There were precedents for the palm-muted, ultra-percussive chug James Hetfield gave Metallica (Judas Priest, Motörhead), but he made it the gold standard of Eighties metal. He's never been a monochromatic headbanger, though, delving early on into the delicate picking of "Fade to Black" and later embracing the more nuanced hard rock of the Black Album. "I wonder if James Hetfield knows how to play the drums," Dave Grohl once said. "Because basically he's taking care of the percussion and melody of Metallica's songs with his guitar. And it's great."
Death By Audio Reverberation Machine Spring type Reverb/synthetic atmosphere creator with Altitude control that allows the reverb to distort. Also has a light/dark switch to control color of the reverb. Pedal was used in a smoke free studio, never gigged and has no velco on bottom. Pedal has small speckled blemishes in paint next to volume knob. This has no effect on function. Pedal is in perfect working order. This is a great pedal for people who want to add more texture to their sound. Ive used it on synths, drum machines and samples- handles any source without discretion. The only reason for letting it go is that i have too many spring type reverbs. Thanks for looking .
First, you have so many different types music – flamenco, jazz, country, blues, classical, rock and pop, to name just a few. Then you have musicians performing at different levels – there are the beginners who’ve never held a guitar before, there are experienced guitarists playing in bands, then there are professional guitarists, who make a career out of playing the guitar.
{"eVar4":"shop: books sheet music and media","eVar5":"shop: books sheet music and media: performance instruction","pageName":"[gc] shop: books sheet music and media: performance instruction: method and instruction books: guitar methods: guitar method books","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[gc] shop: books sheet music and media: performance instruction","prop18":"skucondition|0||historicalgrossprofit|1||hasimage|1||creationdate|1","prop1":"[gc] shop: books sheet music and media","prop17":"sort by","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"category","prop11":"guitar method books","prop5":"[gc] shop: books sheet music and media: performance instruction: method and instruction books: guitar methods: guitar method books","prop6":"[gc] shop: books sheet music and media: performance instruction: method and instruction books: guitar methods: guitar method books","prop3":"[gc] shop: books sheet music and media: performance instruction: method and instruction books","prop4":"[gc] shop: books sheet music and media: performance instruction: method and instruction books: guitar methods","campaign":"gcdirectsourcecode1","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] sub category4"}
Use of a slide or bottleneck. The term slide refers to the motion of the slide against the strings, while bottleneck refers to the material originally used for such slides: the necks of glass bottles. Instead of altering the pitch of a string in the normal manner (by pressing the string against a fret), a slide is placed upon the string to vary its vibrating length and thus its pitch. The slide can be moved along the string without lifting, creating continuous transitions in pitch.
Tube enthusiasts believe that tube amps produce a "warmer" sound and a more natural "overdrive" sound. Typically, tube amps use one or more dual triodes in the preamplifier section to provide sufficient voltage gain to offset tone control losses and drive the power amplifier section. While tube technology is, in many ways, outdated, tube amps remain popular since many guitarists prefer their sound.[15]
At some point, possibly in 1967 – please forgive the fuzzy chronology, – Unicord was purchased by Gulf + Western, the big oil/hospitality conglomerate. This was part the corporate acquisition mania rage of the mid-’60s which included deals for Fender (CBS), Gretsch (Baldwin), Valco (Seeburg), Kay (Valco) and Gibson (Norlin). Either just before or just after the Gulf + Western purchase of Unicord, Unicord was merged with Merson. It was probably then Merson moved from New York City to Westbury.
When we take a look at a guitar neck, it is important that the guitar is under string tension and in playing condition when measured. The PLEK measures the instruments neck and fret height with the instrument strung up to pitch. The computer ascertained a 3-D like graph of the fret board surface, including the position and height of the strings. Thanks to the PLEK SCAN the relief of the neck made by the string tension is taken into account while calculating the process-parameters. The operator then has the ability to manipulate the parameters to give the player an optimal playing instrument.

The neck contains a metal truss rod that prevents it from bowing and twisting due to string tension and environmental factors. Adjusting the truss rod corrects intonation issues that prevent the instrument from being tuned properly. This truss rod can be adjusted either at the headstock, or just inside the body of the guitar, at the base of the neck.

{"eVar4":"shop: guitars","pageName":"[gc] shop: guitars","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"shop","prop18":"skucondition|0||historicalgrossprofit|1||hasimage|1||creationdate|1","prop2":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop1":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop17":"sort by","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"category","prop11":"guitars","prop5":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop6":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop3":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop4":"[gc] shop: guitars","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] category"}


Gibson makes authorized copies of its most successful guitar designs. They are less expensive than those bearing the Gibson name. A former competitor, Epiphone was purchased by Gibson and now makes competitively priced Gibson models, such as the Les Paul and SG, sold under the Epiphone brand,[69] while continuing to make Epiphone-specific models like the Sheraton, Sorrento, and Casino. In Japan, Orville by Gibson once made Gibson designs sold in that country.[70] Gibson has sought legal action against those that make and sell guitars Gibson believes are too similar to their own.
Although the hollow bodies of these guitars create a mellow, naturally voiced tone perfect for jazz, vintage country and other styles that require warmth and clarity, they can also snarl. For proof of the latter, check out Lennon’s performances on “Revolution” and “Cold Turkey.” Too much volume or proximity to the amplifier, however, and hollow bodies can howl with feedback unintentionally. And that’s why the semi-hollow body guitar was invented.
Mr Swike appears to know what he is talking about, and has undertaken a body of work that is unfortunately for sale while only being 70% complete. Some of the instructions are incomplete (like showing what North polarity looks like on Stew-Macs polarity tester, but not South), and at least one (the Varistor mod) wildly inadvisable. Why not get the book done, checked out by objective professional parties, and then released as a complete reference book?
The Science of Electric Guitars and Guitar Electronics considers the electric guitar and related accessories from a scientific point of view. The majority of books about electric guitars try to avoid using mathematics when describing the scientific phenomena related to the electric guitar. However, mathematics is an invaluable tool in the design processes of all areas of technology, even when designing musical instruments and audio electronics. This book presents simple mathematical methods for modelling the electric guitar as a signal source for electric circuits such as effect pedals and amplifiers. In addition to modelling the electronics inside the electric guitar, the principles of operation of some vintage guitar effects and amplifier circuits are explained and analysed using systematic methods of circuit analysis. The book is intended for everyone who is interested in the design and analysis of basic analogue electronics used in the electric guitar and guitar-related accessories. The presented topics cover the whole signal chain from the guitar strings to the loudspeaker. Therefore, a solid foundation is established for creating own designs in guitar electronics using basic components of analogue electronics.
Above here's a blast from the past. The reissue of the 1960's Harmony Stratotone H49 Jupiter. Originally this guitar was manufactured in Japan, but these babies came straight from China many years later. They copied them right down to the T including those Gold Foil Pups. Guitar is hollow body and has a volume, volume, tone, tone, master tone knob, with a really cool 3 way switch. They don't come up on Ebay to often and this ones like brand new but was briefly used. Sold
FU-Tone is very excited to welcome the amazing Zakk Wylde to our list of fine artists. Zakk, of course, needs no introduction and has a established career with Ozzy and his own band Black Label Society. Here are some photos of Zakk with Adam at a recent show with the FU equipped Dean Dimebag Razorback Vertigo guitar! Check out some of the new photos with Michael Wilton from the current Queensryche Tour with his ESP Signature model guitar featuring FU-Tone Big Block and other upgrades. Check out Nuno Bettencourt on the cover of Young Guitar Magazine with his Washbun N4 Equipped with FU Titanium saddles, 42mm Brass L Block, and EVH Dtuna! Also, FU-Tone is really excited to introduce some really cool new bridge parts and accessories for Telecaster Guitars from Vibramate and Bigsby! Enjoy!

Lastly, there's Session mode. When you need to take a break from structured lessons or just want to shred for a while, enter this mode and play to your heart's content. Rocksmith 2014 will even provide you with a backup band: tell the game what instruments you want in your power trio or quartet and the AI will follow your lead on the drums, bass, keys or anything else in its arsenal. We highly recommend the kazoo.
Valve Amp or Solid State Amp? There's no right or wrong here, but, for tone alone, valve amps are way better. If you can afford a valve amp, just go ahead and buy one! They're the amps all the great bands ever used - from Beatles and Rolling Stones to Arctic Monkeys and Radiohead, 99% of all professional musicians simply prefer valve amps, like the Vox AC30 or Fender Hot Rod Deluxe III. But there's nothing wrong with solid state amps - the audience at a gig wouldn't be able to tell the difference.
There are just a few minor differences. For example it has a bolt-on mahogany neck instead of a set neck, and the fretboard is made of rosewood rather than expensive ebony. We don’t really care about that, since rosewood actually is really good for fretboard since it’s naturally oily. You don’t want a super dry fretboard. It’s good for the sound too, since it captures some extra overtones that make your tone fuller, nothing goes to waste!
SHAPING THE BODY This is totaly up to you. You can carve down the body however you want. For my project I chose to carve down the body as close to the way the guitar I was modeling it after was. I used a verity of different sanders. I used a belt sander for the arm contour on the top back of the guitar, a dremmel tool with a sanding attachment for the small carve down under the neck, a 6" sanding disk attachment on my drill for the body contour on the back of the guitar, and a Black and Decker mouse sander for the neck area and smoothe down of all the other areas that had previously been carved. One rule of thumb is to only sand with a 220 grit when carving the body down. This will prevent any deep scratches any lower grit will cause. Don't use any electric sander on the falt parts of the guitar either, like the top or the back. Use a 220 grit paper with a sanding block to smooth out those areas. You can also run a slightly dampened cloth along the surface of the body and let dry before the final hand sanding. This will raise the small grains in the wood so they can be cut by the paper easier. Sand in the direction of the grain.
A direct user interface can give far more musically rewarding results than dozens of parameters, menus and alpha dials. Often, even a panel of knobs isn't anywhere near as natural to play as, say, a Korg Kaoss Pad. Here's something Kaoss Pad 3 owners can try at home: choose effect DL2 (Smooth Delay) in which the pad controls delay time on the X-axis and depth on the Y-axis. Next route your favourite solo patch through it and set the FX depth to about 12 o'clock. Solo wildly whilst simultaneously stroking the top right-hand corner of the Kaoss Pad with short, circular motions. With practice, you should be able to produce delicate pitch sweeps as the delay shifts in time. As you control depth by vertical motion, practise diagonal upwards sweeps followed by vertical downward ones to smoothly dampen the effect. Hey, it takes years to master the violin, so a few evenings spent waggling your finger over flashing LEDs shouldn't be too arduous. Next try the same technique with lush solo pads: simple yet devastatingly effective! Paul Nagle
  I agree to receive these communications from SourceForge.net. I understand that I can withdraw my consent at anytime. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy or Contact Us for more details.   I agree to receive these communications from SourceForge.net via the means indicated above. I understand that I can withdraw my consent at anytime. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy or Contact Us for more details.

• Them Changes: Since the strings on acoustic guitars play a much more important role in projecting volume and clarity than strings on an amplified electric guitar, considering changing acoustic guitar strings often to keep an instrument sounding its best. Remember to wipe down the strings after playing and check for string damaging fret wear. Both can prematurely end a guitar string’s life.

For you, the 15W should be fine for a long time to come. It runs about $215.00 retail but I suspect, like me, you can make an offer on one for less than $200. Many dealers put these up on Reverb or Ebay as “open box” or make an offer. Mine was marked open box but was clearly brand new when I got it. I think I paid $189 for my 15W. By far this series was the best value I have ever seen in an amp. I’ve owned several Fender, Vox, Sundown (smaller 5W) and no name amps. This AV series is super nice.

