Silvertone amp, strap, 5 picks, Allan wrenches, strings, a clip-on tuner, and a tremolo bar.
In some modern valve effects, the "dirty" or "gritty" tone is actually achieved not by high voltage, but by running the circuit at voltages that are too low for the circuit components, resulting in greater non-linearity and distortion. These designs are referred to as "starved plate" configurations, and result in an "amp death" sound.[citation needed]
Some delay pedals also come with full looping abilities, allowing you to play detailed multi-part melodies completely by yourself. A few artists to look to for great examples of delay pedal use are Angels and Airwaves, U2 and Muse. Reverb pedals are an entirely different animal. It brings its own unique type of sustain to a note, infusing the sound with strong texture and character through its distinctive echo. Creating a sound not quite like any other effect, reverb calls to mind the energetic surfer rock of the 1960s, such as Dick Dale's version of "Misirlou." You can stay true to those vintage roots or take the effect in a new, modern direction—it's up to you. With the added dimension they bring to your tone, you'll want to use your delay and reverb effects pedals at every performance. They make a unique contribution to the sound individually and even more so when you use them as a team.
If you are looking for a guitar that is not only surpassing quality levels but also looks classy, Gretsch is the one you require. The company certainly makes some genuinely beautiful instruments that appeal your eyes. Although, some Gretsch guitars come with a considerable price tag, yet they certainly worth the money. Likewise, you can also find several hollow and semi-hollow body guitars at Gretsch that are quite affordable. It means every player from all levels will surely find something of their interest over here.

Yamaha is one of those names that you don’t often see outside the realm of keyboards and digital pianos. While their footholds in fairly limited on the stringed instruments market, their quality is well known. Yamaha builds some of the most balanced and best performing electric guitars in their respective categories. That is simple the truth. Now, they might not be as popular as other brands, but that is a whole different story.
But it would be a mistake to think that this guitar is only suitable for Jason Mraz strumming and happy songs, because it’s just as good for heavy metal! That sweet little tone can easily be transferred to heavy music, or why not pop, jazz or blues? In other words, this guitar is extremely versatile and is the best option for musicians who play many different types of music and want a guitar that works well for pretty much everything.
My dad has an old Norma classical 6 string from the 70s.I've been told it was a cheap brand and not especially remarkable,but his is still holding up and still sounds good.It had to have a neck repair many years ago,but still plays well.I'm not sure what the tone woods are.The neck,back and sides are dark,like mahogany,the top is very orange and kind of ugly.

Usual general wear. Some noticeable impression marks on face. Piece of decorative trim missing from headstock. Plays but Action is high. Neck truss needs adjusting. There is a slight buzz with action as it is (sounds like it's from bridge area). Frets look good. Not perfect but a classic in good condition in need of a little tune up. SOLD AS IS. Ships wrapped and secured inside a Road Runner hard shell case which itself will be plastic wrapped. Ships Priority from Alaska.


Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Quilted - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, Diecast, Nickel, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black, Blue

Before we wade in, please note that National Dobro and subsequently Valco, more than most other manufacturers, were notorious for putting together guitars with parts left around. This, combined with the fact that they routinely used components (especially bodies) provided by other manufacturers, means that you are likely to find instruments with details inconsistent with catalog descriptions, and they may just be Kosher.
Manne guitars - This Italy based guitar manufacturer produces instruments with unique features. The first Manne guitar was built in 1986 and they continue to provide finely crafted instruments based on some very original design concepts. Manne's design philosophy: hand craft the finest stringed instruments then offer them to the public at a reasonable price.
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Gibson Les Paul Standard Electric Guitar This iconic instrument is regarded by many as one of the best electric guitars in the world because of its looks, sound and feel. The 2019 Gibson Les Paul Standard features a figured maple top, mahogany back and neck, rosewood fingerboard with cryogenically treated frets, calibrated BurstBucker Pro humbuckers and an asymmetrical Slim Taper neck shape for total playing comfort.
zircon wrote:Is there any particular reason you're opposed to Kontakt libraries? All of the plugins you mentioned are sample-based themselves, with the notable weakness that you would not be able to change the mapping, grouping, programming (etc), unlike with Kontakt. As someone who uses a lot of virtual instruments, I'd say it's always preferable to have a sample-based instrument in an open sampler plugin since you can see what's going on under the hood and change things like envelopes as needed.
Many Sixties rock acts made political statements, but the MC5 were among the first rockers to make a serious commitment to revolution, aligning themselves closely with the White Panther Party (a Black Panther offshoot organization) and effectively serving as the White Panthers’ agitprop machine. Their blue-collar Detroit roots lent a certain gritty gravitas to their stance. These weren’t effete rock stars dabbling in left wing chic but working-class guerrillas with ammo belts strapped across their bare chests and guitars brandished as rifles.
Recently Vox has emerged as a leader in the digital amp modelling market[citation needed] with the release of its Valvetronix line of digital amplifier modellers. Utilising Korg's REMS modelling software, the Valvetronix are driven via a low-power tube preamp stage and a solid state power amp. The latest line, the AD15VT / AD30VT / AD50VT / AD100VT, has received awards and praise[citation needed] for its recreation of eleven classic guitar amplifiers. The company did not reveal which non-Vox amplifiers were modelled in the product manual. The eleven amplifier types as named on the dial are:
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Unlike a piano or the voices of a choir, the guitar (in standard tuning) has difficulty playing the chords as stacks of thirds, which would require the left hand to span too many frets,[40] particularly for dominant seventh chords, as explained below. If in a particular tuning chords cannot be played in closed position, then they often can be played in open position; similarly, if in a particular tuning chords cannot be played in root position, they can often be played in inverted positions. A chord is inverted when the bass note is not the root note. Additional chords can be generated with drop-2 (or drop-3) voicing, which are discussed for standard tuning's implementation of dominant seventh chords (below).
I ordered this item from their ebay store, roughly the same price with shipping, very easy to read point to point instructions, this was my first diy pedal, I've fooled around with a soldering iron but not enough to speak of. I bought it because I was not pleased with my Peavey Valveking 112's boost sound, it not only boosts the signal, it changes the tone, from the reviews I watched on youtube, it sounded like this pedal would do the trick, for the price, and the fun of a first time build, I love it, it boosts the signal with no change in tone, I'm not super impressed with the pedal's distortion tone, but I am spoiled with that saturated tube tone, there is some extra hum when I turn on the pedal, I don't know if this is my fault from the build, or what, but I would ... full review
-Would be nice to edit the string colors, add training modes telling you which finger to hit the note with, how many times to play through a sequence (so you learn/memorize the song, vs just respond to the game - i.e is the chorus sequence repeated 4 times before moving onto the next part of the song?),indicating strumming patterns to help with timing (newbies tend to down pick everything and just pick faster when the notes are closer vs switching to an up-down strum) etc.
Actually, company founder Leo Fender's first business was repairing tube circuitry equipment including radios, phonograph players, and home music amplifiers. He noticed the growing popularity of amplifiers for home music systems and branched out into selling music records and renting out PA systems he had designed from his repair shop. Then he got even more involved in music by making and selling Hawaiian lap steel guitars containing a proprietary pickup system which he bundled with his own newly designed amplifiers in 1945. The following year he changed the company name from Fender’s Repair Service to Fender Electric Instruments Company.
The D-55 is Guild's dreadnought, very similar in shape to the all-conquering 14-fret Martin on which it's based. However, if your used to a handful in the neck, the D-55 dreadnought makes for quite the contrast: a gloss neck, and slimmer nut accentuating the neck's overall thinness; more a D than a C profile, to invite comfortable first-position chords, aided by an impressively low action. That Adirondack bracing is doing its job, too, because string separation, definition and dynamic range are all notable and it feels loud, alive and resonant when playing soft or hard. If this guitar is anything to go by, the latest Traditional models are absolutely up there with the other big American names, offering superb quality craftsmanship and world-class tone. The D-55 is a potentially serious workhorse that has every likelihood of outlasting and outperforming any one of us as long as we can keep on picking - a sumptuous strummer.