You can hear one all over Led Zeppelin’s debut record and all over Jeff Beck’s trademark “Heart Full of Soul” intro riff from the Yardbirds. He also used it extensively on the Jeff Beck Group sessions. Of course the most famous fuzz pedal is the Dallas Arbiter Fuzz Face. This pedal was favored by Jimi Hendrix and set the benchmark for fuzz tones that we are still chasing to this day.
In any given field there are a handful of companies that rise above the others. This is true whether you are talking about cars or golf clubs or chainsaws, and of course it is true if you are talking about electric guitars. Some brands have proven themselves as the best of the best. They’ve created the most legendary instruments in music history. If you are looking for a new guitar, one of these companies is a smart place to start.
My granddaughter really liked this book. I know it was used but the CD and the wall chart were missing. I wish that would have been noted in the comments. Some of the other book sellers noted that one or the other of these were missing so I didn't order from them. Nothing was noted in the comments on this. My granddaughter was happy with the book and wanted to keep it.
{"eVar4":"shop: books sheet music and media","eVar5":"shop: books sheet music and media: tablature","pageName":"[gc] shop: books sheet music and media: tablature","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[gc] shop: books sheet music and media: tablature","prop1":"[gc] shop: books sheet music and media","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"category","prop11":"tablature","prop5":"[gc] shop: books sheet music and media: tablature","prop6":"[gc] shop: books sheet music and media: tablature","prop3":"[gc] shop: books sheet music and media: tablature","prop4":"[gc] shop: books sheet music and media: tablature","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] sub category"}
So I got this kit last week full of hope yet penssive knowing that these kits from over seas have lots of problems. On first inspection the kit was okay, Nothing, I thought at the time, a little TLC couldn't fix. Here I am getting ready to install the electronic today, level the frets, string it in and play. As I opened the pakage with all of the tone and volume pots I noticed one thing super wrong right away.
Aside from tuning issues, new bass strings, especially roundwounds, can be very bright, and this may result in a lot of finger noise and fret buzz. If they’re changed a day or two before the session, and the bass is played a bit to break them in, there may be less likelihood of problematic noise. In fact, while many players think of them as old-school, flatwounds can sometimes be the best choice, when a fat deep bass sound is called for—it’s worth a thought.
The earliest extant six-string guitar is believed to have been built in 1779 by Gaetano Vinaccia (1759 - after 1831) in Naples, Italy; however, the date on the label is a little ambiguous.[37][38] The Vinaccia family of luthiers is known for developing the mandolin. This guitar has been examined and does not show tell-tale signs of modifications from a double-course guitar.[39] The authenticity of guitars allegedly produced before the 1790s is often in question. This also corresponds to when Moretti's 6-string method appeared, in 1792.
The woods used on the body and neck are worth considering too, although are unlikely to be a defining factor when you consider your purchase. Basswood features heavily as the body wood of many guitars in this price range because it’s affordable and has decent tonal properties. You will also find cheaper to produce woods like poplar and alder, although the traditionally more premium mahogany is also found on affordable guitars these days.
If straightforward lessons aren't what you're looking for, fear not: Rocksmith 2014 tries to refresh your picking skills through games that veer into the ridiculous. I tried out Return to Castle Chordead, which revels in delightfully bad NES-style graphics (the game challenges the player to zap the hungry undead by playing the correct chords). Scales Racer—which, you guessed it, teaches the major and minor scales—puts the player in a car fleeing the police. Pick the right notes and you zip between lanes, eluding the fuzz.
The Hi Flyer was a thin-bodied reverse Strat-type with a German carve around the top, almost always seen in sunburst. This was identical to the Aria 1702T. The bolt-on neck had a three-and-three castle head, plastic logo, string retainer bar, zero fret, 22-fret rosewood with large dot inlays. A white-black-white pickguard carried volume, tone and three-way. Two black-covered single-coil pickups were top-mounted, the neck slanted back like on a Mosrite, with six flat non-adjustable exposed poles in the center. An adjustable finetune bridge with round saddles sat in front of a Jazzmaster-style vibrato. The plastic logo was still in use in 1971, though gone was the string retainer, replaced by a pair of little string trees. Dots had gotten smaller by ’71, and the Hi Flyer was available in three finishes – orange sunburst (U1800), black (U1801) and white (U1802). The Hi Flyer listed for $82.50 (plus $12 for case) in ’71.
According to Michael Wright of Vintage Guitar magazine, Univox itself has a rather convoluted history. Though it was a part of the “lawsuit era” of the ‘70s, Univox wasn’t just another copy manufacturer out of Japan. It’s a bit more complicated than that. The firm was created from a joining of multiple companies that had a few other name brand guitars – Hagstrom, for one – under their corporate umbrellas.
Being a PODHD user for many years now, I am but one of the many who commend its balance of versatility and sound quality. Like many reviewers, it allows me to gig and record conveniently, often times plugging straight to PA with great results. I've also seen a number of professionals using PODHD500X's in their concerts, so it's not surprising that even experts at Music Radar were convinced, saying: "The modelling is excellent throughout, with authentic-sounding amps and quality effects".

5 Star...So fun...I bought the playstation 4 for my wife for Christmas it came with the game uncharted 4 I'm surprised my wife played it and loved it so when she seen the uncharted the Nathan drake collection it has 1 and 2 and 3 on it she had to have it she started playing it and she loves this game also...great games to have for that special moment when you are in the mood for a journey.Few games have that replay ability when you get to know Drake you just can't put it down great deal great price only problem why I gave it 4 Stars there is no incentive or discount if you have already purchased it for Ps3 and now you would want it for your Ps4 but as I said great deal great story great price
To do hammers-ons and pull-offs, you simply click the switch for it on, and every time you play two notes within a small enough interval it plays them as a hammer-on or pull-off. This seems great until you realize it still does this even if you hold those two notes down together like you were playing a chord. To not have the first note immediately cut out, you have to switch this feature off.
Vintage styling, high quality speakers and that classic Fender cabinet warmth - there's a lot to love about the Fender Bassbreaker 212 Guitar Cab. Perfectly matched with the Fender Bassbreaker 15 & Fender Bassbreaker 45 guitar amp heads. There's 2 x 12 inch, 8 Ohm Celestion V-Type speakers inside and the semi-closed back ensure those rich, low end frequencies are captured. A great addition that can act as an extension cabinet to the Fender Bassbreaker 45 combo/head and the Bassbreaker 18/30 combo. if you want to add that signature fender warmth to your sound, this head is a perfect match to your own amplifier head with a total impedance of 16 Ohms.
An extremely wise Liverpudlian once said: "Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans." Well, we've been busy with life and now, after a few year's hiatus, it's time to present the first phase of our new collection. For your consideration are some truly unique guitars: Silvertones, Danelectros Harmonys, a Supro 60, an Eko Florentine, and many more. Also, did we mention for all you Shagg's fans, there's a pretty stunning Avalon AV-2T. There's more to come very soon, stay tuned. Welcome to VintageSilvertones.com!
My favorite guitar effect is Tremolo with a touch of echo. This works well on songs with slower melodic guitar leads and slower rhythms. Tremolo is an effect that has a speed adjustment and amplitude adjustment. The speed needs to be adjusted to the song tempo. This was popular for many songs written in the 1950’s. If you are a guitar shredder you will not be happy with this effect. I have a Boss Guitar Pedal and Line 6 Pod XT and use this effect from the pedal. I am not crazy about software generated effects as there is not enough space on stage for all the equipment and adding a MacBook and keeping it from getting knocked around would be too difficult. After recording I have used Garage Band and this software is easy to use. I probably have four or five software packages and they are too overwhelming at times. I have given up trying to figure out how to use the software with my expensive Presonus 24 track digital AI Board. It is almost impossible to use these recording software packages without having expensive school training.
Most of these sites offer 'free' TAB, chord sheets, and lyrics. A few provide versions that are endorsed by they musician, the writer, or the company that owns the rights to the song (i.e., a licensed site). There is always a fee for access to the licensed TAB or music notation. There are even some unofficial sites that will charge a 'membership fee'.
Prince at #10 just shows me that whoever made this list hasn't seen him play that often. And really, KR doesn't even need to be on the top 10. JH is way overrated, yes on the list, but NOT #1. But anyways, cool to see Prince even on the list. Those stupid people writing those comments are probably the ones that say "Prince plays guitar?" They are so living in a box!
Epiphone, coolest brand ever. More songs have been written on Epiphone guitars than any other. Sure! Gibson bought & attempted to hijack the Epiphone kudos, but failed, as all that happened was Epiphone became the affordable brand of the people. Gibson & Taylor are by far…so far…the least cool brands ever. I’m telling you, more songs (filled with passion & desperation & anger) have been written on Epiphone guitars than any other, by folk who can’t afford or don’t have a mummy to buy them a Fender strat or Gibson.
The company initially manufactured only traditional folk instruments,[citation needed] but eventually grew to make a wide variety of stringed instruments, including violins, cellos, banjos, upright basses—and a variety of different types of guitars, including classical guitars, lap steel guitars, semi-acoustic guitars, and solid body electrics. Some of Kay's lower-grade instruments were marketed under the Knox and Kent brand names.
One of the biggest hits of all-time, this song incorporates everything that is 80’s pop and is performed in the key of F# major, in 4/4 time. Lauper originally didn’t want to sing it since the original version was written by Robert Hazard, who wrote it from the perspective of a man. Eventually, the singer released her version of the song and the rest is history. 
C.F. Martin was born in 1796 in Markneukirchen, Germany and came from a long line of cabinet makers and woodworkers. His father, Johann Georg Martin, also built guitars. By the age of 15, C.F. Martin was apprenticed to Johan Stauffer, a well-known guitar maker in Vienna, Austria. Martin returned to his hometown after completing training and opened his own guitar-making shop. However, he soon became embroiled in a controversy between two guilds.
The good people at Cordoba, therefore, sought to make a Spanish-style guitar with the traditional sound of a Spanish guitar, but the slimmer body and slightly narrower neck of a steel-string. They also added in a Fishman-Presys module for switching the guitar from an acoustic sound to an electric (including a built-in tuner), hence the “Fusion” in the model name.

XM DLX2 is one of two Deluxe models in the highly acclaimed XM series from Washburn. The other one is XM DLX2F. XM DLX2 comes with a solid, double-cut body made of basswood back and maple top. Top is a two-piece and it features the characteristic XM series contour. As all models in this series are, XM DLX2 is made primarily for players of heavy metal and shred styles. Strong pickups, super fast neck and 24-fret fingerboard indicate this. Bridge section features a tune-o-matic bridge with string-through-body construction and black plating. In it`s front, Washburn installs a pair of open-coil humbuckers. Master volume, master tone and a three-way toggle pickup switch comprise the controls unit. 24-fret fingerboard is made of rosewood and it`s installed on top of a set in maple neck.
{"product":{"id":"114572014","stock":"instock","price":"239.99","name":"S421 S Series Solid Body Electric Guitar","download":false,"sku_id":"114572014","checksum":"159269514523","rep_id":"site5114572014","displayId":"114572014","sku_display_id":"114572014","sku_rep_id":"site5114572014","gc_pro":false},"category":"Electric Guitars","pageName":"product_detail","subcategory":"Solid Body Electric Guitars","dept":"Guitars"}
My husband was looking forward to checking this place out. When we entered a guy wearing glasses asked if he could help us with anything and my husband said "oh just browsing." So we walked around some more. When we got to the electric guitar section, my husband saw a $2,000+ guitar he wanted to try. He took off his jacket so as not to scratch the guitar and SLOWLY picked the guitar from the wall hanger. The same guy earlier suddenly came up to my husband and said "You can't just pull it out like that!" My husband was surprised and had to ask what he just said?! I was as surprised. The clerk said "You can't just take it unless you are buying it." Really?! My husband said then you should have told me earlier when we first came in. We did not see any signs nor there's any lock on the guitar hanger. Why would you buy without trying it first?! That clerk probably thinks my husband don't have the money. They just lost a customer and a bunch of my husband's musician friends.