Most commonly associated with classic rock, the Les Paul lives up to its reputation as a rock ‘n’ roll machine. However, the guitar is actually capable of a lot more. Something many don’t recognize about the Les Paul is that in the right situations it actually has a gorgeous clean tone. Les Paul, the famed inventor and namesake of the Gibson Les Paul, used the Les Paul extensively in his career. The famed jazz guitarist did go on to use a highly modified version of the Gibson Les Paul, but he did use the original variant of the instrument when it was initially released. Bob Marley also used a Les Paul to great effect.
One of the earliest studio effects created by taking advantage the distance between the record and playback heads on tape recorders, delay duplicates the original signal and repeats it after the original sound is played. This can be repeated over and over for an echo effect, or be a single repeat that produces the slap-back sound popular in rockabilly. The time between repetitions can be very short, measured in milliseconds. Or it can be longer and more dramatic. Delays can also add a rhythmic element to your playing. There are many different kinds of delay effects available, and most offer a number of different types in the same unit.
Though not much is known about the production of the Hi-Flier after about 1977, it clearly came to an end — and clearly has had an impact on players in the vintage market. Used by guitarists like Cobain and Lee Ranaldo of Sonic Youth, as well as many others in a variety of bands, the Hi-Flier gained notoriety as a unique guitar with a sound as striking as its looks.
i play a squire jazz bass, it has always sounded good and played very good. wanted to " jazz it up" a bit so i was searching for new pickups and control pots and stumbled on your site.. first thing i thought was oh wow, how freaking cool is that.. after ALOT of searching, i purchased the obsidian wire control pots for a jazz bass as well as the control plate since mine looked pretty worn.. i also got the v-mod pickups from fender. install was just as smooth as advertised, especially since i had never even cracked open a bass before, ever.. done in less than 30 minutes ( as far as the wiring ) the pickguard had to be removed and cut to fit, and the old knobs didn't fit ( totally expected ) it is now done and i cannot believe the difference in tone and clarity.... all i can say is your products are innovative and really much more than i expected... thank you..." - Bob Vintage Jazz Bass® Wiring
Power amps are rated in volts and generally come in .7V, 1V, and 1.25V. Most preamps don’t produce strong enough output to power a 1.25V. Most manufacturers don’t rate the average output of their preamp which makes things even harder in determining compatibility. What you can look for is the “line level“, “dBu”, or “dBv” information when researching this aspect of your acoustic electric guitar.
If the microphonic problem is not due to the cover, or is with a singlecoil pickup you have two options. First is to wax pot the pickup. The second is to pot the pickup in something else. Laquer was once commonly used, but it can cause a problem with some types of insulation (disolving it) and prevents future repair (other than full rewind). I have found a great alternative to both. It is vinyl sanding sealer. (I'm using Sherwin williams wood classics interior sanding sealer) This stuff penetrates deeply, dries solidly, and allows for repairs same as wax does. It requires no special equipment or care. Just submerge the pickup wait till bubbles stop appearing, pull it out and set it on a paper towel to dry. Once the excess has run off (a minute or so) wipe off the top and bottom of the pickup with a rag and allow it to finish drying. In it's intended use it dries fully in an hour. I leave them overnight.
The S2 Custom 24 features a mahogany body with book-matched flame maple top, that follows the same double cutaway shape and detailed arch as the original Custom 24. The guitar's mahogany neck is also not far off, being rafted from mahogany with PRS' distinctive 25" scale length. It has a 24-fret rosewood fingerboard that has a comfortably narrow nutwidth of 1.656". Finally, the S2 Custom 24 owes its voice to its dual humbucker pickups that include the S2 Vintage Bass and the S2 HFS Treble - which provide PRS' characteristically open and clear tone. You can push or pull the tone knob for single-coil tones should you need them.
In the late 1950s, various guitars in the Kay line were assigned new model numbers; according to the 1959 catalog, the Thin Twin became K5910 and the Electronic Bass became K5965.[18] Both instruments remained in Kay's catalog offerings with only minor cosmetic variations until 1966, when Kay revamped its entire guitar line to only feature budget instruments. Kay also manufactured versions of the Thin Twin guitar under the Silvertone (Sears) and Old Kraftsman (Spiegel) brands.