While the other digital amplifiers we tried (the Blackstone ID:Core Stereo 10 V2 and the Line 6 Spider Classic 15) offered a similarly wide range of good sounds, most of our panelists preferred the Champion 20 simply because it was easier to use. Lynn Shipley Sokolow preferred the simplicity of non-digital amps such as the Vox Pathfinder 10, but she said, “The Fender is the best of the digitals because it’s easy to understand the controls.”
The people at VOX know a thing or two about creating great sounding amps, after all the AC30 is probably one of the most famous amps of all time. The VOX Valvetronix VT40X modelling guitar amp actually recreates the sound of these great amplifiers and so many more. In fact, you have 11 famous amps to choose from which can expand to 20 when using the included Tone Room Editor as well as 13 effects built in. The hybrid digital/analog power amp provides you with all the warmth of a tube amp but with digital stability! If you want more power, you have the VOX VT100x or the smaller version – the VOX VT20X.
Some resonator guitars possess metal bodies and these are called steel guitars. This can lead to some confusion with the Hawaiian guitar of the same name. They are two distinct instruments. The Hawaiian steel guitar takes its name from the steel bar used to create the glissandi and the Resonator steel guitar refers to the material used for the construction of the body.
Pick-Ups – The pickup is preset underneath the strings, on the body of the electric guitar and it works as a magnetic field. When the metal strings are plucked they vibrate and generate a current that is transmitted by the pickup to the guitar cable and to the amplifier. These may is just a single pickup in a guitar or 3 to 4 pickups depending on the guitar.
Frets are positioned proportionally to scale length—the shorter the scale length, the closer the fret spacing. Opinions vary regarding the effect of scale length on tone and feel. Popular opinion holds that longer scale length contributes to greater amplitude. Reports of playing feel are greatly complicated by the many factors involved in this perception. String gauge and design, neck construction and relief, guitar setup, playing style and other factors contribute to the subjective impression of playability or feel.
The guitar features what is called a Super Strat shape. In other words, it is an evolution of the Stratocaster body style. Ibanez used mahogany as the main tonewood and maple for the neck. This guitar comes with two finish options. You can have the blackberry sunburst or the light violin sunburst. In terms of pickups, we have a set of two Ibanez-made passive humbuckers which pack a decent amount of heat. They handle distortion great but also sound very decent on a clean channel too.
On September 6, 2018, the company announced that a global settlement has been reached with respect to the company’s reorganization plan upon emergence from Chapter 11. Under the plan, the company will be focused on its core musical instruments business with "essentially no debt." Current Chairman and CEO Henry Juszkiewicz will step down as CEO and assume the role of consultant. With immediate effect, Brian J. Fox, the company’s CRO, will oversee daily operations until a new CEO is appointed.[59]
I decided to release the book for public download, which was my initial plan anyways. In the future there will be no official 'second edition' of The Science of Electric Guitars and Guitar Electronics, as the material will live and float around here in the Internet. If time permits, I will add and edit the material on this pdf-version. This 'upgraded version' will be developed and published only here at this website. The revision date in the first page will updated accordingly on every 'new release' and the listing below will give more detailed information about the changes made to each chapter.

These two are definitely the most similar sounding of the bunch and this poses a slight problem. While Steel String has more resonance in the low-end and covers fingerpicking, Songwriter is a little warmer/duller sounding but has twice the samples and round robins.  For me, this makes it hard to pick between the two, and while the tones are different, perhaps not quite enough.
In this era, as well, Gibson began experimenting with new models such as the Les Paul Recording. This model is generally unpopular with guitarists due to its complex electronics. The Recording featured low-impedance pickups, many switches and buttons, and a highly specialized cable for impedance-matching to the amplifier. Less noticeable changes included, but were not limited to, maple fingerboards (1976), pickup cavity shielding, and the crossover of the ABR1 Tune-o-matic bridge into the modern day Nashville Tune-o-matic bridge. During the 1970s, the Les Paul body shape was incorporated into other Gibson models, including the S-1, the Sonex, the L6-S, and other models that did not follow the classic Les Paul layout.

Were its fate left to the Electric Storms, Ovation may never have made it out of the ’60s. However, the breakthrough occurred when the company picked up the endorsement of pop star Glen Campbell, who began his career as a session guitarist and folk singer, at one point touring behind Ricky Nelson. In ’65 he was a member of the Beach Boys, but by the late ’60s he had broken through to be an enormously popular balladeer with country-tinged hits like “By the Time I Get to Phoenix” and “Wichita Lineman.”
Mike Longworth’s book shows at least three guitar amplifiers carrying the Martin name from the early ’60s. Who made them is unknown… most certainly it wasn’t Martin. In 1961 Martin marketed a pair of combos, the Model 110T and Model 112T. Both had top rear-mounted controls and a very groovy geometrical grillcloths in a sort of M.C. Escher pattern. Presumably the 110 featured a 10″ speaker, while the 112 had a 12″. The “T” suggests a tremolo circuit. In 1962 Martin offered a very cool #700 portable amplifier, a unit ensconced in a leather carrying case, presumably battery-powered.
Finally, have you ever heard a definitive answer to the question “how long does it take to learn guitar?” Us neither! Learning your first chords can take a few hours, but the instrument can take a lifetime to master. But that’s the joy of playing guitar – you never stop learning. It’s down to you to practise and progress, because practise makes perfect!
▽ Your account minimum payment amount is determined by the purchases and balances on your WebBank/Fingerhut Credit Account. The change in minimum payment amount is based on your account balance at the time it is advertised, and includes an assumption of interest charges and SafeLine fees, as applicable. The change in minimum payment amount does not include subsequent activity on your account such as any purchases, including deferred payment purchases, backordered, unshipped, returned or other pending purchases or exchanges; any payments, including partial, missed or returned payments; any fees, including recurring partner program charges, subsequent interest charges, late fees or returned payment fees. It is also subject to change based on shipping address, shipping method, partial shipments and taxes. Your minimum payment amount will not change and the purchase will not reflect on your statement until the order ships. If you have a balance or are making a multiple item purchase, see the Existing Balance Payment Chart.
  Technology is not based on good materials and dexterity alone. It's how you finish your work that counts. It's the little details that you labour over until it's just right. It's an arduous process of creating and destroying and rebuilding until its perfect; until there's nothing left to add, and nothing left to take away. Then it's ready. Swing is well known for its attention to detail in our incredible Custom Shop models, but what you may not know, is that we make no distinction between them and our retail guitars. They all receive the same exacting standard we demand of any product that carries the name "Swing". Our attention to quality and detail costs us more than what other manufacturers consider as an adequate alternative. We do not take shortcuts with every detail because we have found that the careful, educated player can hear those shortcuts. Again, it shouldn't come as surprise though, it's really the only explanation why after only 2 years in business we rose to become #1, and have stayed there for three years and counting.
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: 3-Color Sunburst
Nowadays it is customary to play this repertoire on reproductions of instruments authentically modelled on concepts of musicological research with appropriate adjustments to techniques and overall interpretation. Thus over recent decades we have become accustomed to specialist artists with expertise in the art of vihuela (a 16th-century type of guitar popular in Spain), lute, Baroque guitar, 19th-century guitar, etc.[4]

PRS S2 Vela comes as one of the more extraordinary models in this company’s lineup. This is made apparent by the body shape that stands out from their usual designs. When I had some one-on-one time with this axe, it left a good impression. One thing that really stuck with me was just how light it was. That usually means a thinner tone, but not with this PRS. It plays great, and is pretty smooth.
On my bench today, a partscaster with a Hamer Slammer neck, Carvin Rail in the bridge, Ry Cooder Dearmond middle, and PRS P90 in the neck. Wasn’t quite right (throbby) with the usual 3 250K pots and an 022 orange drop (i know, i know, but they aren’t that expensive). So, i went with 500K master vol, 500K master tone (found an old ceramic PRS 022 cap too), and an acme blender pot (neck and bridge) in the last position. Now it’s fun. Lots of variety in positions 1, 2, 4, & 5. 3 knobs and a whammy and she’s done.
Ibanez: Ibanez is a Japanese company whose origins date back to the early 1900’s with a company named Hoshino. They where distributing Spanish guitars with the name Ibanez around the middle of the century and in the 60’s where shipping guitars to the USA. Back in the 1970’s, they became quite known for making copies of famous guitars, putting the Ibanez name on them and selling them for considerably less than the original models they emulated. During that time, Ibanez got really good at making guitars so they started creating some original models of their own. The production of copies finally ended in the late 70’s after a big lawsuit by Norlin (Gibson parent company) against Ibanez. This is the reason why the Ibanez Les Paul copies with the iconic “open-book” headstock are called “lawsuit” or “pre-lawsuit” models. Interestingly enough, although not very expensive, those lawsuit models are quite desirable today fetching interesting prices on eBay.

Played by Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton and Pete Townshend—among countless other electric guitar innovators—the 1959 Super Lead helped shape rock and roll as we know it. Introduced in 1965 (1959 has nothing to do with its year of release), the amplifier included four inputs, two channels, 100 watts of searing power and a Plexiglas faceplate (hence “Plexi”). Matched with 4x12 cabinets, the 1959 Super Lead helped to popularize the “Marshall stack.” The amplifier can be famously seen being played by Jimi Hendrix at Woodstock. It’s been highly sought after ever since.
The Ibanez DT-250 is a perfect guitar for shredding. The basswood is light so you can run all over the stage, jump off your stack, and still have energy to dive-bomb. Even do the splits. Notice that was a “you can.” These were outfitted with a pair of blade-pole V5 humbuckers, produced toward the end of Japanese-made pickups, before Ibanez started working with DiMarzio. They are smokin’ hot! This guitar almost leaps out of your hand when you plug it in. The Japanese improvements on the locking vibrato were also impressive, and this combines the precision of a Floyd Rose with the feather touch of a Kahler.

Students and expert alike describe this guitar as a fun instrument, and goes further by commenting that it has exceeded their expectations. From its fast action playability to the quality of the finish, the Epiphone SGSpecial continues to rake in compliments. Several people even said that it comes surprisingly close to the feel and sound of a Gibson SG.

Regardless of your age, gender or musical preference, you deserve to hone your skills on a guitar that's built by dedicated craftsmen who are just as passionate about music as you are. Thankfully, you don't need to look any further for a beginner guitar that perfectly suits your skill level and influences. Before purchasing your first guitar, there's definitely a few things to consider. For one, you should think about your own music tastes. Is there a sound that you're hoping to achieve? Maybe you have a certain band in mind whose style you'd like to replicate. If so, it helps to do a little research on what that musical artist uses in terms of gear. The good news is that this catalog has plenty of acoustic and electric guitars to choose from. In fact, many of the most well-known and trusted guitar brands specialize in their own affordable yet high-quality beginner models, including Epiphone, Fender, Yamaha, Martin and countless others. For an ideal electric guitar that's specifically designed for enthusiastic novice players, the Squier Bullet HH Stratocaster has everything a beginner needs to take their talents to the next level. This special version consists of pitch-black hardware throughout, right down to the black-taped humbuckers. Other features include three-way switching, synchronous tremolo and a rosewood 21-fret fingerboard with maple neck. Overall, the Squier Bullet HH Stratocaster is a remarkable axe for any budding shredder. This category also contains a wide range of starter bundles, such as the Ibanez JamPack IJV50 Quickstart dreadnought acoustic guitar pack. Combining all of the essential ingredients that a beginner guitarist needs to begin their musical journey, this package includes a beautiful V50 natural-finish acoustic, an accurate electronic tuner, a gig bag, strap and an accessory pouch. With so many beginner options available in the world today, there has never been a better time in history to learn the guitar. Whether you have ambitions of fame or just want to strum along to your favorite songs, the sheer joy and satisfaction you can get from learning the guitar is unlike anything else, and whatever you're looking for, you could bet that this section has it.
The Hoshino Gakki company began in 1908 as the musical instrument sales division of the Hoshino Shoten, a bookstore company. The Ibanez brand name dates back to 1929 when Hoshino Gakki began importing Salvador Ibáñez é Hijos guitars from Spain.[1] In 1933 The Salvador Ibáñez é Hijos cy. was bought by Telesforo Julve and incorporated in his enterprise. Hoshino Gakki started making Spanish acoustic guitars from 1935, at first using the "Ibanez Salvador" name, and then later using the "Ibanez" brand name [2].

Many arguments can be made for Peej’s gifted lead guitarist (and corn-dogging, cheese-mongering Stevie Ray Vaughan acolyte) Mike McCready, but it’s Gossard whose songwriting and toothsome licks propelled the Seattle grunge icons early, record-setting releases. The winsome chords of both “Daughter” and “Black,” the white-knuckle smash of “Animal” or “Deep” or “Do the Evolution” — all were anchored by Gossard, a quiet type more invested in classic-rock craft than classic-rock showmanship.
I have an acoustic that I bought from a lady I know who said she has had it since the early 70's. It says 'Maya' on the headstock and the reinforcement rod cover is stamped with 'Takamine'. The sticker inside the sound hole says 'Maya', "We made this guitar for the people who love guitar music", Made by Takamine, Model No. TF1o1S, Japan. On the inside of the sound hole at the top, the wood block there is stamped with 46.6.3. The guitar is only about 3 1/4 inches deep and approx. 15 inches wide at its widest spot. Small guitar with a big beautiful sound.
As stated previously, the closer 2 coils are to one another, the greater the cancelations will be when they go "out of phase". So, wiring a humbucker out of phase with itself is going to produce a lot of cancelations, a huge reduction in volume and a very thin sound. If that's not enough, the pickup will not be humbucking either. Still there are some people that like this kind of sound. The best way to put a humbucker out of phase with itself is to wire the coils out of phase in series. (see below)
Hey man this is a really great instructable and i am in sort of the same situation that you were in. I have 2 guitars,a Yamaha CG-101 classical, and a Fender Squier Strat. I want to save up for a warlock or Eipiphone les paul or SG or something, but my income is very low and i am going to get a drum set instead. My parents could care less of music, but they are in it for me. Anyways, my strat has three single coils and what I really want to do is replace them all with EMG's.Would that be possible? But those are like $200 a peice. Maybe i should just wait until i get some more money after my drum set. Thanks and shoot me a PM or something.
Here we have a real vintage Rare IBANEZ CONCORD beauty from the Golden Era of the Best Japanese Martin D41 style guitars period... This example is Ibanez Model #679 and is the Top of the Line and is an exact Martin copy and is a great " Law Suit " model from the era where Ibanez set out to make the best guitars worldwide period...Fit and finish even after 30 years it is simply superior it appears to be thin old school Nitrocellulose Lacquer finish, this guitar was constructed using the best woods very ornate intricate triple bindings with lots of beautiful inlaid abalone on the Brazilian Rosewood fretboard and the spruce top body WoW...please do have a very good look ...This example has employed the best exotic woods in its construction, The top looks to be solid no seam edge showing at sound hole some pick wear and looks solid, the sides & back also look the same on the inside and outside grain matches so again it looks to be solid?.... A high grade mahogany neck, Sitka spruce top, Choice Indian Rosewood sides & back, and what seems to be a beautiful Rich Chocolate brown Brazilian Jacaranda Rosewood fretboard with gorgeous abalone, frets show some wear lower several yet plays excellently all the way up with very good action and fast & plays easily...Neck width is a nice slim-med super comfortable 1-3/4" at the nut with no buzzing all the way up action is good set at 5/32nds @ 12th fret. This guitar has been well played and well taken care of and is a good professional grade instrument ready to record tonight. Cosmetically this is a 8.5 out of 10, A real vintage player that has not been abused at all yet has been lovingly well played its tone has richly mellowed with the years and only improved with its age and now after 30 years it shows this wonderful patina that can not be replicated that only comes with age, vintage is not for everyone some like it new we understand that this vintage Martin Copy Japanese Guitar however is not new or is it in mint condition yet it is very beautiful in vintage terms of mellowing with age and patina Wow this is for the TRUE VINTAGE LOVER... also you Ibanez Collectors of Japanese vintage. Its Sound is second to none it has nicely articulate lows with nicely contrasting bright highs and the mid-range has a good punch and ring when finger picked, full on sweet big tone when strumming open cords. This one is a real pleasure to play and is EZ on the eyes too. These are really great old classic guitars and are getting very difficult to find now in anywhere near this kind of vintage condition...its all original and the original tuners work very well with no need to change them out they are keeping the guitar tuned well...no cracks or repairs non needed , excellent original neck set and angle, intonation is good. This Rare beauty is conservatively JVG condition rated at very good - excellent in a 30 year old Vintage guitar...amazing looks and tone & playability in a real vintage collectible that your not going to want to put down.. Every bit as good as the much more expensive Martin for a fraction of that. Any questions ask? gr8bids@comcast.net .
Recent amplifiers may include digital technology similar to effects pedals, up to the ability to model or emulate a variety of classic amplifiers. Some modeling systems also emulate the tonal characteristics of different speaker configurations, cabinets, and microphones. Nearly all amp and speaker cabinet modeling is done digitally, using computer techniques (e.g., Digital Signal Processing or DSP circuitry and software).
achieved by the creators. A lot of YouTube channels can be very amateurish and suffer from poor video quality, muffled audio and presenters who don’t work well with a camera. And it doesn’t matter if the lesson is coming from someone in the same room or from a studio on the other side of the world, the guitar teacher needs to be good. Someone who communicates clearly and makes you feel welcome.
{"eVar4":"shop: guitars","pageName":"[gc] shop: guitars: victoria","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop1":"[gc] shop: guitars","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"brands","prop11":"victoria","prop5":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop6":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop3":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop4":"[gc] shop: guitars","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] category"}
One of the biggest hits of all-time, this song incorporates everything that is 80’s pop and is performed in the key of F# major, in 4/4 time. Lauper originally didn’t want to sing it since the original version was written by Robert Hazard, who wrote it from the perspective of a man. Eventually, the singer released her version of the song and the rest is history. 
Just SOLD OUT: here is a great sounding wonderful 43 year old Vintage Japanese OOO guitar in excellent vintage condition. We have already set her up with our Martin Bone Nut & Compensated Saddle and action is dialed in to Martin specs. We also upgraded the original plastic bridge Pins to SOLID Ebony with Abalone dot with brass ring and of course a new set of Martin Strings 80/20 Bronze 12's.. and this guitar Sounds like a true vintage classic if not familiar with the Morris brand thats ok many are not, I have know of these for 2 decades now many of these were made in the Terada factory in Japan... another name you may not have heard of none the less they are know to make the highest end guitars in Japan in those days and also today, for makers like Ibanez virtually all of their top end guitars like Musicians - Artists - George benson GB line and the old Aria L-5's and Ibanez L-5's and many others continuing on today in that great Custom Shop tradition. This is one of them and is very well constructed with top workmanship and fit and finish build quality is comparable to a Martin- Taylor_Gibson and so on... that is to say no worries this guitar Morris has an excellent pedigree. Guitars of great playability and great sounding what more do you need?.... This guitar was built from wods aged at least 20 years at time of build that was over 40 years ago and just look at its condition to this day... it has truly stood the test of time. See for yourself... it this price range a wonderful classic 000 style Japanese true Vintage guitar in its own right. Great Value and great fun Japanese vintage collectible. For a song. .
Distortion is an important part of an electric guitar's sound in many genres, particularly for rock, hard rock, and metal. A distortion pedal takes a normal electric guitar signal and combine harmonic multiplication and clipping through the use of analog circuitry to create any number of sounds ranging from a fuzz sound to the sound of an overdriven tube amp and beyond! Distortion is essential to Heavy Metal Music.
James Patrick "Jimmy" Page, OBE is an English musician, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and record producer who achieved international success as the guitarist and leader of the rock band Led Zeppelin. Page began his career as a studio session musician in London and, by the mid-1960s, he had become the most sought-after session guitarist in England. He was a member of the Yardbirds from 1966 to 1968. In late 1968, he founded Led Zeppelin. Page is widely considered to be one of the greatest and most influential guitarists of all time. Rolling Stone magazine has described Page as "the pontiff of power riffing" and ranked him number 3 in their list of the "100 Greatest Guitarists of All ...more on Wikipedia
By 1970, regular distribution of Japanese-made guitars, including Lyle brand guitars, began in America. In the early 1970s, Arai joined with instrument manufacturing company Matsumoku to produce guitars. It is inconclusive if they continued producing Lyle guitars at this time, but they did launch the Aria Pro II line in 1975, which included set-neck copies of the Gibson Les Paul and SG, and Fender Stratocaster and Telecaster guitars.

{"reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","pageName":"[gc] product comparison","prop2":"[gc] product comparison","prop1":"[gc] product comparison","prop5":"[gc] product comparison","prop6":"[gc] product comparison","prop3":"[gc] product comparison","evar51":"default: united states","prop4":"[gc] product comparison","channel":"[gc] product comparison","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com"}


I agree to receive these communications from SourceForge.net. I understand that I can withdraw my consent at anytime. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy or Contact Us for more details. I agree to receive these communications from SourceForge.net via the means indicated above. I understand that I can withdraw my consent at anytime. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy or Contact Us for more details.
when I started playing, if you wanted distortion, you "cranked up" the volume on the guitar and the amp. my old Gibson amp had reverb and tremolo. I used to play without reverb or tremolo. nowadays, in my old age, I use a little reverb for flavoring. I have pedals, but it's too much hassle to set everything up. so, I just plug into the amp with a little reverb. I'm happy and that's all that really counts. isn't it ?
Quality-wise, they range from complete and utter crap, to OMG! Acoustics, tend to fall into the former range. Electrics, mostly the hollow bodies, were somewhat, but not always better. Solid bodies, mostly made from plywood, BUT they do have their own feel and sound. I happen to love them, others despise that cheap feel and sound. Remember, they were built to fill the growing demand of guitars, that the kids saw on tv, with the Monkee's and the Beatles
Modulation is where we step away from the more subtle (relatively) effects which serve to colour an existing tone, and into areas where you can truly begin to add flavour and texture to your tone. There are a few main types of modulation; chorus, phase, tremolo, wah and flange. Chorus subtly mimics your tone with a microscopically detuned duplicate, which when played together adds a nice warm layer to the sound. As an example, play the ‘e’ note on your second string (fifth fret) and the open ‘e’ first string at the same time. Naturally, there is a cent or two difference in the tuning. But you can see that two virtually (but not exactly) instances of the same note makes everything sound a bit bigger and a bit wider. That, in an admittedly basic form, is the chorus effect.

By the early ’80s, MTI was importing Westone guitars from Matsumoku, which had made its earlier Univox guitars (and the competitive Westbury guitars offered by Unicord). Wes-tone guitars continued to be distributed by MTI until ’84, when St. Louis Music, now a partner in the Matsumoku operation, took over the brand name and phased out its older Electra brand (also made by Matsumoku) in favor of Electra-Westone and then Westone. But that’s another story…


If you’re looking for a decent guitar at a super affordable price, look no further. This Ibanez features Powersound Pickups as well as 5-way switching to give you a variety of tones and styles. With a contoured body, it’s super easy to get comfortable while shredding away on this puppy. If your music styles fall in line with hard rock or country, then this is the guitar for you!