The wah-wah pedal is one of the most identifiable of all guitar effects, yet is one of the most simple as well.  An easy way to think of it is that you have a tone knob under your foot.  It is literally just that.  A rocker foot pedal allows you to accentuate high frequencies when your toes are down.  When you put your heel down, you accentuate the bass frequencies.
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Fender Pro Series Stratocaster and Telecaster Case   New from$119.99In Stockor 4 payments of $30 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Epiphone E519 Hardshell Case for 335-Style Guitars   New from$129.00In Stockor 4 payments of $32.25 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Epiphone Hardshell Case for Les Paul-Style Guitars   New from$129.00In Stockor 4 payments of $32.25 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Fender Deluxe Molded Case for Stratocaster or Telecaster   New from$149.99In Stockor 4 payments of $37.50 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING See All Electric Guitar Cases
Hi everyone! I have a quick question regarding string action. I have just gotten my 2003 Standard set up a few months ago, but I am having trouble with how low the action is; strings slip off of my fingers during bending now. If I just turn the screws on the Tune-O-Matic bridge to heighten the action a little bit, without touching or adjusting the truss rod, individual saddles, or tailpiece, will that screw up my intonation?

After Spanish guitar manufacturer Ibáñez e Hijos was bought by Telesforo Julve in 1933, Hoshino Gakki, who used to import these guitars to Japan, decided to build them himself under the brand name Ibanez Salvador, which would later become Ibanez. In the 1960's and 1970's, the production was limited to Gibson, Fender and Rickenbacker copies (and the associated legal proceedings). But in the 1980's and 1990's things started to get serious thanks to guitar players like Steve Vai and his famous JEM. Also noteworthy is the birth of the Universe model and the more affordable RG series, which are leading products in the "Super-Strat" market segment today. Even though Ibanez also builds quality hollow-body guitars for famous endorsers (Pat Metheny), the brand has become a reference among metal heads and shredders. Ibanez guitars have a very fast neck and usually pickups with a high-output level to go with it.
In 1962 Vox introduced the pentagonal Phantom guitar, originally made in England but soon after made by EKO of Italy. It was followed a year later by the teardrop-shaped Mark VI, the prototype of which was used by Brian Jones of The Rolling Stones. Vox guitars also experimented with onboard effects and electronics. The Teardrop won a prize for its design. In the mid 1960s, as the sound of electric 12 string guitar became popular, Vox introduced the Phantom XII and Mark XII electric 12 string guitars. Vox produced many more traditional 6 and 12 string electric guitars in both England and Italy. It may be noted that the Phantom guitar shape was quite similar to that of first fretted electric bass guitar, the Audiovox "Electric Bass Fiddle" of 1934.

The relationship between perceived volume (loudness) and power output in watts of an amplifier is not immediately obvious. While beginners sometimes assume that there is a linear relationship between perceived volume and wattage (e.g., beginners may think that a 50-watt amp will be much louder, or about ten times louder than a 5-watt amp), in fact the human ear perceives a 50-watt amplifier as only twice as loud as a 5-watt amplifier (which is a tenfold increase in power in watts). Doubling the power of an amplifier results in a "just noticeable" increase in volume, so a 100-watt amplifier is only just noticeably louder than a 50-watt amplifier. Such generalizations are also subject to the human ear's tendency to behave as a natural audio compressor at high volumes.
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Two and a half steps down from standard tuning. Used in Swedish death metal by bands such as At The Gates, Dismember, Edge of Sanity, Entombed, Amon Amarth, and Arch Enemy (during the Johan Liiva era), as well as Fear Factory, Carcass, Type O Negative, Cathedral, Seventh Void, Fleshgod Apocalypse, Sepultura, Five Finger Death Punch, Soulfly, Within Temptation, Triptykon and guitarist Kirk Windstein of Crowbar and Kingdom of Sorrow.

The Vintage El Dorado Leather Guitar Strap is meticulously hand-tooled in traditional Western motifs by leather artisans with decades of experience. Each strap is an individual and unique work of craftsmanship that you'll be proud to display on your guitar. The designs date back to late 19th century Western leatherwork, used extensively in the decoration of saddles, saddlebags, belts and holsters.
Primarily, people also use Mahogany wood to construct the guitar neck. Since it’s able to prevent the neck from warping, you’ll never have to worry about any impact that can deteriorate the quality of sound. Furthermore, the body ends up with a spruce top. In comparison with cedar, spruce is much brighter and provides better echoes through the instrument.

The modern "tone block" is a design-based marketing approach from EBMM starting in their guitars a few years back. It originally involved routing out an alder body, fitting a block of mahogany from just behind the bridge to the neck join and applying a top to the guitar. It is an alteration of the design and some purists believe they hear a difference in the tone of the guitar versus plain alder bodied or mahogany instruments.
However, unlike a boost pedal, the overdrive effect is not dependent on the amplifier to have a distorted sound. The overdrive pedal will internally boost the input signal so much that the top of the signal wave will be forced to naturally shrink itself. This is called soft clipping and it simulates amplifier like clipping as though an amplifier was being overly driven, hence the name overdrive. The distortion pedal will also boost the input signal but will then add resistors within the circuitry to not just shrink or soft clip the wave form but completely flatten the wave peaks. This is called hard clipping. For more understanding on the differences between soft clipping and hard clipping see the illustration below.
The specs for this stripped-back Singlecut are identical to PRS's gloss Standards; the difference is in the paint - or, rather, the lack of it. Instead of that faster S2 gloss, here we have a nitrocellulose satin finish that doesn't bother with grain filler - you can easily see the body wood's grain and feel it on the neck - for a thinner finish, which will wear and age the harder you play it. Plus, thin finishes don't choke any vibrations or resonance. Along with the dot-only fingerboard inlays, this Satin Singlecut looks very workmanlike, but the build and parts still deliver the goods. The body is one-piece mahogany, the neck three-piece. The bridge is the USA Stoptail, the locking tuners, like the pickups, made in Korea to PRS specs. The pattern regular neck is a nice mainstream handful, and setup and intonation are, as ever, top-drawer. Mahogany guitars can be dark-sounding and here, yes, there's a throaty midrange focus, but a clean-edged ring and resonance that provides clarity and punch, much like the pickups that nail an almost P-90-ish sizzle and classic-rock poke. The four-control layout means there's plenty of adjustment, and the coil-splits on the tone controls add authentic single-coil cut. Clean, low, medium or high-gain, this one's a banker: the most rock-out, resonant blue-collar PRS we've ever played, and that's why it's one of the best electric guitars, especially at this price point.
Everyone listens to music for different reasons. The transition of 'acknowledgment' to 'love' of an artist or song is an entirely unique experience, starting from smell, location, time of day, time of year, repetitions over time etc., that triggers interest. Obviously, anyone who bashes John Mayer is stuck on radio feeds and needs to explore his music before judging on pop tunes, and almost all Hendrix aficionados are late adopters that buy trends (a marketer's dream).
Kay was best known for its mid-priced guitars, (i.e., quality guitars priced below top-of-the-line instruments like Gibson and Gretsch models) as well as its budget instruments. Kay made guitar models for its own brand name and guitars branded as Silvertone for Sears, Sherwood and Airline for Montgomery Wards, Old Kraftsman for Spiegel, Custom Kraft for St. Louis Music,[2] Truetone for Western Auto,[3] 'Penncrest' for JC Penney, etc.[16] Also, Kay produced a line of archtop acoustics called Kamico.
Fire Guitar Tuner tunes your guitar in seconds. This tuner tunes makes it easy to play in perfect pitch all the time and eliminates any need to buy those expensive microphone tuners at the music shop. Play a note, and this guitar tuner will display it. And once you''re in-tune, Fire Guitar Tuner will incinerate your mind as it lights ablaze in this Tuner''s fabulous glow animation. Why spend money on a guitar tuner when you can have one for free ?