For a slightly more distant, but fuller sound, bring up the fader on the mid- distance mic. Slowly add that signal to the close sound described in the previous paragraph. You'll have the detail of the close mic, but with the fullness that comes with adding some "room" sound to it (just like sitting in the tenth row). This is a pretty standard approach that will give you a pretty standard rock guitar sound.
: : Does anyone know for sure where these originated. I have been told Vox (the England years) made this flat bodied plank guitar in the skiffle days of early 60's/late 50's. Mine is painted white(by hand) with a large black pick guard that curves to envelope the two chrome "toaster" pickups ,bottom of neck, and three control knobs.The strings have a moveable maple bridge(not secured) and a small chrome hardtail heel.The neck has a zero fret at top and 19 more playing frets.There are dot inlays at the 3rd,5th,seventh,ninth,12th,and 17th frets.The headstock is of natural finish light maple with a top edge cut at a sloping angle like Hofner.It has brass tuning pegs,gears and gear plates and the keys are white plastic.The beautiful short neck is true ,natural maple.Along one of the tuning gear plates is the numbers: 35515 which are etched into the wood. Four bolts without any plate hold the neck base to the plain body and a green decal above the pegs at top face of headstock reads: Shadow. The fret board is rosewoodand is laid on neck without bindings.It has six strings and sounds like a short scale Baritone guitar. It also only has one strap peg at bottom since they used to put the other end of strap on a tuning key. No other holes are seen for any former peg at other end of body(where normally found). Please send any info on this small,early,simple but awesome sounding electric skiffle guitar from England(Vox?).Thanks!!!!!
Fender Pro Series Stratocaster and Telecaster Case   New from$119.99In Stockor 4 payments of $30 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Epiphone E519 Hardshell Case for 335-Style Guitars   New from$129.00In Stockor 4 payments of $32.25 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Epiphone Hardshell Case for Les Paul-Style Guitars   New from$129.00In Stockor 4 payments of $32.25 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Fender Deluxe Molded Case for Stratocaster or Telecaster   New from$149.99In Stockor 4 payments of $37.50 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING See All Electric Guitar Cases

Although early Les Paul imitations in the 1960s and 1970s, such as those made by Höfner, Hagström, Harmony Company and Greco Guitars differed from Gibson’s design, with different electronics, and even bolt-on necks, in the late 1970s some Japanese companies came very close to perfecting copies of the original 1958–60 Standards. These guitars later became known as “lawsuit” guitars. The lawsuit was brought by the Norlin Corporation, the parent company of Gibson guitars, in 1977, and was based on an Ibanez headstock design that had been discontinued by 1976. Ibanez settled out of court, and by 1978 had begun making guitars from their own designs.[citation needed]
While they may be on the dry side, these books are convenient because they’re always available for reference. In an online class or an app, you might have to go digging through files or lessons to find that one scrap of information that was helpful. You also have to be on your phone or at your computer. For some people, the old way is still the best way.
Fender’s legendary tone is enough to win just about anyone over, and they cater to a wide range of customers by offering the more cost friendly Squier series. While their classic electric guitars are favored by plenty of players, their acoustic selection and Jazzmaster offerings have their fair share of supporters as well. No matter what you’re looking for in a guitar or what price range you’re shopping in, you’re likely to find a good fit with Fender.
As a long time player conveying the skill, craft and passion of this art, which is as much as a science, players of ANY and every instrument can unanimously agree that there are no “best” players. Some have great moments that were captured and regurgitated in the media time and a get which put them in a permanent vista. This is greatness? Hardly. I’ve seen A LOT of players, some included in the article and the majority chanted by the readers on this board screw things up beyond repair–some during the opening of their first song of the performance. OUCH that hurts…but it happens. Some completely lost track with what they were doing during a show casing of their solo work…oops. Yep it happens, like sometimes happens to singers who forget their lines–it doesn’t matter that they have written the song they were performing. Yea, we hear about this stuff every now and then, however at the end of the day, this doesn’t matter. The truth is, people hear only what they want to hear and will by their very disposition, ignore the negatives and embrace the positives of their work–alas this is why this supportive listeners are called FANS.
But this was different. This was build quality, and it completely wrecked the sound, feel and playability of the guitar. A competent pre-shipment QC inspection should have caught this and sent it back to be fixed at the factory, and they didn't. No serious guitarist would stand for ANY guitar made this way, at ANY price point. Yet there it was, on display on a guitar positioned as the flagship model of the brand, occupying the most expensive price point in the market.
The Effect: When it comes to effects pedals, those which offer more than one type of effect are usually seen as the best cost effective solution out there. Although many still prefer that standard, standalone configuration, multi-effects pedals have a lot to offer. Take Carl Martin Multi Effects Pedal as an example. This thing is packed to the brim with boutique level effects. Easy to use, a board such as this one can substitute a whole pedalboard depending on the variety of effects you use. One of the other great features of this design is the fact that multi-effect pedals come in both digital and analog form. They have transcended that artificial sounding performance that plagued effects processors some 10 years ago. Today, a multi-effects pedal is every bit as capable as its standalone counterparts. While this design is aimed at everyone, budget oriented users stand to gain the most from it.

I’ve been keeping track of completed Ebay sales since I started looking at Kents, and have come up with a few average sale prices. The way I figure an average is by first tossing out the highest and lowest sales. If I am left with fewer than three sales I don’t bother. That’s too small a sampling to be worthwhile, otherwise I take the average of the rest. The table below will only be updated when there is a sale that results in a change, so if the table looks like it might be dated, it’s probably because there haven’t been any sales that affected the numbers. Availability of Kent guitars on Ebay seems to ebb and flow.
Volume Swell Normally guitar has a very fast attack. It is at its loudest just after a not has been picked and there is a definite picked sound. You can get a softer pad style sound be picking with the volume off or very low and then raising the volume as the note/chord plays. This can be done with the guitar's own volume knob, but sometimes it is more convenient to leave your picking hand free and use a rocker pedal. By adding delay and/or reverb you can soften the note's ending also so that it doesn't stop abruptly.
Maybe the most well known amplifier released under the Peavey name, the 5150 is the result of a collaboration between Peavey and Eddie Van Halen. Debuting in 1992, the 120-watt, all-tube, two-channel head featured a searing lead channel that helped usher in a new wave of high-gain guitar ferocity in the early Nineties. Since Van Halen and Peavey parted ways in 2004, the model name was changed to the Peavey 6505 and has become an industry standard for modern metal bands such as Chimaira, August Burns Red, All That Remains and others.

Effects pedals, or stompboxes, are effects units designed to sit on the floor or a pedal board and be turned on and off with the user's feet. Typically, effects pedals house a single effect. The simplest stompbox pedals have a single footswitch, one to three potentiometers (knobs) for controlling the effect, gain or tone, and a single LED display to indicate whether the effect is on or not. More complex stompbox pedals have multiple footswitches, numerous knobs, additional switches and an alphanumeric display screen that indicates the status of which effect is activated. An effects chain, or signal chain, may be formed by connecting two or more effects pedals together.
It is traditional to think that learning guitar initially involves learning lots of chord shapes. I agree that this can be a distraction, and for me, it made the guitar seem more complicated than it is. As well as (or instead of) learning lots of chords 'by rote', an alternative would be to learn a few scales, and learn how to construct chords from those scale shapes.
Having perfected the modelling amp concept, Line 6 have become experts at delivering a huge variety of great sounds in a convenient, affordable package. Experiment with 12 different amp models, from classic 1960s Fender tone to the “Insane Red”, inspired by the mental Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier, and sculpt your tone further with the seven built-in effects.
The HOF is one of the single best examples of a convergence of price and quality features that we've ever been able to find. While we can't mention pricing in this article, we'd recommend clicking through and checking the retail price on the HOF, then comparing it to the other reverb pedals in this list. As far as value, the HOF is nearly a perfect 10.
Guitar culture was pervasive, whether in movie houses (“Karate Kid” Ralph Macchio outdueling Steve Vai in the 1986 movie “Crossroads”; Michael J. Fox playing a blistering solo in “Back to the Future” and co-starring with Joan Jett in 1987’s rock-band drama “Light of Day”) or on MTV and the older, concert films featuring the Who and Led Zeppelin on seemingly endless repeats.
Although there have been several copies of Gibson guitars in Epiphone, yet their quality, tone, and artisanship suffice to attract and retain more customers. During the past few years, Gibson has adapted some modifications in their lineup. This includes restoring their classic Les Paul Studio design as Studio T, and the Les Paul Studio Faded, which is an affordable variant.

A tabletop unit is a type of multi-effects device that sits on a desk and is controlled manually. One such example is the Pod guitar amplifier modeler. Digital effects designed for DJs are often sold in tabletop models, so that the units can be placed alongside a DJ mixer, turntables and CD scratching gear.[17] For a DJ, a pedal located on the floor would not be practical because she/he would find it hard to adjust the knobs.
You’ll need to get yourself setup with an account on some of the web stores selling components such as effects pedal specialty stores listed above, and some general component stores such as Mouser and Digikey. AMZ provides a list of the components required for each project. Make sure you check carefully the component requirements such as type of capacitors. Many components may have suitable electrical values but different physical layouts, so use the datasheets for your chosen component. Measure the spaces and holes on your PCB to make sure the components will fit. Remember that you’ll also need an enclosure in which to install the finished circuit and don’t forget things such as knobs, battery holders etc.
I’ll give your guitar a thorough inspection inside and out, letting you know what is correct and what may need attention now or in the near future. Frets, neck, action, bridge and bridge plate, truss rod, tuners, and internal bracing are some of the things that are assessed. This service is provided as a courtesy to my customers and there is no obligation or pressure to buy anything.
This general tip applies to all so-called temporal effects. Anything that messes with the timing of the signal should come last. If you were to put reverb before distortion, which is often one of the first effects in a chain, that distortion would be applied to both the original signal and all of the echoes. In other words, you’d get a mess. Naturally, this isn’t a rule written in stone. There are always exceptions. However, it is best to start with reverb at the end as this is the most neutral position.
String gauge refers to the thickness of the guitar string. This thickness in thousandths of an inch. The larger the gauge, the heavier the string. When describing gauges, guitarists typically omit the decimal, and speak only of the number (they will say an "eight" when referring to a string gauge of .008). There are both advantages and disadvantages to using lighter/heavier gauge strings.