When Electric Guitars first hit the music market way back in the early fifties, they weren’t easily accepted by the people. However, later electric guitars became an integral part of the music industry throughout the world. The following article describes this amazing music instrument, which unlike its conventional counter-part, works on the laws of electromagnetism.
Most of the guitars, banjos and mandolins my customers use and collect have been made by major manufacturers such as Martin, Gibson and Fender or a few superb handcrafters such as D'Angelico and Stromberg, but over the years, by far the greatest number of instruments purchased in the USA and worldwide have been lower-priced student models. Prior to 1970 most student grade instruments sold in the USA were made here by companies such as Kay, Harmony and Regal in Chicago or Oscar Schmidt of Jersey City, New Jersey, and Danelectro of Neptune, New Jersey. When I started out playing and collecting guitars in the mid 1960s, brands such as Harmony, Kay, Stella, Silvertone and Danelectro were the standards for student use. We saw very few Oriental imports.
The MOD Reverb Tanks are high quality upgrade units. Some of the major differences between the MODs and other reverb tanks are that the transducers are wired directly to their respective RCA jacks as opposed to current production tanks where transducers are connected by a detachable plug to their respective RCA jacks. This makes the tanks less receptive to any outside interference. The original Hammond, Accutronics and Gibbs tanks from the 1960s were also wired directly to their respective RCA jacks. In addition very close attention has been paid to the spacing and size of the lamination of the Transducers resulting in a more vintage like tone.
Imagine someone telling you about an old-time music store that had a huge stash of unsold guitars from the 1960s, plus some guitar effects from the ‘70s lying around in its upper floors in Newark, NJ. Well, you can bet it didn’t take long for me to beat a path to the door of Newark Music City (calm down; this was a long time ago and, while the company still exists, it’s long gone from Newark). Even though I was late in the game, there were still unmined treasures to be had. A real Temple of Doom!
I'll be referring to a lot of different producers in this article, and it's understandable that you may not have initially heard of some of them, even if you've probably heard some of their productions. To avoid an avalanche of parentheses, I've put a list of all the producers I mention into a box which runs across the bottom of this article. The box also includes a few of their most celebrated credits, so that you can have some idea of where each of them is coming from stylistically.
By 1947 with the release of ‘Call it Stormy Monday’ – his biggest hit, Walker preferred playing with a smaller band lineup of six members. This size of band bridged the gap between the solo rural blues players like Robert Johnson or Charley Patton and the larger big band ensembles of the 20’s and 30’s. It became popular and adopted by bands that would find success over the next few decades.
Our list of best electric guitar brands will remain incomplete if we do not add Schecter in it. Schecter Guitar Research is a firm that evolved from a startup into a guitar giant during the recent years. Aimed mainly at the heavy metal side, Schecter produces several guitars that metal players look. However, players from all genres will find something of their wish at Schecter as it touches every side of this domain. Created with the utmost care, delicacy, and artisanship, these guitars exhibit the most amazing and high-end features that suffice to surpass most expensive brands in the market today.

A very good option in the budget pedal market. Comes with a great number of effects to combine for solid sounds. Virtually all the factory pre-sets are worthless and are sort of demonstrations of what the pedal can do. But you have plenty of user saves and setting up good tones is straight forward and simple. The tuner in this and my handheld one never agree. Someone is lying!

Every year we bring a new opening act on tour with us, and every year I have the harsh task of going on stage after some of the finest players in the business. This summer’s tour was no exception. With Montgomery Gentry in the support slot of the Toby Keith Biggest and Baddest tour, I had my work cut out for me. Two of the best axe slingers the music scene has to offer—Frank Bowers and Bo “two-timechampion” Garrett—have some of the greatest chops and sounds on the circuit today.


Bass chorus effects use a cycling, variable delay time that is short so that individual repetitions are not heard. The result is a thick, "swirling" sound that suggests multiple instruments playing in unison (chorus) that are slightly out of tune. Bass chorus effects were more common in the late 1980s, when manufacturers such as Peavey included chorus effects in its bass amplifiers. In the 1990s and 2000s, more sophisticated bass chorus effects devices were created which only apply the swirling chorus effect to the higher parts of the bass tone, leaving the instrument's low fundamental untouched.[5]
Large-diaphragm models are popular, with Neumann mics particularly favoured. The famous U87 studio workhorse is probably the most commonly mentioned, but it's by no means the only contender. Eddie Kramer, Steve Albini and John Leckie single out its predecessor, the U67, for example, while both of the earlier U47 models (valve and FET) receive name checks from people such as Steven Street, Glenn Kolotkin, Butch Vig and Bruce Botnick (note that U47s were marketed under both Neumann and Telefunken brand-names, but they're essentially the same mics). Neumann aren't the only game in town, though: AKG's C414B-ULS is probably joint most popular large-diaphragm model alongside the U87.
The solution is pretty simple actually. When setting your intonation it should look like two sets of steps. You should never need to move the saddles all the way forward or turn them around. If you want to adjust something do it in a way that allows you to keep this configuration. You do that and you'll never have to worry about tuning issues period, let alone a g-string.
For my tastes, position 1 on a clean tone can be a bit too boomy. Even if one backs the volume a bit to take the edge off, it doesn't quite suit acoustic-style strumming. Position 2 is perfect for these sorts of things, though. I'd always use it for the small high chords you often find in funk and reggae. Position 2 is also a nice way thinning a distorted tone without it cleaning up too much, like Position 1 with the volume dialled down does. If you have your rig set so Position 1 screams, Position 2 will sing.