Description: Natural Model. Guitar Type: Acoustic - Body: Mahogany - Top Wood: Spruce - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Construction: 1 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 26" (66cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Bracing: X-Type - Soundhole: Round (Traditional) - Rosette: Pearloid - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast, Classical Tuners - String Instrument Finish: High Gloss Natural
Yet you’d never find a punk rocker who didn’t want to be just like him. Whereas most punk guitarists found inspiration from the same hard rock and proto-metal players that they pretended to despise, Strummer was influenced by reggae, rockabilly, soul, ska and even early New York rap music when most of the world still hadn’t heard of the Sugarhill Gang.
Pedaldoc – is a company specialized in the production of kits to convert standard guitar effect pedals into boutique sounding pedal stomp boxes. They carry “do it yourself” kits to modify many topselling Boss pedals, Electro harmonix stompboxes, Vox 847´s wah pedals and more. The only thing needed to perform one of their mods in is about an hour of your time and a soldering iron. Their kits are designed for guitar and bass players who may not have any knowledge of electronics and all the components that need to be substituted are clearly market on a picture of the pcb board of the pedal.
Compression/Sustain – a dynamic effect that smooths out the highest and lowest volume levels of your guitar signal to a more consistent level. A compressor also has the side effect of increasing the sustain of your guitar signal. Compression boosts the overall level of your guitar while clamping down on the volume of the loudest parts to prevent clipping. Compressors usually have an attack knob that allows you to control how fast it takes the compressor to start effecting the tone and a threshold knob that sets the volume level that the compressor starts clamping down on peaks.
Player-friendly features like a slim "C"-shaped maple neck give this guitar a slick, smooth feel, while the 12" fingerboard radius and jumbo frets are ideal for speed and effortless bends. The dual ceramic humbucking pickups boast hot output for powerful tones perfect for crunchy rhythms and soaring solos. Premium styling cues include chrome pickup covers and an eye-catching matching painted headstock to make this guitar stand out from any crowd.
The dark underbelly is Lou Reed’s comfort zone. Despair and degradation are his muses. Emerging in the mid Sixties at the helm of the Velvet Underground, he offered up a gritty black-and-white alternative to the rainbow-colored pyschedelia of the prevailing rock culture. He brought us along, albeit reluctantly, to meet junkies and hustlers, S&M bondage goddesses and suicidal transvestites. He was one of the first rock guitarists to embrace chaos truly and wholeheartedly.
This book teaches you how to visualize the notes, which will lead quickly to remembering them. Once you know where the notes are, forming chords becomes easier, which leads to fluid playing in any position. At the very least, if you can identify your root notes, you can bail yourself out of trouble at any time. That skill for resolution serves you in improvisation and the random jams that will provide much of your growth.
But the question remains, was that environment good for the artists or for the equipment? Think of it this way: experienced chefs know very well the value of a seasoned pan or grill. Flip on any show from the Food Network and you’ll see cooks bragging about their 30-year-old griddle and how it imparts an amazing flavor to their corned beef hash. Preparing food leaves behind actual physical substances, unlike immaterial sound waves, so that comparison doesn’t work exactly. But the dirt and dust and grime could certainly effect the equipment. In a similar way, we have to ask ourselves, was that dirty studio, then, a source of inspiration or were the dirty, beer-smelling microphones actually improving the music? Regardless, the studio imbued the recording with an undeniable quality. Many guitar nuts can identify a particular instrument while listening to a song. Recording experts can do the same thing with studios.
sorry this has SOLD OUT: Poor mans Authentic Blues Parlor guitar from way back. This is the real deal used over 60 years this is what some poor share cropper genuine American Blues men would have been able to afford back in the day and subsequently used throughout the south by mostly poor Black folks where the berth of the blues was born of course this is from the place where great things happen BORN in USA baby and is widely considered and is acknowledged to be by most all of our greats in US or British Rockers - Jazz players & Country too all these greats players feel that these original US Southland blues is the truest of ART FORM's PURE and RAW ....you feel it in your soul... this original sounds was not overly sophisticated at all it was RAW that was its beauty this sound from this old Stella is Authentic like that and is RAW and its woods are good - solid Burch wood and actually is an excellent tone wood in fact in those days Burch was widely used and my belief is that is a characteristic in the tone of this Original blues... Classic sound to this guitar OK it has it.... I have a few of these Stella's and love them, when you want to record and lay down an authentic REAL old school style rhythm track or play it on your porch swing and sip mint julip from a mason jar to get in the mood you can do it with this guitar its the real deal. This guitar is old did I say at least 60 likely older that being said it plays well it really kinda does... with pretty good action for what it is as good as it was 60+ years ago I recon. Tuners work, body is in good shape it aint goin anywhere its prety well made it has surface cracks and they are there and not a problem they have been there 40 years and have not gotten any worse not in the 15 years I have owned Stella! Like the movie STELLA! I could not resist the reference but I digress, Condition is Vintage good obviously not new or mint but she is 100% cool Authentic bluesman material if you want that old time Mississippi Delta to Chicago raw blues this old vintage American Icon of a Poor mans Parlor guitar, this is a classic threw & threw... I suppose I could have simply said it sounds good.... ahow ow ow ow.
If you love the Telecaster look and sound, then here’s a great entry level Tele for beginners. In fact, “entry level” really doesn’t do this Telecaster justice. I’ve considered buying this exact model for myself–for times when I need to record some true single coil tones. If country twang is your thing, this is the guitar to get started with. But the Telecaster isn’t a one-trick pony. Plenty of rock (and even metal) players have used Telecasters over the years. Swap that bridge pickup with a single coil-sized humbucker and you’ve got a guitar that can do rock and metal with the best of ’em.
ESP is yet another brand that acquires a notable stance in the history of guitars. Back in the 1980s and 1990s, the company was known for producing high-quality, custom-shop instruments with incredible original designs. Even now, the trend goes on. Today, ESP guitars are among the preferred guitars for most professional musicians around the world. Particularly, the metal and hard rock players mark this brand as their favorite.
The way you fix this is by finding a book that makes you reconsider an aspect of your playing, regardless of what that is. If you’re into metal go ahead and pick up a book on Gypsy jazz. If you’re a dedicated Bluegrass flatpicker try your hand at learning some jazz. If you learn one thing from a different genre that you can routinely apply to your genre of choice you can break yourself out of just about any rut imaginable.
Dissatisfaction with vintage units of this type usually centers around their limited gain, and their inability to sound truly fierce with Drive cranked up to full. The more exemplary users of this type of pedal, however—such as Stevie Ray Vaughan or Eric Johnson, who were both masters of early Tube Screamers—usually kept the Drive control in the lower part of its range, where the sound remains more natural and, yet again, serves as an excellent pre-boost to drive a good tube amp into distortion when the Level control is set high enough. Some players also find older pedals built to this design to have a distinct midrange hump, a slightly wooly tonality, and/or a lack of low end (as ever, depending upon the ears of the player you talk to). Consequently, a lot of newer makers have accounted for these in their redesigns. Visual Sound’s Route 66 pedal has a Bass Boost switch, Ibanez’s own recent-era TS9DX Turbo Tube Screamer has a Mode control that takes you from classic sounds to settings with more distortion and more low end, and plenty of other makers address both in their variations on the circuit.
With 24 amp models including a digital chromatic tuner, 9 stomps boxes, 4 amps, 5 cabs, 3 mics, and 2 rack effects; AmpliTube Custom Shop is a great way to get your hands on IK Multimedia's great guitar simulation software. As the name suggests, in addition to the free units you can purchase more effects units from right inside the plugin to build your own custom guitar shop.
If you’re looking for a unique sound that delivers an exaggerated twang, than the Gretsch G5422TDC Electromatic is the best electric guitar to offer these features. Designed with wider frame and a hollow body, this guitar utilizes “Black Top” Filter’Tron pickups to deliver a dynamic sound that is both bright and focused in its tone. The toggle has three positions that allows the user to customize the balance of the tone, and all strings on the guitar are able to deliver strong intonation due to the Adjusto-Matic bridge. The vibrato tailpiece adds resonance and depth to the sound quality, and by utilizing maple for the body frame there is a clarity provided within the tone that is unique to that design. With a three position pickup, open-back tuners, and a rosewood fingerboard, this retro style guitar provides a high-quality option for musicians alike. Here’s a great G5422TDC video for some samples of that warm hollow-body sound.
I’ve played Martin D35 and O18 for decades and fooled around with Maton and Cole Clarke’s for a bit, but switched to James Goodall’s ( 6 and 12) which are simply stunning instruments. Why they’re not mentioned here is a mystery to me – especially if it’s quality of woods and craft and tone you’re chasing. I love the Martin’s but Goodall stole my soul.
This page is a work in progress and as new information is revealed it will be added to the list. But I can't do this alone, folks. See a guitar not listed? Tell me! Listed below are the major manufacturers, known badges and suspected badges to the best of my knowledge in written and list form to make it easy to find out WHO MADE YOUR GUITAR! In some cases I won't know because the badge you have may be extremely rare and virtually unknown to even seasoned collectors.
Kramer Guitars is the manufacturer of electric guitars & basses originated from America. Inearly’s off origination in 1970’s, they produced aluminum necked electric guitar& basses & in later 1980’s they started producing wooden-necked guitars catering to hard rock and heavy metal musicians. This is the brand of guitar that challenges the quality of guitars made by Gibson. Made of maple wood and aluminum inlays, this makes one of the finest make of bass and electric guitars. These are highest priced electric guitar which starts from 90,000 to 1.5lacs. These are one of the most powerful ranges of electric guitars used by professional musicians.
However, these two companies were not always in as direct competition as might be assumed; yes they both made guitars, basses and amplifiers, but both tended to play to their strengths; Gibson's expertise was it's luthierie; they stuck to high end electric-acoustics, semi-acoustics and skillfully made solid bodies, whilst Fender excelled at electronics; they made amplifiers and easily built solid body basses and guitars.
The Fender CC-60SCE acoustic-electric guitar combines the powerful onboard electronics with classic Fender tone and the comfort of their longstanding craftsmanship. The smaller concert body features a solid spruce top, mahogany back and sides, and "Easy-To-Play" neck, making it a perfect choice for beginning to intermediate level players looking to take the next step in their music. 
Awesome for the money! I have had my guitar for about a month now. The guitar itself is worth the money. I play on a 100w amp at church and it sounds good. Definitely not the highest quality but still a good full body sound. (After restringing it. The strings it comes with are garbage) The amp that this comes with is nice ... I actually was using it as a practice amp with my bass and it did fine. Nothing that I could play with any other instruments but definitely can hear what I'm doing. My son also uses it as a practice amp on an electric guitar and it does fine, it doesn't have any functions just meant to be an accustic amp. Definitely worth the money.
There was a question from Benhur about Cort. If you lived in England you may know them better. They are an Indonesian company who builds many of the lower price point guitars for the big names like G&L and Fender just to name a. Few. Lower price doesn’t always mean less quality. Cort has a following in their own skin, and many with other well known names just may not know they are playing a Cort.

The traditional Firebird style pickguard is layered white and black and has Slash's "Skull & Top Hat" log in red. The Mahogany neck is glued to the body with a deep-set neck tenon and has a standard 24.75" scale and a rounded custom "Slash" profile. The Pau Ferro fingerboard has single-ply cream binding with Pearl trapezoid inlays, a nylon nut, and 22 medium jumbo frets along with a 2-way adjustable truss rod. The back of the Firebird's traditional reverse headstock has Slash's Snakepit logo in gold.
As a teacher I use a strat because it’s relatable, comfortable, and clean/clear tones. The gibson doesn’t have warmer overtones. That’s not a thing. It has weaker overtones, so a stronger fundamental. That’s why it sounds warmer/duller, and the fender sounds more lively/brighter, because the fender (longer scale) have more overtones to ring louder. That lets you hear mistakes more easily, and is helpful to improve more quickly.
Gotoh’s Telecaster bridge has the vintage look and mounting layout with a few modern additions: The In-Tune saddles give you the vintage look with unique grooves cast into the saddle to move the contact point of each string for more accurate intonation. Each saddle is reversible and can be used in any position. This gives you a huge advantage over traditional barrel style saddles that were never designed with precision intonation in mind. The brass saddles will give you that bright Tele twang! The stamped steel base plate’s cut down sides give you the unrestricted string access that many modern players prefer.

Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Diamond - # of Strings: 6 - 12 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Custom - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Natural, Brown
Delays can also be set to many repeats that take a long time to be reiterated.  This creates a very spaced out sound that envokes large environments.   Be careful with how loud and how many repeats you get going, because older analog delays will begin to experience a feedback loop and can blow out your speaker easily.  Some players learn to control this and have an entire new effect in their arsenal.  Delays are a super powerful tool that just never seems to run out of new sounds.  You can tweak knobs for days and never get bored!
A continuation of the 7-string, adding another string a perfect fourth lower than the seven strings low B. The eight string guitars additional low F♯ string is just a whole step up from a bass guitars low E string. While luthiers have been building these instruments previously, mass-produced Eight-string electric guitars are a relatively recent innovation. Ibanez was first to offer a production eight-string guitar in March 2007.[46] Many other companies now produce mass-market eight-string models, yet these guitars remain relatively uncommon.
{ "name": "Candy Apple Red", "skuUrl": "/Fender/California-Redondo-Player-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Candy-Apple-Red-1500000152032.gc", "status": "instock", "statusText": "In stock", "skuItemType": "New", "inventoryText": "In Stock & Ready To Ship", "inventoryKey": "in_stock", "availableDate": "09-22-2018", "price": 399.99, "isOnSale": false, "msrp": 400.01, "salePrice": 399.99, "easyPayOptions":"0,0,100002,6 Months Promotional Financing,01/01/2019,Special 6-month financing^ + $19 back in rewards Valid through,399.99,true,/pages/Gear-Card-Rewards.gc", "formatedIntegerValue": "399", "decimalValue": "99", "listPrice": 399.99, "isPriceDrop": false, "priceDropPrice": "", "savingsAmount": 0.02, "discountPercentage": 0, "promos":["coverageEligible","freeShipping","return"], "warranty": true, "sku": "site51500000152032", "shipToStore": true, "displaySku": "K47863000002000", "displayId": "1500000152032   POS #: 113861041", "serialized": false, "shipsFree":true, "condition": "New", "commerceType": "New", "priceVisibility": "1", "scene7SetID": "MMGS7/K47863000002000_MEDIA_SET", "invMsgVendorDropShip":"false", "invMsgOverSized":"false", "invMsgBackOrdered":"false", "invMsgPreOrder":"false", "invMsgPromiseDate":"", "invMsgAvailability":"", "invMsgDetail":"", "invMsgAddOnText":"", "currencySymbol": "$", "styleImgUrl": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/California-Redondo-Player-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Candy-Apple-Red/K47863000002000-00-140x140.jpg", "styleImgAlt": "California Redondo Player Acoustic-Electric Guitar Candy Apple Red", "freeGiftWarning":false, "freeGiftWarningTips":"", "kitCarouselItems": [], "availableInStoreOnly": false, "isShipsInternational": false, "checksum":"352089750023", "restrictionType":"", "restrictionError":"" ,"storeInfo":[ { "storeName" : "La Mesa", "storeStatus": "Ship to Store" } , { "storeName" : "San Ysidro", "storeStatus": "Ship to Store" } , { "storeName" : "San Marcos", "storeStatus": "Ship to Store" } ] }

In late 1960, the amp was redesigned with three, rather than two, channels, each with two inputs, and offered with an optional Top Boost, or Brilliance, circuit, which introduced an extra gain stage and separate bass and treble controls. The Top Boost feature proved popular enough that it became standard on the AC30/6 (so named for its six inputs). Its chimey high end was a signature of the Beatles’ early recordings and was later favored by guitarists like Brian May, Tom Petty, Peter Buck and The Edge, whose 1964 AC30/6 has been featured on every U2 album.


{ "thumbImageID": "RGA-series-RGAR42MFMT-Electric-Guitar-Flat-Dragon-Eye-Burst/J55980000002000", "defaultDisplayName": "Ibanez RGA series RGAR42MFMT Electric Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Flat Dragon Eye Burst", "sku": "sku:site51500000051296", "price": "349.99", "regularPrice": "499.99", "msrpPrice": "688.88", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ibanez/RGA-series-RGAR42MFMT-Electric-Guitar-Flat-Dragon-Eye-Burst-1500000051296.gc", "skuImageId": "RGA-series-RGAR42MFMT-Electric-Guitar-Flat-Dragon-Eye-Burst/J55980000002000", "brandName": "Ibanez", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/RGA-series-RGAR42MFMT-Electric-Guitar-Flat-Dragon-Eye-Burst/J55980000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Flat Blue Lagoon Burst", "sku": "sku:site51500000051295", "price": "349.99", "regularPrice": "499.99", "msrpPrice": "688.88", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ibanez/RGA-series-RGAR42MFMT-Electric-Guitar-Flat-Blue-Lagoon-Burst-1500000051295.gc", "skuImageId": "RGA-series-RGAR42MFMT-Electric-Guitar-Flat-Blue-Lagoon-Burst/J55980000001000", "brandName": "Ibanez", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/RGA-series-RGAR42MFMT-Electric-Guitar-Flat-Blue-Lagoon-Burst/J55980000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
000-28EC[10] and 000-28ECB: Two of the five “Eric Clapton” models. Same body size as the 000-15, but with the Martin short scale (24.9″). This artist signature model is constructed with higher-quality woods (especially the more expensive 000-28ECB constructed from Brazilian Rosewood, hence the “B”), a different shape to the neck, and more ornamentation around the edge of the body.
National did not seem interested in the project, and, as we’ve seen, Beauchamp and Barth left National that year to begin Ro-Pat-In with Rickenbacker, where they used their ideas on the development of the new Electro electric Hawaiian aluminum “frying pans” and Spanish guitars. Again, some disagreement exists regarding the relative roles of Beauchamp and Rickenbacker in the development of these guitars, but, again that’s a different story. Beauchamp applied for a patent on his “frying pan” on June 8, 1933, and again on June 2, 1934, eventually receiving the patent on August 10, 1937.
This technique is only possible with 4-conductor pickups or pickups that already have coil-tap lead instead of all four leads. Coil tap is a connection between two coils in a humbucker and is sometimes referred to as “series link”. Vintage style pickups have their coil tap enclosed in the pickup which means that we can’t play with it. Having coil tap gives us a couple of wiring options:
The Marshall CODE412 - 4x12 Speaker Cabinet is a powerful monster designed as a companion to your CODE 100 head. A classic angled cabinet that is packed with four 12” speakers, each with a 30-watt output. This extremely affordable 4x12 amplifier cab is perfect for those in need of a high-quality option for their set up, whether you have a CODE or not. A single input makes it easy to plug and play and the 24kg weight ensures you won’t break your back carrying it to practice. It’s also Marshall’s most affordable friendly speaker cabinet, making it a great choice for those on a budget.
Maton Guitars - Australia's leading manufacturer of Acoustic and Acoustic / Electric Guitars. Until the late 1930's the Australian guitar manufacturing industry was virtually non existent and good quality guitars were hard to find. The best guitars, it was well understood, came from the U.S.A. Bill May, a Melbourne born jazz musician, woodwork teacher, and luthier, decided to change all that.
Similar to the previous model we mentioned, Squier by Fender Bullet Strat represents the Stratocaster beginner family. It’s a guitar full of tradeoffs, but you are rarely going to find a model more capable in this price range. I’ve played a lot of these, and even have one which I use strictly for practicing at home. I like it, even though it’s somewhat limited.
{"eVar4":"shop: guitars","eVar5":"shop: guitars: acoustic guitars","pageName":"[gc] shop: guitars: acoustic guitars","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[gc] shop: guitars: acoustic guitars","prop1":"[gc] shop: guitars","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"category","prop11":"extended range acoustic guitars","prop5":"[gc] shop: guitars: acoustic guitars","prop6":"[gc] shop: guitars: acoustic guitars","prop3":"[gc] shop: guitars: acoustic guitars","prop4":"[gc] shop: guitars: acoustic guitars","campaign":"4soswxxa","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] sub category"}
Late 1944 to about 1949: the bracing was tapered. This stopped in the late 1940s, and was a progressive thing. So unlike scaloped bracing that had a definate endpoint, tapered braces evoloved into "straight" braces by 1949. This is why 1945-1949 Martins are still highly regarded as "better" than their 1950s counterparts, but not as good as the 1944 and prior scalloped braced guitars.
First off I need to mention that there is a category of effects I will call “overdrive” effects where descriptive labels often overlap so it can be confusing. They are essentially effects that simulate amplifier tubes being overdriven to create distortion. These type of effects are can be called: distortion or overdrive or fuzz or metal. And the label is usually based on the amount of gain they produce. 
There are many varieties of speaker combinations used in guitar speaker cabinets, including one 12" speaker, one 15" speaker (this is more common for bass amplifiers than for electric guitar cabinets), two 10" speakers, four 10" speakers, four 12" speakers, or eight 10" speakers. Less commonly, guitar cabinets may contain different sizes of speaker in the same cabinet. Cabinets with eight 10" speakers are large and heavy, and they are often equipped with wheels and a "towel bar"-style handle for transport. Some cabinets use mixed speaker types, such as one 15" speaker and two 10" speakers.
Strings produce sound in the guitar. In electric guitars, because there are no holes, the vibration is passed to a pickup which senses the vibration of the strings passes the signal on to the guitar amplifier. There are two types of strings for electric guitars, light and heavy gauge. Lighter ones are easier to play and allow easy bending of notes, but they are more likely to break and produce less volume. On the other side, heavier ones produce high volume but are hard to play and require more finger pressure to bend notes.

The so-called modeling amps can be said to differ from both tubes and solid state ones as they employ modern processing technology to apply preloaded characteristics to the sound. This can alter the output in a variety of ways, from imitating certain classic styles to rendering something entirely new. Needless to say, they are favored by cover bands and electronic music fans, but many guitarists don’t appreciate their “artificial” sound, although they can serve as good practice amps.   


I want to talk about a session that I got hired for this week. On this particular session, I was asked to recreate a very early-to-mid 70’s guitar tone. Something in the vein of George Harrison. Maybe “All Things Must Pass” era.

So I want to talk about my method, and the process to get this sound. The first key element is guitar and amp. I always start here. I feel like this is the most important relationship in getting any era of sound.

The second issue of the Les Paul guitar was introduced to the public in 1954. Called the Gibson Les Paul Custom, this entirely black guitar was dubbed the Black Beauty. The Les Paul Custom featured a mahogany top to differentiate the instrument from its Goldtop predecessor’s maple top. It also featured the new Tune-o-Matic bridge design and a pickup with an alnico-5 magnet, P-480, in the neck position. In addition, since 1957, the Custom was fitted with Gibson’s new humbucker pickups, PAF,[16] and later became available with three pickups instead of the more usual two. The three pickup model retained the standard Gibson 3-way switch so not all pickup combinations were possible. The neck and bridge-only settings were retained, but the middle switch position was set to enable the middle and bridge pickups. A common modification was to restore the standard neck/both/bridge switching combination and add a switch to enable the middle pickup on its own.[citation needed] The guitar is wired as a “normal”2 pick up Les Paul except there is a master volume , master tone, (for front and back pu) while the middle pick up has its own volume / tone. this allows the middle pu to turned out of the circuit or mixed with the other two. allowing many different tones.
Description: Body: Maple & Poplar & Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Maple & Poplar & Maple - Neck Attachment: Glued - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 1 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Binding: Cream - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Pearloid block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: ABR-1 - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, Grover Tuners - Pickups: Burstbucker 1/Burstbucker 2 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Faded Cherry - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case, Certificate of Authenticity - Made In: America
Death By Audio Reverberation Machine Spring type Reverb/synthetic atmosphere creator with Altitude control that allows the reverb to distort. Also has a light/dark switch to control color of the reverb. Pedal was used in a smoke free studio, never gigged and has no velco on bottom. Pedal has small speckled blemishes in paint next to volume knob. This has no effect on function. Pedal is in perfect working order. This is a great pedal for people who want to add more texture to their sound. Ive used it on synths, drum machines and samples- handles any source without discretion. The only reason for letting it go is that i have too many spring type reverbs. Thanks for looking .
“The bottom line is you get a better dynamic response from the coil. Most people who play a hand-wound pickup say it sounds more ‘open’. It’s easy to make a pickup sound brighter but to have a truly open voice it’s got to be dynamically responsive – and that’s what scatter-winding [intentionally irregular hand-winding of a pickup coil] does. Also, compared to a machine-wound coil, the frequency response is slightly extended. So the sound is bigger and you hear more not just in the high frequencies but also in the depths of the frequency response.”
At some point, I'm guessing near the end of the Buegeleisen & Jacobson ownership-era, a few hollow and semi-hollow body guitars were sold. They shared some of the hardware and necks of the 7-800 series guitars but had symmetrical bodies and no tilted pickup. The bodies resembled the Gibson ES-335 and ES-175T. They appeared to be equiped with humbucking pickups. I'm not following those, but I'd love to have that 175T copy. See the very end of the Varieties page for some photos.
Epiphone are a well respected subsidiary of Gibson, and have been making musical instruments since their founding in what is now Turkey, Europe, in 1873. After being acquired by Gibson in 1957, Epiphone are now best known for manufacturing affordable versions of some of the most iconic guitar models around, including the Les Paul and SG. However they do make a couple of original models, such as the Casino, which was famously used by the Beatles.

Matsumoku is one of the Japanese manufacturers that did not survive long after the heyday of the 1970s guitar market despite having a long tradition of quality stringed instrument craftsmanship. Matsumoku produced guitars for major manufacturers Greco, Guyatone and Yamaha. Matsumoku made Arai, Aria, Aria Pro II and Aria Diamond badges, with Aria being their primary badge for a majority of this time frame. Badged guitars known to have been made by Matsumoku include Apollo, Arita, Barclay, Burny, Capri, Columbus, Conrad, Cortez (electrics only), Country, Cutler, Dia, Domino, Electra, Epiphone, Granada, Hi Lo, Howard, Ibanez, Lindberg, Lyle, Luxor, Maxitone (this guitar differs from Tama's Maxitone badge), Mayfair, Memphis, Montclair, Pan, Pearl (electrics only), Raven, Stewart, Tempo, Univox ,Vantage, Ventura, Vision, Volhox, Washburn (in 1979 and 1980), Westbury, Westminster and Westone. Possible Matsumoku badges include: Bruno, Crestwood, Conqueror, Eros, Mako, Memphis, Orlando and Toledo.
SOLD OUT! Takamine EF406 RARE Here we have a RARE and GORGEOUS 1999 limited Edition Takamine acoustic-electric guitar, model EF-406. This instrument is a PREMIUM example of a New York or also called a Parlor guitar and is a Hand Crafted in Japan model an amazing example of Japans high Quality workmanship & fit & finish and is truly just as good as it gets. As you can see from the pictures, it is simply gorgeous to look at. It has a classic slotted headstock with Top Quality gold open gears and gold tuners with Pearl buttons. The Top- Back & sides are all a High grade choice AAAA FLAMED KOA with natural Koa color (there is no stain)and none was needed to bring out the AWESOME grain patterns of this Rare Native Hawaiian Wood. The top sound hole apears to be bound or painted and inside looks same as out /all Takamine internet information leeds to say the tops on this model is solid however we can not guarantee this as fact. The electronics are a GRAPH-EX pre-amp system: peizo transducer, with "exciter," volume, bass, treble, and mid controls. It comes with a deluxe, plush hardh shell case, note: In he picture close up of the ack of the headstock you may notice a dull spot running threw the center over the made in Japan tag area this is just a spot of waxed area that was inadvertently missed and not rubbed out... it is fine this guitar is in Excellent used condition. .
Whether you call us Guitar Center Forth Worth or GC Cowtown, it's all the same to us! One way or the other, we'll be sure to send a smile and a big Texas "Howdy!" your way when you walk in the front door. Conveniently located on South Hulen Street, we're just a stone's throw from Hulen Mall, near the Chisholm Trail and I-20 interchange. Turn in when you see Chili's, and get ready to experience the down-home vibe that's been growing our community of regular customers since our grand opening back in 2004.First and foremost at Guitar Center Fort Worth, we strive to give you the experience that Guitar Center is known for nationwide: big-store selection and prices with small-shop expertise and personality. From sales to repairs, our staff in each department is well-trained to cater to Dallas/Fort Worth area music-lovers. Our store is open every day of the week, so there's always a right time to visit even if you're on a busy schedule.