Description: Body: Maple & Poplar & Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Maple & Poplar & Maple - Neck Attachment: Glued - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 1 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Binding: Cream - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Pearloid block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: ABR-1 - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, Grover Tuners - Pickups: Burstbucker 1/Burstbucker 2 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Faded Cherry - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case, Certificate of Authenticity - Made In: America

One glance at this bad boy reveals just how accurate it is to the 1959 version. We are talking exact same tubeless truss rod assembly, aniline dye, exact same finish... everything. In terms of hardware, they went with a set of Klauson Deluxe tuners and period specific Tune-o-Matic bridge. The custom humbuckers were coiled and voiced to perfectly match the original PAF design from the late '50s which was done using Alnico III magnets and 42 AWG wire. The performance of this guitar is an experience that is rarely found out there.
Martin is an American guitar company specializing in acoustic guitars. Most of their instruments are still built at their facility in Nazareth, Pennsylvania, and their legacy dates back all the way to 1833. Martin, in many ways, has helped to shape the look and sound of the American acoustic guitar. In fact, they invented the now-classic dreadnought shape in an effort to help American country musicians who wanted more projection out of their guitars onstage.
This is a wide range of electric guitar series that have a stylish body and deliver high-quality sound. Cort guitars are fabricated by South Korean manufactures and have been on the market since 1973. Those who are keen on the appearance of the guitar can opt for this brand of electric guitar. This is an electric guitar that is available at an affordable price range between 10,000 to 40,000 INR.

"With a note of music, one strikes the fundamental, and, in addition to the root note, other notes are generated: these are the harmonic series.... As one fundamental note contains within it other notes in the octave, two fundamentals produce a remarkable array of harmonics, and the number of possible combinations between all the notes increases phenomenally. With a triad, affairs stand a good chance of getting severely out of hand."
With smaller combos, it is worthwhile experimenting with their position within the room, especially when a distance mic is being used. For example, raising the combo further from the ground will result in a different reflected signal path length for ground reflections. Placing a reflective material such as hardboard or linoleum on the floor between the amp and mic will emphasise any coloration this produces. Where a small combo or practice amp lacks bass end, you can try to exploit the boundary effect by placing a mic in the corner of the room, then facing the amplifier into the corner. If the added bass is too much, move the mic and amplifier away from the corner until the tonal balance seems right.
One thing to point out here. When you take the strings off a Les Paul, there is (usually) nothing holding the bridge or the tailpiece on, so be careful with this. That said, I do want to mention that while the strings were off this guitar, I took the opportunity to lower the tailpiece. I prefer the tailpiece to be lowered all the way to the body if possible. Many believe that this will give you better tone/sustain, although it's hard to prove such a thing scientifically. That said, there is very little reason for the tailpiece to be anywhere other than as low as possible anyway.
Acurious phenomenon that ac-companies certain guitar compa-nies is an inability to translate success from one medium to another. For instance, Martin has never been able to transfer its reputation for high-quality acoustics to electric guitars. And Fender has never been able, on its own, to really succeed in marketing acoustic guitars. Instead, it purchased Guild.
Another popular modification is to reverse the electric polarity of one of the pickups (or one coil of a dual-coil pickup). When two pickups are selected, this produces a very thin and weak sound, due to phase cancellation between the pickups.[21] The closer the pickups are to each other, the greater the cancellation and thus the weaker and thinner the resulting sound. In case of a humbucker this results in a sound that is so weak as to be almost unusable, as well as the loss of the pickup's hum-cancelling properties (due to the coils being magnetically out-of-phase, but electrically in-phase with each other).[22]

For subtle modulation just set every knob at about 11 o'clock. You'll get a thin, shimmering layer over your acoustic guitar's tone that doesn't drown out the natural resonance of the instrument. The pedal doesn't boost your signal or add any kind of volume. All you'll hear is a clear, simple effect. Additionally, the CH-1's two stereo outputs allow you to easily split your signal between two amplification sources. Simply plug your primary source into output A (mono) and the secondary source into output B.


For our purposes, I’ll break pedals down into four overarching categories: 1) Boost, Compression, Distortion, and Fuzz; 2) Modulation; 3) Echo and Delay; and 4) Filtering and EQ-Based effects, and this series will focus on individual types that come within each of those larger categories (for example, Modulation includes many quite different effects, such as chorus, vibrato, phasing, and so on). This is not to say that some manufacturers or other writers couldn’t categorize things differently, and certainly a few examples below could be safely lifted out of the heading I have stuck them in and accurately described by another category. It doesn’t matter all that much. These headings are mainly a means of breaking down the sonic results of the enormously varied range of pedals that exists out there, and taking a brief look at what makes them tick.
He was no virtuoso, and that's the whole point: By snatching electric guitar from note-shredding technicians and giving it back to artists, freaks and poets, Kurt Cobain became one of the most important players ever. Cobain didn't invent alt-rock. But with his love of Cheap Trick, the Melvins and Kiss, he gave it the metallic power necessary to conquer the world. His playing wasn't all untutored squall, either: See the unconventional chord progression and mastery of quiet-loud-quiet dynamics on "Lithium" – and pretty much every other Nirvana song.

I myself own an Ashton and I think that they are overall really great guitars. I own an Ashton SL29CEQLTSB Acoustic Electric and it is simply amazing. It comes with a built in tuner and the strings last for quite a very long time. I have owned a couple guitars in my time and I am happy to say that the sound is impressing. So all of the other people who put down this guitar either know nothing about guitars, are super spoiled and want the best of the best, or just had bad luck with them.
The Fender Stratocaster born in the early 1950's in Southern California, and more precisely in Fullerton, near Los Angeles, hometown of the Fender(tm) Musical Instrument Co. Since it's official debut in early 1954, the Fender Stratocaster(tm) has proved to be possibly the most successful electric guitar ever manufactured. Quite a legend in it's own right! The Strat(tm) - as it is affectionately known has to be acknowledged as one of the major landmarks in the history of the guitar. It enjoys a popularity undiminished by time and changing fashions and remains quite clearly a firm favourite among many generations of players, no matter what their style of music....... Fender Stratocaster 'Tex Mex' Jimmie Vaughan signature model - $999
Also remember pedals change in sound character with different guitars/pickups/amps so it’s worth experimenting before buying. If you’re not sure where to start try a few ‘classics’ as a reference point. Ibanez’ Tube Screamer or one of it’s imitators of which there are many, are mild overdrives that also usefully liven up cheaper amps, particularly when volumes need to be kept low.
The first popular humbucker was introduced by Gibson in 1955, and the world of music was never the same again. In general, the humbucker offers a thick, rich tone, with a medium to high output, which is why they are staple of heavy rock and metal (although equally popular in jazz music). You will find that humbuckers are used by everyone from Eddie van Halen and Dave Mustaine, to Jimmy Page and Dimebag Darrell. Humbuckers feature two coils wired out of phase with each other, and – as the name suggests – are used to eliminate the unpleasant 60-cycle hum that plagues many single-coil pickups. Gibson’s ’57 Classic Plus is a legend in the world of humbuckers, although be sure to check out our humbucker page for more excellent models.
Looper – A time-based effect that records a “phrase” of your playing and loops it back repetitively. These phrases can play sequentially in a song-style format or overdubbed to create dense layers, as used by one-man band style performers, vocalists to beatboxers. Larger loop pedals have more than one pedal for multiple tracks and allow you to add in-built effects to your loops. Remember: If you want to record your chain of effects pedals, make sure your loop pedal is always at the end of effects chain.

We are going to start with a Fender amplifier. This Mustang I V2 is a 20-watt combo amp that has won over hearts of a lot of players because of its ease of use and versatility. With one channel that has 24 presets and eighteen amp models you won’t be scrambling for diversity. Apart from that, of course, you get some of the major controls like Gain, Volume, Treble, Bass, Master, Preset Select, Modulation Select, Delay/Reverb Select, Save, Exit and Tap Tempo. The size and price of this model really do not do it justice (I mean, don’t make it more pricey but still). You also will find that this amp features USB connectivity, chromatic tuner and black textured vinyl covering with silver grille cloth that accentuates the simple and elegant look of this model. While 20-watt, as you might know, is not much (unless it’s a tube amplifier) this baby is pretty great if you want it for practice.
Taylor does produce a more budget friendly line of instruments with the 200 series, which is ideal for beginners looking to capture their famous sound at a fraction of the price. Taylor also produces small bodied guitars such as the Baby, Big Baby and GS Mini, which rival their full bodied instruments at a lessened price and are perfect for kids and beginners to learn on (6).
One of the tricky parts about teaching yourself to play is knowing what to focus on. As I said, I strongly encourage you to start by learning as many chords as possible because even tunefully outlining them through a progression will help you keep up in just about any setting. But that’s a pretty broad ask. This book is laser-focused on what modern guitarists need to know to best express themselves. Each of the 200 exercises comes with an audio track to help you learn how to listen, too. Though there are no shortcuts to greatness, consider this a quick-start guide that will help you know where to look. A fine complement to this might be Alexander’s The Practical Guide to Modern Music Theory for Guitarists, which takes a similar approach to learning the theory.
Of all of the variables available to a musician, from amps to instruments, the effects pedal is king.  They can offer a player the ability to change the tone and color of their sound in a way that can create unique sonic textures never before heard, or reproduce the traditional reliable tones of yesteryear.  Many players, like U2’s The Edge, use effects to carve out their own personal identity amongst the herd.
There are two basic types of pickups for electric guitars, Single Coil and Humbucking (double coil). The most practical difference is that single coils tend to sound crisp and bright while humbuckers tend to sound warmer (for more information see Seymour Duncan's detailed explanation). An electric guitar can have any combination of the two types and the combination on a guitar is described using the first letter of the pickup type in order from the one closest to the bridge. For example a classic stratocaster will be described as SSS meaning all three pickups are single coil. A more recent development is the HSS strat which means it has a Humbucker at the bridge with two Single coils. I've put the pickup configuration of each guitar below in brackets after the model name so you can easily see which pickups each guitar has and in what positing they are.
At 10.8 pounds and 11.4 by 12 by 6.7 inches, the Crush 12 is one of the smallest amps we tested, so it’s easily portable and stashable—although with just 12 watts and a 6-inch speaker, it’s the least powerful of our top picks. It has a ¼-inch headphone jack but no line input, so you can’t connect a smartphone for play-along sessions. While our sample came in the company’s iconic orange color, it’s also available in black—although as Wirecutter editor-at-large Geoffrey Morrison put it, “Buying an Orange amp in black is like buying a sports car with an automatic transmission.”