The Univibe effect was produced to also mimic the sound of the Leslie rotary speaker, but in a slightly different way from the new digital pedals previously mentioned.  They often combine slight amounts of all modulation type effects at the same time to approximate the rotary sound, but became a unique sound of its own.  Some pedals allow some individual tweaking of each modulator, but most typically allow the user to adjust the speed of the Univibe effect.
The customer then tells me that it was the second brand new preamp that they failed to get working. The first one they couldn’t get working and blamed it on a defective preamp. Could have been, who knows? So the guy orders another new preamp and they still couldn’t get it working after 2 weeks. Sadly, they charged him anyway and he left with a bass that still was not working. So he brings it to me after being recommended by some of my very kind customers.
Situated just under the Spectrum 5 were the Teisco K guitars. Indeed, these Ks may have been introduced slightly before the Spectrums, since they appear in a 1966 Japanese Teisco brochure that does not contain the Spectrum. A second ’66 Japanese Teisco brochure contains both Ks and Spectrums. The K guitars were very similar in profile to the Spectrum, except that the horns were not curved, and flared out more or less equally in a more tulip shape, though still pointing slightly inward. These still had the German carve relief, 22-fret rosewood fingerboards, plus the new hooked headstocks. Inlays, however, were dots, and the vibratos were the more pedestrian Japanese version of the Bigsby. Pickguards were the new striped metal affairs introduced the year before, extending from above the strings down through the lower bout control area.
Modulation is where we step away from the more subtle (relatively) effects which serve to colour an existing tone, and into areas where you can truly begin to add flavour and texture to your tone. There are a few main types of modulation; chorus, phase, tremolo, wah and flange. Chorus subtly mimics your tone with a microscopically detuned duplicate, which when played together adds a nice warm layer to the sound. As an example, play the ‘e’ note on your second string (fifth fret) and the open ‘e’ first string at the same time. Naturally, there is a cent or two difference in the tuning. But you can see that two virtually (but not exactly) instances of the same note makes everything sound a bit bigger and a bit wider. That, in an admittedly basic form, is the chorus effect.
I ordered this item from their ebay store, roughly the same price with shipping, very easy to read point to point instructions, this was my first diy pedal, I've fooled around with a soldering iron but not enough to speak of. I bought it because I was not pleased with my Peavey Valveking 112's boost sound, it not only boosts the signal, it changes the tone, from the reviews I watched on youtube, it sounded like this pedal would do the trick, for the price, and the fun of a first time build, I love it, it boosts the signal with no change in tone, I'm not super impressed with the pedal's distortion tone, but I am spoiled with that saturated tube tone, there is some extra hum when I turn on the pedal, I don't know if this is my fault from the build, or what, but I would ... full review
Finally, you’ll want to make sure you have the accessories you need to get up and playing fast. A strap, spare strings (they do break from time to time), and some plectrums are all essentials – and don’t forget an amplifier! You’ll also want a case (preferably hardshell, but soft and padded will do) to store and transport your guitar, and an electric tuner to keep it sounding good. These can all be picked up from your local guitar store, although if you are starting from scratch, you may want to consider a combo kit, which usually offer good value and convenience.
If you mean the Guitar Hero III guitar then there are two switches on the back. The one just below the neck of the guitar (It looks like a quarter of a circle.) detaches the neck so you can store the guitar AND the neck in a smaller space, and the switch towards the side of the guitar detaches the faceplate so you can put a different faceplate on, or play without a faceplate.
So, here's the story I heard from the guys in this shop, one of whom claims to have met Trev at NAMM. He said Fender (and maybe Gibson?) owe him a bunch of money for custom parts and design fees and whatnot, so he started the Vintage line as a sort of f*** you to them. Don't know if it's true but they're so much like a real tele I could see him getting sued, assuming they're not afraid of him countersuing for unpaid invoices. Who knows, maybe it was all a sales ploy. In any case all the sales pitch I needed was playing one. Plays as nice as my MIM Deluxe for half the price.

After years of analogue delay companies decided that it was not clean or accurate enough. So they came up with a much sturdier design with digital delay chips.Not only can these get the timing down perfectly every time but they can also cover a wider range of delay options. Depending on the chip inside you can easily get multiple seconds of delay time in a single pedal.The main downside to these is that they can sound a bit clinical and too clean. Manufacturers have battled this by adding in different modulation options on delays like this to give it more character. If you want a delay for every possible scenario digital might just be the way to go.


As for necks, the majority of guitars will have either a maple or mahogany neck, with a rosewood, maple or ebony fretboard. Again, there’s no right or wrong, and a neck wood is never going to sway your decision. But you should choose something that feels smooth and comfortable to play. There are a variety of shapes and profiles, and what you go for will depend on personal preference and playing style. For example, a modern C-shaped neck is always a safe choice as the majority of guitarists will feel comfortable using it, while a thin U-shape is great for faster players (think punk rock and metal).
Soundwise, it still packs the same AudioDNA2 processor but somehow sounds 'better', I think John Johnson (founder of Digitech before it was sold to Harman re-hired to work on this RP) had a lot to do with the improvements. I think they have made this with it being used/abused in mind, from the rigid metal chasis, to the USB connectivity, line-in jack to play along backing tracks, headphone input, stereo out, built-in looper (40 seconds) and the awesome Stompbox and SoundCheck features.
Welcome to Silesia Guitars, the guitar repair shop in Shoreline that is dedicated to taking good care of your dear friend, the guitar. We are located in Shoreline, just 15 min north of downtown Seattle. Our work consists of repairs of anything from broken headstocks and  cracked guitar tops, through replacing/installing electronics and custom inlays. Just need a set up or a string change? No problem! We try to accommodate any needs, big or small. Usually, the cheaper the guitar, the more it would benefit from being professionally set up. Evaluations are free, so stop by with your guitar today and let's talk about how we can help you get the most out of it!
You honestly could get a single multi-effects unit that will already have thousands of the most popular stompboxes built in, plug it into your PA or headphones, turn on one of the many built-in amp modelers, and you’re good to go. This is actually a solution that many touring musicians have gravitated towards, as it is so much easier to just carry around a single multi-effects unit compared to a pedalboard with several different pedals and a separate amp.

Power-tube distortion is required for amp sounds in some genres. In a standard master-volume guitar amp, as the amp's final or master volume is increased beyond the full power of the amplifier, power tube distortion is produced. The "power soak" approach places the attenuation between the power tubes and the guitar speaker. In the re-amped or "dummy load" approach, the tube power amp drives a mostly resistive dummy load while an additional low power amp drives the guitar speaker. In the isolation box approach, the guitar amplifier is used with a guitar speaker in a separate cabinet. A soundproofed isolation cabinet, isolation box, isolation booth, or isolation room can be used.


Les Paul was an extraordinary pioneer of music and instrument development, and he also paved the way for popular music today from blues and jazz to rock, country, and metal.  The Les Paul electric guitar stems from one of the best electric git brands to date – Gibson.  This came to be with Paul’s and Gibson president Ted McCarty’s collaboration to find the best electric guitar with resonance and sustain but with less distortion.  Since they couldn’t find one, they had to make one.

At this time (and for a while now) the best guitars are made in Japan and Korea. However Japanese guitars carry a premium which you don’t find to the same degree on Korean guitars. So Korean guitars will offer the best value and quality for price. There is a Cort factory in Korea, however 1) The Korean Cort factory also makes entry level guitars and 2) Cort also have other factories in other countries which have much lower standards. There are some good/excellent Cort guitars but there are also many bad ones with shoddy workmanship. So Cort as a brand name isn’t enough to guarantee a well made instrument - you also need to check it’s made in Korea, and also that it’s one of the better models (price will probably be a guide). All the brands made at the largest factory, the World Instrument Co. one (which makes PRS SE and Chapman guitars among others) are built to a very high standard.


I have a question you might be able to help me with. I currently have a Yamaha silent guitar both nylon and steel and want to set up a home speaker system for a small room. I use a couple of pedals with my guitar. (reverb & delay) and at present use a Yamaha THR amp for sound. This is great for practice but does not fill the room so to speak. I have a larger acoustic amp but not happy with the sound. Can I use a pair of studio monitor speakers instead and if so would I need anything else e.g. (EQ or amp)I am looking to recreate the best possible sound I can get. At present it is only through my headphones. Any help or advice with this would be greatly appreciated.
Tube or solid-state? One has the nice warm vintage tone, but the other is just so much simpler and free of hassle. Vox make one of the best hybrid amps, which heats up your guitar signal with a proper 12AX7 tube in the preamp before it becomes amplified by conventional transistors to deliver up to 30 Watts. A warm tone with smooth overdrive, but without the aggravation.
I have an old Montclair that my uncle modified. He told me that is a '52 but the info here dates it as '60-62 if I remember correctly. I just registered over at the forum, I thought you guys might get a kick out of seeing this guitar. My uncle stripped almost all the paint, there's a bit under the bottom of the neck just to show how it was. He added a hand carved bridge and custom binding on the backside. Also there are a few other unique mods. I really am interested to see what you think about this guitar. It is my main player and has been for years now, an amazing sounding punchy guitar. Hopefully I'll be able to post up some pics at the forum. Cheers! -Gabriel-

Just wanted to get back with a thank you note. I received the kit last week and installed it in my Stratocaster with Texas Special p'ups. It's absolutely brilliant. Not only is the Blend control a superb new addition to the tonal options, but the pots also feel so sturdy and smooth. Feels like I have some custom build now. Just amazing, thank you! In addition, the treble bleed mod is the icing on the cake. I’m no longer afraid to roll down the volume knob." - Andrei Custom Blender Mod for Strat®  
This technique is only possible with 4-conductor pickups or pickups that already have coil-tap lead instead of all four leads. Coil tap is a connection between two coils in a humbucker and is sometimes referred to as “series link”. Vintage style pickups have their coil tap enclosed in the pickup which means that we can’t play with it. Having coil tap gives us a couple of wiring options:
The Telecaster is known for its ability to produce both bright, rich, cutting tone (the typical telecaster twang) or mellow, warm, bluesy tone depending on the selected pickup, respectively “bridge” pickup or “neck” pickup. The bridge pickup has more windings than the neck pickup, hence producing higher output, which compensates for a lower amplitude of vibration of the strings at bridge position. At the same time, a capacitor between the slider of the volume control and the output, allows treble sounds to bleed through while damping mid and lower ranges.[3] A slanted bridge pickup enhances the guitar’s treble tone. The solid body allows the guitar to deliver a clean amplified version of the strings’ tone. This was an improvement on previous electric guitar designs, whose hollow bodies made them prone to unwanted feedback. These design elements allowed musicians to emulate steel guitar sounds, making it particularly useful in country music. These characteristics make the Telecaster a versatile guitar, usable for most styles of music including country, blues, rock, and jazz.
I had a Soundgear 5 string bass when they first came out and it was one of the worst basses I have ever owned. Crappy electronics, uncomfortable neck and the list goes on. I used it as a back up when I was touring 100+ shows per year and luckily my Tobias Killer B5 never had issues other than the occasional broken string. The best thing I can say about it is I lent it to a "colleague" and he ended up stealing it. Good riddance!
Great for beginner guitar players, the electric guitar packages/electric guitar kits give you all the essential tools that’ll help you get started on your musical journey. These electric guitar packs typically include an electric guitar, a guitar amplifier, and various must-have guitar accessories including guitar picks,guitar straps, and an electric guitar gig bag.
×