The Effect: Volume pedals are a simple, yet frequently essential piece of equipment for many musicians out there. This device’s function is quite self-explanatory – it allows the user to control the level of the sound output, allowing them to increase or decrease the volume of the instrument. Additionally, many of these products can also operate as expression pedals, or a control for some of the other effects on your pedalboard. These gizmos are typically known for being strong and sturdy pieces of gear, as they should since they get stomped on quite a lot. If you are looking for a proven solution, go for the Boss FV-500H, if not, check out our Best Volume Pedal reviews to find your perfect match.
The SparkFun Proto Pedal is an easy-to-assemble kit that makes building guitar effect pedals easier. Let’s face it, most guitar pedals start with all-too-similar circuitry – you need the input and output jacks, the bypass switch, and a barrel jack for power input. In some pedals, there may be as much wiring involved in the jacks and switch as there is in the effect itself. The SparkFun Proto Pedal takes care of the hard part and provides you with a simple infrastructure; all you need to do is decide what simple circuit to make to gain your desired effect, and you’ll be ready to rock!
On the extreme end of things, adding a lot of reverb to your tone can create large, expansive soundscapes where the notes are less distinct and everything forms one carpet of background sound. Reverb pedals often have a number of controls, from the most basic knobs controlling the volume of the effect (known as “mix”, or how much reverb is mixed into your guitar signal) and the length each note reverberates for (known as “decay”), to more versatile pedals that have controls for different kinds of reverb such as “small room”, “plate” and “arena”.
Play power chords easily with one-finger barre'd across two (or three) strings. Simply place your index finger over the sixth & fifth stings at the same fret. (You can also barre the 4th string, which is also a D, and will match the root of your chord one octave higher.) The resulting power chord is named after the note played on the sixth string. At the first fret, it's D#5, at the third fret, it's F5. For tunes blues-rock tunes that use a lot of 5 & 7 power chords, such as those made famous by Chuck Berry, Drop D tuning allows you to play those 7 chords as though they were normal power chords.
I keep coming back to this point because it’s absolutely essential: learn how to solo over chords. I don’t mean simple chord arpeggiating, even though that has its place, too. If you can follow the chord changes with smooth, soulful playing, you will never be fenced in. You can drop into any style, any band, and any situation. Most of us get stuck playing a given scale pattern for years before something shakes us up. Make this the foundation of your learning with this book.
A more affordable but still high-quality pair from Audio-Technica would be the M20x, which still shares some features with the premium products offered by this manufacturer. The drivers — in this case at 40 mm in size — feature the same rare earth magnets, and the voice coils are made of copper clad aluminum wire to provide for the clearest possible tones.
You are bidding on a previously owned and in good playing condition Breedlove Atlas Series AD25/SM acoustic electric guitar. This auction is for the guitar and case you see pictured. No battery is included. Nothing else is included. It comes as pictured. Please take a moment to look at the pictures and get a better idea of what you are bidding on. There is a nick on the face of the guitar (see picture 3 for a better look). This guitar has scuffs and scratches from use. It could use a good cleaning. The electronics have been tested and are in good working condition. The neck is straight and the frets have plenty of life in them. The guitar is in good playing condition. Please take a moment to check out my other great items! Thanks ccloan.
Look at the action. Action is the distance between the fingerboard and the string at any given time. Make sure you hear no buzzing from the guitar when playing a note at a normal weight. Try it at the 5, 10, 12, fret, etc. and listen for the 'buzz' of strings banging on the frets below it. If any guitar is like this, ask the music store (any good one will do this for you) to adjust the neck if you can try it out in playable condition. If they can adjust it for you, then there is no problem, it just needed adjustment.

“The tone thing is amazing because you can have one rig, have three different guitar players, and each guy can play the same exact thing and it’s going to sound different,” says L.A. Guns guitarist Stacey Blades. “It’s all in the hands.” Waara from Line 6 agrees. “Any guitar player will tell you, at the end of the day, it’s in your hands and you will sound like you will sound,” he says. The percentage of influence the hands wield is shockingly high.
There's no reason not to try an effect if you want to. Sure, some kind of effect might mask some bad habits (reverb and delay might sort off mess your timing), but distortion for example is almost like playing another instrument, and if you're into punk/rock, the sooner you try it the better. You will have to figure out ways to mute the strings and reduce string noises, which is part of the technique.
Hi, it seems like the problem lies in your hands and not in the guitar itself. If you are a beginner, you must start slowly and build up strength in your hands. A good way is to simply buy a "stress ball" or other hand exerciser. A "Gripmaster" one that lets you work each finger individually, which can be very useful, they are available for about $20 at most music stores.
As has already become apparent, the resonator instruments which made both the National and Dobro names in the late ’20s and ’30s were not the only effort underway to increase the volume of the guitar. The ampliphonics found immediate acceptance among Hawaiian players, notably Sol Hoopii, the very first to record with them when he used a prototype in his first session for Columbia on October 18, 1926. This was used on “Farewell Blues.” But they still didn’t satisfy the desire of orchestra guitarists to get out of the rhythm section. In addition to metal resonator cones, electricity was waiting in the wings, and National, Dobro and National Dobro would play a significant role, both directly and indirectly, in that ultimately triumphant development.

While Dave Matthews Band has no more confirmed dates on their schedule, Matthews and guitarist Tim Reynolds have a number of duo performances on the docket, including a slot at Farm Aid 2018 in Hartford, CT on September 22nd alongside Willie Nelson, Neil Young, John Mellencamp, Chris Stapleton, Sturgill Simpson, Kacey Musgraves, Margo Price, Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats, Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real, and Particle Kid. Dave and Tim also just announced their return to Mexico for a concert destination event set to take place February 15th–17th, 2019.
This is a guitar that we’ve featured before as our top pick for those who are looking for an electric acoustic for less than $500, so there’s no surprise that it’s back as one of the very best prospects at any price at all. Epiphone might be Gibson’s more affordable brand, but that certainly doesn’t mean you aren’t getting very high quality when you choose the Dove Pro.
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Note from the Editors: While exploring the “Psychology of Tone” last month, we learned that digging into the mushiest part of any signal chain (the listener’s noodle) leads to a better understanding of the tonal journey involved. The journey itself may be more important than you realize. We continue this series dedicated to messing with your head with a look at the science involved with the creation of those tones. Everything can be explained with science, right?
Hey Frank i removed the pick guard and discovered why they were so tall.I just bought the guitar the day i asked you about it and it was late very late after midnight and i found out someone used pick guard screws to just secure them to the PG…lol And i have it back together correctly installed now.No pictures yet here is a better detailed description.The body is solid wood stained factory dark cherry.Rosewood fretboard semi-enclosed tuners…SSS P/U arrangement in a 3 ply black PG and 5 way switch and probably weighs 8 lbs.Thanks ….Larry
Dissatisfaction with vintage units of this type usually centers around their limited gain, and their inability to sound truly fierce with Drive cranked up to full. The more exemplary users of this type of pedal, however—such as Stevie Ray Vaughan or Eric Johnson, who were both masters of early Tube Screamers—usually kept the Drive control in the lower part of its range, where the sound remains more natural and, yet again, serves as an excellent pre-boost to drive a good tube amp into distortion when the Level control is set high enough. Some players also find older pedals built to this design to have a distinct midrange hump, a slightly wooly tonality, and/or a lack of low end (as ever, depending upon the ears of the player you talk to). Consequently, a lot of newer makers have accounted for these in their redesigns. Visual Sound’s Route 66 pedal has a Bass Boost switch, Ibanez’s own recent-era TS9DX Turbo Tube Screamer has a Mode control that takes you from classic sounds to settings with more distortion and more low end, and plenty of other makers address both in their variations on the circuit.

1958-1969: replaces the "U" models and now has a double cutaway body with short horns. Masonite/poplar frame bodies, 13.25" wide. Models numbers include the "Standard": 3011 (black 1 pickup), 3012 (bronze 1 pickup), 3021 (black 2 pickup), 3022 (bronze 2 pickup), 5025 (blond 2 pickup). The 3021 is considered THE Jimmy Page model. "Seal" shaped pickguard and concentric knobs on 2 or 3 pickup models. Round control knobs.
When we talk about instruments, sometimes the guitar gets all the credit. Of course guitars are great, but an electric guitar on its own—even a hollow-body—is only so loud. For giving one of the world's favorite instruments its voice, guitar amplifiers deserve a little love too. These amps and speakers are the powerhouses of your audio setup, turning your guitar's output from a simple electric current into those familiar sounds.
Yes, don't do it. Take her to a music store and let her play whatever they have that's within your price range, and let her take home the one she most enjoys playing. You don't need to spend a ton. I just bought a used Breedlove for a similar gift, and it was under $200 at my local music store. The key is finding one she doesn't want to set down. That's what will get her playing.
Our professional guitar technicians inspect each instrument by hand, then perform a full, and precision setup. All brand new guitars need proper setup after shipment to suit your personal preference that would strongly correlate to your playing style. Truss rod adjustments are made to alter the straightness (flatness) of the neck. Truss rods often require adjusting when temperature and humidity change the amount of bow in the neck. Weather, specifically temperature and humidity, may have a dramatic impact on the way your instrument plays. All instrument woods expand and contract with seasonal actuations in temperature and humidity, and naturally, string height and playing action are affected. The neck needs a simple truss rod adjustment to correct any problems like fret buzz and bow neck which can be easily done by guitar experts. And also, you may adjust the bar of bridge. Please be advised that guitar necks are crafted from wood, and they will sometimes shift during shipping and as the temperature/humidity/elevation changes. An important part of maintaining your guitar is knowing how to adjust the truss rod. When a guitar experiences temperature and humidity swings, such as when seasons change, it can develop a slight bow in the neck that results in a guitar that plays buzzy or is suddenly much harder to fret. If this situation occurs, you can often correct the problem simply by tightening or loosening the truss rod. You may bring your brand new guitar in your Local Guitar Shop for proper setup and adjustment of the truss rod.
I'm going to break this review into pros and cons. Pros: Top notch wood, electronics, wonderful bound neck and great machine heads. The action/fretboard are wonderful (after being setup). Sounds beautiful!, and more so if you take my advice. One last pro, all of the cons are easily remedied. Cons: The saddle, nut, and bridge pins are plastic (kind of like putting crap tires on a good sports car). I replaced the saddle and nut with tusk, and for the bridge pins I went with brass. It was like the volume went from a 4 to a 8, and the tone went from nice to beautiful and singing. It was about a 40$ upgrade, that made it sound like a thousand dollar guitar. This is the first time I bought a guitar before playing it. The gamble more than paid off. Been playing guitar for 25 years, and I

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If you pine for the days when giants scarred the earth with odes to their arena-sized wangs, then Michigan’s Greta Van Fleet are your new jam. Not only do they look like they’ve stumbled out of the pages of 70s Vogue, they also have a preternatural knack for brow-raising classic rock anthems. Guitarist Jake Kiszka is highly capable, combining Page-like pentatonic ping-pong with a bag of lead licks that channel everyone from Jefferson Airplane to Mike Campbell. 

In 2007, Gibson announced the idea to create a computerized Les Paul, dubbed the “Robot Guitar” which was released on December 7, 2007. The guitar has a computer integrated into the body with a “master control” knob next to the volume knobs, which can be pulled out, turned, or pressed to issue different commands to the guitar. One of the more notable features is the ability to tune the guitar to standard tuning simply by pulling out on the master control knob and strumming the guitar, while the tuning pegs adjust themselves to standard tuning. Another use of the master control knob is to be able to tune the guitar to alternative tunings, such as drop D, by pressing on the control knob to fit the setting. The new Les Paul has a new custom silverburst blue finish.[30] While the product was advertised in the American popular press as a “world’s first”, similar systems, some external, have been in use for decades.
Obviously listing something as subjective as musical greatness is tough and inevitably going to cause disagreement, but this is another level. Including John Frusciante and Jack White was a little absurd. Excluding players like Yngvie Malmstein, Dave Mustaine, and Slash was questionable. Excluding Eric Clapton was shocking, offensive, but almost admirable. Very little genre diversity, too. By my count, half of these players are blues or heavily blues-based. The complete absence of heavy metal is glaring. This list is ambitious, but golly, this is pretty darn bad.
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I personally use Vegas, Sonar, and REAPER. I would not recommend Vegas or Sonar for live playing, if for no other reason than both have crashed on me during recording sessions, and I do not easily forgive that. REAPER (Audio Production Without Limits) never, ever crashes. It’s not as full featured as some DAWs, but what it does, it does well. I use it for all my recording.
The neck, which extends from the guitar body, includes the fretboard and headstock on which the tuners are mounted. It contains a metal truss rod that prevents neck bowing and twisting, and can be adjusted to help the guitar maintain consistent pitch. The fretboard is usually made from a thin layer of rosewood or ebony, although some models, usually with maple necks, have a fretboard made of the same wood as the neck. Most fretboards have position dots or other markers inlaid in the fretboard. Some models have markers on the upper edge of the fretboard offering the player easy visibility.
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The four-string guitar is better known as the tenor guitar. One of its best-known players was Tiny Grimes, who played on 52nd Street with the beboppers and played a major role in the Prestige Blues Swingers. Multi-instrumentalist Warren Ellis (musician) of Dirty Three and Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds is a contemporary player who includes a tenor guitar in his repertoire.
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